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Art Gallery

Going Forward, Looking Back – Practicing Historic Photographic Processes in the 21st Century

November 17, 2009  - January 31, 2010

Programs

Rooftop View, Queens, New York © Keliy Anderson-Staley, Wet Collodion on Metal
Rooftop View, Queens, New York © Keliy Anderson-Staley, Wet Collodion on Metal
Botannical Diptych © Laura Blacklow, Cyanotype/Van Dykenderson-Staley, Wet Collodion on Metal
Unique Diptych, from Backyard Botanicals © Laura Blacklow Cyanotpe with Van Dyke brown prints
Lathe
Lathe © Niles Lund, Cyanotype
Origin © Jessica Somers, Ziatype on Salted Paper
Origin © Jessica Somers, Ziatype on Salted Paper

November 21, 2009 - Serendipity & Exquisite Manipulation Lecture by Frances Scully Osterman, 3:00-4:00 p.m., CHP Lecture Hall.  Tickets are $10 at the door, followed by an Opening Reception in the Art Gallery from 4:00-6:00 p.m.  Tim Whelan, fine art photography bookseller, will offer books for sale.

December 5, 2009, 3:00-5:00 p.m. – Artists will demonstrate their historic photographic processes in the UNE Art Gallery. A corner will be set up where artists will take pictures of attendees, and in many cases process the photographs, as well.

January 30, 2009 – Lecture by Brenton Hamilton on 19th Century Photographic Processes and their Practitioners, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in the CHP Lecture Hall.  Tickets are $10 at the door, followed by an Opening Reception in the Art Gallery from 4:00-6:00 p.m., with demonstrations of historic photographic processes by participating artists.

The Exhibition

"Going Forward, Looking Back - Practicing Historic Photographic Processes in the 21st Century" helps us understand the beginnings of the total overhaul of reality in the 19th century. Today, there are fine art photographers in New England deeply committed to teaching and practicing these many original photographic processes. Every five years, it seems, between the original paper photograph in 1839 up to and very importantly including Kodak's Brownie Camera, there would be a newer, better, faster way of freezing time, of putting everyone's everyday reality on paper to review long afterwards. It went from an elite practice to a common pastime.

Background

We may not know it, but most of our reality today is grounded in the photographs of our lives; from the portraits of ancestors we never knew, to the photo albums filled with pictures that eventually cull our memories to what is in its pages, and to the twilight zone of getting a video from a friend on your e-mail or cell phone as he's standing in Rome listening to the Pope while you are drumming away on a keyboard in Peoria, Illinois! As technology develops at a lightening speed, we know our 2009 hold on "reality" is tenuous at best. "Beem me up,  Scotty" could be the reality of tomorrow.

Because photographs have been integral to our understanding of life in the last 100 years, it's almost impossible for us to imagine a world without them -  how extraordinary the first 60 years of photography was to the makers, subjects and viewers of photographs.

It made no sense to anyone's reasoning that you could capture a moment in time - forever! There was no precedent of freezing time in the 19th century concept of reality - to have an event or a loved one's image on a certain day, available to see on a piece of paper or iron or glass. Nothing compares to the jolt photography gave the world - until the internet. The internet is comparable, and has changed our modern day reality so much, so fast, that we can hardly remember life before it.

Just as the internet has completely changed our modern day reality to the instant, photography in the 19th century allowed the general public to become much more deeply engaged in their lives. Instead of relying on paintings and books to learn about the rest of the world, everyone could bring back with them pictures of travels around the world to look at and share whenever they opened their albums. Experiences were able to be relived many times over and shared with others who, in fact, had not been there with you. Your reality, your memories, became theirs.

Other Venues

  • Simmons College, Trustman Art Gallery, Boston, MA: April 20 - May
    28, 2010
  • UMASS/Dartmouth, University Art Gallery, New Bedford, MA: June -Sept., 2010
  • Maine Media Workshop, (new gallery), Rockport, ME: October -
    November, 2010
Artists
  • Anderson-Staley, Keliy - Tintypes
  • Bakos, Jon - Ziatypes
  • Blacklow, Laura - Cyanotypes/ Van Dykes
  • Calafiore, Robert - large color Pinhole
  • Conway, Bev - Collodian/A nthrotypes
  • Crane, Tillman - Palladiums
  • Crump, Walter - Pinhole
  • Estabrook, Dan - Various
  • Ferguson, Jesseca - Argyrotype/ cyanotype/ mixed media/ collage
  • Frey, Mary - Black glass ambrotypes
  • Gibbons, Nate - Tintypes/Ambrotypes
  • Goodman, Jon - Photogravure
  • Hamilton, Brenton - Cyanotypes/ Gum Bichromate
  • Harris, Sean - Palladiums
  • Harvey, Cig - Gum Bichromates, Argyrotypes
  • James, Christopher - Salt Prints - variety
  • Lund, Niles - Kallitypes, Cyanotypes, Van Dykes
  • Madden, Peter -Cyanotypes
  • Puntel, David - Ambrotypes
  • Samson, Gary - Albumen and Salt Prints
  • Somers, Jessica - Ziatypes on Salted Paper
  • Strasburger, David - Platinum/Palladium
  • Strout, Dana - Carbon Prints/Palladiums?
  • Wolfe, David - Platinum/Palladium