Undergraduate Catalog

Admissions

Candidates for admission to the University of New England may be surprised to discover that we spend as much time and effort helping them to evaluate the University as we do in evaluating their own credentials. We are interested in establishing a good match between the applicant's needs and goals and the University's ability to meet them.

Campus Tours and Information Sessions

Prospective students, their friends, and families have an open invitation to visit the University. The pleasant drive to scenic Maine and the opportunity to meet the University's students and admissions staff results in a day that is both interesting and informative.

Biddeford Campus tours and information sessions may be scheduled by contacting the Admissions Office, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Prospective students are encouraged to visit on a weekday if at all possible. Daily tours are offered durring the school year at 9am, 11am, 1pm and 3pm.  Durring Summer, walking tours are at 10am and 2pm.  Saturday tours with information sessions are offered on the Biddeford campus during the months of October, November, December, January, February, March, and April. Please call in advance, (800) 477-4863.  You can also register online.

Admissions Criteria

To determine an applicant's qualifications as a candidate for admission to the undergraduate programs of the University of New England, we carefully consider the following criteria:

  • The secondary school transcript.
  • The SAT1 or ACT scores.
  • Extracurricular involvement.
  • The essay or personal statement.
  • The two recommendations
  • Qualified students with equivalency certificates are also considered for admission.

The University of New England supports the efforts of secondary school officials and governing bodies to have their schools achieve regional accredited status in order to provide reliable assurance of the quality of the educational preparation of applicants for admission.

Nursing Students

Students interested in the following programs should apply online using The Centralized Application Service for Nursing Programs (NursingCAS):

  • Accelerated Second Degree Bachelor (A-BSN) Program
  • Registered Nurse Bachelor Completion (RN-BSN) Program

All other first-year applicants are required to submit the following:

  • A Common Application with the $40 application fee.
  • Official SAT or ACT results.
  • Official copy of high school transcript, with 1st semester senior grades.

Admissions Deadlines

Fall

Early Action- December 1

We offer an Early Action Application deadline for undergraduate applicants who desire early notification of their admission status.  Applicants wishing to be considered for Early Action admission will need to submit their completed application by December 1.  Students submitting all application materials on or before December 1 will receive notification of their admissions decision prior to December 31.

Regular Decision - February 15

Freshman:  Freshman applicants wishing to be considered for Regular admission must submit their completed application by February 15.

Spring

All applicants wishing to be considered for the spring semester must submit their completed application by  January 1.

Reservation Agreement

Once accepted, students are required to submit a $500 deposit that will guarantee their place in the entering class. In order to give accepted students enough time to hear from all colleges to which they have applied and to eliminate any undue pressure that may affect their final decision, the reservation deposit is refundable through May 1st for students entering the fall semester. After this date, the deposit is either credited toward the expense of the first semester's tuition (and room for residential students) or forfeited for those students withdrawing.  

Early Admissions

Qualified applicants who display exceptional ability and maturity are admitted to the University of New England upon successful completion of the third year of their secondary school program. Early admission applicants must have the consent and cooperation of secondary school officials. A personal interview is required.

Physical Examination and Immunization

The University requires all entering students to have a physical examination prior to enrollment. The necessary form, along with an immunization record, will be sent to all entering students following admission and receipt of the reservation fee. The forms must be completed by an approved health care provider and returned to the University Health Center prior to matriculation. Maine State Law requires all students born after 1956, who wish to register and matriculate for seven or more credits, to produce proof of immunization against those diseases listed on the immunization record form. The University of New England requires additional immunizations, over and above state mandates, for health profession students. That information will also be available on the health forms.

Advanced Placement and CLEP

The University of New England participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) administered by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. Both of these examinations provide academic credit for students qualified for advanced standing. The CAS and CHP undergraduate programs may accept courses toward graduation via these two types of examinations in accordance with the tables which follow.

To receive academic credit from the University of New England through the CLEP and advanced placement examinations, the student must be admitted to the University, and must provide UNE with official transcripts from the organization(s).

Advanced Placement Equivalencies

Qualifying scores necessary to receive credit for advanced placement are recommended by the academic departments and are approved by the University Registrar. They are treated as transfer credit in accordance with the following table.

AP Exam Title Minimum Score Course Equivalent Credit Earned
Biology 4 BIO 105 or MAR 105 or BIO 104 and
BIO 106
8
Calculus AB 4 MAT 190 4
Calculus BC 3 MAT 190 4
Calculus BC 4 MAT 190 and MAT 195 8
Chemistry 3 CHE 110 4
Chemistry 4 CHE 110 and CHE 111 8
Chinese Language and Culture 3 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
English Language and Composition 4 ENG 110 4
English Literature and Composition 4 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Environmental Science 3 ENV 104 3
European History 3 HIS 231 - Exploration 3
French Language 3 FRE 100 - Exploration 3
German Language 3 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Government and Politics: Comparative 3 PSC 204 - Exploration 3
Government and Politics: United States 3 PSC 101 - Exploration 3
Japanese Language and Culture 3 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Latin: Vergil 3 ENG 198 - Exploration 3
Macroeconomics 3 BUEC 203 3
Microeconomics 3 BUEC 204 3
Music Theory 3 MUS 101 3
Physics B 3 PHY 110 4
Physics B 4 PHY 110 and PHY 111 8
Physics C: Mechanics 3 PHY 110 4
Physics C: Mechanics 4 PHY 210 4
Psychology 4 PSY 105 3
Spanish Language 3 SPA 101 - Exploration 3
Statistics 3 MAT 120 3
Studio Art: 2-D Design 4 ART 106 3
Studio Art: 3-D Design 4 ART 113 3
Studio Art: Drawing 3 ART 100 - Exploration 3
United States History 3 HIS 199 - Exploration 3

If an advanced placement examination has been taken on a subject not listed in the table above, the student should contact the Registration Services at  uneregistrar@une.edu

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) minimum score standard for each examination, and its UNE equivalent course, is individually determined by the Department in which the course is offered.

CLEP - General Exams Minimum Score Course Equivalent Credit Earned
English Composition w/ Essay 50 ENG 110 4
English Composition 50 ENG 110 4
Social Sciences and History 50 Explorations (2) 6
Natural Sciences 50 Clear with Department  
Humanities 50 Explorations (2) 6
Mathematics   No Equivalency  
American Government 50 PSC 199 3
American Literature 50 ENG 200 3
Analyzing and Interpreting of Literature 50 ENG 199 3
Algebra, College 50 SASC 022 (non-degree) 3
PreCalculus 50 MAT 180 3
English Literature 50 ENG 199 3
General Chemistry 50 CHE 110 4
General Chemistry 65 CHE 110 and CHE 111 8
Psychology, Introduction 50 PSY 105 3
Human Growth and Development 50 PSY 220 or PSY 270 3
Principles of Management 50 BUMG 200 3
Accounting, Introduction 50 BUAC 201 3
Business Law, Introduction 50 BUMG 326 3
Principles of Marketing 50 BUMK 200 3
Trigonometry   No Equivalency  
Macroeconomics, Introduction 50 BUEC 203 3
Microeconomics, Introduction 50 BUEC 204 3
Sociology, Introduction 50 SOC 150 3
French: 2 Semesters 50 FRE 100 3
French: 4 Semesters 50 FRE 100 and 101 6
German: 2 Semesters 50 Exploration (1) 3
German: 4 Semesters 50 Explorations (2) 6
Spanish: 2 Semesters 50 SPA 101 3
Spanish: 4 Semesters 50 SPA 101 and 102 6
Calculus 50 MAT 190 4
General Biology 50 BIO 105 or MAR 105 4
Biology 50 BIO 100 4
U.S. History I 50 HIS 201 3
U.S. History II 50 HIS 202 3
Western Civilization I 50 LIL 201 3
Western Civilization II 50 LIL 202 3
Educational Psychology, Introduction   Clear with Department  
Information Systems and Computer Applications 50 CITM 100 3
Freshman College Composition 50 ENG 110

4

If a CLEP examination has been taken on a subject not listed in the table above, the student should contact Registration Services at  uneregistrar@une.edu 

DANTES

DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs) provide an opportunity for people to obtain college credit for what they have learned in non-traditional ways. The DSST Program is made available by The Chauncey Group International® and is used by adult education programs, the United States Department of Defense, and two and four-year colleges. Designed originally for the military, DSSTs are available to civilian students and adult learners as well. The DSST program is used by colleges and universities to award college credit to those who demonstrate that they have knowledge comparable to someone who completed the classroom course in the subject.

Recommended credits and minimum scores are based on evaluation by qualified individuals in the American Council on Education (ACE). The symbol B signifies credit to be awarded at the bachelor's level; the symbol BU signifies recommended credit at the upper division (3rd and 4th year) level.

DANTES Exam Title Minimum Score (ACE) Course Equivalent Credit Earned
Fundamentals of College Algebra 3B/47 LAC 021 (non-degree) 3
Principles of Statistics 3B/48 MAT 120 3
Art of the Western World 3B/48 ARH 270 3
Contemporary Western Europe: 1946 - 1990 3B/48 HIS 199 3
Introduction to the Middle east 3B/44 PSC 199 3
Human/Cultural Geography 3B/48 HIS 334 3
Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union 3BU/45 HIS 199 3
History of the Vietnam War 3B/49 HIS 199 3
Civil War and Reconstruction 3BU/47 HIS 199 3
Foundations of Education 3B/46 EDU 105 3
Lifespan Developmental Psychology 3B/46 PSY 220 3
General Anthropology 3B/47 ANT 101 3
Drug and Alcohol Abuse 3BU/49 General Elective 3
Introduction to Law Enforcement 3B/45 General Electitve 3
Criminal Justice 3B/49 General Elective 3
Fundamentals of Counseling 3B/45 General Elective 3
Principles of Finance 3BU/46 BUMG 315 3
Principles of Financial Accounting 3B/49 BUAC 201 3
Human Resource Management 3B/48 BUMG 302 3
Organizational Behavior 3B/48 BUMG 301 3
Principles of Supervision 3B/46 BUMG 199 3
Business Law II 3BU/52 BUMG 325 3
Introduction to Computing 3B/47 CITM 100 3
Introduction to Business 3B/46 BUMG 199 3
Money and Banking 3BU/48 BUMG 199 3
Personal Finance 3B/46 BUFI 199 3
Management Information Systems 3BU/46 CITM 100 3
Business Mathematics 3B/48 General Elective 3
Astronomy 3B/48 General Elective 3
Here's to Your Health 3B/48 HSM 199 3
Environment and Humanity:Race to Save the Planet 3B/46 ENV 104 3
Principles of Physical Science I 3B/47 CHE 125 4
Physical Geology 3B/46 GEO 200 3
Technical Writing 3B/46 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Ethics in America 3B/46 PHI 199 3
Introduction to World Religions 3B/49 REL 200 3
Principles of Public Speaking 3B/47 SPC 100 3
 

Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exams (CAPE)

The Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exam minimum score standard for each examination, and its UNE equivalent course, is individually determined by the Department in which the course is offered.

CAPE Exam Title Accepted  Score Course Equivalent Credit Earned
Accounting Unit I 1 or 2 BUAC 201 3
Biology Unit I 1 or 2 BIO 106 4
Biology Unit II 1 or 2 BIO 105 4
Caribbean Studies 1 or 2 HIS 199 3
Chemistry Unit 1 or 2 CHE 110 4
Chemistry Unit II 1 or 2 CHE 111 4
Communication Studies Unit I 1 or 2 ENG 110 4
Economics Unit I 1 or 2 BUEC 203 3
Economics Unit II 1 or 2 BUEC 204 3
Environmental Science Unit I 1 or 2 ENV 104 3
Environmental Science Unit II 1 or 2 ENV 104 3
French Unit I 1 or 2 FRE 101 3
Geography Unit I 1 or 2 ELE 199 - Elective 3
Information Technology Unit I 1 or 2 CITM 100 3
Information Technology Unit II 1 or 2 CITM 102 3
Law Unit II 1 or 2 BUMG 325 3
Literatures in English Unit I 1 or 2 ENG 199 3
Literatures in English Unit II 1 or 2 ENG 198 3
Management of Business Unit I 1 or 2 BUMG 200 or 302 3
Management of Business Unit II 1 or 2 BUMG 312 3
Pure Mathematics Unit I 1 or 2 MAT 180 and 190 7
Pure Mathematics Unit II 1 or 2 MAT 195 4
Physics Unit I 1 or 2 PHY 110 4
Physics Unit II 1 or 2 PHY 111 4
Psychology Unit I 1 or 2 PSY 105 3
Psychology Unit II 1 or2 PSY 105 3
Sociology Unit I 1 or 2 SOC 150 3
Sociology Unit II 1 or 2 SOC 170 3

International Baccalaureate (IB) & International Examination

Students are eligible to receive a minimum of 3 credits for each Higher Level (HL) courses with a score of 5 or higher.  No credit is awarded for Standard Level (SL) exams. The university will determine the number and equivalence of actual transfer credits after evaluating the applicant's individual program of studies. Students must have an official IB transcript sent to the Office of Admissions along with a course syllabus for each course being considered for transfer credit.

Note: Credit may be awarded for Advanced Placement examinations, International Baccalaureate HL courses, Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exams, some foreign diploma programs and/or college level courses completed while in high school.  If students choose to take one or more courses at the University of New England which covers substantially the same material as any of these exams or courses the credit from the transferred course or exam will be forfeited.  Students may not receive credit twice for the same material.

International Student Admission

The University of New England (UNE) welcomes applications from students from around the world.

UNE is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and has been approved by the Department of Homeland Security to enroll international students and issue student and/or exchange visitor visa-qualifying documents (I-20/DS-2019). We comply with all regulations of the U.S. Government pertaining to the enrollment and tracking of international students under the SEVIS Program.

At UNE, an international student is someone who is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. (holder of a “Green Card”). Prospective international students must meet the same admissions criteria required of all other applicants.

Note:  Applicants to online programs are not eligible for a student visa.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR:

An international applicant (not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who will require a visa to study in the U.S.)

OR

An applicant with international degrees or coursework (a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who has been educated outside of the U.S. and will not require a visa to study in the U.S.)

  • General admissions criteria for the University and its academic programs can be found by accessing the undergraduate or graduate admissions catalogs or the individual program or major.
  • In addition to the general University admissions criteria, and program specific criteria, international students must also meet the following:

    English Language Proficiency
    • International applicants must be able to understand and communicate in English to gain full admission to the University of New England. If English is not your native language, you will need to submit documentation that indicates your level of English proficiency.
    • UNE accepts several methods of English proficiency including the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), as well as others. Students will meet the minimum standards for English proficiency at UNE by demonstrating one of the following:
TEST SCORE
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) 550 (paper-based)
213 (computer-based)
79 (internet-based)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Overall Band 6.0 or higher
IB (International Baccalaureate) Grade 5 or higher
SAT (Critical Reading and Writing Sections) 500 or higher
GRE (Analytical Writing Section) 4.0 or higher
AP English Language and Composition Exams Score of 3 or higher with college transfer credit received
One year of English composition, taken at a U.S. institution, which counts as transfer credit at UNE (not ESL)    Grade of "C" or higher

 

Additional Methods:

  • Students who have attended a regionally accredited U.S. high school or U.S. Department of Defense school overseas for at least three years, or have received an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university will meet English proficiency requirements.
  • UNE also waives the English proficiency requirement for students who graduated from a regionally accredited school in other English-speaking countries: Anguilla, Antigua/Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Guyana, Canada (except Quebec), Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica/other West Indies, Liberia, Montserrat, New Zealand, South Africa, St. Helena, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caico Isle, United Kingdom, and Virgin Islands, and others.
  • Passing scores on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) with the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) Certification (with submission of photocopy of ECFMG certification to UNE Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions).

VERIFICATION OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Federal law requires that we document how you will finance your education in the U.S., prior to issuing the appropriate student visa application form. In addition to the application for admission to your program of interest, all international applicants must: 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS

  • English Translation of Transcript
  • Official transcripts from ALL schools attended must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions as a part of the application process.
  • All official scholastic records submitted in support of your application must be in English or include English translations.
  • English translations should be literal (word-for-word, not interpretive) translations.
  • For specific procedures and admission criteria for each of our academic programs, please check the program website.
  • Evaluation of Transcripts
  • UNE requires all international applicants and all U.S. students with international degrees or coursework to have international transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution within the U.S. (Any exceptions to this policy will be noted in specific program admissions requirements.)
  • UNE will accept transcript evaluations from World Education Services (WES) only. Evaluations must be for grade and degree equivalency. Please order the WES ICAP service to ensure that copies of your transcripts will be included with the evaluation report.
  • International medical school graduates only: If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. you must have the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) submit review and verification of the equivalency of your medical degree to that of one earned at a regionally accredited U.S. medical school. The ECFMG review and verification of the student’s International Medical Degree will be accepted as an official evaluation of the degree.
  • Official transcripts from Canadian Medical Schools that are approved by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) do not require external evaluation. There is joint accreditation between LCME and Canada adding 17 more schools to the LCME list. Any school on this LCME list can be considered as offering a valid Doctor of Medicine (MD). 


Please note: official transcripts from ALL schools that the student has attended, U.S. or International, must be submitted to the Office Admissions as a part of the application process. Concerns regarding your ability to provide official transcripts should be directed to your admissions counselor.

Seek Assistance in Your Home Country
For further assistance with securing official documents and information from your country, please contact your local U.S. Embassy/U.S. Consulate/Office of Public Affairs for referral to an overseas educational advising center near you, or consult the list available on the U.S. State Department website.

Transfer Admissions

Students applying for transfer admission are required to forward the completed application form and application fee of $40, and official college transcripts of ALL academic work to the Admissions Office. If the student has less than 30 college credits at the time of application the application must also include their College Board scores and  secondary school records.

All undergraduate students accepted to the University will be expected to fulfill both the University and program requirements prior to being awarded a degree from the University of New England. Transfer students will be individually advised by the Admissions Office of all such requirements left outstanding after the evaluation of transfer credit has been completed prior to registration. A transfer student's grade point average (GPA) is based only on grades received at the University of New England.

Transfer students are evaluated on the basis of their collegiate records according to the following guidelines:

  • All students who have earned an associate degree in a program of study from an accredited institution that is parallel or related to the academic offerings at the University of New England are eligible for admission to the University. The student could receive credit for all courses therein, up to a total of 65 credits. However, not all of those credits will necessarily apply towards core or degree requirements.
  • Students who have earned less than an associate degree will be granted transfer credit for those courses completed at an accredited institution that parallel or relate to courses offered by the University with a grade of C- or higher. Some restrictions may apply. Refer to program descriptions for further information.
  • All eligible students with a grade point average of at least 2.5 will be considered for admission to the University; students with a grade point average below 2.5 are considered on an individual basis.
  • Class standing is determined by the University Registrar.
  • Transfer credit is given for courses graded C- or higher. Some restrictions may apply. Refer to program descriptions for further information.
  • While credits may transfer in based on the criteria above, grades and/or grade points do not transfer into the student's UNE academic record. Grades for accepted transfer courses are identified on the UNE transcript with a "TR" symbol in the grade column, which denotes credit accepted but no GPA calculation value.

Note: Matriculated UNE students who wish to have college-level credits transferred back (for course work taken at institutions away from UNE) must follow policy identified under the Academic Policy section of this catalog.

Portfolio Assessment Credit for Prior Experiential Learning

The University of New England will consider, for credit equivalency, prior experiential learning which a matriculated student might possess, which is considered by the faculty to be college-level learning. It is imperative that the experience relate directly to specific course work in the student's program of study and has occurred within five years of the student's matriculation at UNE. Experience gathered after matriculation at UNE will not be considered under this policy. A maximum of eight credits, not to exceed two courses, can be awarded for prior experiential learning, which will be documented from an approved portfolio initiated and prepared by the student. An individual portfolio must be submitted for each course equivalency. Individual departments may designate courses exempt from this policy. There is a $50 processing fee for each portfolio assessment.

Note: Nursing students should contact the Department of Nursing for further information concerning this area of assessment credit.

Portfolio Assessment Application Procedure Outline

The student is responsible for the following procedure of portfolio assessment.

  • Portfolio assessment packets are available from the Registration Services on both the Biddeford and the Portland Campus.
  • A request for credit equivalency, and the subsequent portfolio submission, must occur during your first two semesters at UNE.
  • Secure a faculty sponsor from UNE or within the Greater Portland Alliance of Colleges and Universities. The faculty sponsor will provide guidance in the preparation of the portfolio.
  • Complete the portfolio per the Guidelines for Portfolio Assessment document available in Registration Services.
  • Submit portfolio to the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The dean will notify Student Accounts that the request for experiential learning has been submitted and the student will be billed for a $50.00 non-refundable portfolio assessment fee. The dean will forward the portfolio to the chair of the department in which the course is offered. The chair of the department will select a faculty member to review the portfolio. Faculty selected must have either taught the course for which credit is requested or have proper qualifications to teach the course if/when it is offered at UNE. The faculty reviewer may interview or test the student, or request further information from the student, in order to assess if course objectives have been met. The faculty reviewer will then make a decision and forward it to the chair of the department and the dean for approval or rejection of the credit equivalency request, or may return the portfolio to the student for suggested revision.
  • The decision of the faculty reviewer is final. A reconsideration for the same course equivalency may not be made.
  • If approved, the Registrar records course equivalency as prior experiential learning credits.
  • Course equivalency credit approval for an individual course does not result in a waiver or equivalency credit for any prerequisites of that course. A separate portfolio must be submitted if credit equivalency is requested for the prerequisite.
  • Student is billed by Student Accounts for portfolio assessment, regardless of the decision rendered by the faculty reviewer.

Veterans

Programs of the University of New England have been approved for persons eligible for Veterans Administration Benefits by the Maine State Approving Agency for Veterans' Education Programs. The University encourages active and retired military, National Guard and reservists, as well as veterans, to become matriculated students. For further information concerning veterans admissions and benefits, please contact:

Judi Brewer
Enrollment Specialist
716 Stevens Ave
Portland ME  04103
Phone: (207) 221-4246
Fax: (207) 221-4898
jbrewer2@une.edu

Applicants who are requesting Veterans Administration educational benefits are required to have all previous postsecondary education and training evaluated for transfer credit.
Applicants with military service should send a copy of an Army/ACE Registry Transcript Service (AARTS) or a SMART (Sailor/ Marine Corps American Council on Education Registry Transcript) to Registration Services for credit evaluation.

More information on veterans benefits is available on the Veteran Education Benefits website.

Financial Information

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees 

(2014 - 2015 Tuition and Fees subject to change)

Full-Time Fall Spring Total
Tuition $16,440 $16,440 $32,880
Room and Board** $6,695 $6,695 $13,390
General Services Fee* $600 $600 $1,200
Total Full Time $23,735 $23,735 $47,470

* Biddeford Campus only ; General Services Fee for Portland Campus is $840 for one year.

** Standard Double Occupancy rate for 1st year student housing. The University offers other options on the Biddeford Campus for upperclassman.

Scope of Tuition: Tuition for full-time undergraduate students covers a course load from twelve to eighteen hours per semester. A course load in excess of eighteen hours requires prior academic approval and will be subject to an overload charge of $1,160 per credit hour.

Part-Time Matriculating: $1,160 per credit hour

Deposits

Admissions Deposit

A $300 deposit is required for all incoming students. The deposit is refundable through May 1st. This deposit is later credited on the fall billing.

Reservation Deposit
A non refundable $100 deposit is required in the spring for all returning full-time matriculating students prior to fall registration scheduled in April. This deposit is later credited on the fall billing.

Room Deposit

A $200 escrow deposit is required for all residential students. This escrow deposit will be held by the University as long as the student is a residential student.

Fees

General Services Fee (Biddeford Campus)

This mandatory fee is billed to undergraduate matriculating full- and part-time day students enrolled in 7 or more credits and provides the following services:

  • Orientation/educational assessment testing program designed to introduce new students to UNE. Includes cost of food, testing, student housing, and entertainment.
  • Graduate activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  • Student Senate (Government) activities including support for clubs, programs, cultural events, etc.
  • Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  • Campus Center featuring a gymnasium, running track, pool, fitness center with racquetball court, snack bar, and bookstore.
  • Athletic events including intramural programs and all intercollegiate home games.
  • Transcripts.

General Services Fee (Portland Campus)

Undergraduate - This mandatory fee is billed to undergraduate matriculating full and part time students enrolled in 7 or more credits and provides the following services:

  • Orientation/educational assessment testing program designed to introduce new students to UNE. Includes cost of food, testing, student housing, and entertainment.
  • Graduate activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  • Finley Center gymnasium
  • Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  • Transcripts

Health Insurance

Students are required to enroll in UNE's Student Medical Insurance Plan unless proof of comparable insurance can be demonstrated. Please refer to the Health Insurance Brochure.

Student Malpractice Insurance

Annual mandatory malpractice insurance for the students involved in clinical training rotations.

Applied Exercise Science, annual, 4th year

$90

Athletic Training, annual, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years $75
Dental Hygiene, annual, 3rd and 4th years $255
Nursing, annual, 3rd and 4th years

$65

Travel and Student Teaching Fees

Fees are charged to students who enroll in travel, student teaching, or other designated courses. The fee is listed in the official course schedule published at the time of registration. Please refer to semester course schedules for fee structures.

Late Registration

Students who register after the published deadline will be required to pay a $75 late registration fee.

Parking Fee

Students, Faculty and Staff wishing to park a vehicle on campus must purchase a parking permit fromwww.thepermitstore.com  Enter your destination as University of New England.  Permit prices vary.  A Resident Permit is $300.00.  Commuters are $90.00.  Failure to register a vehicle will result in a fine and having your vehicle towed from campus. 

Summer Session

Courses are open to any student on a direct registration basis.  Contact the Office of Continuing Education for more information and course listings.

College of Arts and Sciences' Courses

  • $315 per undergraduate credit
  • $690 per directed study undergraduate credit
  • $315 per audited undergraduate course
  • $635 per graduate credit (non-matriculated students and courses not part of a graduate program)
  • $690 per audited graduate course

Westbrook College of Health Professions' Courses

  • $1,160 per undergraduate credit
  • $315 per audited undergraduate course

Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy

Course changes for matriculated students are allowed during the add/drop period during the fall and spring semesters. After the add/drop period, no refunds are made for course withdrawals.

Tuition Refunds

Refunds for students leaving the institution during a semester will be made as follows:

Fall and Spring Refunds

During first two weeks 80%
During third week 60%
During the fourth week 40%
Over four weeks No refunds

Summer or other Special Sessions Refunds

Beford second class 100%
During first week 40%
During second week 20%
Over two weeks No refunds

Please Note: Any undergraduate student who intends to withdraw from the University will be required to go through the withdrawal process. He/she must first see the Dean of Students Office to obtain the necessary forms. Verbal notice is not sufficient. For purposes of computing refunds, the date of withdrawal recorded by the Dean of Students after receipt of withdrawal forms from the student shall be considered official and that date will be used by the Student Financial Services Center to compute any refunds due to the student.

Room (60 % of Room and Board Rate)

There will be no refund of the room charge for the semester after the room has been occupied. A student obtaining permission to break the Residence Hall/Dining Service Contract by moving off campus for the spring semester will be billed 60 percent of a double room rate for that semester.

Board (40 % of Room and Board Rate)

If a student withdraws during the semester, a refund for board charges will be prorated effective the first of the following month.

Other Fees

After registration there shall be no refund of lab fees or other annual fees.

Adjustments

Adjustments to scholarships, grants and loan programs will be made in accordance with respective Title IV program regulations and University policy before a refund to the student or parent is calculated. In cases where a refund may be due and the student has received funds through the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, it is our policy to refund those funds directly to the bank which made the loan, consistent with Federal guidelines. Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, dismissal or suspension.

Leave of Absence Policy

In the event a matriculating undergraduate student desires to apply for a leave of absence, a Leave Form must be submitted to the Dean of Students. The form will include the reason for leaving as well as the expected date of return. Leave of absence adjustment to the student accounts will be given based upon the Withdrawal policies.  Failure to return on the date agreed will result in a withdrawal. 

A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester. Room, board, and fees will be subject to regular withdrawal policies.

Payment Options

The person or persons responsible for tuition and fee payments (whether it be a student, their parent(s), or guardian(s) may pay the charges as they come due each semester or by using the ten month installment plan offered through Tuition Pay (see Option II: Monthly Payment Plans). They may also arrange to pay by using a combination of these payment arrangements.

The payment dates in the UNE sponsored payment plans cannot be deferred for the convenience of families using guaranteed student and parent loans, or other tuition payment programs. Both long and short term financial arrangements should be made far enough in advance to assure payment on the required dates. Special problems or emergency situations can be discussed with the Student Financial Services Center at any time.

In addition to the following options for payment, UNE accepts Mastercard, Discover, and VISA cards.

Option I:  Payment by Semester

About June 15 a bill will be sent for the tuition, board, room rent, and fees for the fall semester. Payment on this bill is due August 1st. Payments from the family, or any other cash payments will appear on the bill as credits. Awarded financial aid will appear as a credit or if pending, as a memo to be deducted from the amount owed on the bill. The balance due is the difference between all charges, credits, and memos. The bill for the spring semester will be sent about December 15 and is due on January 10.

Option II:  Monthly Payment Plans

The UNE Installment Plan (IP) spreads the full year charges over ten months beginning June 1st. This program is administered on behalf of UNE by Tuition Pay at 800-635-0120. These plans are designed to relieve the pressure of "lump sum" payments by spreading the cost over 10 months. There is an application fee. There are no interest charges.

Application Deadline

Students and/or their parents are urged to apply by May 15th. Applications made after the start of the program (June 1st) must be accompanied by an initial payment sufficient to become current with the regular 10 month payment schedule. Applications for the 10 month plan will not be accepted after August 15th.

Late Payment Charge

The balance due each semester will be considered overdue if not paid by the specified date, and any unpaid balance will be subject to a late charge of 12% per annum or 1% per month.

Students with unpaid bills will not be able to register for courses and they will not be allowed to attend classes until they have made satisfactory arrangements with the Student Financial Services Center. Students with overdue accounts are not eligible for academic credit, transcripts, or degrees.

Additional Information

  • Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  • For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies. People's United Bank, which is our preferred bank, provides a full-service ATM machine located in the Campus Center and in the Alfond Forum on the Biddeford Campus, and in the breezeway between Proctor and Hersey Halls on the Portland Campus.  For those students who have People's United Bank checking accounts, ATM transactions are free of charge. Checks may also be cashed daily ($75 maximum) at the Student Accounts Office on the Biddeford Campus.
  • The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. The sign-up form is available on the web at the HR website.
  • The University will not be responsible for the loss of property on or off-campus although it strives to safeguard students' property on campus.
  • Students are expected to pay for books at the beginning of the semester. Books, supplies and other items available at the University Bookstores may be paid for with cash, check, Master Card, VISA, Discover, and American Express.

Academic Policy and Regulations

Graduation Requirements for Undergraduates

The academic requirements outlined in the catalog at the time of a student's matriculation into a program of study are generally normative for graduation. If a student withdraws or is dismissed from the University and subsequently reenters, he/she must observe the catalog requirements in effect at reentry.

Although academic advisors are available to assist students in fulfilling major and graduation requirements, the ultimate responsibility for these matters rests with the student.

All undergraduate students entering the University fall semester 1995, or after, must fulfill the following general requirements:

A minimum of 120 credits for a baccalaureate-level program. For specific credits see program requirements listed under each degree/major. The minimum required credits are normally arrived at by a defined combination of:

  1. Satisfactory completion of the course standards and specific requirements in the student's major program. See specific degree/major requirements in this catalog.
    1. ​University core requirements - to explore important college themes, develop crucial skills, and prepare for lifelong learning.
    2. Program, or professional requirements - to complete curricula established by the academic department responsible for the major area of study.
    3. General elective credit - to encourage additional study in areas of interest and to accumulate credits required for a degree.
  2. Fourth (senior) year in residence.
  3. Submission, by the student, of a Application for Graduation no later than January 30th prior to intended commencement in May.  Application for August graduation (no ceremony) are due by June 30th and December graduation (no ceremony) are due September 30th.
  4. Satisfaction of all Business Office obligations.
  5. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. Higher grade point requirements may apply in certain programs. Refer to departmental and degree/major requirements.

  Notes:
 
  A fourth-year student who expects to complete degree requirements by the conclusion of the following fall semester with two courses (typically 6-8 credits*) or less of outstanding degree requirements may opt to:

  1. Participate in the May commencement prior to his/her last semester (diploma to be issued after completion of studies); or
  2. Participate in the May commencement following his/her last semester.

* A student might have greater than 6-8 credits if the two courses involve clinical, practicum, or internship study. Learning Assistance Center and developmental mathematics courses do not carry degree credits for fulfillment of graduation requirements, with the exception of the courses Peer Tutor Workshop and Peer Tutor Practicum.

Petition to Graduate and Receipt of Diploma

In the last year of enrollment, students who anticipate completion of all degree requirements must submit a petition to graduate. The Petition to Graduate form is available via the "Apply to Graduate" link in UOnline. The completed form sets into motion all final processing towards: verification of the degree completion, correct spelling of name on the diploma, correct mailing address, and indication of plans to participate in the commencement ceremony.

If a mailing address should change after submission of the form, the student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's office of a new address. It is the goal of the office to verify/post degree completions and mail out diplomas within six to eight weeks of a student's completion of studies.

Commencement is held at the end of each spring semester (usually May) and students who successfully complete all degree requirements per academic policy are considered to be in the "Class of...[that particular year]." Student names must be approved, on recommendation of the faculty, by the Board of Trustees prior to being authorized a degree and diploma from the University of New England.

Under some circumstances, documentation of early graduation may be possible for students who complete all of their degree requirements in a semester prior to the planned "Class of ..." ceremony. In these cases the degree will be dated at the end of the semester in which the requirements are completed. Board approval must still be obtained, so all petitions and verifications must be completed in a timely manner. Guidelines for submission of the petition form are as follows:

If graduation is anticipated by the end of: Submit the petition to graduate by:
Summer Semester June 30th
Fall Semester September 30th
Spring Semester January 30th

The degree awarded date will correspond to the term where the last course requirement was completed and graded.  The exception is where one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided).  In the case of late completion of course requirements (e.g due to an "Incomplete" grade), the degree will be awarded in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.  Further information regarding graduation procedures can be obtained through the credentials evaluator in Registration Services, extension 2138.

Residency Requirements

Any course offered for credit by the University of New England is designated as residence or campus credit.  This may include University sponsored off-campus experiences including internships, distance learning, exchange programs, and consortium courses.

Bachelor’s Degree:  For a baccalaureate degree, student must complete at least 30 of the last 45 credits in residence at the University of New England.

Second Bachelor’s Degree:  Students who are pursuing a second bachelor’s degree must complete at least 30 semester hours in residence once the first degree is finished.  If the first degree is from the University of New England, the same requirements apply as the first bachelor’s degree.

A waiver of residency requirements may be obtained by written request from Registration Services, University of New England, 11 Hills Beach Road, Biddeford, Maine 04005.  The student’s advisor and the appropriate College Dean’s Office will carefully review each request.  Requestors should receive written notification of the decision within one month of submission.

For more information see:

Frequently Asked Questions About Graduation

Commencement Ceremony

Academic Load

An undergraduate student's normal academic load ranges from 12 to 18 credit hours during the fall and spring semesters. Students must obtain advisor permission to enroll in 19 or 20 academic credits per semester, and must obtain academic dean's permission to enroll in greater then 20 credits. A student must register for a minimum of 12 credits per semester in order to maintain status as a full-time student. A student attempting more than 18 credits during a semester will be subject to an overload charge at the part-time per credit tuition rate.

Semester and Semester Hour Credit

Semester: A calendar 15 weeks of instructional time or its equivalent in effort.


Federal Definition of the Credit Hour 

Federal regulation defines a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutional established equivalence that reasonably approximates not less than 

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester .
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Registration and Enrollment Confirmation

Students matriculated in any undergraduate program must be pre-approved to register for courses, or change course registration, through their advisor. Advising liaisons in CAS are also available in each department to approve courses. In CHP, students may contact their program director or coordinator for this purpose. First-time students will be registered by the Registrar's office staff and will go through a new student orientation  where they receive their course schedule. Returning students can preregister for courses at dates established in the University's Academic Calendar.

Course registration must be confirmed through Registrar's office. This is accomplished only after matriculated students have cleared all other offices on campus, i.e., Student Accounts, Financial Aid, Health Center, Security, or other offices through which arrangements must be made in order to become fully enrolled at the University. On-campus students must confirm their enrollment at the beginning of each semester within certain time lines by methods identified by Registrar's office. Instructions regarding enrollment confirmation are e-mailed to each student. Students who do not confirm their registration within the announced time limits are subject to a $75 late confirmation fee.

Course changes are allowed during a designated add/drop period only, as specified on the current academic calendar. Detailed instructions as well as designated time lines regarding the add/drop process are e-mailed to each student. Tuition and/or financial aid may be adjusted, depending on number of credit hours enrolled.

Transfer students should note that they must meet all University of New England requirements to qualify for the  bachelor, or master's degree. Adherence to this policy should be discussed fully with the faculty advisor and the Registrar before registration is completed.

A pre-matriculated student who wishes to make the transition to matriculated status must first obtain permission from the appropriate dean. The student's academic record will then be evaluated by the Registrar who will make a determination as to the student's classification. All courses are open to qualified students who have met the necessary prerequisites.

Classification

Student-level, or classification, is pertinent to financial aid eligibility, class year, student organizations, information systems, and other post-secondary related institutions or nomenclature. The chart below is intended to clarify student classification:

Minimum Credits Earned Towards UNE Degree:

Year Terminology Credits
First-Year Freshman 1-23
Second-Year Sophomore 24-56
Third-Year Junior 57-89
Fourth-Year Senior 90-120
Fifth-Year Fifth-Year *
*Beyond Baccalaureate Degree    

Class Attendance

All students are expected to attend all classes for which they have registered. Attendance policies regarding unexcused absences are established and announced by the individual instructor for his/her classes. If a student is absent to the extent that his/her work is adversely affected, the instructor will report the student's absence to the department chair/program director with comments on the status of the student in the course. Ordinarily, for each course, absences per semester should not exceed the number of times that the course meets weekly.

Whenever a student is specifically reported in writing by an instructor to the department chair/program director as being excessively absent from class, the instructor, with the approval of the department chair/program director, may drop the student from that course with an appropriate grade.

When a student misses class for any religious observances, it is an excused absence. The student should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. Before the absence, the student is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty to arrange to obtain all information contained in each missed class. The student must plan, at the discretion of the faculty member, to take any missed exam either prior to or following the scheduled exam time. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Athletic Competition and Class Attendance

When an athlete misses class for a scheduled varsity intercollegiate competition, it is an excused absence. The student athlete should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. This policy does not apply to students on clinical rotations.

When such absences occur, the student athlete is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty and making arrangements to obtain all information and/or training contained in each missed class. The athlete must make arrangements to take exams scheduled for a day of absence early or late, at the instructor's preference. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Faculty are not required to remediate student athletes as a result of these absences.

Examinations

Final examinations are held at the close of each semester. Other assessments, such as papers, quizzes, tests, and portfolios, may be used during the course at the discretion of the instructor. An unexcused absence for a scheduled examination leaves a student subject to a failing grade for that exam.

Grading System

The following grading system is presently in effect: A (outstanding work), B (excellent work), C (satisfactory work), D (passing but not satisfactory work), F (failure), P (pass), I (incomplete), W (withdrew without penalty), WP (withdrew passing), WF (withdrew failing), *F (administrative F, assigned to incompletes which haven't been completed within designated time or to non-attending students who are enrolled in courses who have not formally withdrawn), and AU (audit).

Equivalent quality points assigned to grades are as follows:

A 4.00
A- 3.75
B+ 3.50
B 3.00
B- 2.75
C+ 2.50
C 2.00
C- 1.75
D 1.00
F 0.00
  Note: Students may not elect to take a course that satisfies a core requirement on a pass/fail basis.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the instructor, enroll in a course for an audit grade ("AU"). This must be done at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of and audit grade is not possible (i.e., once enrolled for "AU" the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record). The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to attend classes regularly but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count towards enrollment status (i.e., part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veterans benefits, etc.

Pass/Fail Policy

Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in a course on a pass/fail basis may do so by notifying the Registrar no later than15 class days into the given semester on a form provided for this purpose. The decision to take a course pass/fail is final. Note: Students may not elect to take a course that satisfies a core requirement on a pass/fail basis.

Passing represents earned grades of an assigned A through C-. The Registrar will translate the letter grade submitted by the instructor to either pass or fail. Most courses are open to pass/fail enrollment except courses in major fields and English composition and courses satisfying core requirements. Students may register for not more than one course per semester on a pass/fail basis (with the exception of student teaching, field education, LAC 020 Math Basics) not to exceed eight courses in a degree program. Students in health science programs should consult their departmental requirements for exceptions to the pass/fail policy.

Incomplete Policy

An incomplete (I) grade may be given by the instructor to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The I grade must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days following the end of an eight-week session. Until changed, the I grade defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative *F grade for the course. Some programs have established more restrictive or differing policy regarding incomplete grades. Students should consult the program in which they are enrolled for exceptions to this policy. Once an I grade is removed, academic standing will be updated according to  good standing or probationary standards. If one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided due to an "I" grade), then the degree awarded date (if applicable) will be posted in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.

Course Withdrawal Policy

In the fall and spring semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence for a specified period of time, not to exceed one (1) academic year, may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form available from the respective program/school director, Student Affairs, Registrar's office or online.  A student who is on an approved leave of absence has the status "active/not enrolled" and may not may enroll in courses for credit at another insitution. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. A student returning from a leave of absence should contact the Registrar's  office well in advance of  returning semster so that status changes are made allowing the student to access courses. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Students with Fiancial Aid should meet with a Fiancial Aid representative prior to completing leave of absence paperwork.

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or Registrar (undergraduate) to indicate change of plans.

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from your respective program/school director, Student Affairs or Registration Services.  Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

Repeat Course Policy

A student may repeat a course in order to improve his/her grade. However, only the second or last course taken will receive credit on the student's transcript, and only the second or last grade received will calculate into the cumulative GPA.

Course Work at Another Institution

Matriculated students who wish to transfer college-level course work taken at other institutions must obtain permission to do so. The student should work closely with his/her advisor regarding this process. Request for Course Work at Another Institution forms are available from Registration Services. A minimum grade of "C-" must be earned for the course in order for it to be accepted by the University of New England (further restrictions may apply - check with department regarding transfer-back policy). 

Important note regarding transfer credits: while credits may transfer based on these criteria, grades and/or grade points do not transfer into the student's UNE academic record. Grades for accepted transfer courses are identified on the UNE transcript with a "TR" symbol in the grade column, which denotes credit accepted but no GPA calculation value.

Approved Study Abroad

Matriculated students who wish to receive credit for a 3rd Party Study Abroad Program must obtain permission to do so. The form is available at the study abroad website. The student should work closely with his/her advisor regarding this process. Approved Request for Study Abroad Coursework forms are required prior to departure.

Approved Study Abroad Grades

The grades for courses taken on 3rd Party Study Abroad Programs will appear on the student's UNE academic record. Original course titles and grades are identified on the UNE transcript which denotes the actual international grade.  However, since the actual grade values vary from nation to nation, the grades for third party Study Abroad Courses will have no GPA calculation value.  That is, such courses will not affect your GPA at UNE.  Graduation credit for such courses will only be given for “passing” grades as defined by the World Educational Services guidelines and by verification from the UNE Registrar.  UNE program and departmental requirements for specific courses will also apply.  This is why approval prior to departure is required.

Semester and Term Grade Reports

Semester and term grade reports are issued after examinations have been held at the close of each semester or term and are viewable on Uonline. Semester and term grades reported by faculty members to the Registrar's office are final. Notices of deficiency, if reported, will be distributed at mid-semester. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal

The student who is attempting six credits or more and whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 1.70 or whose cumulative grade point average is below the minimum acceptable level is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall , spring semester  or summer term to raise his/her cumulative GPA to the minimum acceptable level and will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 1.70 for the semester. Failure to meet both of these criteria will result in automatic dismissal from the University for academic deficiency.

A student on academic probation is ineligible to participate in major extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate athletics, or to serve as officer or director of any student activity.

The minimum cumulative semester-end grade point averages are:

First Year
1.70
Fall of Second Year
1.70
Spring of Second Year
1.80
Fall of Third Year
1.80
Spring of Third Year 1.90
Fall of Fourth Year 1.90
Notes: A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is required for graduation. Higher levels of minimum acceptable semester and/or cumulative GPA may be established by individual departments or academic programs.

Academic Honors

The Dean's List contains the names of full-time matriculating students in good academic standing who have attained a semester grade point average of 3.30 or better. The student must have earned at least 12 credits. A grade of D,F or I automatically prohibits a student from receiving this citation. A student must have a minimum of three courses other than pass/fail in order to be named to the Dean's List with the exception of individual courses offered for 8-15 credits.

Alpha Chi National College Honor Society

Alpha Chi is a national college honor scholarship society, founded in 1922, with membership limited to third- and fourth-year students enrolled in institutions with Alpha Chi chapters. To be eligible for active membership, a student must be in the top 10 percent of the third or fourth year.

Citation of Achievement at Graduation

Citations for identified cumulative grade point accomplishments are noted at graduation, and are posted to the student's academic record.  Effective with the graduating Class of 2011, honors are based on all academic course work completed at UNE.  Undergraduate degrees will be conferred per the following classifications:

Summa Cum Laude on students who have achieved a cumulative grade point (GPA) average between 3.80 - 4.00.
Magna Cum Laude on students who have achieved a cumulative GPA between 3.60 - 3.79.
Cum Laude on students who have achieved a cumulative GPA between 3.30 - 3.59.

Declaration and Change of Major

Before March 15 of the second year, a student is required to make a formal declaration of major using the appropriate form available from Registration Services. Students declaring majors in marine biology, medical biology, and elementary education are asked to declare by the end of the first year.  This declaration must be signed by the advisor and the chair/director of the major department. The declared major must be an existing, approved academic program of study.  See undergraduate catalog (majors) for existing programs of study.

Personal Major (College of Arts and Sciences only)

In exceptional circumstances College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) students may propose a personal major as an alternate to a traditional academic major degree program.  Personal major degree programs must have sponsorship of an academic department within CAS and approval of the CAS Dean’s office.  To receive approval of a personal major degree program an undergraduate student must work collaboratively with college/department faculty and the CAS academic dean to design and describe a proposed comprehensive program that combines core curriculum, departmental requirements, and a course of study reflecting the student's personal scholarly interests.  Approval to begin planning and eventually submit a personal major proposal must be obtained through the CAS Dean’s office. To be eligible for consideration of a personal major, students must be in their second year of study and are required to have a minimum 2.50 overall GPA.  A student pursuing a Personal Major must matriculate, without exception, the equivalent of one full academic year, full time status (30 credit hour minimum) after the approval of his/her degree program.  Additional policies and procedures regarding proposal protocols are available through the CAS Dean’s office.

Academic Minors

The University of New England offers the option for students to petition for a minor program of study. A "minor" is a structured plan of study outside the student's major. See undergraduate catalog (minors) for available options.  In most cases, the minimum amount of credits required for a minor is 18 credits. Minors do not appear on UNE diplomas.

Student Advising

Students are assigned a faculty advisor who will serve as the students' primary resource for academic and career guidance planning while at the University. Although academic advisors are available to assist students in fulfilling major and graduation requirements, the ultimate responsibility for these matters rests with the student.

Students are also encouraged to avail themselves of additional services provided by the Counseling and Career Center and the Learning Assistance Center.

Student Enrollment Status

The University of New England classifies student load status for purposes of financial aid loan deferments. Enrollment classifications:

Program Classification credits

Undergraduate

Full Time

3/4 Time

Half Time

Less Than Half Time

12.0 or more

9.0 - 11.9

6.0 - 8.9

1.0 - 5.9

Graduate/First Professional/Doctoral Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0 or more

3.0 - 5.9

Graduate Level Certification Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0

3.0

Master of Science Nurse Anesthesia Full Time Only Full Time Only
College of Osteopathic Medicine Full Time Only Full Time Only
College of Pharmacy

Full Time

Half Time

Less Than Half Time

12.0 or more

6.0 - 8.9

1.0 - 5.9

Student Records and Transcripts

Academic Records- Complete records and related documents are maintained in Registrar's office, Decary Hall. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment to the Family Educational and Privacy Act (FERPA), students have the right to review and inspect all official records, files, and data, including all material that is incorporated into each student's cumulative record folder. However, the Department of Health and Human Services has said that clarifying amendments provide that letters of recommendation submitted on the basis of a pledge of confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975 need not be shown to students, and that a student may be allowed but not required to waive his/her right of access to letters of recommendation received after that date. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment, post-secondary institutions must provide students not only access to official records directly related to them, but also an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. It is the right of students to file a complaint with the Department of Health and Human Services concerning an alleged failure by an educational agency or institution to comply with section 438 of the Act that guarantees such rights. University students wishing to review their records may do so by providing a written request to Registration Services at least 48 hours in advance of the desired appointment.

Student Conduct Records - Student conduct records and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students in the Student Affairs offices on each campus. Student conduct records/files are maintained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

  1. All student conduct and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of no less than four years after separation from the University. Records may be destroyed at that time. Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time or permanently if specified in the terms of disciplinary sanctions.
  2. Disciplinary records may be voided by the Dean of Students Office with the concurrence of an Appeals Committee for good cause based upon written petition by student(s).
  3. Denials of petitions to void disciplinary records may be appealed to the vice president of academic affairs.

Student Access and Annual Notification

FERPA (see above) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. The student should submit a written request, that identifies the records which they wish to inspect, to Registrar's office.  The office will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students should write to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will accompany this notification.
  3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task; or the Veterans Administration for students registered for various GI Bill programs. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failure(s) by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information and Disclosure

The University normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including directory information. One exception to this policy is the result of a federal law known as the Solomon Amendment which requires the University to release directory information to military recruiters upon request. For this purpose, directory information is defined as: name, address, email, telephone listing, date and place of birth, level of education, academic major, degrees received, and educational institution in which a student most recently was enrolled. Information not required or permitted by the Solomon Amendment and not considered directory information under FERPA will not be released without written permission of the student.

Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing on a per-academic-year basis. Request forms are available in Registration Services and Student Affairs Offices at either campus. Requests must be submitted prior to September 30th (if first-time enrollment for academic year is fall semester) or January 30th (if first-time enrollment for academic year is spring semester) to affect a withhold status.

Please remember: active students must renew a request for non-disclosure each year to keep such requests in effect. The University may disclose directory information about former students without meeting notification requirements; however, at the last opportunity as a student (just prior to departure from the University), written requests for non-disclosure will remain in effect until a written request to change non-disclosure status is made by the student.

Response Time and End-of-Term Processing

Due to production demands in registration services (both campuses), requests for student records services cannot be processed on demand. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

At the end of each fall and spring semester, Registration Services  must process significant volumes of grades, completions, and verifications after all final grades are submitted by instructors. This end-of-term processing is not finished for a minimum of two weeks after the last final exam.

For students graduating at the end of spring semester: degree verification, posting, and diploma printing/mailing must be done after end-of-term grades are processed. Diplomas are not normally mailed for a minimum of four weeks after the last final exam. Students are advised to anticipate waiting these periods of time, and should plan ahead when working with employers, graduate schools, agencies, or licensing bureaus when ordering transcripts, grade reports, or degree verifications.

Transcripts

No official transcript will be issued until all financial obligations have been met.
Transcripts are issued only at the written and signed request of the student. The purpose of this policy is to protect the privacy of the individual concerned and to minimize the possibility of the use of another's transcripts for fraudulent purposes. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

Official transcripts are normally issued directly to other educational institutions or prospective employers designated by the student. Official transcripts issued to the student for purposes of transport to another party can be provided in a sealed envelope but will be considered unofficial if opened by the student. Unsealed transcripts issued directly to students are considered unofficial and are stamped Issued to Student.

CAS Core Curriculum

The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) Core Curriculum provides an innovative common learning experience for all UNE CAS undergraduates. It invites students to explore four college-wide themes from multiple disciplinary perspectives and to develop important intellectual skills. Students focus on a theme each year - (1) Environmental Awareness, (2) Social and Global Awareness, (3) Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges, and (4) Citizenship. Skills of communications, mathematics, and critical thinking are taught throughout the core. Designed to provide a foundation in the liberal arts, the core reflects the values of the college and is designed to prepare students for living informed, thoughtful, and active lives in a complex and changing society.

First Year Theme

Environmental Awareness is the first-year theme. All entering students enroll in Introduction to Environmental Issues and a laboratory science course. Students discover science as a process and discuss the role of science and technology in society. The laboratory science course will serve to introduce the scientific method as an approach to knowledge while infusing significant consideration of issues pertaining to Environmental Awareness.

As part of the first-year experience students will enroll in one Humanities Exploration course and a subsequent Humanities or Social/Behavioral Sciences Exploration course. These courses foster student inquiry into engaging academic topics. Each course, while connecting to one or more of the common core themes, introduces the intellectual tools of the discipline, thereby encouraging students to understand the liberal arts as distinctive ways of understanding. All exploration courses promote writing as a tool of learning and teach critical thinking skills explicitly.

Second Year Theme

Social and Global Awareness is the second year theme that focuses attention on the human experience by means of two specific types of courses.

In the Social/Global Awareness courses, human experience is explored in cultural, societal, national, and global contexts.  Students use perspectives and methods of the social and behavioral sciences to examine human interaction and growth.

In the Human Traditions courses, human experience is examined within the traditions of the humanities. Students inquire into the rise and fall of civilizations, study works of art and literature, and examine the philosophical, religious, and economic ideas that shaped ancient cultures and the modern world.

Third Year Theme

Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges is the third year theme that builds upon and develops the knowledge and skills students have mastered in their first two years.  This theme and approach enhances the ability of students to deal with the complex problems and issues they confront in their upper-level major courses. Each program requires its majors to enroll in a course where students and faculty engage in informed critical and creative thinking about problems confronting people in their discipline. Centering on the thinking process, as well as on the issues, students research and identify causes of problems, generate and evaluate possible solutions, and decide upon a plan of action.

Fourth Year Theme

Citizenship is the fourth year theme.  It prepares students to make a difference in the world, their communities, and their professions. Students will enroll in an interdisciplinary seminar and participate in community service or civic activity. During their seminar, students discuss the personal and public responsibilities they anticipate and share their concerns for the world they are about to enter. This theme challenges students to understand the balance between making a living and making a life. Activities provide the opportunity to weave together various threads of the core and the major.

During the third and fourth year of study, students are required to take Advanced Studies courses in an area or areas outside of their major area.  These courses explore methodologies, theories, and/or concepts important in the Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and/or Humanities. Students select two courses in this category based on their preference. 

Once during their academic careers, students participate in a creative arts experience by taking a specific course or by completing an independent project. This requirement emphasizes the value of their creative spirits and uncovers gifts that will sustain students throughout their lives.

Subject Area Details Credits
   
First Year Theme: Environmental Awareness  
ENV 100/101 or ENV 104 - Intro to Environmental Issues 3
One laboratory science course 4
One Humanities Explorations course 3
One Humanities or Social Behavioral Science Explorations course 3
ENG 110 - English Composition 4
One Mathematics course 3 - 4
Second Year Theme: Social and Global Awareness  
Two Social Global Awareness courses 6
Human Traditions
ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC OR REL
6
276 - Human Traditions I  
and
ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC OR REL
 
278 - Human Traditions II  
Students must take a Human Traditions I and a Human Traditions II from two different humanities disciplines   
Third Year Theme: Critical Thinking  
Fourth Year Theme: Citizenship  
Two courses in Advanced Studies 6

CIT 400 - Citizenship Seminar or

CIT 420 - Global Citizenship

1
Once Across the Four Years  
One Creative Arts Experience course 3
   
Total Credits 42 - 43

University Core Curriculum Summary and Objectives

  • Effective communications skills - Besides taking English Composition students use writing as a tool of inquiry and research in both major and non-major courses. Students also practice public speaking skills.
  • Critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills - Formally taught in Explorations and again in Case Studies, thinking skills are fostered throughout the curriculum.
  • Mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills - Students will be advised to take a specific mathematics course(s) according to their skill level and major. They will be encouraged in a variety of courses to use mathematics as an essential quantitative tool of analysis.
  • Diversity Issues - Questions of gender, race, class, and culture are investigated in the Social and Global Awareness theme courses and have important relevance to all the themes within the common core. Different perspectives on these issues will be infused across the curriculum.

The core curriculum emphasizes active, collaborative, and experiential learning. It challenges students to transfer knowledge from one arena to another, appreciate different disciplinary perspectives on the same topic, and integrate what they have learned to construct their own knowledge. The curriculum provides an interwoven and reinforced set of experiences in core courses, in major or professional requirements, in special all-campus events, and in general college life.  The faculty at the University of New England believes that our core curriculum is intrinsically valuable and that it helps us to influence our graduates to be better citizens and to be well equipped to be contributing members of society.  

A more thorough description of the core is available through the College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Office.

 

WCHP Common Curriculum

The Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) Common Curriculum is designed to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to engage in liberal arts and sciences course work while exploring health profession study.  Contemporary education in the health professions is demanding and unique.  The shaping of a competent health professional requires strong traditional liberal arts and sciences foundations, comprehensive disciplinary knowledge and the advancement of interprofessional abilities.  The construction of the WCHP Common Curriculum supports the development of the student in this educational endeavor.

The WCHP Common Curriculum is constructed around three (3) domains of study: Study in the Arts and Sciences, Interprofessional Education and Discipline-specific Study.

Study in the Arts and Sciences: Engagement in the arts and sciences provides an essential underpinning for health profession study and renders a framework for the first two academic years.  This arena serves to develop important intellectual skills, and is characterized by a well-scaffolded sequence of biological course work and study in social-behavioral science.  Quantitative reasoning and critical thinking are examined through mathematics and scientific inquiry.  Written and oral communication abilities are cultivated through English composition and supporting exploratory humanities.  Elements of the College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum are interwoven throughout, providing academic offerings in creative arts, social-global awareness, humanities exploration, and advanced studies/ human traditions course work.  Understanding in the arts and sciences is additionally fostered through Core Connections and other special campus co-curricular events and throughout general collegiate life.  Study in the arts and sciences supports the development of effective communication skills, critical thinking abilities, quantitative reasoning and exploration of issues related to societal diversity.

Interprofessional Education:  Contemporary health profession practice demands that graduates be competent not only in disciplinary expertise but also interprofessional collaboration.  This requires health professionals to learn about, with and from each other in gaining knowledge and capability in communication, teamwork, understanding of roles and responsibilities and ethical comportment.  Interprofessional education course work (IPE) examines these competencies, providing students with the opportunity to engage in increasingly complex problem solving, work collaboratively in teams, analyze systems, apply principles of intrapersonal/ interpersonal communication, and appraise and utilize best evidence in considering patient care.  Interprofessional course work is delivered in years one and two, with application occurring through experiential learning in years three and four.

Discipline-specific Study:  Engagement in the major characterizes years three and four of health profession course work.  Study within the major provides the student with experiential learning opportunities integrating foundational cognitive, psychomotor, and affective knowledge gained from study in the arts and sciences and IPE.  Disciplinary education is informed by classroom learning experiences, guided hands-on clinical laboratory, facilitated simulation exercises, and diverse experiences in field work and clinical practice sites.  Study within the major advances critical and creative thinking within the discipline, instills a spirit of inquiry and life-long learning, and upholds the imperative of citizenship within a complex, changing society.  

WCHP Common Curriculum Objectives and Summary

 

  • Employ critical thinking and problem solving skills
  • Examine ethical knowledge, professional standards and values congruent with interprofessional practice
  • Demonstrate effective communication and interprofessional collaboration abilities
  • Appraise knowledge of self and self-reflective abilities for interprofessional practice

Summary:

The WCHP Common Curriculum is outcomes-oriented and emphasizes active, engaged approaches to learning.  It challenges students to acquire and then integrate knowledge across fields of study in shaping a capable and competent health professional.  The faculty in the Westbrook College of Health Professions uphold the Common Curriculum as an essential component to producing graduates who are highly effective in their disciplinary practice, competent with interprofessional collaboration and informed citizens ready to contribute to a complex, dynamic society.  

 

Student Academic Success

The Student Academic Success Center (SASC), a unit within Student Support Services, provides a comprehensive array of academic support services, including placement testing, courses, workshops, tutoring, and individual consultations. The goal of the Student Academic Success Center is to assist students in becoming more independent and efficient learners so that they are able to meet the University's academic standards and to attain their personal educational goals.

Placement Testing

Before Orientation, all new undergraduate and transfer students are assessed for competence in writing and mathematics. Placement test scores, SAT scores and a review of each incoming student's previous coursework are considered.

Students who do not meet the University's predetermined criteria are placed into an appropriate developmental mathematics course, developmental writing course, or both. SAS courses are subject to the academic policies and procedures set forth by CAS and CHP.  SAS courses, however, do not satisfy core curriculum or graduation requirements.

Based on placement testing results, students are assigned one of five levels in Mathematics.

L2:   Introduction to Algebra and Problem Solving (SAS 021)
     
L3:   Advanced Algebra and Problem Solving (SAS 022), Quantitative Reasoning (MAT 110), or Statistics (MAT 120)
     
L4:   Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (MAT 130), Statistics for the Life Sciences (MAT 150), or Precalculus (MAT 180)
     
L5:   Calculus I (MAT 190) or Geometry (MAT 240)
     
L6   Calculus II (MAT 195), Linear Algebra (MAT 220), or Foundations of Mathematics (MAT 230).

Students with a Math SAT score of 550 or higher (ACT≥ 22) are assigned a UL4 placement level and are not required to complete the placement test.   Students with a Math SAT score lower than 550 (ACT < 22) are required to complete the Accuplacer® placement exam. Placement testing will be offered on the first day of new student orientation. Students may also complete testing by appointment at the Student Academic Success Center.  Students who do not complete placement testing will be assigned a UL2 placement level.

Based on the placement process, students are assigned one of three levels of Writing.

UWT:   Developmental level Writing Tutorial (SAS 010)

UWL:   Engaging with Text Writing Lab (SAS011)
     
UEC:   English Composition (ENG 110)     

Students with a Writing SAT of 470 or higher (ACT≥20) are placed in ENG110.  Students with a Writing SAT score of 440-460 (ACT 18 -19) are placed in ENG110 and SAS011 concurrently.  Students with a Writing SAT score lower than 440 (ACT ≤17) are placed in SAS010.  Students without Writing SAT, ACT, transfer courses, or AP credit will be required to take the Writing placement exam offered at orientation.

Tutoring

The Student Academic Success Center offers professional and peer tutoring to support a variety of undergraduate courses. Peer tutors complete a training program by the College Reading and Learning Association. Peer and professional writing support services are also available.  Tutors' regularly scheduled hours are posted in the Student Academic Success Center on each campus and are accessible online at une.tutortrac.com.

Individual Consultation

Learning specialists are available (by appointment) to meet with students seeking assistance with their specific course demands. Consultations regarding learning styles, note-taking skills, active reading skills, time management skills, test-taking skills and preparation for professional boards are  available.

Animal Behavior

Mission

The Department of Psychology offers students a broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on community, social and individual approaches to understanding human behavior.  Students are thus exposed to a combination of theoretical, scientific and practical approaches to solving human problems.  Issues of gender, race, class and culture are emphasized in courses throughout the curriculum.  As a result of required course work and internship experiences, the department graduates students with marketable skills that prepare them for entry-level positions in social services or for graduate study in related areas.  As part of this mission, the Department of Psychology offers four majors: psychology, neuroscience, animal behavior and psychology and social relations.

Animal behavior involves the investigation of how an organism relates to its environment - comprised of both physical and social factors - and includes a wide variety of topics, from finding food to achieving dominance, that all influence an organism's ability to survive and reproduce. It is by its very nature interdisciplinary, drawing on techniques and concepts from multiple diverse fields such as psychology and neuroscience. Through the use of expertise in psychology (the study of behavior and mental processes) and biology (the study of the living world), we can understand how animals behave, how these behaviors develop and the mechanisms, explanations and consequences of these behaviors. Answers to the mechanisms of behavior include not only how external stimuli in the environment affect behavior but also how the internal hormonal and neural mechanisms mediate behavior. The study of the development of behavior focuses on the way behavior changes over an individual's lifetime as a result of both genes and experience. Investigations of the explanations of behavior examine immediate effects of a particular behavior on an animal, and ultimate effects such as a behavior's value in helping a species survive and reproduce successfully and that behavior's evolution over time.

The mission of animal behavior, as an interdisciplinary science that combines both psychology and biology, is to examine the complicated question of how and why animals behave the way they do by using techniques and concepts from multiple fields.  By the time they graduate, animal behavior majors will know how to think like scientists. This will include a mastery of the basic skills that underlie the fields of psychology and biology - from critically observing the world around them to formulating basic hypotheses - as well as an understanding of concepts central to the disciplines and how these concepts interact and interrelate. In order to enable students to attain these goals, they will be actively involved in the scientific process. Through active involvement, students will gain an appreciation of not just animal behavior but psychology and biology as a whole.

One of the things that makes the University of New England a unique institution is its focus on learning by doing. The psychology faculty is wholly supportive of this approach as indicated not only by strong student-faculty relationships but also by requiring an internship experience. The animal behavior major further embraces this philosophy by providing research experiences within and outside the classroom learning environment. Research experience is as critical a component of a well-rounded degree as content mastery and provides students with skills that are beneficial throughout their careers after graduation. Through these hands on experiences, students will discover their talents, hone their skills, achieve their goals and become independent, critical thinkers that understand their role in not just the work force but the community in general.

Major Description

Animal Behavior is an interdisciplinary major offered jointly by faculty from the Department of Psychology and the Department of Biological Sciences. Animal behavior is the scientific study of not only everything an animal does but why it does it. This major is designed for students who are interested in understanding why animals act the way they do on a proximate and ultimate level. An animal behavior major can lead to employment in national parks, research laboratories, veterinary clinics, animal shelters, aquariums or zoos, or academia. Students who are planning on attending a graduate program in this field should be prepared not only to maintain an appropriately high GPA but also to conduct research in a laboratory on campus or at another institution.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology and psychology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology and psychology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of "C-"  must be achieved in all courses used to fulfill the requirements for the Animal Behavior major. See Undergraduate Academic Policy also.

Double majoring or majoring and minoring within the Department of Psychology is permissable. However, students interested in this option should do so with close consultation of their academic advisor to ensure that a substantial degree of overlap between the two areas does not occur.

 

Curricular Requirements
  Credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses 50-59
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
BIO 105/105L - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution w/Lab OR MAR 105/105L 4
BIO 106/106L - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular w/Lab OR MAR 106/106L 4
CHE 110/110L - General Chemistry I w/Lab 4
CHE 111/111L - General Chemistry II w/Lab 4
PSY 225 - Psychology Statistics 3
PSY 275 - Introduction to Tech/Animal Behavior  
PSY 285 - Research Methods 3
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology or BIO 245 General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology & Pathophysiology 4
PSY 335 - Comparative Animal Behavior 3
Organismal Topic* 3
PSY 362 - Animal Cognition 3
PSY 365 - Biological Bases of Behavior 3
PSY 382 - Animal Learning and Behavior 3
PSY 425 - Advanced Methods in Animal Behavior 3
PSY 495 - Animal Behavior Internship/Research 3-12
Animal Behavior Electives (see below)  

*Organismal Topics courses must be 200-level or higher and include a hands on component. These courses include but are not limited to: BIO 222 Finfish/Shellfish Culture Tech; BIO 255 Entomology; BIO 319 Ornithology; BIO 330 Comp Vert Anatomy; ENV 318 Adv Research Methods Avian Ecol; ENV 356 Terrestrial Wildlife Eco/Cons; MAR 320 Invert Zoology; MAR 331 Biology of Fishes; MAR 355 Biology Marine Mammals; PSY 406 Spec Topics Animal Behavior. 

 

 
Minimum Required Total Credits 120
  Credits
Note: Curricular Elective Detail:
Three electives are required for the animal behavior major if the internship is 3-4 credits. If the internship is 5 or more credits, then only 2 electives are required. Other courses may be applied as electives with the approval of the animal behavior program director or the department chair.
 
Animal Behavior Electives  
BIO 207 - Organismal Genetics 4
BIO 232 - Microbiology  4
BIO 332 - Vert Neuroanatomy 3
BIO 333 - Evolution 3
BIO 345 - General Prin Anat/Phys/Pathophys

5

BIO 350 - Ecology 4
ENV 250 -Environ Policy Compar Perspect 3
ENV 318 - Advanced Methods in Avian Ecology 4
ENV 356 - Terrestrial Wildlife and Ecology 4
MAR 237 - Marine Animal Rehab 3
MAR 250 - Marine Biology 4
MAR 252 - Nat His Marine Mammals 3
PHY 110/PHY 111 - Physics     4-8
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology     3
PSY 226 - Motivation & Emotion  3
PSY 245 - Evolutionary Psychology 3
PSY 330 - Psychology of Stress   3
PSY 370 - Drugs, Society, Behavior 3
PSY 383 - Memory & Cognition 3

PSY 406 - Spec Topics in Animal Behavior

3
Learning Outcomes

Students will acquire the following skills as they complete their 
Bachelors of Science Degree in Animal Behavior at UNE: 
 
1. Quantitative skills 
1.1 Ability to represent information in a quantitative format 
1.2 Ability to analyze and interpret quantitative information, including graphs and 
statistics 
1.3 Ability to quantitatively manipulate data and information 
 
2. Critical and integrative thinking skills 
2.1 Ability to critique and develop experimental designs and methodology 
2.2 Ability to integrate findings from diverse fields to address a research question or 
develop a testable hypothesis
2.3 Ability to read and analyze a primary research paper 
 
3. Research skills 
3.1 Ability to develop a hypothesis and design experiments to test this hypothesis 
3.2 Ability to collect, analyze, and interpret data 
3.3 Ability to perform multiple techniques related to animal behavior research (specific 
techniques may vary, but include: observational learning, biochemical techniques, 
behavioral studies, etc.) 
 
4. Communication skills 
4.1 Ability to present information orally in an organized and understandable manner 
4.2 Ability to communicate scientific information in written format for scientific 
publication 
4.3 Ability to communicate scientific information to the lay public in both oral and 
written format 
 
5. Independent critical thinking skills 
5.1 Ability to defend unique views/approaches/answers to well established phenomenon 
and theories based upon objective evidence 
5.2 Ability to overcome barriers/impediments to learning/research. 
5.3 Ability to find answers to questions that may not be specifically addressed in a course 

Measures 

Knowledge 
base

Skill 1

Skill 2

Skill 3

Skill 4

Skill 5

Use of the information

MCAT or GRE Exam

scores for Animal 
Behavior majors who 
anticipate applying to 
medical or graduate 
school 

X (sort of)

X     X

Data are 
reported to 
department 
annually in 
aggregate and 
students are 
given their 
individual 
scores. All data 
are reviewed as 
part of program 
review every 
four years

All students are 
required to complete 
an PSY 425: 
Advanced Methods in 
Animal Behavior and 
complete a grant 
proposal as a final 
project 

X X X X X X

Data are 
reported to 
department in 
an annual 
assessment 
meeting in 
aggregate and 
used as part of 
program review

Graduating student 
survey administered in 
early May of senior 
year 

X X X X X X

Data are 
reported to 
department in 
an annual 
assessment 
meeting in 
aggregate and 
used as part of 
program review

Internship Evaluation 
Form for all students 
in required ANB 
internship experience 

X X X X X X

Data are 
reported to 
department in 
an annual 
assessment 
meeting in 
aggregate and 
used as part of 
program review

Minor

A student with a major in another area may minor in Animal Behavior with the permission of their academic advisor and the Chair of the Psychology Department. A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit with a minimum grade of "C-" is required for the minor in Animal Behavior as follows:

  Credits
Minimum Credits 18
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 335 - Comparative Animal Behavior 3
PSY 365 - Biological Bases of Behavior 3
BIO XXX - One Organismal Topic (see above) 3-4
Animal Behavior Elective (see above) 3-4
PSY 382 - Animal Learning and Behavior 3
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Teresa Dzieweczynski

tdzieweczynski@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Animal Behavior

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Psychology

Applied Exercise Science

Mission

The Applied Exercise Science (AES) program is a student-centered, innovative, comprehensive program designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for excellence in the fields of exercise science, sport performance, and health & wellness. The curriculum encourages life-long learning through classroom, laboratory, internship, and research experience. Graduates will become highly effective, compassionate allied health care professionals capable of working with varied populations.

Major Description

The AES program is designed to provide graduates with the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to perform pre-participatory screening, fitness testing, exercise prescription, and exercise leadership for healthy, health-compromised populations, and athletic performance enhancement. With a combination of basic science, exercise science and athletic training courses, these students are prepared for career opportunities as an exercise science professional in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, strength and conditioning, sports medicine, corporate fitness, personal training, and health promotion. Internship settings include: colleges and universities, sport/athletic organizations, hospitals/clinics, private/commercial/community health and fitness facilities, municipalities, corporations, and non-profit organizations. A senior year research option is also available on a selected basis. The Applied Exercise Science program provides a strong foundation for graduate school preparation for allied health programs. 

Program Goals

The goals of the AES program are to prepare students to pass accredited national certification examinations, entry-level employment and graduate school admissions. The goals are compatible with the missions of the Department, College, and University and are attained through the interprofessional curriculum. They are as follows:

  1. Prepare students to be competent exercise science professionals.
  2. Develop a comprehensive curriculum that meets the demands of the exercise science profession.
  3. Contribute to the body of knowledge in exercise science through scholarly and research activities.
  4. Provide continuing education opportunities for exercise science professionals.
  5. Actively participate in and contribute to professional activities at the department, college, and community (state, regional and national) levels.
Accreditation

National Strength and Conditioning Association - Education Recognition Program Endorsement

Admissions

The following criteria must be met for admission to the AES program:

  • A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including: chemistry (must include laboratory); biology (must include laboratory); mathematics (two mathematics courses - algebra required, geometry preferred); English (three years required - four years preferred).        
  • Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses.        
  • Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) scores must be submitted.        
  • A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding applicant's complete physical exam.

Also see Undergraduate Admissions.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Students accepted to the Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) at the University of New England are subject to two sets of academic guidelines, one to meet minimum qualifications for ongoing enrollment at the University of New England and the other to meet specific program requirements.

WCHP Common Curriculum Standards – Semesters One Through Four (Freshman and Sophomore Years)

  1. In keeping with the guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows:
     
    Fall of First Year 1.70
    Spring of First Year 1.70
    Fall Of Second Year 1.70
    Spring of Second Year 1.80
  2. Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the Catalog of the University of New England.
  3. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in the following courses: MAT 120, CHE 110, PHY 110, BIO 104, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 309, EXS 120, EXS 180 and IHS 220. Failure to achieve a “C” will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  4. Failure to earn a C or above in any of the above courses requires the student to repeat the course.
  5. Failure to achieve a C or above a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  6. A student may enroll in any of the courses listed above a maximum of two times. Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade. Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.

Applied Exercise Science Program Standards – Semesters Four Through Eight (Junior and Senior Years) 
 

Minimum acceptable semester-end GPA 2.5
Minimal grade of a C or better in any EXS or ATC prefix course 2.0
  1. Once in course work within the major (fall of the junior year and beyond), students must maintain a minimum semester-end grade point average GPA of 2.5.   Failure to do so will result in program–level probation and may affect academic progression and delay graduation. 
  2. Students whose semester-end GPA falls below the 2.5 threshold for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the program. 
  3. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in each EXS and ATC prefix course 
  4. Student may only enroll in any course in the major a maximum of two times.  Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade.  Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
First Year  33
IHS 110 - Introduction to Health Care 2
IHS 120 - Health Care Issues 1
BIO 208 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 104 - General Biology 4
ENG 110 - English Composition 4
EXS 120 - Personal Health and Wellness 3
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Explorations Course 3
One (1) Creative Art (May be ART, ARH or MUS course) 3
   
Second Year  32
IHS 210  - Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
IHS 220  - Nutrition 3
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
ATC 333 - Gross Anatomy 3
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
EXS 180 - Motor Learning and Performance 3
BIO 209 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
MAT 180 - Precalculus 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
   
Third Year 32
ATC 101 - Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 3
ATC 420 - Research Methods 3
EXS 310 - Kinesiology and Biomechanics w/Lab 3
EXS 320 - Exercise Physiology w/Lab 3
EXS 330 - Fitness Evaluation and Prescriptions 3
EXS 380 - 12 Lead ECG Interpretation w/Lab 3
EXS 392 - Clinical Exercise Testing/Presc 3
EXS 495 - AES Seminar 1
PHY 110 - General Physics w/ Lab 4
AES Elective Course 1 of 4** 3
AES Elective Course 2 of 4** 3
   
Fourth Year  24
EXS 340 - Concepts of Strength and Conditioning 3
EXS 432 - Exercise Management for Chronic Disease & Disability 3
One Social Global Awareness Course 3
One Advanced Studies Course 3
EXS 499 - Internship* 6
Or  
EXS 499 - Internship* and 3
EXS 489 - Research Practicum  3
AES Elective Course 3 of 4** 3
AES Elective Course 4 of 4** 3
   
Minimum Required Credits 121

INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE

*The senior-level culminating experience may be either EXS 499 taken as a six-credit field experience internship (taken in the fall or spring) or a combination of EXS 499 for three credits and EXS 489 Research Practicum for three credits (taken in the fall or spring). Research Practicum would involve data collection/interpretation/results and presenting during the department research symposium.   Each student is required to complete a minimum of 270 hours (45 hours/credit) under the direct supervision of an approved clinical internship site supervisor, averaging between 20-24 hours per week.  To be eligible to complete the internship the student must be in good standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater and no grades lower than a C in the core courses as outlined in the catalog.  Failure to achieve these academic standards may delay graduation.   

**AES Electives (12 credits):
A minimum of 6 out of 12 credits are required to have an EXS or ATC prefix.  The remaining credits must have a BIO, CHE or PHY prefix.  Elective course substitution per permission from the Exercise and Sports Performance Department Chair.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Applied Exercise Science Program students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the exercise sciences including: anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology, kinesiology and biomechanics, ECG interpretation, exercise testing and prescription, motor learning and nutrition.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of and clinical proficiency in the following content areas for both apparently healthy and chronic disease populations: a) pre-participation screening/ health risk appraisal and stratification, b) fitness assessment and evaluation c) the design of individually tailored exercise prescription, d) appropriate exercise techniques.
  3. Recognize the importance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of safe, high quality care within the health care system/exercise science field.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in both oral and written formats.
  5. Recognize the importance of ethically-grounded care for diverse clients, patients and/or athletes.
  6. Successfully challenge entry-level professional certification examinations from the American College of Sports Medicine and/or the National Strength and Conditioning Association.
  7. Participate in activities to promote life-long learning and professional development. 
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Heath R. Pierce, M.Ed., RSCC, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, HFS (Program Director)
hpierce@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Applied Exercise Science

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Exercise and Sport Performance

Applied Mathematics

Mission

The Department of Mathematical Sciences is an integral part of the strong liberal arts tradition at the University of New England. We believe a student's education is enriched by studying mathematics, and our courses support the College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum. Our Applied Mathematics major and minor programs provide a solid foundation in contemporary mathematics which prepares students to pursue further study and careers in the mathematical sciences or mathematics education. The Department’s faculty mentor student research and are active in original scholarship. Through consulting and research collaborations, we are a resource for students and faculty across the University.

Major Description

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics provides a well-rounded education in the liberal arts focused on the mathematical sciences and their use to solve quantitative questions in mathematics and many other disciplines. The program places emphasis on mathematical modeling and statistical methods, culminating in a student research project during the senior year. The curriculum integrates technology and theoretical mathematics to give students perspectives on how mathematics is used in research, the sciences, and industry to solve real problems. This major prepares students for advanced study in mathematics, statistics, or related fields, including professional programs in areas such as health care and business. The program also gives students the quantitative skills to support careers in business, industry, finance, government, research, and many other fields. Students looking to double major will find that an Applied Mathematics major complements many science, health science, and business majors, as mathematics is used increasingly in these areas of study.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred mathematics courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the mathematics courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements (excluding mathematics) 39
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I 4
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
MAT 200 - Calculus III 4
MAT 212 - Applied Discrete Mathematics 3
MAT 220 - Applied Linear Algebra 3
MAT 225 - Computer Programming w/ MALAB 3
MAT 315 - Applied Mathematics w/ Differential Equations 3
MAT 321 - Applied Statistics I 3
MAT 323 - Applied Statistics II 3
MAT 400 - Real Analysis 3
MAT 480 - Mathematics Research Seminar 3
Program Minimum Required Total Credits  39
Science Elective Credits 6 - 8
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120


Secondary Education Certification

Students majoring in Applied Mathematics can work toward secondary mathematics teacher certification by selecting all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school mathematics teachers.

The program provides future teachers with a background in applied mathematics, extensive coursework in education, and model instruction, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will prepare students to meet the standards for State of Maine teacher certification.

This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits

CAS Core Requirements (excluding mathematics)

39
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I 4
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
MAT 200 - Calculus III 4
MAT 212 - Applied Discrete Mathematics 3
MAT 220 - Applied Linear Algebra 3
MAT 225 - Computer Programming w/ MATLAB or
     MAT 323 - Applied Statistics II
3
MAT 240 - Geometry 3
MAT 315 - Applied Mathematics w/Differential Equations 3
MAT 321 - Applied Statistics I 3
MAT 400 - Real Analysis 3
MAT 470 - Mathematics Education Research Seminar 3
Program Minimum Required Total Credits  39
  Credits
Education Required Courses  
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory & Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester)
1
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 439 - Teaching Secondary Mathematics 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Internship 15
Education Minimum Required Total Credits  40 - 41
Science Elective  3 - 4
Open Elective Courses (as needed to complete 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120

Refer to Mathematics Placement Procedures for guidelines about mathematics placement.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Applied Mathematics major will:

  1. use  mathematical reasoning, modeling, and statistical methods to explore, represent, and communicate about quantitative relationships;
  2. apply quantitative methods to solve problems in a variety of disciplines;
  3. develop proficiency with computer algebra, statistical, and geometric software to investigate mathematical concepts and applications;
  4. engage in independent inquiry in an area of interest in mathematics, applied mathematics, or mathematics education;
  5. prepare mathematical documents for dissemination in written and presentation formats;
  6. gain analytic and technological skills to support careers in mathematics and related areas, and graduate and professional study.

Additionally, students completing the secondary mathematics teacher certification option will develop their abilities to:

  1. incorporate mathematics education research into their perspectives on mathematics teaching and learning;
  2. draw upon a variety of sources, including textbooks, reference, materials,  professional organizations, and curriculum frameworks to inform their perceptions and practices of mathematics teaching and learning.
Minors

Students may earn a mathematics minor by completing a minimum of 6 mathematics courses numbered MAT 120 or above. Only one of the courses MAT 120 or 150 can be applied to a mathematics minor.  Students wishing to declare a mathematics minor must submit a course plan in writing for approval by the Department of Mathematical Sciences faculty. Prior consultation with a mathematics faculty member is encouraged.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Susan Gray (Chair)
sgray@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Applied Mathematics

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Applied Social and Cultural Studies

Mission

The mission of the Department of Society, Culture and Languages is to offer a broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics. The department provides a combination of theoretical, scientific, and practical approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture as well as hands on learning are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for entry-level positions in social services or for graduate study in related areas.

Degree Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Applied Social and Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary degree which allows students to integrate coursework from sociology, anthropology, political science, psychology, communications and other related fields of study. The major core emphasizes social science methods and ways of knowing while introducing students to a variety of social science disciplines. Within the Applied Social and Cultural Studies degree, students will also pursue a concentration in one of the three particular content areas.

Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements
  Credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
Three of the following four courses:   9
ANT 102 - Cultural Anthropology 3
PSC 105 - Introduction to Political Science 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
And  
SOC 268 - Statistics and Methods for Social Sciences 3
SOC 270 - Classical Sociological Theory or
SOC 280 - Contemporary Social Theory
3
SOC 300 - Sociology Internship 3
SOC/ANT 370 - Applied Field Methods 3
SOC 491,493, 494 - Applied Capstone Experience 9-15
Total Credits in Core of Major 30-36
Concentration Credits (see below for course options for each concentration)  12
Total Credits in Major   42-48
Open elective credits (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Total Required Credits   120

Applied Concentrations

After taking the course required by the major the student will select one of the three areas of concentration. A minimum of four (4) courses must be taken in the student's selected concentration for a total of twelve credits. At least two of these courses must be at the 300 or 400 level. A maximum of one humanities course (ENG, REL, HIS, PHI) can be counted toward the concentration.

Health, Medicine and Society

This concentration is for students interested in pursuing a career in public health, health administration, mental health and related fields, as well as students interested in pursuing graduate work in public health, medical sociology, medical anthropology and more. Courses examine the phenomenon of health, illness, disability and mental health issues; the organization and delivery of healthcare; the production of medical knowledge and alternative health systems. Students in this concentration are well prepared to advance to graduate study in public health, community services and a variety of other health and service related fields.

Sample Electives Credits
ANT 211 - Medical Anthropology 3
ANT 224 - Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights 3
SOC 224 - Family, Health and Social Change 3
SOC 226 - Environmental Sociology 3
SOC 228 - The Sociology of Aging 3
SOC 275 -The Sociology of Food and Health 3
SOC 355 - Medical Sociology 3
SOC 425 - Sex, Gender, Sexuality: Critical Perspectives 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 235 - Health Psychology 3
PSY 250 - Theories of Personality 3
PSY 295 - Listening/Communication Skills 3
PSY 310 - Children and Stress 3
PSY 370 - Drugs, Society and Behavior 3
PSC 325 - Politics and Public Health 3

Society, Human Services and Society

This concentration is for students interested in careers in business, social work, social policy, human services administration, community development, education and more. Courses focus on helping students to understand the communities, institutions and constituents that are involved in community service and development. Concentration courses focus on content, process and application in the community. Students are thus well prepared to advance to graduate study in social work and community studies.

Sample Electives Credits
SOC 210 - Displaced Cultures and Society 3
SOC 215 - Poverty 3
SOC 226 - Environmental Sociology 3
SOC 228 - The Sociology of Aging 3
SOC 240 - Race, Class and Gender 3
SOC 320 - Community Organization 3
SOC 413 - Societies of the Future 3
SOC 425 - Sex, Gender, Sexuality: Critical Perspectives 3
SOC 460 - Social Policy and Planning 3
SOC 480 - The Family 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 215 - Psychology of Gender 3
PSY 318 - Community Psychology 3
PSY 236 - Mental Health and Society 3
PSY 255 - Social Psychology 3
PSY 295 - Listening and Communication Skills 3
PSY 370 - Drugs, Society and Behavior 3
PSC 110 - Politics-Culture/Inven/Trad 3
PSC 203 - The Politics of Law 3
CMM 320 - Intercultural Communication 3
PSY 410 - Theory, Research and Practice in Counseling Psychology 3

Law, Crime and Society

This concentration is for students interested in pursuing a career in the criminal justice system, social services and related fields, or for students interested in pursuing graduate work in criminology and related fields or who are planning on attending law school. Course work introduces students to criminological justice system. Courses explore how society defines and responds to crime as they also examine the relevance of social class, race, gender and age. As a result, students are well prepared to advance to graduate study, law school or other professions within the legal field.

Sample Electives Credits
ANT 224 - Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights 3
SOC 170 - Deviance and Crime 3
SOC 226 - Environmental Sociology 3
SOC 333 - Sociology of Law 3
SOC 350 - Deviance 3
SOC 345 - Crime, Media and Culture 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 236 - Mental Health and Society 3
PSY 252 - Forensic Psychology 3
PSY 255 - Social Psychology 3
PSY 370 - Drugs, Society and Behavior 3
PSC 203 - The Politics of Law 3
PSC 210 - Constitutional Law 3
CMM 411 - Communication, Law and Regulation 3
Learning Outcomes
  1. The Social Sciences Perspective
    Students will be able to:
    • describe the differences between different perspectives in the social sciences as they are applied to social phenomena.
  2. Social Science Theory
    ​Students should be able to:
    • describe the role of theory in building knowledge.
    • compare and contrast different theoretical perspectives.
    • apply these theories to social conditions.
  3. The Nature of Evidence in the Social Sciences
    Students should be able to:
    • identify the basic methodological approaches in building knowledge grounded in the social sciences.
    • compare and contrast various research methodologies.
    • design and complete a written research project.
    • critically assess published research.
  4. Data analysis.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • understand the role of data analysis in building knowledge and testing theory.
    • use computer software for statistical analysis.
    • understand appropriate statistical techniques.
    • draw valid conclusions from the data analysis.
  5. How cultural and social structures operate.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • describe different social institutions and their various influences on the individual.
    • explain how the aforementioned institutions are interrelated.
    • evaluate them using social science theory.
  6. The diversity of human societies.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • describe the significance of variation by race, class, gender, religion and age.
    • explain patterns and variations using social science theory theory.
    • justify policy recommendations to address social inequalities.
  7. Communicate effectively.
    Students should be able to:
    • produce well written papers that clearly express knowledge grounded in the social sciences.
    • clearly express such knowledge in verbal presentations.
    • demonstrate critical thinking.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Sam McReynolds

smcreynolds@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Applied Social and Cultural Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Society, Culture and Languages

Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history – at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age – students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems, and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies.  Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty.  Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them.  In addition, the biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience and experiential learning.  The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog. 

Major Description

The Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences major provides students the opportunity to develop analytical skills in biology and business, and technical skills in the culture and maintenance of marine and freshwater organisms. Students who successfully complete the program should satisfy employment needs in the fields of marine and freshwater aquaculture and in the educational, maintenance and design needs of local, regional and national aquarium museums and businesses. Students who choose to go into graduate programs in these fields should be prepared to do so after maintaining an appropriate GPA in this program.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-43

 

Credits

Program Required Courses

36-37

BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (included in core requirements)

4

BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular

4

BIO 200 - Genetics or BIO 207 Organismal Genetics

5-4

BIO 204 - Parasitology

4

BIO 221 - Principles of Aquaculture

3

BIO 222 - Techniques in Finfish and Shellfish Culture

4

BIO 223 - Health, Nutrition and Feeding of Cultured Organisms

 4

BIO 232 - Microbiology or BIO 234 Environmental Microbiology

4

MAR 250 - Marine Biology

4

BIO 323 - Principles of Aquarium Operations and Science

4

MAR 325 - Marine Science Speaker Series

1

Program Required Credits Sub-Total

36-37

 

Credits

Topic Area Program Required Courses (to be selected in consultation with advisor)

 

Physiological Topic Area

4

Ecological Topic Area

4

BIO 495 - Internship

6

Program Minimum Required Total Credits

50 - 51

 

Credits

Science and Mathematics Required Courses

 

CHE 110 - Chemistry I

4

CHE 111 - Chemistry II

4

MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences

3

 

Credits

Business Administration Required Courses

 

BUMG 200 - Management

3

BUFI 302 - Personal Finance

3

 

Credits

Highly Recommended Elective Credits

 

CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis

5

CITM 100 - Introduction to Microcomputer Software

3

EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design

3

SPC 100 - Effective Public Speaking

3

Open elective courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)

variable

Minimum Required Total Credits

120

 

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

A.  Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas.

Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life - including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, reproduction.

  • Organismal Diversity - including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
  • Interrelations of Organisms and their environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.

B.  Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:

  • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
  • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
  • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).

C. Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:

  • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
  • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
  • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.
Minor

A biology minor requires 6 biology courses, including the introductory biology series. In particular, department of biological sciences majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences Minor Required Courses
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
Or
BIO 104 - General Biology and one of:
(BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution ,
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
or MAR 150 - Introduction to Oceanography)
And
BIO 221 - Principles of Aquaculture
BIO 222 - Finfish/Shellfish Culture Techniques
BIO 223 - Health/Nutrition/Feeding Cultured Organisms
BIO 323 - Principles of Aquarium Operations Science
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biological Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biological Sciences.

Dr. Jeri Fox
jfox@une.edu
or
Dr. Stine Brown
sbrown@une.edu

Or

The Marine Science Deptartment in the College of Arts and Sciences.

 

Bachelor of Science with a major in Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Biology

Art Education K-12

Mission

The Arts and Communications Department is staffed by a community of professional artists with national reputations. The mission of the faculty is to nurture and encourage students' individual growth, development and expression while preparing them to pursue a professional career.  After a firm grounding in the foundations, students are mentored in the development of an original body of work in their preferred medium.

Major Description

The Arts and Communications Department in collaboration with the Department of Education offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in art education. Staffed by professional scholars and artists with national reputations, students learn the theory and practice of education as well as effective educational strategies that prepare them as elementary and secondary teachers. Through in-depth study in the studio, culminating in an exhibition of their personal work developed in the Studio Concentration Seminar students will gain a strong understanding of the artistic process and their own expressive capabilities. Students will leave the program as skilled and confident advocates for the arts with Maine state teaching certification (levels K-12) in the visual arts.

Curricular Requirements

 

Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42 - 43
  Credits
Required Art Courses  
ART 100 - Drawing I 3
ART 104 - Painting I 3
ART 106 - Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 113 - Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 200 - Advanced Drawing 3
ARH 210 - Art History Survey I 3
ARH 211 - Art History Survey II 3
ARH 260 - Renaissance and Baroque Art or  3
ARH 270 - Art in the Modern World  
ART 395 - Studio Concentration Seminar 3
ART Elective 3
One additional courses in studio arts (ART 200-499) 3
Art Minimum Required Total Credits 36
   
Required Education Courses  
EDU 105 - The Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Edu Psych & Classroom Mgmt 3
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 441 - Methods of Art Education 3
EDU 486 - Secondary or Art Ed Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Education Internship and Seminar 15
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester as of Spring 2009)
1
Education Minimum Required Total Credits 40 - 41
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)   
Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes for the Art Education Program conform to the Maine Department of Education Teacher Certification Objectives listed below. Additionally the Studio Art component of the program has its own guidelines and specific outcomes in the list following the MDE standards.

Teacher Certification Objectives
Maine Department of Education Chapter 114

Standard One: Learner Development: The teacher understands how students learn and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

Standard Two: Learning Differences: The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that allow each learner to reach his/her full potential.

Standard Three:  Learning Environments: The teacher works with learners to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.

Standard Four:  Content Knowledge: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners

Standard Five:  Innovative Applications of Content: The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical/creative thinking and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard Six:  Assessment: The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to document learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s on-going planning and instruction.

Standard Seven:  Planning for Instruction: The teacher draws upon knowledge of content areas, cross-disciplinary skills, learners, the community, and pedagogy to plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals.

Standard Eight:  Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to access and appropriately apply information.

Standard Nine:  Reflection and Continuous Growth: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students,  families,  and  other  professionals  in  the  learning  community),  and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Standard 10:  Collaboration: The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Standard   11:   Technology Standards for Teachers - (NETS.T): Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for   Students   (NETS•S)   as   they   design,   implement,   and   assess   learning experiences  to  engage  students  and  improve  learning;  enrich  professional practice;   and   provide   positive   models   for   students,   colleagues,   and   the community. All teachers will meet the following standards and performance indicators.

Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in art with the permission of the Arts and Communications department chair. Eighteen credits hours as indicated below is required:  

  Credits
ART 100 - Drawing I 3
ART 101 - Watercolor or
ART 104 - Painting or
ART 106 - 2D Design
3
ART 110 - Ceramics or
ART 113 - Three Dimensional Fundamentals
3
One Studio Elective 3
One 200 Level Studio 3
Any ART History 3
Minimum Required Total Credits  18

A student with a major in another department may minor in Art Therapy with the permission of the  Arts and Communications department chair or the Psychology department chair. Twenty-one credit hours** as indicated below are required: 

  Credits
Psychology Department  12
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 410 - Theories, Research and Practice of Counseling (Pre-req PSY 105) 3
PSY 430 - Introduction to Art Therapy (Pre-req PSY 410) 3
One of the following courses:  
PSY 205 - Abnormal 3
PSY 295 - Listening & Communication Skills 3
PSY 310 - Children & Stress 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
   
Arts and Communications Department  9
ART 100 - Drawing I 3
ART 104 - Painting I 3
One of the following courses:  
ART 110 - Ceramics 3
ART 113 - Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
In the event that the above courses have been taken to fulfill requirements for the Art Education major or an art minor, students will be required to take 9 credits from the following list:  
ART 102 - Photography 3
ART 103 - Intro to Image Capture 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 199 - Art Topics Course 3
ART 204 - Painting II 3
ART 214 - Color Digital Photography 3
ART 230 - Graphic Design 3
Minimum Required Total Credits 21

**Because of the pre-requisite for PSY 410, students are required to take 21 credits to complete this minor. Courses may not be used to fulfill both major and minor requirements.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Stephen Burt (Chair, Arts and Communications Department)
sburt@une.edu

Dr. Douglas Lynch (Chair, Education Department)
dlynch@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Art Education

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Arts and Communications

Art Therapy

Minor Description

The Departments of Arts and Communications, and Psychology jointly offer a Minor in Art Therapy. Art Therapy in a burgeoning field that draws from the disciplines of psychology, art, and other creative process to promote healing and overall well-being for individuals with mental and physical disabilities. The minor provides a basic foundation for continued study or for work in community art programs and organizations where art is used as part of the therapeutic process.  The permission of the chair in either Arts and Communications or Psychology is required.

Curricular Requirements

The minor in Art Therapy requires a total of 21** credits - 12 from the Psychology Department and 9 from the Arts and Communications Department. Courses may not be used to fulfill both major and minor requirements.

  Credits
Psychology Department 12
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 410 - Theories, Research and Practice of Counseling 3
PSY 430 - Introduction to Art Therapy (**Pre-req PSY 410) 3
One of the following courses:  
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psych 3
PSY 295 - Listening & Communication Skills 3
PSY 310 - Children & Stress 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
   
Creative and Fine Arts Department  9
ART 100 - Drawing I 3
ART 201 - Painting I 3
One of the following courses:  
ART 110 - Ceramics 3
ART 113 - Sculpture 3
In the event that the above courses have been taken to fulfill requirements for the Art Education major or an art minor, students will be required to take 9 credits from the following list:  
ART 102 - Photography 3
ART 103 - Intro to Image Capture 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 199 - Art Topics Course 3
ART 204 - Painting II 3
ART 214 - Digital Photography 3
ART 230 - Graphic Design 3
Minimum Required Total Credits 21

**Because of the pre-requisite for PSY 410, students will need to take 21 credits to complete this minor as opposed to 18 which is common for most minors. However, it is important to note that PSY 105 is already a requirement for Psychology majors and all WCHP majors.

 

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Stephen Burt, Arts and Communications Department, Chair
sburt@une.edu

Dr. Linda Morrison, Psychology Department, Chair
lmorrison@une.edu

Minor in Art Therapy

College of Arts and Sciences

Art Therapy Minor - Psychology

Art and Design Media

Mission

The Arts and Communications Department is staffed by a community of professional artists with national reputations. The mission of the faculty is to nurture and encourage students' individual growth, development and expression while preparing them to pursue a professional career.  After a firm grounding in the foundations, students are mentored in the development of an original body of work in their preferred medium.

Degree Description

Major Description

The Arts and Communications Department offers a Bachelor of Arts in Art and Design Media.

The Art and Design Media course of study develops intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills through an active hands-on curriculum taught by professional scholars and artists. While imparting foundational expressive skills in traditional art media, the program encourages students to expand their conceptual and perceptual capabilities and receive training in current technological media that both support the traditional arts and are essential tools in contemporary society.

Developing connections between their personal experience and art, science, social science, and the environment is an important part of the program and is emphasized in a year-long concentration seminar experience (required of all majors) where students choose an area of focus ranging from traditional arts such as painting and ceramics to video production.  Majors will gain a strong understanding of the creative process and their own expressive capabilities culminating in an exhibition of their personal creative work. Whether planning a career in the arts or developing innovative interdisciplinary work in a double major, the Art and Design Media program will build diverse strengths and skills for the 21st century student.

Program Description

The Art and Design Media program stresses students' acquisition of skills that represent appropriate professional practices and a clear understanding of how to evaluate their own work for accuracy, expression and clarity. Among these skills students will develop experience in and knowledge of:

  • Creative and compositional methods across media.
  • The creative process starting from initial sketches and outlines to the finished work. Problem solving is intrinsic to this process.
  • The development of their personal voice through intensive study in the senior capstone year.
  • The link between concept and media.
  • Art history with an emphasis on contemporary practice in Western and Non-Western worlds.
  • Critical thinking and aesthetic assessment both verbal and written.

The program provides students with hands on experience with the tools and latest technologies used in the arts professions in which they will work. They study and learn to:

  • Appreciate, understand and utilize methods of craftmanship in a variety of media.
  • Develop their knowledge and abilities in graphic and web design, commercially viable skills with broad applicability.
  • Develop working knowledge of the gallery and museum world.

Students are encouraged to link their study of art with other disciplines and have the opportunity to create work that expresses their personal backgrounds and interests. The 36 credits required of an art media major allows them the possibility to double major in English, History, Liberal Studies, Political Science, Math or Psychology, along with the proposed co-major in Documentary Studies.

Students can also take (3 credit) internships in art and/or communications organizations as part of their course of study. Faculty will work with interested students to facilitate this option.

Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements
  Credits

CAS Core Curriculum

42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses 30
ART 104 - Painting I 3
ART 118 - Drawing/Design Fundamentals 3
ART 113 - Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 232 - Graphic Design for the Working World 3
ART 200 - Advanced Drawing 3
ART 395 - Studio Concentration Serminar 3
ART 495 - Exhibition Concentration Seminar 3
ARH 222 - Contemporary Currents 3
CMM 302 - Fundamentals of Web Design 3
And one of the following:  
ARH 210 - Art History Survey I or
ARH 211 - Art History Survey II or
ARH 270 - Art in the Modern World
3
ART/CMM Electives
See elective options below
6
   
Electives Options I (choose one)  
ART 101 - Watercolor 3
ART 102 - Photography 3
ART 110 - Ceramics 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 199 - Topics Course (any media) 3
   
Electives Options II (choose one)  
ART 214 - Color Digital Photography 3
ART 230 - Graphic Design 3

ART 234 - Animation with Adobe Flash

3
ART 299 - Topics Course (any media) 3
ART 401 - Arts Internship 3
CMM 311 - Digital Video and Audio Production 3
CMM 300 - Photo and Video Documentation 3
CMM 430 - Internship in Communication 3
Program Minimum Required Credits 36
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Suggested Progression for Art and Media Majors

Learning Outcomes
  1. The program will stress the student’s acquisition of skills that represent appropriate professional practices as well as a clear understanding of how to evaluate their own work for accuracy, expression and clarity. Among these skills students will develop experience in and knowledge of:
    • Creative and compositional methods across media.
    • The creative process starting from initial sketches and outlines to the finished work. Problem solving is intrinsic to this process.
    • The development of their personal voice through intensive study in the senior capstone year.The link between concept and media.
    • Art history with an emphasis on contemporary practice in Western and Non-Western worlds.
    • Critical thinking and aesthetic assessment both verbal and written.
  2. Courses in the creative arts introduce understanding of materials, processes and their application. The program will provide students with hands on experience with the tools and latest technologies used in the arts professions in which they will work.
    • They will study and learn to:
      • Appreciate, understand and utilize methods of craftsmanship in a variety of media.
      • Develop their knowledge and abilities in graphic and web design, commercially viable skills with broad applicability.
      • Develop working knowledge of the gallery and museum world.
  3. Students will be encouraged to link their study of art with other disciplines and have the opportunity to create work that expresses their personal backgrounds and interests. The number of credits required of an art media major will allow them the possibility to double major in English, History, Liberal Studies, Political Science, Math, Psychology, along with the proposed Co-Major in Documentary Studies.
    • Students can also take internships in art and/or communications organizations as part of their course of study. Faculty will work with interested students to facilitate this option.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

 

Stephen Burt (Chair, Arts and Communications Department)
sburt@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major Art and Design Media

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Arts and Communications

Athletic Training

Mission

The mission of the Athletic Training Education Program at the University of New England is to provide a comprehensive curriculum designed for individuals who want to enhance the quality of health care for active persons and to advance the profession of athletic training through education and research in the prevention, evaluation, management, and rehabilitation of injuries.

Major Description

This degree program is designed for students who want to work to improve individual and team wellness and health. The curriculum in this program combines the study of anatomy and other health-related sciences with the art of preventing, managing, and rehabilitating athletic and orthopaedic injuries. Students are provided with a thorough understanding of the effects of sport and sport-related injuries on the individual performer through a series of classroom (didactic) and field (clinical) experiences both on- and off-campus.

Accreditation

The UNE Athletic Training Program is an undergraduate program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

Admissions

Admission to the Pre-Professional Phase of the program follows the general undergraduate admissions criteria.  See Undergraduate Admissions for details concerning these requirements.

The following criteria must be met for a student to be eligible for admission into the pre-professional phase of the athletic training education program:

  1. A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including: chemistry (must include laboratory); biology (must include laboratory); mathematics (two mathematics courses - algebra required, geometry preferred); English (three years required - four years preferred).
  2. Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses.
  3. Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) scores must be submitted.
  4. A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding applicant's complete physical exam.
  5. Complete the Common Application.

The Athletic Training Program employs a competitive secondary admissions process at the end of the fall semester in the second year (pre-professional phase).   Athletic training accreditation standards mandate that admission to the professional phase of the program be criteria-based. Therefore, meeting the coursework requirements does not guarantee a student admission into the professional phase of the program. The number of students admitted to the professional phase of the program on an annual basis is dictated by the number of available field experience sites and may vary slightly from year to year.  Please contact the program director for additional information

The following criteria must be met for a student to be eligible for admission into the professional phase of the athletic training program (ATEP):

  1. Minimum cumulative UNE GPA of 2.5.
  2. Minimum academic standing of first -semester sophomore.
  3. Completion of BIO 208 and BIO 209 with a grade of C or better in each course.
  4. Completion of a minimum of 40 observational  hours under the supervision of a Certified Athletic Trainer in a traditional setting (i.e., high school or college).
  5. Successful completion of yearly OSHA-required bloodborne pathogens safety training.
  6. Regular attendance at ATEP meetings and presentations.
  7. Completion of the Professional Phase Application and formal interview with program faculty .
  8. Proof of full compliance with Westbrook College of Health Professions' Immunization Requirements.
  9. Proof of full compliance with the ATEP Technical Standards.
  10. Proof of current certification in Emergency Cardiac Care* that includes a minimum of the following:
    • Adult & Pediatric CPR
    • AED
    • 2nd Rescuer CPR
    • Airways Obstruction
    • Barrier Devices (e.g., pocket mask, bag valve mask)
    • *Courses that meet the minimum requirement include, but are not limited to, American Heart Association ACLS, American Heart Association BLS Healthcare Provider, and American Red Cross CPR/AED for the professional rescuer.
  11. Proof of current certification in Basic First Aid** that includes aminimum of the following:
    • Burns & Wounds
    • Splinting & Bone/Joint Injuries
    • Sudden Illness
    • Shock
    • Controlling Bleeding
    • Head/Neck/Back Injuries
    • Heat/Cold Emergencies
      * Courses that meet the minimum requirement include, but are not limited to, American Red Cross First Aid Basics.
  12. All students transferring into the ATEP must meet all admissions requirements and complete the entire professional phase of the program.

See Undergraduate Admissions for details concerning first year admissions requirements.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Students will be retained within the Athletic Training Program providing the following criteria are maintained throughout the undergraduate experience:

  1. Minimum requirements for successful progression in years one and two as outlined in the UNE undergraduate Catalog must be met.
  2. Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in the following courses: MAT 120, CHE 110, BIO 104, BIO 208, BIO 209, IHS 220 BIO 309. Failure to achieve a "C" will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression. 
  3. Students may enroll in any course in the WCHP Common Curriculum a maximum of two times. The second time enrolled in a course, a student must achieve a minimum grade of "C". 
  4. Students enrolled in the Professional Phase of the ATEP must maintain a minimum cumulative semester GPA of 2.5.
  5. Students enrolled in the Professional Phase of the ATEP must maintain a minimum grade of "C" in each required course. Students may enroll in required courses in the Professional Phase a maximum of two times regardless of the final grade, including "W", "WP" or "WF".
Technical Standards

The Athletic Training Program at the University of New England is a rigorous and intense program that places specific requirements and demands on the students enrolled in the program. An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged in physical activity. The technical standards set forth by the Athletic Training Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for students admitted to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer, as well as meet the expectations of the program's accrediting agency (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education [CAATE]). The following abilities and expectations must be met by all students admitted to the Athletic Training Program.

Compliance with the program's technical standards does not guarantee a student's eligibility for the Board of Certification (BOC) entry-level certification examination.

Candidates for selection to the Athletic Training Program must demonstrate:

  1. The mental capacity to assimilate, analyze, synthesize, integrate concepts and problem solve to formulate assessment and therapeutic judgments and to be able to distinguish deviations from the norm.
  2. Sufficient postural and neuromuscular control, sensory function, and coordination to perform appropriate physical examinations using accepted techniques; and accurately, safely and efficiently use equipment and materials during the assessment and treatment of patients.
  3. The ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and colleagues, including individuals from different cultural and social backgrounds; this includes, but is not limited to, the ability to establish rapport with patients and communicate judgments and treatment information effectively. Students must be able to understand and speak the English language at a level consistent with competent professional practice.
  4. The ability to record the physical examination results and a treatment plan clearly and accurately.
  5. The capacity to maintain composure and continue to function well during periods of high stress.
  6. The perseverance, diligence and commitment to complete the athletic training education program as outlined and sequenced.
  7. Flexibility and the ability to adjust to changing situations and uncertainty in clinical situation.
  8. Affective skills and appropriate demeanor and rapport that relate to professional education and quality patient care.

Candidates for selection to the Athletic Training Program will be required to certify with the ATEP director that they have read, understand and meet these technical standards or that they believe that, with certain accommodations, they can meet the standards. Please see Disability Services for more information.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
First Year  28
BIO 104 - General Biology 4
BIO 208 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
ENG 110 - English Composition 4
IHS 110 - Introduction to Health Professions 2
IHS 120 - Health Care Issues 1
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
ATC 100 - Introduction to Athletic Training

1

One (1) Art Course (May be ART, ARH or MUS course) 

3
   
Second Year  32
ATC 202 - Fundamentals of Athletic Training 3
ATC 252/252L - Diagnosis of Athletic & Orthopaedic Injuries I w/ Lab 3
ATC 298 - AT Clinical Practicum I 3
ATC 333 - Gross Anatomy 3
BIO 209 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
IHS 210 - Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
MAT 180 - Precalculus 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
   
Third Year 33
ATC 352/352L - Diagnosis of Athletic & Orthopaedic Injuries II w/ Lab 3
ATC 398 - Athletic Training Clinical Practicum II 4
ATC 399 - Athletic Training Clinical Practicum III 4
ATC 420 - Research Methods 3
ATC 342/342L - Physical Agents in Athletic Health Care w/Lab 3
ATC 332/332L - Rehabilitation Techniques in Athletic Health Care w/Lab 3
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
EXS  320 - Exercise Physiology w/lab 3
EXS 310 - Kinesiology & Biomechanics w/ Lab 3
PHY 110 - General Physics I w/ Lab 4
   
Fourth Year 31
ATC 306 - Psychology of Sport & Exercise 3
ATC 354 - Pharmacology in Athletic Health Care 2
ATC 452 - General Medical Conditions in Athletic Health Care 2
ATC 482 - Administration of Athletic Training Programs 2
ATC 495 - Seminar in Athletic Training 1
ATC 498 - Athletic Traning Clinical Practicum IV 5
ATC 499 - Athletic Training Clinical Practicum V 4
IHS 220 - Nutrition 3
EXS 340 - Concepts of Strength & Conditioning 3

One (1) Social Global Awareness (SGA) Course

3
One (1) Advanced Studies (ADV) Course 3
   
Minimum required total credits 124
 
Learning Outcomes

Every graduate from the UNE Athletic Training Program will be able to:

  1. Successfully challenge the athletic training entry-level Board of Certification (BOC) examination;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of and clinical proficiency in all five domains of athletic training: 1) injury/illness prevention and wellness protection, 2) clinical evaluation and diagnosis, 3) immediate and emergency care, 4) treatment and rehabilitation, and 5) organizational and professional health and well-being;  
  3. Articulate the importance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of high-quality athletic health care;
  4. Communicate effectively with peers and the general public about athletic training as a career and a discipline;
  5. Provide evidence-based, clinically-relevant care to athletes and the physically active; and
  6. Examine athletic training practice utilizing ethical, legal, and regulatory decision-making frameworks in accordance with the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Code of Ethics. 
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Wayne Lamarre
wlamarre@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Athletic Training

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Exercise and Sport Performance

Biochemistry

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science, and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. To understand living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, chemistry/secondary education, biochemistry and laboratory science, and a minor in chemistry, the department fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics.  Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in biochemistry, with its balanced curriculum, assures that each student will achieve a substantial foundation in the other major chemical subdisciplines, including analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical chemistry. This major is a good choice for students who are especially interested in studying the applications of chemistry in biological systems. With appropriate choice of courses, graduates will be prepared for entry into graduate programs in chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and many other fields that rely on chemistry as a fundamental science. Students wishing to enter the job market immediately after completion of their degree program have available to them a wide range of career opportunities in both the public and private sectors. Graduates will be especially well-prepared for entry-level positions in the rapidly growing biotechnology industry.

Admissions

Preferred conditions for entry into the biochemistry major are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry and physics. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in biochemistry, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
BIO 105 - Biology I (included in core requirements) 4
BIO 106 - Biology II 4
BIO 200 - Genetics or BIO 207 Organismal Genetics 5-4
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 327 - Applied Physical Chemistry* 3
CHE 350 - Biochemistry I: Proteins 5
CHE 351 - Biochemistry II: Metabolism and Bioenergetics 3
CHE 401 - Chemistry Seminar 1
MAT 190 - Calculus I (included in core requirements) 4
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
PHY 210 - University Physics I** 4
PHY 211 - University Physics II** 4
* May substitute CHE  371 for CHE 327  
** PHY 110 may be substituted for PHY 210 at advisor discretion  
**  PHY 111 may be substituted for PHY 211 at advisor discretion  
Minimum Program Required Credits  58-59
  Credits
Flexible Program Required Courses
Select a minimum of three courses below for a total of 9 credits, no more than 3 credits of which may be CHE 410 and CHE 411.  At least one course from CHE 309, CHE 375.  Consult with your academic advisor for approval of advanced CHE courses not listed below.
 
CHE 280 - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3

CHE 309 - Introduction to Instrumental Analysis

4

CHE 320 - Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 3
CHE 380 - Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 375 - Advanced Laboratory 2
CHE 401 - Chemistry Seminar 1
CHE 405 - Medicinal Chemistry 3
CHE 410 - Research I 1-4
CHE 411 - Research II 1-4

CHE 420- Spectro Method Struct Analysis

3
Minimum Flexible Required Credits 9
Minimum Program Credits  67-68
   
Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120
Learning Outcomes
  • Students will be able to describe and apply advanced biochemical information and concepts.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe and ethical laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate biochemical information in both oral and written forms.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Stephen Fox
sfox4@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Biochemistry

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Chemistry and Physics

Biological Sciences

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history – at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age – students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems, and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies. Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty. Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them. In addition, the biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience and experiential learning. The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog. Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

Biological Sciences major provides a broad background for students interested in biology. The program is flexible, thereby permitting the student latitude in the area of emphasis. A goal of the major is to provide students with the necessary background for entry-level career positions and graduate study. The major is particularly suited to students interested in the overall field of biology but not wishing to specialize in one of the other majors. It prepares students for advanced study in a variety of graduate programs.

The department offers Biological Sciences majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7 - 12) in the area of life science.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admisssions also.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Biology Core Program Required Courses 20-25
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (included in core requirements) 4
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 200 - Genetics or BIO 207 Organismal Genetics 4-5
BIO 400 or higher level elective (not satisfied by Internship/Research) 3-4
Topic Areas- (to be selected in consultation with advisor) See below.  
Physiology topic area 3-4
Ecology topic area 3-4
Organismal topic area 3-4
  Credits
Biology Program Required Science and Mathematics Courses 31-32
Chemistry   
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II or 5
CHE 310 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry 4
   
Mathematics  
MAT 150-Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I 4
   
Physics   
PHY 110 - Physics I and 4
PHY 111 - Physics II 4
Or  
PHY 210 - University Physics I and 4
PHY 211 - University Physics II 4
 
Open Elective Courses  (as needed to reach 120 credits) 17 - 26
Minimum Required Total Credits  120
Curricular Area Requirements Credits
Ecology Area  
BIO 333 - Evolution 3
BIO 350 - Ecology 4
   
Organismal Biology Area  
BIO 204 - Parasitology 4
BIO 208/209 - Introductory Anatomy and Physiology 4
BIO 223 - Health, Nutrition and Feeding Cultured Organisms 4
BIO 232 - Microbiology or BIO 234 Environmental Microbiology 4
BIO 245 - BIO 345 - Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology 4-5
MAR 252 - Natural History of Marine Mammals 3
MAR 310 - Phycology 4
BIO 319 - Ornithology 4
MAR 320 - Invertebrate Zoology 4
BIO 323 - Principles of Aquarium Operations and Science 4
BIO 330 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4
MAR 331 - Biology of Fishes 4
MAR 355 - Biology of Marine Mammals 4
MAR 375 - Biology of Sharks, Skates and Rays 4
   
Physiology (Cellular Biology) Area  
BIO 203 - Histology 4
BIO 208 - BIO 209 - Introductory Anatomy and Physiology 4
BIO 245 - BIO 345 - Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology 4-5
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 365 - Immunology 3
BIO 370 - Cell/Molecular Biology 3
BIO 404 - Neuroscience 4

Additional Guidelines

No BIO 100 level courses or Genetics (BIO 200) fulfills any of the Biology Area requirement courses.

BIO 230, BIO 290, BIO 415 or BIO 450/451, may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on subject matter and advisor permission.

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers Biological Sciences majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7 - 12) in the area of life science. While providing a solid foundation in the biological sciences, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Ed Psych & Classroom Mgmt 3
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 437 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3-4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester)
1
Education Minimum Required Total Credits  40 - 41

See Education Department for more details.

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

A.  Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas.

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life - including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, reproduction.
  • Organismal Diversity - including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
  • Interrelations of Organisms and their environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.

B.  Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:

  • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
  • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
  • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).

C. Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:

  • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
  • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
  • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.
Minor

A biology minor requires 6 biology courses, including the introductory biology series.  In particular, department of biology majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Minor Required Courses
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
Or
BIO 104 - General Biology and one of:

(BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
BIO 150 - Intro to Oceanography)
And
One Organismal Biology Area course
One Ecology Area course
One Physiology (Cellular Biology) Area course
One additional Biology course
Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology.

Dr. Stine Brown
sbrown@une.edu
or
Dr. Jeri Fox
jfox@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Biological Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Biology

Biophysics

Minor Description

A student may minor in Biophysics with permission of the chair of the Department of Chemistry and Physics.  

 

 

 

Curricular Requirements

The Biophysics minor requires eighteen hours of coursework as specified below.

 

Biophysics Minor:  Required Courses

Credits

18

PHY

210*

University Physics I

4

PHY

211*

University Physics II

4

PHY

305

Revolutions of 20th Century Physics

3

PHY

310

Biophysics: Structure & Motion

3

PHY

311

Microscopic Biophysics

4

 

     

Optional courses**

 

PHY

306

Math Methods of Modern Physics

1

MAR

368

Adv Oceanography II: Phy/Che

3

CHE

370

Physical Chemistry I

4

       

*

PHY 110/111 accepted with permission

 

**

With permission, optional courses can be substituted for one

 

required course.  Will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 
Learning Outcomes
  • Students will be able to describe basic physical, biophysical, and biomechanics concepts

 

  • Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of physical processes/instrumentation used to investigate biophysical and biomechanical phenomena

 

  • Students will be able to clearly communicate scientific information in both oral and written forms

 

  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings
Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Stephen Fox

sfox4@une.edu

Minor in Biophysics

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Chemistry and Physics

Business Adminstration

Mission

The mission of the Department of Business is to provide experienced, skilled and supportive faculty who offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in and face the challenges of an ever-changing world. More specifically, the department strives:

  • to prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in business, not-for-profit organizations and society in general;
  • to develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems;
  • to prepare students to speak and present in front of various audiences in an articulate and compelling manner;
  • to help students achieve their personal and career goals; and
  • to prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level.
Major Description

The Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration is designed to work together with the University's liberal arts core curriculum to achieve the following  goals:

  • to facilitate students' acquisition of  basic business knowledge in the functional areas of business including, but not limited to, accounting, business law, economics, finance, management, and marketing;
  • to facilitate students' acquisition of technical skills and competencies in  quantitative techniques;
  • to provide students with the opportuinty to focus their business studies by selecting  one of six concentrations: Management, Marketing, Economics, International Business, Sustainable Entrepreneurship or Health Sector Management.
  • to provide experiential opportunities, including at least one credit-bearing internship, to hone students' skills and facilitate their career exploration and professional job search;
  • to facilitate students' ability to integrate their knowledge of the functional areas of business with their technical skills and competencies and their professional experiences and to apply that knowledge and those skills.
Accreditation

All degree programs offered by the Department of Business are accredited by The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).  The Business Administration Degree Program in the Department of Business  is additionally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards
  1. Business majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all Business Core required courses and all business elective courses.
  2. Business minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all four required courses and the two business elective courses.
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements (Includes MAT 120) 42
  Credits
Program Required Courses 45
BUAC 201 - Financial Accounting 3
BUAC 203 - Managerial Accounting 3
BUEC 203 - Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 - Microeconomics 3
BUFI 315  - Business Finance Concepts &  Skills 3
BUMG 200 - Management 3
BUMG 302 - Human Resource Management 3
BUMG 311 - Business and Society Relations 3
BUMG 325 - Legal Environment of Business 3
BUMG 335 - International Management 3
BUMG 495A - Internship in Business Administration 3
BUMG 498 - Strategic Management 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMK 312 - Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management 3
MAT 110 - Quantitative Reasoning 3
  Credits
Business Elective Required Courses 15
Choose FIVE of the following courses*  
BUEC 370 - Money Credit and Banking  3
BUEC 380 - Economic Development of the United States 3
BUEC 385 - Health Economics 3
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics 3
BUEC 399 - Economics Topics  3
BUFI 322 - Investments 3
BUMG 301 - Organizational Behavior 3
BUMG 328 - Employment Law 3
BUMG 360 - Leadership 3
BUMG 400 - Management Seminar 3
BUMG 495B - Internship in Business Administration 3
BUMK 301 - Services Management 3
BUMK 310 - Advertising 3
 BUMK 335 - Global Marketing 3
BUMK 405 - Sales Management 3
*One BUEC, and one BUMG and one BUMK required as business electives for General Business concentration  
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)  
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

 

Learning Outcomes

Department of Business Administration Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing in application of concepts and theories. 
  2. Demonstrate effective skills in written and oral communications using appropriate technologies.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to integrate the concepts of the core areas of business.
  4. Demonstrate awareness to the importance of the ethical requirements of business activities.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to conduct methodological, secondary research into business issues, which may relate to general business or to a specific business function, which requires familiarity with a range of data, research sources and appropriate methodologies.

Concentration Learning Outcomes

The Management Concentration covers the organizational, operational and sales aspects of management, as well as introduces non-profit management techniques.

Upon completing the concentration in Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an ability to apply general Management know-how in practical business situations.
  2. Develop an understanding of business that reflects the moral responsibility of management to all relevant stakeholders and the natural environment.
  3. Understand the nature and dynamics of social behavior relating to organizational performance in order to develop strategies to become effective in organizations.

The Marketing Concentration focuses on developing strategic and tactical marketing skills, including those used in both digital media and global environments.

Upon completing the concentration in Marketing, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of how marketing initiatives by business and not-for-profit organizations impact society and the economy.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the strategic and tactical use of the primary decision making areas of marketing used by organizations.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of traditional and digital channels of distribution.
  4. Understand the uses of traditional and digital promotional methods.
  5. Understand the strategic importance of global marketing and be able to develop tactics for an organization’s global marketing thrusts.

The Economics Concentration focuses on understanding the impact of the economy on individuals, society and global business development.

Upon completing the concentration in Economics, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of economic thought regarding the incentives.
  2. Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  3. Demonstrate the assumptions and limitations of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  4. Understand the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using the Keynesian model.
  5. Understand the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economy development with reference to theory and empirical data.

The International Business Concentration focuses on understanding the role that cultural differences, globalization and worldwide trends play in the global marketplace.  A semester abroad is required.

Upon completing the concentration in International Business, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate detailed familiarity with the impact of the global economy on US businesses and organizations, utilizing appropriate terminology and concepts.
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of cultural differences in the conduct of business and/or daily life within major global markets during a study abroad experience.
  3. Demonstrate global awareness through an understanding of international business concepts and trends and an ability to internationalize domestically developed business methods and practices.

The Sustainable Entrepreneurship Concentration focuses on applying the concepts of sustainability to the creation of a new venture with triple bottom line responsibility and ecological value.

Upon completing the concentration in the Sustainable Entrepreneurship, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding and the application of the concepts of sustainability and sustainable entrepreneurship and distinguish sustainable entrepreneurship from traditional economic entrepreneurship as well as from social entrepreneurship.
  2. Evaluate and articulate the rewards and risks of undertaking sustainable entrepreneurship by measuring the economic, social and environmental risks and rewards (triple bottom line) of a new venture and measuring and comparing the short-term economic risks and returns of the venture with the long-term expected benefits.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the ecological problems facing local and global communities as well as the ability to recognize business opportunities for entrepreneurs that arise as a result of the trend of identifying and resolving those ecological problems; Undertake this demonstration by applying those skills necessary to investigate and evaluate all the various aspects of the business and policy environment that have an impact on sustainable entrepreneurship decisions, including an evaluation of corporate behavior in the context of sustainability.

The Health Sector Management Concentration focuses on understanding how U.S. healthcare policy and systems impact business in the health sector.

Upon completing the concentration in Health Sector Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to integrate core general management skills with sophisticated understanding of the institutions of the US health care sector.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of US health care economy and markets and those factors that significantly influence decision-making both at the policy level and at the level of the organization.
  3. Utilize the terminology and concepts of health sector systems such as governmental programs, managed care, and information management to recognize and explain the importance of cost, access and quality to providers, payers and vendors.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the legal systems and processes impacting healthcare, including governmental regulation, tort litigation and reform, non-discrimination and privacy legislation and access/equity of care movements in both the federal and state governments.
Concentrations

Management

Marketing

Economics

International Business

Sustainable Entrepreneurship

Health Sector Management

Minor(s)

Minor in Business Administration

A student with a major in another department may, with the permission of the Business and Communications Department Chair, minor in Business Administration.

  Credits
Required Courses  
BUAC 201 - Financial Accounting 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMG 200 - Management 3
BUEC 204 - Microeconomics 3
Business Electives 6
Total Credits  18

Minor in Economics

A student with a major in another department may, with the permission of the Business and Communications Department Chair, minor in Economics.

  Credits
Required Courses  
BUEC 203 - Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 - Microeconomics  3
BUEC 380 - Economic Development of the U.S. 3
BUEC 385 - Health Economics 3
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics 3
Total Credits  18
 
Economics Minor Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop an understanding of economic thought regarding the incentives faced by individuals and how incentives resolve in real world situations.
  2. Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  3. Demonstrate the assumptions and limitations of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  4. Understand the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using the Keynesian model.
  5. Understand the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economy development with reference to theory and empirical data.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Beth C. Richardson, JD, Chair

(207) 602-2557

brichardson@une.edu

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Business

Chemistry

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science, and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. To understand living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, chemistry/secondary education, biochemistry and laboratory science, and a minor in chemistry, the department fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics. Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry stresses the important fundamental aspects of the discipline, including analytical chemistry, biochemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical chemistry. Classroom work in each of these essential areas is complemented with laboratory exercises designed to illustrate important chemical principles and provide students with hands-on experience in the important classical and instrumental techniques of chemistry. While the chemistry core courses provide both depth and breadth in the basic areas of chemistry, students also have the opportunity to study selected areas of modern chemistry more intensively in advanced elective courses and in undergraduate research. The department's courses stress the integration of theory and experiment, the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills, and the cultivation of oral and written communication skills. The department's faculty members are highly committed to undergraduate education in general and undergraduate research in particular. One of the strengths of the department's programs is the opportunity it provides for students to become involved in undergraduate research in collaboration with a faculty mentor.

The curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training. Students will be well prepared for entry into a variety of laboratory positions or for entry into graduate programs in many areas of science. Chemistry graduates typically are very well prepared for entry into professional programs such as medical, dental, or veterinary schools. The department is well equipped with modern laboratory instrumentation, available to students in laboratory courses and research projects.

Admissions

Preferred conditions for entry into the chemistry major are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry and physics. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in chemistry/secondary education, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Curricular Requirements

  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 280/280L - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 350 - Biochemistry I: Proteins 5
CHE 370 - Physical Chemistry I 4
CHE 371 - Physical Chemistry II 3
CHE 375 - Advanced Laboratory 2
CHE 401 Seminar 1
CHE 407 - Instrumental Methods of Analysis 5
MAT 190 - Calculus I (included in core requirements) 4
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
MAT 200 - Calculus III 4
PHY 210 - University Physics I 4
PHY 211 - University Physics II 4
   
 

Additional program courses (program electives) 

Minimum one course (3 cr) from the following:

 

 
CHE 320 - Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 3
CHE 380 - Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 405 - Medicinal Chemistry 3
CHE 410 - Research I 1 - 4
CHE 420 - Spectroscopic Methods of Structural Analysis 3
 Minimum Program Credits 65
Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120

Secondary Education Certification

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry program is modified for students who wish to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7-12) in the area of physical sciences. While providing a solid foundation in the important areas of chemistry, this curriculum includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education. The program provides a sufficiently strong chemistry base that graduates will be well-prepared for entry-level laboratory positions and also for entry into programs of advanced study.

  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 280/280L - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 310 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry* 4
CHE 327 - Applied Physical Chemistry** 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I (included in university core requirements) 4
PHY 110 - General Physics I*** 4
PHY 111 - General Physics II**** 4

*(CHE 350 + CHE 351) may be substituted for CHE 310
** (CHE 370 + CHE 371) may be substituted for CHE 327
*** PHY 210 may be substituted for PHY 110
**** PHY 211 may be substituted for PHY 111

 
   
 Flexible Required Program Courses
Select a minimum of two courses below, at east one of which must be a CHE course. Consult with your academic advisor for approval of advanced CHE courses not listed below.
 
CHE 309 - Introduction to Instrumental Analysis 4
CHE 351 - Biochemistry II: Bioenergetics and Metabolism 3
CHE 371 - Physical Chemistry II 3
CHE 405 - Medicinal Chemistry, or 3
CHE 420 - Spectroscopic Methods of Structural Analysis 3
ENV 230 - Environmental Geology 4
BIO 360 - Oceanography 4
Sub Total of Flexible Program Required Courses  6-8
Minimum Program Credits  47-49
   
Education Required Courses   
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of internship semester)
1
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 437 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 486- Secondary or Art Education Practicum 3-4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship or Seminar 15
   
Minimum Required Education Credits 40 - 41
Open electives credits (as needed to reach 129 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  129
 

 

Learning Outcomes
  • Students will be able to describe and apply advanced chemical information and concepts.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate chemical information in both oral and written forms.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.
Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in Chemistry with the permission of the Chemistry and Physics Department Chair.  Twenty-three hours of course work is required for the Minor in Chemistry as specified below. This minor indicates a significant level of accomplishment in the important foundation areas of Chemistry.

  Credits
Minor Required Courses 23
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5`

The chemistry course grade point average must be maintained at 2.00 (C) or better. Please note that there are no substitutions for the above requirements.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Stephen Fox
sfox4@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Chemistry and Physics

Communications

Mission

The mission of the Department of Arts and Communications is to provide competent, supportive faculty and to offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to cope with and thrive in an ever-changing world. More specifically, the department strives:

  • to prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in their chosen professions and society;
  • to develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems;
  • to help students achieve their personal and career goals; and
  • to prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level.
Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards
  1. Communication majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all Communications required courses and all additional required courses.
  2. Communication minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in the two required courses and the four elective courses.
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
(includes MAT 120)  
  Credits
Program Required Courses 36
CMM 110 - Introduction to Communication 3
CMM 210 - Understanding Media 3
CMM 211 - Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 220 - Communication Dynamics in the Org 3
CMM 300 - Photo and Video Documentation 3
CMM 305 - Principles of Public Relations 3
CMM 311 - Digital Video and Audio Production 3
CMM 320 - Intercultural Communictions 3
CMM 410 - Writing for Digital and New Media 3
CMM 411 - Communication Law and Regulation 3
CMM 416 - Communication and Global Organization 3
One of the Following   
CMM 420 - Senior Project 3
CMM 430 - Internship/ Study Abroad 3
Additional Required Courses 12
CMM 122 - Oral Communication 3
CMM 201 - Intro to Information Technology 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMK 310 - Advertising 3
Open Elective Courses 30
   
Minimum Total Required Credits 120
Learning Outcomes

The program goals of the Bachelor of Arts in communications are strongly focused on providing our students with the oral, written, technical and critical thinking skills that are necessary for them to function effectively in the professional and personal world. Learning outcomes for the degree relate to the teaching of communication skills and practices that extend across different communication contexts.  The learning outcomes listed here are built upon the core competencies that are inherent in each course required for the degree.

  1. Demonstrate oral communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Effectively speak in public settingsApply advance decision-making processes within groups
    • Negotiate and collaborate effectively
  2. Demonstrate written communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Write for specific purposes and situations
    • Write informatively, persuasively and clearly
  3. Use current technology related to the communication field effectively and ethically.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Use a range of applications software effectively
    • Use communication technology effectively and ethically in a professional setting
    • Understand the limitations of technology
  4. Competently employ digital media in professional settings as an effective communication tool. Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Have a working knowledge of media story structure
    • Create media content that communicates effectively using a variety of tools
    • Contribute to the production of media content by serving in different roles and working effectively in teams.
Minor

The Minor in Communications examines questions about society, business and communication practices with critical attention to the newest media and computer-related technologies. Students will explore communications theory and also learn how to communicate effectively using a full range of media channels including new media technology. Upon completion of the minor students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and evolution of communication and the role of societies and institutions in shaping communications;
  • Articulate and apply the theories and best practices for the use and presentation of images and digital information including audio and video;
  • Apply tools and technologies used in the communications professions.
  Credits
Required Courses  
COD 110 - Introduction to Communication 3
COD 210 - Understanding Media 3
   
Elective Courses  
Select two of the following communication theory courses:   
COD 220 - Communication Dynamics in the Organization 3
COD 305 - Principles of Public Relations 3
COD 320 - Intercultural Communication 3
COD 411 - Communication Law and Regulation 3
COD 416 - Communication and Global Organization 3
   
Select two of the following communication practice courses:  
CITM 201 - Intro to Information Technology 3
COD 300 - Photo and Video Documentation 3
COD 311 - Digital Audio and Video Production 3
COD 410 - Writing for Digital and New Media 3
Total Credits 18
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Stephen Burt, Chair
sburt@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts in Communications

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Arts and Communications

Dental Hygiene (Bachelor Degree)

Mission

The Department of Dental Hygiene  improves the oral health of individuals and communities by graduating students who value life-long learning along with the desire and motivation to achieve beyond the limits of self-expectation. Faculty support individuals in an academic environment that develops both intellectual curiosity and professional expertise.

Major Description

This dynamic 4-year program begins with the students becoming fully engaged during their first four semesters in the building of a foundation of knowledge in the sciences and liberal studies, while simultaneously being introduced to interrelated disciplines within the health professions. The students begin their academic experience on the Biddeford campus, which will provide them with the opportunity to enjoy full participation in clubs, seminars, sports and intercollegiate activities.

The last four semesters are delivered on the Portland campus where students are immersed in both the study of dental hygiene theory and professional clinical practice. Dental hygiene students will have the opportunity to engage in interprofessional educational experiences with students and faculty in undergraduate and graduate level health professions programs within the University setting. The dental hygiene baccalaureate program is designed to provide the student with expanded professional opportunities, therefore, skill development in the areas of critical thinking, ethical decision-making and leadership are enhanced.

Admissions

 Admissions Requirements

  1. A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including: chemistry (must include laboratory); biology (must include laboratory); mathematics (two mathematics courses - algebra required, geometry preferred); English (three years required - four years preferred).       
  2. Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses. College GPA will be considered only if applicant has completed at least 15 semester hours.        
  3. Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) scores must be submitted.        
  4. A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding applicant's complete physical exam.        
  5. Documentation of 20 hours of observation of a dental hygienist is required, prior to enrollment.
  6. Complete the Common Application

See University Undergraduate Admissions also.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of "C" is required in all BIO, CHE, MAT and DEN prefix courses, IHS 220 and professional electives.  A "C" or higher must be achieved in all prerequisites for these courses.

See Technical Standards.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
Core Requirements  
BIO 104/104L - General Biology 4
BIO 208/208L - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 209/209L- Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
BIO 242/242L - Applied Microbiology 4
CHE 130/130L - Principles of Chemistry 4
DEN 201 - Histology and Embryology 2
ENG 110 - English Composition 4
IHS 110 - Introduction to Health Care 2
IHS 120 - Health Care Issues 1
IHS 210 - Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
IHS 220 - Nutrition 3
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
SPC 100 - Effective Public Speaking 3
One (1) Creative Arts Course (with prefix ARH, ART or MUS) 3
One (1) Social Global Awareness (SGA) Course 3
One 276 or 278 Human Traditions Course with the following prefix:
ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC or REL
3
Total Core Requirements 65
  Credits
Department Required Courses  
DEN 303 - Dental Hygiene Theory I 2
DEN 304 - Dental Hygiene Theory II 2
DEN 310 - Dental Hygiene Clinic I 2
DEN 311 - Dental Hygiene Clinic II 3
DEN 322 - Radiology 2
DEN 322L - Radiology Lab 1
DEN 324 - Preservation of Tooth Structure 2.5
DEN 324L - Preservation of Tooth Structure Lab .5
DEN 332 - Community Health I 2
DEN 334 - Community Health II 2
DEN 338 - Medical Emergencies 1
DEN 341 - Oral Anatomy 2
DEN 342 - Head and Neck Anatomy 2
DEN 403 - Dental Hygiene Theory III 1
DEN 404 - Dental Hygiene Theory IV 1
DEN 410 - Dental Hygiene Clinic III 4
DEN 411 - Dental Hygiene Clinic IV 4
DEN 416 - Applying Evidence Based Research I 1
DEN 418 - Applying Evidence Based Research II 1
DEN 422 - Leadership 2
DEN 425 - Periodontology I 3
DEN 435 - Periodontology II 3
DEN 442 - Pharmacology 2
DEN 445 - Special Care I 2
DEN 446 - Special Care II 2
DEN 452 - Oral Pathology 3
DEN 456 - Pain Management 3
Electives 6-9
Total Dental Hygiene Curriculum  62-65
Total Required for Graduation  127-130
Learning Outcomes

The Department of Dental Hygiene offers students the opportunity to:

  1. Competently provide the public with dental hygiene care based on a sound foundation of scientific knowledge and effective decision-making.
  2. Provide individuals and groups with up-to-date dental hygiene care as an essential component of comprehensive, interprofessional health care. 
  3. Explore the complexities of ethical decision-making as it relates to professional situations.
  4. Gain access to dental hygiene licensure in the state of choice by successfully preparing students to complete the national and regional board examinations.
  5. Develop a commitment to life-long learning by continuing with educational plans following graduation.
  6. Demonstrate the knowledge necessary to assess, plan, implement and evaluate community-based oral health programs.
  7. Utilize appropriate communication methods to effectively provide patient care.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Bernice Mills, RDH, MS, BS 
bmills@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Dental Hygiene

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Dental Hygiene

Education (Teacher certification with Bachelor's degree)

Mission

The mission of the Department of Education is to develop - through research, service, and innovative teaching - reflective teachers and school leaders who are competent and caring lifelong learners. In addition to the mission statement, the Department of Education has four guiding principles that are used in development and delivery of all courses and programs. These principles are:

  • Rigorous mind
  • Compassionate heart
  • Competent demonstration
  • Reflective stance

"Rigorous mind" and "compassionate heart" are overlapping principles we want to build in our students. Tasks may require primarily one principle-describing a theory in leadership-yet many times an overlap occurs when one applies knowledge to the school setting-how can a theory in leadership be used to benefit the school environment and impact student learning? Hence, as these two principles "rigorous mind" and "compassionate heart" are played out, the essence of both is our commitment to requiring "competent demonstration" from our students whether they are aspiring to be teachers or school leaders or are presently teachers or school leaders pursuing an advanced degree. The fourth principle, "reflective stance," encompasses the first three principles, since it is critical that our students are continuously reflective in all aspects of their work. These four principles work with our mission statement to define our commitment to our students. Since programs in the Department of Education are aligned with state teacher certification standards, only individuals who demonstrate that they possess the knowledge, skills, professional attitude, and commitment to future students will be recommended by the institution for certification. The goal of the Department of Education and the University is to graduate teachers who reflect rigorous minds, compassionate hearts, competent demonstrations and reflective stances. That is, we seek students who are suitable to contribute to the teaching profession.

Major Description

The teacher certification programs described below are approved by the Maine State Board of Education as meeting the state standards for certification.

  1. Elementary Education Major with K-8 certification
    Students complete a four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor of science degree in elementary education and earn Maine certification to teach in grades K - 8. There is also an option to complete all of the courses in the program without participating in the internship. In this case, students complete a bachelor of science in Educational Studies without the K-8 certification.
  2. Secondary Certification (grades 7-12) is based upon a solid academic preparation within an academic major. Students complete a four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree in a content area. Maine state requirements mandate 24 credits in the major. Academic areas that lead to secondary certification are: biology (and associated life science majors), chemistry, English, environmental science, environmental studies, history, marine biology, mathematics and political science. Other majors, like psychology, can lead to partial fulfillment, and a consultation with a member of the EDU department can help direct students towards certification. The Education Department provides professional teacher preparation courses culminating in a semester of student teaching. Successful passing of the Professional Education Review Board leads to UNE recommending Maine state teacher certification. Areas of secondary certification are: English, life science, mathematics, physical science, and social studies.
  3. Art Education Major with K-12 Certification
    Students complete a four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor’s degree in art education (a major offered in collaboration with the Arts and Communications Department) and earn Maine certification to teach art, grades K-12. 

Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may complete a professional education core sequence to become eligible for state certification in grades K-8 or secondary certification (7-12). For more information see the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program in the Graduate Catalog.

Admissions

Candidates for all undergraduate education programs not already possessing a bachelor’s degree must meet the core requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the requirements for their major. Elementary certification requirements for the major rests solely within the Department of Education. Secondary certification students and art education students must meet two sets of major requirements involving their content major as well as the requirements for professional certification. Hence, undergraduates seeking secondary or K-12 art certification should consult first with their content advisor and next with their education advisor within the Department of Education. An additional application form must be filed for those seeking secondary or art education certification, since an applicant must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in their content teaching area and all courses counted in the content teaching field must be passed with a “B” or better. 

Each undergraduate student will be reviewed for admission to advanced standing when s/he has completed approximately 60 credit hours. Advanced standing is earned by achieving minimums of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in professional education courses with no course grade below a C; 3.0 in content area classes for those pursuing secondary or art education certification; and a 2.5 cumulative grade point average across all courses including the core curriculum and electives. Grade point averages will be calculated using only courses taken at UNE (the cumulative grade point average) and using transfer courses if accepted as a part of the professional program (the cumulative professional grade point average). Students who do not meet these grade-point average requirements must improve their grade-point average before continuing in education courses, or change their major to Education Studies. If a grade below C is attained in a professional education course, that course must be retaken until at least a C is received before additional education courses can be taken.

At the time of the 60-credit review, students must pass the Praxis I Pre-professional Skills Tests (PPST) or the Praxis I Computer-Based Test (CBT) using the state of Maine minimum scores. Undergraduate transfer students who bring in more than 60 transfer credits have up to one year to pass Praxis I or before the internship application deadline, whichever comes first. If Praxis I is not passed at the time of these deadlines, no further certification courses may be taken and if a student is at the point of internship, the application will not be accepted which automatically restricts the student from participating in the internship the following semester. Students must provide evidence of State of Maine Educational Technician II as part of the 60-credit review.

All students must show evidence of passing Praxis II before the internship application deadline.

Students may obtain PPST registration information and Praxis II registration information from the Department of Education office or from the Educational Testing Service website: www.ets.org.

In addition to these achievement requirements, students admitted to UNE's teacher education programs are assessed systematically for the purpose of determining their professionalism and suitability for teaching. Students complete self-assessment questionnaires in each professional education course and these are reviewed by faculty. If serious reservations arise in two or more of the assessments, a committee will convene to determine a student’s continuance in the program. Finally, students must pass the Professional Education Review Board (referenced later in this section of the catalog) at which competency in the Maine teaching standards must be shown.

All certification coursework including the internship should be completed within a five-year timeframe. A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of course work. Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised plan program in order to meet state certification regulations.

Curricular Requirements

 See University Undergraduate Admissions Requirements. 

Elementary Education K-8 Certification Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42
Professional Core Courses (*Indicates that the course requires a field experience)  
EDU 105 - The Culture of Schools* 3
EDU 133 - American Education* 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory & Design* 3
EDU 209 - Creative Arts in Learning* (fulfills Creative Arts requirement for the University Core) 3
EDU 217 - Literacy for Diverse Learners* 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom* 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 345 - Technology in Teaching and Learning: Elementary* 3
EDU 361 - Teaching Social Studies: K - 8* 3
EDU 367 - Teaching Science: K - 8* 3
EDU 373 -Teaching Mathematics: K - 8* 3
EDU 381 - Reading, Language Arts & Children's Lit: Early Elementary* 3
EDU 382 - Reading, Language Arts & Children's Lit: Adolescence* 3
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation* 3
EDU 485 - Elementary Practicum* 3 - 4
EDU 490 - Elementary Internship and Seminar* 15
Mathematics   
MAT 130 - Math for Elementary School Teachers 3
Electives**   
At least three credits must have an HIS prefix either in the CORE or in Free Elective section. Liberal Arts and Science courses are highly recommended as preparation for Praxis exam. Consult your academic advisor when selecting free electives.

**Program Standards-Accreditation: The Education Certification Programs are approved by the Maine Department of Education and meet documented state standards. Please note that state requirements can change over time, which can affect curriculum and test requirements for students. Please check with your education advisor to obtain any updates.

 
Minimum Required Total Credits  123

Bachelor's Degree in Educational Studies without Elementary Certification

A student in the elementary education program may elect to pursue a bachelor's degree in education without leading to certification. Students would major in Educational Studies and follow much of the Elementary curriculum with the exception of the pre-service teaching internship. Instead, students will substitute a 1 -15 credit field placement/internship in a setting outside of a K-12 school system (EDU 465). Generally, this placement is with a social service agency that focuses on children.

Secondary (7-12) or Art (K-12) Education Certification Credits
University Core Requirements 42
Major Subject Requirements 
See requirements for your major: ArtBiologyChemistryEnglishEnvironmental Science,Environmental StudiesHistoryMarine Sciences, MathematicsPolitical SciencePsychology
varies
Professional Core Courses (*Indicates that the course requires a field experience) 40-41
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools* 3
EDU 133/533 - American Education* 3
EDU 202/502 - Curriculum Theory & Design* 3
EDU 220/510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom* 3
EDU 330/549 - Educational Psych and Classroom Management* 3
EDU 430/530 - Education Assessment and Evaluation* 3
Select one appropriate methods course from the following list: 3
EDU 436/536 - Teaching Secondary English*   
EDU 437/537 - Teaching Secondary Science*   
EDU 438/538 - Teaching Secondary Social Studies*   
EDU 439/539 - Teaching Secondary Math*   
EDU 441/541 - Methods of Art Education*   

EDU 486- Secondary Practicum*

EDU 492 - Secondary Internship and Seminar* or
EDU 493- K-12 Internship and Seminar*

3-4

15

EDU 346 - Technology in Secondary Teaching
(Part of internship semester.)
1
   
Minimum Required Total Credits  121

Field Experience
The faculty in the Department of Education are committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific competency-based focus to meet the Maine standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in teacher preparation will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, the teaching of lessons, conducting of experiments, administration of assessments, etc.) Sophomore and Junior level students must participate in a minimum of 30 hours field study per semester. Transportation to and from schools is the responsibility of the student. 

Internship
Without specific permission from the Education Department Chair, courses may not be taken during the internship semester, so all required coursework must be completed the semester prior to the internship (Note: There is one exception for secondary and art certification students. EDU 346, a 1 credit module, is part of the internship semester). Admission to the internship is not guaranteed (see section on “Admission requirements and successful progression in the program”). In addition, the student should have:

  1. Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  2. Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  3. Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  4. Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  5. Understanding of and empathy for working with students.
  6. No serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument that is conducted in every course.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer. Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects both schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the Initial Certification standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Department of Education, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests.

The 15 week student teaching experience must be done in a local Maine Public School that is in an established internship protocol with the University of New England. Only in documented cases of hardship of a non-financial nature will courtesy internships and/or internships with a non-partnered school be considered. Documentation of the hardship must be presented at the time of the internship application. Decisions to grant are made on a case by case basis. The Department of Education reserves the right to deny requests for courtesy internship placement for reasons it deems appropriate or necessary.

The University, at its discretion, will not place students in internship settings (1) where an intern's children or relatives are enrolled, or (2) where a spouse or relative of an intern is currently employed.

Professional Educator Review Board (PERB)

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence with respect to Maine's Standards for Initial Certification before the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB). The Board is comprised of professional educators from area schools as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a portfolio reflecting their proficiency in meeting these state standards and present and defend the portfolio in front of the Board. Passing the PERB is a requirement for completion of the certification program and subsequently being recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

Learning Outcomes

Maine Department of Education Chapter 114

Standard One: Learner Development

The teacher understands how students learn and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

Standard Two: Learning Differences

The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that allow each learner to reach his/her full potential.

Standard Three:  Learning Environments

The teacher works with learners to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.

Standard Four:  Content Knowledge

The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners

Standard Five:  Innovative Applications of Content

The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical/creative thinking and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard Six:  Assessment

The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to document learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s on-going planning and instruction.

Standard Seven:  Planning for Instruction

The teacher draws upon knowledge of content areas, cross-disciplinary skills, learners, the community, and pedagogy to plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals.

Standard Eight:  Instructional Strategies

The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to access and appropriately apply information.

Standard Nine:  Reflection and Continuous Growth

The teacher is a reflective practitioner who uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students,  families,  and  other  professionals  in  the  learning  community),  and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Standard 10:  Collaboration 

The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Standard   11:   Technology Standards for Teachers -  (NETS.T)

Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for   Students   (NETS.S)   as   they   design,   implement,   and   assess   learning experiences  to  engage  students  and  improve  learning;  enrich  professional practice;   and   provide   positive   models   for   students,   colleagues,   and   the community. All teachers will meet the following standards and performance indicators. 

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Individuals who have full acceptance in the Teaching Certification Program can transfer up to, but no more than (6) education credits from other universities.

In-service or workshop-type courses that do not carry college credit will not be accepted for transfer equivalency.

No courses of any kind will be accepted from other institutions after your acceptance into the program at UNE without a course equivalency granted prior to the course’s being taken.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Douglas Lynch (Chair) 
dlynch@une.edu

Eligible for Teacher Certification in the State of Maine

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Education

Mission

The mission of the Department of Education is to develop - through research, service, and innovative teaching - reflective teachers and school leaders who are competent and caring lifelong learners. In addition to the mission statement, the Department of Education has four guiding principles that are used in development and delivery of all courses and programs.  These principles are:

  • Rigorous mind
  • Compassionate  heart
  • Competent demonstration
  • Reflective stance

"Rigorous mind" and "compassionate heart" are overlapping principles we want to build in our students. Tasks may require primarily one principle-describing a theory in leadership-yet many times an overlap occurs when one applies knowledge to the school setting-how can a theory in leadership be used to benefit the school environment and impact student learning? Hence, as these two principles "rigorous mind" and "compassionate heart" are played out, the essence of both is our commitment to requiring "competent demonstration" from our students whether they are aspiring to be teachers or school leaders or are presently teachers or school leaders pursuing an advanced degree. The fourth principle, "reflective stance," encompasses the first three principles, since it is critical that our students are continuously reflective in all aspects of their work. These four principles work with our mission statement to define our commitment to our students.  Since programs in the Department of Education are aligned with state teacher certification standards, only individuals who demonstrate that they possess the knowledge, skills, professional attitude, and commitment to future students will be recommended by the institution for certification. The goal of the Department of Education and the University is to graduate teachers who reflect rigorous minds, compassionate hearts, competent demonstrations and reflective stances.  That is, we seek students who are suitable to contribute to the teaching profession.

Minor Description

The Education Department minor meets the needs of the students who wish to consider an education role as a career as well as those who wish to work in a teaching role outside of K - 12 school settings.  Numerous institutions need teacher expertise to:  Train new workers, inform patients/clients of services provided by the institution, work with immigrant agencies, design curricular materials for government, environmental, or charitable agencies,  or work overseas in an educational capacity.  There are numerous alternative settings that use educational skills: health care, museums, environmental programs, social agencies and with children or teens in group homes, non-profit associations and human resource departments.  Specialized academic areas such as mathematics combined with computing skills may lead to a career in designing software utilizing educational principles.  An Education minor validates professional skills to qualify for such career opportunities.

Curricular Requirements

Eighteen credits are required for the Education Minor. The four 3-credit courses listed below are required. The additional six credits may be taken from any of the remaining education courses (with the exception of intern teaching).

  Credits
Program Required Courses 18
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU Electives 6
 
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Douglas Lynch (Chair)
dlynch@une.edu

Minor in Education

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

English

Mission

Through its avant-garde approach, interdisciplinary course offerings, innovative theoretical models, and accomplished instructors, the English major exposes students to a wide and diverse body of knowledge and provides them with the tools to think, analyze, and write with confidence.

Major Description

The Department of English introduces students to significant global literary works and trains them in the careful analysis of texts, ranging from traditional novels to film and emerging electronic communication. The English major doesn't limit itself to works originally written in English language but, relying on the art of translation, crosses national and language boundaries to include the entire global literary and textual experience. Through a variety of theoretical approaches, students will learn how to analyze the heavily textualized world around them and prepare themselves for numerous occupations in their professional careers.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
ENG 115 - British Literature I 3
ENG 116 - British Literature II 3
ENG 200 - Writing, Revolution, and Resistance in US Literature 3
ENG 201 - Cultural Diversity and Common Identity in US Literature 3
ENG 206 - Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism 3

ENG 334 - Methods in Literary and Cultural Criticism

3
Global Literacy elective 3
Interdisciplinary Literacy elective 3
Major Concentration Courses/English Electives 12
Program Minimum Required Total Credits 36
Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Total Required Credits  120

Note: the department encourages students to learn a foreign language and recognizes up to six credits of foreign-language study toward fulfilling the electives credit requirement for the major.

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers English majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle school or high school english teachers (grades 7-12). While providing a solid foundation in English, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester)
1
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 436 - Methods of Teaching Secondary English/Language Arts 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
   
Education Total Number of Credits 40 - 41
Learning Outcomes

English majors will be able to…

Read texts closely and think critically 

  • Comprehend a text’s literal/factual content
  • Distinguish between a passage's literal/factual content and its figurative/symbolic/interpretive content
  • Analyze a text closely and identify rhetorical strategies therein
  • Connect a passage's formal structure and thematic content with the text as a whole
  • Extrapolate the larger implications (social, philosophical, ethical, argumentative) of these patterns

Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of literatures in English

  • Demonstrate familiarity with specified content areas in literature, literary history, theory, and criticism
  • Understand literature as a culturally and historically embedded practice 
  • Relate literature to other fields of inquiry

Communicate effectively

  • Approach writing as a recursive process
  • Develop and support claims about literary texts
  • Articulate claims in conceptually coherent essays
  • Use conventions of standard written English
  • Present research findings orally within the conventions of the discipline

Conduct research in literary and cultural studies

  • Use bibliographic tools to find source material
  • Employ appropriate critical approaches in their research
  • Contribute to scholarly conversations about literary and cultural texts and phenomena
  • Incorporate and document source material using MLA style
  • Communicate in accordance with standards of academic integrity
Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in English with the permission of the English Department Chair. Eighteen hours of approved course work is required for the Minor in English.

Note: the department encourages students to take advantage of all courses that it administers and recognizes ENG 110 English Composition and SPC 100 Effective Public Speaking as electives toward fulfilling the credit requirement for the minor.

  Credits
Program Required Courses 18
ENG 334 - Methods in Literary and Cultural Criticism 3
Course(s) approved by English Department Chair 15
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Susan McHugh, Ph.D., Department Chair
smchugh@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in English

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of English

Environmental Science

Mission

The Department of Environmental Studies strives to increase awareness and appreciation of human connections with the rest of nature, and to stimulate advocacy for sustainable behaviors. The curriculum stresses sound interdisciplinary understanding of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities disciplines in order to explore past, present, and potential ways of living on the earth. We are concerned with environmental issues at local, regional, national, and global levels, and we especially desire to help individuals and communities practice sustainable living by means of our research, teaching and service. Faculty and students collaborate in active and critical learning through community discourse, personal inquiry, and experiential learning. We intend that our students develop a personal aesthetic awareness of the earth, and that they engage in the inquiry, discovery, critical thinking, and debate that characterize the study of environmental issues.

Major Description

The department offers majors in environmental science and environmental studies. Both build upon a sound foundation in basic science, and both provide broad explorations of human interaction with the environment.

During the first two years, course requirements are nearly identical. The difference between the two majors emerges during the final two years in course selection: environmental science emphasizes scientific aspects of environmental questions, while environmental studies emphasizes humanistic, social, and political aspects.

During the first year both majors take courses in Environmental Issues, Biology, Literature, Nature & the Environment(or appropriate substitute), and Economics in Context (or appropriate substitute). This two-semester program, called the Green Learning Community (GLC), provides an interdisciplinary framework to explore fundamental themes of environmental studies. Moreover, it develops academic, social, and affective skills necessary for successful college learning and collaborative professional work.

During the second year DES students look more deeply into the nature of environmental issues by taking courses in Population, Conservation and Preservation, and Environmental Policy.  In addition, the Conservation Field Lab teaches conservation field skills as well as data analysis and environmental communication arts. In the Environmental Sustainability Lab, students apply classroom learning as they propose, research, and bring about a sustainability project on the campus or the larger community. These interdisciplinary environmental issues courses ensure a broad understanding while preparing students for more advanced study.

In their third year, students in both majors take BIO 350 Ecology. In their third and fourth years, aided by a faculty advisor, students choose advanced courses according to their interests and career plans. Environmental science majors choose science electives in environmental science or in biology, chemistry, physics, marine biology, and psychology.  Environmental studies majors in the third and fourth years choose advanced courses from the following distribution groups: Conservation, Preservation, and Restoration; Environmental Policy; Arts, Humanities, and Values; Global Ecology and Social Justice.

In both majors, the advanced courses not only stress deeper understanding, but also involve problem solving. Some courses examine the ways that human attitudes affect our environment, while other courses deal with hands-on tasks such as designing a conservation area, restoring a natural ecosystem, or considering technologies to reduce pollution. In order to ensure an intense direct experience of the natural world, the department offers a variety of field study courses. The curriculum culminates with the Senior Capstone in Sustainability in which students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to an in-depth study of the concept.

Philosophy

Because the study of environmental issues requires knowledge from a wide range of subjects, the department maintains a firm commitment to interdisciplinary education in our curriculum. Core courses in the department utilize knowledge and concepts drawn from the basic sciences as well as from the humanities and social sciences. Upper-division courses investigate environmental questions through disciplines such as literature, anthropology, economics, biology, history, political science, chemistry, physics, and ecology. Through all four years, our curriculum develops the skills necessary for dealing with environmental problems: writing, speaking, critical thinking, computing, research techniques, and media arts. The Environmental Studies Program prepares students to become informed citizens, competent professionals, and lifelong learners.

The Green Learning Community

As mentioned above, all entering first-year environmental students participate in a year-long learning community focused on the fundamental themes of environmental studies. The Green Learning Community includes courses as follows: 8 credits of biology, 3 credits of literature (or an appropriate substitute), 3 credits of economics and 3 credits of environmental issues for a total of 17 credits over two semesters. This interdisciplinary approach enables students to understand more clearly the complexity of environmental issues and at the same time improve skills in critical thinking, writing, oral communication, research, and use of computers. Experiential learning activities are central.

Center for Sustainable Communities

The Center for Sustainable Communities (CSC) is an internship and service-learning program that creates mutually beneficial partnerships between students and environmental organizations in the communities surrounding the Biddeford and Portland campuses. Through hands-on involvement with local governments, non-profit organizations, and community groups, students are able to field test academic learning in situations that make tangible the challenge to "think globally, act locally." The most significant partner organization is the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve. Its mission, research and education about coastal environments, attracts DES faculty researchers as well as student interns.

Internships and Careers

Internships provide students with an opportunity to practice learned skills in an actual work environment with the guidance of a CAS internship coordinator, who helps students match their interests with a work experience that might take place locally, regionally, nationally, or internationally. Internships provide career exploration, and can help establish professional networks that lead to career opportunities upon graduation. The interdisciplinary nature of environmental studies is reflected in the wide variety of careers open to graduates, such as air and water resource management, ecological restoration, education, habitat conservation, park management, toxicology, field research, journalism, environmental advocacy, environmental impact assessment, law and regulation, and environmental health. Our graduates enter both masters and doctoral programs in several of these fields.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards

All courses that fulfill a degree requirement must be completed with a grade of C- or higher. 

Curricular Requirements

Since 1991 the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences has defined environmental awareness as a major theme in the College's Core Curriculum, and asked the Department of Environmental Studies to deliver the course Introduction to Environmental Issues to all undergraduates regardless of major. The UNE College of Arts and Sciences is one of the few in the nation that requires formal instruction in environmental studies as a requirement for graduation.

  Credits
CAS Core Requirements (includes 13 credits required by major) 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses including Green Learning Community (First year) 17
ENV 100 & 101 - Introduction to Environmental Issues Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
BIO 105/105L - Biology I : Ecology/Evolution Fulfills University Core Requirement  4
BIO 106/106L - Biology II : Cellular/Molecular 4
LIT 121 & 122 - Literature, Nature and The Environment Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
BUEC 104 & 105 - Economics in Context Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
CHE 110/110L - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111/111L - General Chemistry II 4
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
   
Interdisciplinary Environmental Issues Courses (Second year)  17
ENV 200 - Population and the Environment Fulfills University Core Requirement 3
ENV 220 - Conservation and Preservation 3
ENV 220L - Conservation and Preservation Lab 2
ENV 240 - Environmental Sustainability Lab 2
ENV 250 - Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
BIO 350 - Ecology (Third year) 4
   
Upper-Division Science Electives  16
 After consulting with their academic advisors, ENV Science Majors will choose at least sixteen credit hours of upper-division science courses from the Department of Environmental Studies, and from the Departments of Biology, Marine Science, Chemistry/Physics and/or Psychology. (This group of courses should be taken during third and fourth years.)  
Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements** (Third and fourth year - See listing below)  6 - 8
Two courses chosen from different distribution groups in the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements  
Internship:  3-9*

*Up to 12 credits may be arranged with special permission from the department chair.

ENV 295 or 495

 
 
Senior Capstone in Environmental Studies  3
ENV 499  
   
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120
   

**Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements List 

 
   
Group One: Conservation, Preservation, Restoration

Credits

ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 312/312L Wetland Conservation and Ecology 4
ENV 313/313L Wetland Restoration: Science and Policy 4
ENV 315 Land Conservation Practicum 3

ENV 316/316L Land Conservation Practicum with Field Lab

4
ENV 317 Case Studies in Preserving Biodiversity and Protected Areas 3
ENV 318/318L Advanced Field Methods in Avian Ecology & Conservation 4
ENV 309 Sustainability & Ecological Restoration 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies (3 credits) 3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab (4 credits) 4
   
Group Two Environmental Policy and Management  
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 321 Environmental Communicaation: Expert Practices for Ecosystem Management 3
ENV 324 Environmental Economics 3
ENV 328 Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife & Human Health 3
ENV 357 Sustaining Water 3
ENV 372 Forest Landscape Ecology & Management 3
ENV 398 Topics in Environmental Studies  3
ENV 399 Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab  4
   
Group Three:  Arts, Humanities, and Values   
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 331 Women and the Environment 3
ENV 332 The Literature of Nature 3
ENV 333/333L The Nature Writers with Field Lab 4
ENV 334 Contemporary Nature Writing 3
ENV 334L Contemporary Nature Writing Lab 1
ENV 335 Environmental History of New England  3
ENV 336 Seminar on Edward Abbey 3
ENV 337 Outdoor Environmental Education 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies  3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab  4
   
Group Four: Global Ecology and Social Justice   
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 340 Environmental Movements and Social Change 3
ENV 341 Indigenous Ecology, Conservation Biology, and the Politics of Knowledge 3
ENV 344 Environmental Ethics 3
ENV 348/348L Environment, Health, and Community Development in East Africa

4

ENV 376 Caribbean Sustainable Development 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies  3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab  4

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers environmental sciences majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle school or high school teachers (grades 7-12) in the area of science. While providing a solid foundation in environmental studies and science, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

Education Courses Credits
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester)
1
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 437 - Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 486 Secondary Education Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
   
Education Minimum Required Total Credits 40-41

See Education for more details.

Learning Outcomes

All graduates will achieve the following learning outcomes: 
 
I.     Intellectual Flexibility - Students will possess the intellectual flexibility necessary to view environmental questions from multiple perspectives, prepared to alter their understanding as they learn new ways of understanding. 
II.    Problem Solving - Students will solve problems systematically, creatively, and reflexively, ready to assemble knowledge and formulate strategy. 
III.   Interdisciplinarity - When encountering environmental problems students will assess necessary scientific concepts and data, consider likely social dynamics, and establish integral cultural contexts. 
IV.   Research - When faced with questions that lie beyond their current knowledge base, students will actively research data, concepts, histories, and narratives necessary for adequate consideration of the issue. 
V.    Communication - Students will communicate with precision, effective art, and 
         sound rhetoric in writing, in speech, and in digital media. 
VI.   Values - Reflecting upon their internalized values system, students will continue to evolve an individual vision of harmonious and sustainable interaction among humans as well as between humans and the rest of the natural world. 
VII. Knowledge – Students will have mastered foundational knowledge enabling them to make sound life decisions as well as enter a career in an environmental profession or graduate school. 
 
To deal with environmental issues one must understand not only scientific concepts, but also the social interactions by which humans behave and the cultural values that underlay behaviors. Therefore, our Environmental Studies and Environmental Science programs lead to learning outcomes involving many different disciplines, or ways of knowing. We have organized our more detailed learning outcomes according to the three traditional academic categories: social sciences, natural sciences, and the humanities. 

A. Social Sciences 

  1. Students will be able to articulate the basic structure, functions, and processes of key social systems affecting the environment. 
  2. Students will be able to apply specific models of social system processes derived from various social science theories to explain environmental issues (including current and past conditions), and to propose future solutions to environmental problems 
  3. Students will be able to identify, interpret, and apply basic measures (metrics and formulae) of social system variables to assess socio-environmental conditions. 
  4. Students will be able to articulate basic understanding of various social science theories/frameworks and how they apply to environmental issues. 
  5. Students will be able to explain how various paradigms or worldviews and their implicit and explicit assumptions and values shape the viewer’s perception of environmental problems and solutions. 

B. Natural Sciences 

  1. Students will understand key concepts in the life and physical sciences, and will apply them to environmental issues. 
  2. Students will understand and apply the scientific process, as well as appreciate both the potential and limitations of the process. 
  3. Students will be able to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from the scientific literature. 
  4. Students will analyze data using appropriate statistical methods, and will be able to evaluate the use of statistics by others in a variety of contexts. 
  5. Students will apply knowledge of the sciences within an interdisciplinary context in solving environmental issues such as environmental health, food and agriculture, energy, waste and pollution, climate change, population, resource management, and loss of biodiversity. 
  6. Students will carry out an applied research project in the natural sciences. 
  7. Students will be able to communicate science effectively through written work and oral presentations to a variety of audiences. 
  8. Students will apply the tools commonly used in field research, particularly in the study of plants, animals and soils; and will find their way on the landscape using map, compass and GPS technology, and use spatial analysis software such as GIS, Google Earth and Google Maps. 

C. Humanities 

  1. Students will articulate historical epochs and concepts relevant to the evolution of environmental consciousness and policy.  
  2. Students will analyze and evaluate ideological and philosophical approaches used to understand environmental relationships. 
  3. Students will be aware of and able to analyze the potential of literature and fine arts to communicate assumptions of value about human relations with the biosphere. 
  4. Students will articulate a coherent philosophy of the environment, & consider ethical bases for responding to environmental questions. 

The 3rd and 4th year curriculum of the Environmental Studies/Science majors build on the core learning outcomes through a process of intensification, adding depth and sophistication to students’ learning of the concepts and skills specified above. For students majoring in Environmental Studies, the outcomes listed under “Social Sciences” and “Humanities” are emphasized, while the outcomes listed under “Natural Sciences” are emphasized for students majoring in Environmental Science. 

Double Major

It is possible for DES students to add a second major or minor in areas such as marine biology, medical biology, political science, history, sociology, and English. DES students interested in a double major should consult with their DES faculty advisor, who in turn will coordinate with an advisor from the second department.

Minors

Minor in Environmental Studies

A student with a major in another department may minor in Environmental Studies with the approval of the Environmental Studies Department Chair. A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

  Credits
ENV 100/101 or ENV 104 - Introduction to Environmental Issues 3
ENV 200 - Population and Environment 3
ENV 220 - Conservation and Preservation 3
ENV 250 - Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
Two courses chosen from the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements  

 

Minor in Geographic Information Systems

 A student with a major in another department may minor in Geographic Information Systems with the approval of the the Environmental Studies Department Chair. A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

  Credits
GIS 161 - GIS I: Fundamentals of Geospatial Science & Technology 3
GIS 162 - GIS II: Application of Geospatial Science & Technology 3
GIS 224/224L - Remote Sensing/Remote Sensing Lab 4
GIS 265 - Global Positioning Systems (optional) 2
GIS 364/364L - Spatial Analysis/Spatial Analysis Lab 3 - 4
GIS 495 - GIS Internship (variable credit) 3+
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Pamela Morgan (Chair)
pmorgan@une.edu

Dr. Richard Peterson (Assistant Chair)
rpeterson@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Environmental Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies

Mission

The Department of Environmental Studies strives to increase awareness and appreciation of human connections with the rest of nature, and to stimulate advocacy for sustainable behaviors. The curriculum stresses sound interdisciplinary understanding of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities disciplines in order to explore past, present, and potential ways of living on the earth. We are concerned with environmental issues at local, regional, national, and global levels, and we especially desire to help individuals and communities practice sustainable living by means of our research, teaching and service. Faculty and students collaborate in active and critical learning through community discourse, personal inquiry, and experiential learning. We intend that our students develop a personal aesthetic awareness of the earth, and that they engage in the inquiry, discovery, critical thinking, and debate that characterize the study of environmental issues.

Major Description

The department offers majors in environmental science and environmental studies. Both build upon a sound foundation in basic science, and both provide broad explorations of human interaction with the environment.

During the first two years, course requirements are nearly identical. The difference between the two majors emerges during the final two years in course selection: environmental science emphasizes scientific aspects of environmental questions, while environmental studies emphasizes humanistic, social, and political aspects.

During the first year, both majors take courses in Environmental Issues, Biology, Literature, Nature & the Environment (or appropriate substitute), and Economics in Context (or appropriate substitute). This two-semester program, called the Green Learning Community (GLC), provides an interdisciplinary framework to explore fundamental themes of environmental studies. Moreover, it develops academic, social and affective skills necessary for successful college learning and collaborative professional work.

During the second year DES students look more deeply into the nature of environmental issues by taking courses in Population, Conservation and Preservation, and Environmental Policy. In addition, the Conservation Field Lab teaches conservation field skills as well as data analysis and environmental communication arts. In the Environmental Sustainability Lab students apply classroom learning as they propose, research and bring about a sustainability project on the campus or the larger community. These interdisciplinary core environmental courses ensure a broad understanding while preparing students for more advanced study.

In their third year, students in both majors take BIO 350 - Ecology. In their third and fourth years, aided by a faculty advisor, students choose advanced courses according to their interests and career plans. Environmental science majors choose science electives in biology, chemistry, physics, marine biology, and psychology, as well as in environmental science. Environmental studies majors in the third and fourth years choose advanced courses from the following distribution groups: Conservation, Preservation and Restoration; Environmental Policy; Arts, Humanities, and Values; Global Ecology and Social Justice.

In both majors, the advanced courses not only stress deeper understanding, but also involve problem solving. Some courses examine the ways that human attitudes affect our environment, while other courses deal with hands-on tasks such as designing a conservation area, restoring a natural ecosystem, or considering technologies to reduce pollution. In order to ensure an intense direct experience of the natural world, the department offers a variety of field study courses. The curriculum culminates with the Senior Capstone in Sustainability in which students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to an in-depth study of the concept..

Philosophy

Because the study of environmental issues requires knowledge from a wide range of subjects, DES maintains a firm commitment to interdisciplinary education in our curriculum. DES Core courses utilize knowledge and concepts drawn from the basic sciences as well as from the humanities and social sciences. Upper-division DES courses investigate environmental questions through disciplines such as literature, anthropology, economics, biology, political science, chemistry, physics, and ecology. Through all four years, our curriculum develops the skills necessary for dealing with environmental problems: writing, speaking, critical thinking, computing, research techniques, and media arts. The Environmental Studies Program prepares students to become informed citizens, competent professionals, and lifelong learners.

The Green Learning Community

As mentioned above, all entering first-year environmental students participate in a year-long learning community focused on the fundamental themes of environmental studies. The Green Learning Community integrates courses as follows: 8 credits of biology, 3 credits of literature (or an appropriate substitute), 3 credits of economics and 3 credits of environmental issues for a total of 17 credits over two semesters. This interdisciplinary approach enables students to understand more clearly the complexity of environmental issues and at the same time improve skills in critical thinking, writing, oral communication, research, and use of computers. Experiential learning activities are central.

Center for Sustainable Communities

The Center for Sustainable Communities (CSC) is an internship and service-learning program that creates mutually beneficial partnerships between students and environmental organizations in the communities surrounding the Biddeford and Portland campuses. Through hands-on involvement with local governments, non-profit organizations, and community groups, students are able to field test academic learning in situations that make tangible the challenge to "think globally, act locally." The most significant partner organization is the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve. Its mission, research and education about coastal environments, attracts DES faculty researchers as well as student interns.

Internships and Careers

Internships provide students with an opportunity to practice learned skills in an actual work environment with the guidance of the CAS internship coordinator, who helps students match their interests with a work experience that might take place locally, regionally, nationally, or internationally. Internships provide career exploration, and can help establish professional networks that lead to career opportunities upon graduation. The interdisciplinary nature of environmental studies is reflected in the wide variety of careers open to graduates, such as air and water resource management, ecological restoration, education, habitat conservation, park management, toxicology, field research, journalism, environmental advocacy, environmental impact assessment, law and regulation, and environmental health. Our graduates enter both masters and doctoral programs in several of these fields.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

All courses that fulfill a degree requirement must be completed with a grade of C- or higher. 

Curricular Requirements

Since 1991 the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences has defined environmental awareness as a major theme in the College's Core Curriculum, and asked the Department of Environmental Studies to deliver the course Introduction to Environmental Issues to all undergraduates regardless of major. The UNE College of Arts and Sciences is one of the few in the nation that requires formal instruction in environmental studies as a requirement for graduation. 

  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses including Green Learning Community (First Year) 17
ENV 100 & 101 - Introduction to Environmental Issues Fulfills University Core Requirement 3
BIO 105/105L - Biology I : Ecology/Evolution Fulfills University Core Requirement  4
BIO 106/106L - Biology II : Cellular/Molecular 4
LIT 121 & 122 - Literature, Nature and the Environment Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
BUEC 104 & 105 - Economics in Context Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
CHE - Any college level Chemistry course w/ Lab 4
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences Fulfills University Core Requirement  3
   
Interdisciplinary Environmental Issues Courses (Second year) 13
ENV 220 - Conservation and Preservation 3
ENV 220L - Conservation and Preservation Lab 2
ENV 250 - Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
ENV 200 - Population and the Environment Fulfills University Core Requirement 3
ENV 240 - Environmental Sustainability Lab 2
   
BIO 350/350L - Ecology (Third year)
 
4
Environmental Science Elective
After consulting with their academic advisors, ENV Studies Majors will choose 3 - 4 credit hours of an upper-division science course from the Department of Environmental Studies, and from the Departments of Biology, Marine Science, Chemistry/Physics and/or Psychology. (This course should be taken during third and fourth years.)
3 - 4
   
Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements** (Third and fourth year - See listing below) 
One course from each of the 4 Distribution Groups in the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements, and additional credits chosen from any of the groups to total 21 or more credits.
 
21 - 28
Internship
ENV 295 or ENV 495
3 - 9
   
Senior Capstone in Environmental Studies
ENV 499
3
   
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) variable 
   
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements List

Group One: Conservation, Preservation, Restoration Credits
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 312/312L Wetland Conservation and Ecology 4
ENV 313/313L Wetland Restoration: Science and Policy 4
ENV 314/314L Restoring Coastal Habitats in the Gulf of Maine 4
ENV 315 Land Conservation Practicum 3
ENV 316/316L Land Conservation Practicum with Field Lab 4
ENV 317 Case Studies in Preserving Biodiversity and Protected Areas 3
ENV 318/318L Advanced Field Methods in Avian Ecology & Conservation 4
ENV 309  Sustainability & Ecological Restoration 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies (3 credits) 3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab (4 credits) 4
   
Group Two: Environmental Policy and Management  
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 321 Environmental Communication: Expert Practices for Ecosystem Management 3
ENV 324 Environmental Economics 3
ENV 325 Ecological Economics 3
ENV 328 Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife & Human Health 3
ENV 357 Sustaining Water 3
ENV 372 Forest Landscape Ecology and Management 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies  3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab  4
   
Group Three: Arts, Humanities, and Values  
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 331 Women and the Environment 3
ENV 332 The Literature of Nature 3
ENV 333/333L The Nature Writers with Field Lab 4
ENV 334 Contemporary Nature Writing 3
ENV 334L Contemporary Nature Writing Lab 1
ENV 335 Environmental History of New England Seminar 3
ENV 336 Seminar on Edward Abbey 3
ENV 337 Outdoor Environmental Education 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
   
Group Four: Global Ecology and Social Justice  
ENV 275 Environmental Studies Colloquium 1
ENV 340 Environmental Movements and Social Change 3
ENV 341 Indigenous Ecology, Conservation Biology, and the Politics of Knowledge 3
ENV 344 Environmental Ethics 3
ENV 348/348L Environment/ Health, and Community Development in East Africa 4
ENV 376 Caribbean/Sustainable Development 3
ENV 398 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies  3
ENV 399 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab  4

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers environmental studies majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle school or high school teachers (grades 7-12) in the area of science. While providing a solid foundation in environmental studies and science, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of internship semester)
1
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 437 - Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
Education Total Number of Credits 40 - 41
Learning Outcomes

All graduates will achieve the following learning outcomes: 
 
I.     Intellectual Flexibility - Students will possess the intellectual flexibility necessary to view environmental questions from multiple perspectives, prepared to alter their understanding as they learn new ways of understanding. 
II.    Problem Solving - Students will solve problems systematically, creatively, and reflexively, ready to assemble knowledge and formulate strategy. 
III.   Interdisciplinarity - When encountering environmental problems students will assess necessary scientific concepts and data, consider likely social dynamics, and establish integral cultural contexts. 
IV.   Research - When faced with questions that lie beyond their current knowledge base, students will actively research data, concepts, histories, and narratives necessary for adequate consideration of the issue. 
V.    Communication - Students will communicate with precision, effective art, and 
         sound rhetoric in writing, in speech, and in digital media. 
VI.   Values - Reflecting upon their internalized values system, students will continue to evolve an individual vision of harmonious and sustainable interaction among humans as well as between humans and the rest of the natural world. 
VII. Knowledge – Students will have mastered foundational knowledge enabling them to make sound life decisions as well as enter a career in an environmental profession or graduate school. 
 
To deal with environmental issues one must understand not only scientific concepts, but also the social interactions by which humans behave and the cultural values that underlay behaviors. Therefore, our Environmental Studies and Environmental Science programs lead to learning outcomes involving many different disciplines, or ways of knowing. We have organized our more detailed learning outcomes according to the three traditional academic categories: social sciences, natural sciences, and the humanities. 

A. Social Sciences 

  1. Students will be able to articulate the basic structure, functions, and processes of key social systems affecting the environment. 
  2. Students will be able to apply specific models of social system processes derived from various social science theories to explain environmental issues (including current and past conditions), and to propose future solutions to environmental problems 
  3. Students will be able to identify, interpret, and apply basic measures (metrics and formulae) of social system variables to assess socio-environmental conditions. 
  4. Students will be able to articulate basic understanding of various social science theories/frameworks and how they apply to environmental issues. 
  5. Students will be able to explain how various paradigms or worldviews and their implicit and explicit assumptions and values shape the viewer’s perception of environmental problems and solutions. 

B. Natural Sciences 

  1. Students will understand key concepts in the life and physical sciences, and will apply them to environmental issues. 
  2. Students will understand and apply the scientific process, as well as appreciate both the potential and limitations of the process. 
  3. Students will be able to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from the scientific literature. 
  4. Students will analyze data using appropriate statistical methods, and will be able to evaluate the use of statistics by others in a variety of contexts. 
  5. Students will apply knowledge of the sciences within an interdisciplinary context in solving environmental issues such as environmental health, food and agriculture, energy, waste and pollution, climate change, population, resource management, and loss of biodiversity. 
  6. Students will carry out an applied research project in the natural sciences. 
  7. Students will be able to communicate science effectively through written work and oral presentations to a variety of audiences. 
  8. Students will apply the tools commonly used in field research, particularly in the study of plants, animals and soils; and will find their way on the landscape using map, compass and GPS technology, and use spatial analysis software such as GIS, Google Earth and Google Maps. 

C. Humanities 

  1. Students will articulate historical epochs and concepts relevant to the evolution of environmental consciousness and policy.  
  2. Students will analyze and evaluate ideological and philosophical approaches used to understand environmental relationships. 
  3. Students will be aware of and able to analyze the potential of literature and fine arts to communicate assumptions of value about human relations with the biosphere. 
  4. Students will articulate a coherent philosophy of the environment, & consider ethical bases for responding to environmental questions. 

 
The 3rd and 4th year curriculum of the Environmental Studies/Science majors build on the core learning outcomes through a process of intensification, adding depth and sophistication to students’ learning of the concepts and skills specified above. For students majoring in Environmental Studies, the outcomes listed under “Social Sciences” and “Humanities” are emphasized, while the outcomes listed under “Natural Sciences” are emphasized for students majoring in Environmental Science. 

Double Major

It is possible for DES students to add a second major or a minor in areas such as marine biology, medical biology, political science, history, sociology, and English. DES students interested in a double major should consult with their DES faculty advisor, who in turn will coordinate with an advisor from the second department.

Minors

Minor in Environmental Studies

A student with a major in another department may minor in Environmental Studies with the approval of the Environmental Studies Department Chair. A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

  Credits
ENV 100/101 or ENV 104 - Introduction to Environmental Issues 3
ENV 200 - Population and the Environment 3
ENV 220 - Conservation and Preservation 3
ENV 250 - Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
Two courses chosen from the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements 6

Minor in Geographic Information Systems

A student with a major in another department may minor in Geographic Information Systems with the approval of the Environmental Studies Department Chair. A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

  Credits
GIS 161 - GIS I: Fundamentals of Geospatial Science & Technology 3
GIS 162 - GIS II: Application of Geospatial Science & Technology 3
GIS 224/224L - Remote Sensing/Remote Sensing Lab 4
GIS 265 - Global Positioning Systems (optional) 2
GIS 364/364L - Spatial Analysis/Spatial Analysis Lab 3-4
GIS 495 - GIS Internship 3+
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Pamela Morgan (Chair)
pmorgan@une.edu

Dr. Richard Peterson (Assistant Chair)
rpeterson@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Environmental Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Environmental Studies

Geographic Information Systems

Minor Description

A student with a major in another department may minor in Geographic Information Systems with the approval of the Environmental Studies Department Chair.  A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

  Credits
Program Required Courses  
GIS 161 - GIS I: Fundamentals of Geospatial Science & Technology 3
GIS 162 - GIS II: Application of Geospatial Science & Technology 3
GIS 224/224L - Remote Sensing/Remote Sensing Lab 4
GIS 265 - Global Positioning Systems (optional)  2
GIS 364/364L - Spatial Analysis/Spatial Analysis Lab 3-4
GIS 495 - GIS Internship (Variable Credit) 3+
Learning Outcomes
  1. Comprehends fundamental concepts and practices of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and advances in Geospatial Information Science and Technology (GIS&T). 
  2. Applies basic graphic and data visualization concepts such as color theory, symbolization, and use of white space. 
  3. Demonstrates organizational skills in file and database management. 
  4. Give examples of interdisciplinary applications of Geospatial Information Science and Technology. 
  5. Apply GIS analyses to address geospatial problems and/or research questions. 
  6. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of GIS tools to create maps that are fit-for-purpose and effectively convey the information they are intended to. 
  7. Effectively communicate and present project results in oral, written, and graphic forms. 
  8. Demonstrate confidence in undertaking new (unfamiliar) analyses using GIS, troubleshoot problems in GIS, and seek help from software/website help menus and the GIS community to solve problems. 
  9. Apply mathematical concepts, including statistical methods, to data to be used in geospatial analyses. 
  10. Gather and process original data using a Global Positioning System (GPS) or other Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). 
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Pamela Morgan (Chair)
pmorgan@une.edu

Minor in Geographic Information Systems

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Environmental Studies

Health, Law & Policy

Minor Description

The Health, Law & Policy minor is designed to introduce students to the United States health care system, with a special emphasis on the public health sector.  As a minor, students are provided the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the law that governs our health care system & the politics that shape those laws.  Students completing the minor will be well positioned for expanded roles of leadership within a health provider organization or political entity charged with creating health care policy.  

Curricular Requirements

Students wishing to pursue a minor in health law & politics must have an advisor in the program and approval from the chair of the political science department.  Each student will work with a faculty advisor to design a minor consisting of six courses (18 credits) that supports the student's interests, according to the following guidelines and availability:

Program Required Courses:

PSC 325 - Politics of Public Health

Three of the following courses.  However, a student must take at least one law course and at least one political science course:

Law

PSC 106 - Law & American Society

PSC 125 - Understanding the Law

PSC 203 - Politics of Law

PSC 210 - Constitutional Law

Political Science:

PSC 101 - Introduction to American Politics

PSC 105 - Introduction to Political Science

PSC 200 -  Introduction to Political Theory

PSC 220 - Research Methods

PSC 432 - Autonomy/Politics of Reproduction

Two of the following courses:

ENG 310 - Writing & Women's Health

ANT 211 - Medical Anthropology

SOC 355 - Medical Sociology

BUEC 385 - Health Economics

HSM 370 - Law & Ethics of Health Care

PHI 406 - Human Genome Project Ethics

SOC 460 - Social Policy and Planning

PSY 235 - Health Psychology

Internship

Learning Outcomes

This minor provides students additional choices and options that are career oriented in a field that is expected to see significant growth over the next twenty years.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Ali Ahmida

aahmida@une.edu

Minor in Health, Law & Policy

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Political Science

Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies

Mission

Our mission is to develop caring, collaborative scholars through a dynamic, student-centered, occupation-focused educational program.

Vision

Our vision is to address society's occupational needs by fostering excellence in health, wellness, and occupational studies through teaching, scholarship, and service.

Degree Description

Our program in Health, Wellness and Occupational Studies gives students a broad education that will prepare them for a variety of career paths. Students will be prepared for opportunities including application to graduate programs in occupational therapy, disability studies, physical therapy, counseling, or related health professions, as well as a career as a wellness coach, wellness coordinator, activity director, health educator, case manager, medical salesperson, or paraprofessional in mental health and educational settings.

If students choose to enter the workforce directly with a Health, Wellness and Occupational Studies degree, they can apply for ACSM/NSPAPPH specialty certification in Physical Activity in Public Health, ACSM/NCPAD certification as an Inclusive Fitness Trainer, CHES certification as a Health Education Specialist, or FDC credentialing as a Family Development Specialist.

Our program grounds students in the core arts and sciences, with an emphasis on courses that study human occupation, such as Occupational Science, Occupational Media, and Disability Studies. The curriculum includes wellness courses such as Principles of Health Promotion, Stress Management, and Substance Abuse Prevention. Students also study interdisciplinary health subjects, alongside Nursing, Applied Exercise Science, Athletic Training, and Dental Hygiene students.
 

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of the program, the HWOS student will:

  • Critically analyze concepts of health and wellness through application at the personal (micro), population (meso), and societal (macro) levels.
  • Synthesize biological, psychosocial, and educational theories that influence human behavior and occupational participation.
  • Assess the influence  of disease and disability with respect to health promotion and occupational well-being.
  • Model compassion as an essential attribute in understanding diverse occupational engagement across the lifespan
  • Collaboratively engage in integrative leadership in occupational media, research and science in preparation for inter-professional endeavors.
  • Be prepared to apply for graduate study in the field of occupational therapy or a related health profession.
Admissions

High School Graduates

For entrance into the BS in Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies (HWOS) students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Students seeking admission should have completed high school courses in chemistry, biology, and two to three years of mathematics including Algebra II.
  2. Applicants submit their application materials to the Admissions Office during the fall of the year prior to matriculation. Decisions on applicants will be made on a rolling basis. Qualified students who apply after the fall will be admitted on a space-available basis.

Internal Transfer Students

Students who are enrolled in other majors at the University may apply for admission into the Health, Wellness and Occupational Studies major by completing a change of major form.  The Admissions Committee meets at the close of each semester to determine eligibility on a space available basis.

The potential student is encouraged to explore the professional possibilities by shadowing a health professional, going to appropriate web-sites, and/or volunteering in a program that supports people with disabilities to participate  in occupations. Include this information in the required essay (see below). 

Students who wish to transfer into the Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies must complete the following:

  1. Discuss interest in the program with the Coordinator for the HWOS program.
  2. Fill out, complete, and submit a change of major form.
  3. Write an essay of 300 words or less on the rationale for transfer into the HWOS major. This statement should be submitted to the Coordinator of the HWOS program.
  4. Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above at the end of the semester of transfer request.

All of these steps should be completed prior to the end of the semester.

External Transfer Student Policy (For students who do not have a BA/BS)

  1. UNE accepts qualified transfer students.
  2. The minimum GPA to be considered from another institution is 2.75 (B-). A 3.0 (B average or higher is preferred).
  3. Students are responsible for completing all WCHP and University core coursework for the HWOS major.
Grading

All students in the Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies major are subject to the UNE WCHP undergraduate grading policy (see undergraduate academic policy) and progression guidelines.

Progression Guidelines

HWOS follows the WCHP Common Curriculum Academic Progression Guidelines
The requirements laid out below are for the first two years of enrollment in any undergraduate program of the Westbrook College of Health Professions. Beginning with the Fall semester of the third year, students will be held to their program specific progression guidelines.

  1. In keeping with the guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows: 

    Fall of First Year

    1.70

    Spring of First Year

    1.70

    Fall of Second Year

    1.70

    Spring of Second Year

    1.80

    Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the Catalog of the University of New England.
  2. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in the following courses: MAT 120, CHE 110, CHE 125, CHE 130, BIO 104, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 242, IHS 220, BIO 309 and BIO 404.  Failure to achieve a “C” will result in program level probation, and may affect academic progression.
  3. Students may enroll in any of the math/ sciences courses referenced above a maximum of two times. 
  4. Cumulative GPA required for enrollment into the “300” and “400” level courses of the OT Major is 2.50.

 

Curricular Requirements
Courses Credits
WCHP Common Curriculum  
BIO 104/104L - General Biology 4
BIO 208/208L - Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 209/209L - Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
CHE 125/25L - Introduction to Chemistry & Physics 4
ENG 110 - English Composition 4
EXS 120 - Personal Health & Wellness 3
EXS 180 - Motor Learning & Performance 3
IHS 120 - Health Care Issues 1
IHS 110 - Introduction to Health Care 2
IHS 210 - Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
IHS 310 - Ethical Practice in Health Professions 3
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
Creative Arts Course (with prefix ARH, ART or MUS) 3
Explorations Course 3
Social Global Awareness Course 3
Advanced Studies Course 3
   
HWOS Requirements  
BIO 404/404L - Neuroscience 4
HWOS 305 - Introduction to OT 3
HWOS 313 - Occupational Media 3
HWOS 316 - Research Methods 3
HWOS 331 - Principles of HP, DX Prevention 3
HWOS 341 - Health and Wellness in an Aging Society 3
HWOS 405 - Occupational Science 3
HWOS 414 - Stress Management 3
HWOS 424 - Theories of Education & HP 4
HWOS 432 - Disability Studies & Inclusive Communities 3
HWOS 434 - Substance Abuse & Prevention 3
Electives 21
   
Total Credits 121
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Caryn Husman, HWOS Coordinator, 

11 Hills Beach Rd. Biddeford, ME 04005 

602-2065; Fax 602-5921 cbirstler@une.edu

Bachelor of Science in Health, Wellness and Occupational Studies

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Occupational Therapy

History

Mission

The objectives of the Department of History and Philosophy are to bring the study of the past to bear on the present; to demonstrate that knowledge and experience are dependent upon particular historical contexts; to expose students to a variety of cultures in historical context; to assist students to develop research and writing skills; to enrich students' appreciation and enjoyment of the richness of human endeavors; and to prepare students for a productive and rewarding professional life following the completion of their studies.

Major Description

The major and minor in History offer students the opportunity to study the past in connection with the present. Students combine courses focused on specific geographic areas with elective course work from a variety of periods and areas of the world, preparing students for a range of career paths including education, graduate school, law, museum work and business. The history and philosophy department works closely with the education department to prepare students for teaching history and social studies at the secondary school level.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all history courses used toward the major.
A minimum grade of C must be achieved in HIS 290 to be used toward the major.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses 33-43
Two of the following three options:  
Option I  
HIS 222 - US History: Contact through the Civil War 3
HIS 223 - US History: Reconstruction to Present or 3
Option II  
HIS 230 - Continuity/Change from Ancient to Renaissance 3
HIS 231 - Continuity/Change in Modern Europe or 3
Option III  
HIS 240 - Colonial Latin America 3
HIS 241 - Modern Latin America 3
Program Required Option Sub-Total  12
Each of the Following:  
HIS 290 - History Hands On 3
HIS 450 - Senior Thesis 3
History Electives 15
Program Minimum Required Total Credits  33
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers history majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle school or high school teachers (grades 7-12) in the area of social studies. While providing a solid foundation in history, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the secondary Classroom (Part of the internship semester) 1
EDU 430 - Educational assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 438 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Ed Social Studies 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
Total Education Credits 40-41

See Education for more details.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of their history program, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an ability to locate and use reliable primary and secondary historical sources
  2. Demonstrate competence with Chicago style in notes and bibliography
  3. Demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate and use evidence to support an interpretation
  4. Communicate ideas clearly orally and in writing
  5. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the historical content of two areas of the world
Minor

A student in another department may, with the permission of the department chair, earn a minor within the department upon the completion of 18 hours of course work in History.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Elizabeth DeWolfe
edewolfe@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in History

College of Arts and Sciences

History

Laboratory Science

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science, and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. To understand living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, chemistry/secondary education, biochemistry and laboratory science, and a minor in chemistry, the department fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics.  Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The laboratory science (LS) major is designed to prepare graduates for work in a variety of modern laboratory settings, ranging from biotechnology labs to quality control labs to academic, medical, or industrial research labs. The program includes a broad spectrum of laboratory courses in chemistry, biochemistry, and biology, so that the graduate will have as comprehensive a repertoire of lab skills as possible. With careful selection of electives, LS graduates wishing to become medical technologists will be well-prepared for acceptance into accredited hospital internship programs in medical technology.  Recent LS graduates have been successful in pursuing careers in industry and post-baccalaureate graduate studies.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in laboratory science, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
Program Required Courses  45-46
BIO 105/106 - Biology I and II (4 cr included in core requirements) 4
BIO 200 - Genetics or BIO 207 Organismal Genetics 5-4
BIO 232 - Microbiology 4
BIO 260 - Immunology 4
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 309 - Intro to Instrumental Analysis 4
CHE 310 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry 4
MAT 190 - Calculus I (included in core requirements) 4
PHY 110 - General Physics I 4
  Credits
Flexible Program Required Courses
*Choose a minimum of three courses selected from the following
12-14
BIO 203 - Histology 4
BIO 204 - Parasitology 4
BIO 245 - Gen Prin of Human Anat, Phys and Path I 4
BIO 345 - Gen Prin of Human Anat, Phys and Path II 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
PHY 111 - General Physics II 4
Minimum Required Total Credits  99
   
Recommended Elective Courses   
BIO 330 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (if BIO 245/345 not selected) 4
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
Open Elective Credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120
Learning Outcomes
  • Students will be able to describe and apply advanced information and concepts relevant to general laboratory science.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate information in both oral and written forms relevant to general laboratory science.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Stephen Fox
sfox4@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Laboratory Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Chemistry and Physics

Latin American Studies

Curricular Requirements

The Minor in Latin American Studies at the University of New England consists of 18 credits (6 three-credit courses) and an experience in Latin America. Study will be in disciplines such as: history, sociology, language, literature, film studies, and political science. Three courses are required from three different disciplines. Students will choose three additional courses from the list of electives below. There is also a Latin American Experience requirement that is detailed below.*

Languages of Latin America (3 credits):

It is expected that students will complete at least a second level or semester of a language to receive credit for the minor. The first level may come from a year of high school language study, a semester of college study, or from native proficiency. Students are expected to attain this level of proficiency in either Spanish or Portuguese.

  Credits
SPA 211 - Intermediate Spanish or 3
POR 211 - Intermediate Portuguese (to be developed in 2013) 3

History of Latin America (3 credits):

At present students may select from one of two courses to satisfy this minor requirement. Other courses may be added later. A student may petition for another course or for transferred credits to count for this requirement.

  Credits
HIS 240 - Latin American History I: Colonial Latin America 3
HIS 241 - Latin American History II: Modern Latin America 3

Society in Latin America (3 credits):

At present this is the only course that satisfies this requirement. A student may petition for another course or for transferred credits to count for this requirement.

  Credits
SOC 230 - Society in Latin America 3

Electives (9 credits)

For the remaining three courses, or nine credits, students may select from the following:

   
Languages of Latin America Credits
SPA 101 - Basic Spanish 3
SPA 211 - Intermediate Spanish 3
SPA 301 - Advanced Spanish 3
   
History of Latin America  
HIS 240 - Latin American History I: Colonial Latin America 3
HIS 241 - Latin American History II: Modern Latin America 3
HIS 370 - Slaves and Citizens: Africans in the Americas 3
HIS 331 - Revolution and Social Protest in Mexico 3
   
Society in Latin America  
SOC 310 - Population, Society and Culture 3
   
Politics and Economics in Latin America  
PSC 320 - Global Systems: Origins, Politics and Culture 3
PSC 405 - Latin American Politics 3
PSC 406 - State and Society Relations in Third World Countries 3

Courses in Latin American Studies can also be taken through the Greater Portland Alliance. In addition, courses from UNE study abroad programs in Latin America can be substituted on an individual basis for courses in the core and electives of the minor. These courses will be approved on an individual basis by the Latin American Studies Coordinating Committee.

Latin American Experiences

*In addition to completing the 18 credits in the Latin American Studies Minor, a student must also have spent a minimal amount of time in another country in Latin America or the Caribbean. This can consist of living in a country in Latin America, studying in a country in Latin America, or a personal visit. The minimum is a two week stay in which there is an effort to learn language, culture, and history. Each Minor will apply to the Latin American Studies Coordinating Committee for approval of their experience.

If a student has not been able to complete a Latin American Experience, then they can still complete a minor by either taking an additional course approved by the Latin American Studies Coordinating Committee or by completing an independent study with a faculty affiliated with the program for a total of 21 credits.

Learning Outcomes

These are the student learning outcomes for the 2 required courses for the Latin American Studies minor:

Intermediate Spanish

Students leave this course with Intermediate Proficiency in Spanish in the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading, writing. These elements are measured by quizzes, homework assignments, and recorded dialogs. Students learning outcomes for this course are:

  • Develop vocabulary proficiency in food, drink, and restaurant experiences, traveling and going on vacation, speaking of free time activities and home life, and basic health care-related issues.
  • Develop grammatical proficiency: students will be able to comprehend, speak, read, and write in the present and past tenses.
  • Develop cultural proficiency: students will learn about the the basic historical origins of Spain and parts of Latin America, such as Mexico, Peru, and Guatemala.
  • Develop reading and writing proficiency: students will be able to read and write about some original literature in Spanish in the form of the essay and the short story.

Society in Latin America

This course has six interrelated student learning outcomes. The overall objective is to provide a student learning opportunity that is focused on the social and cultural experiences of peoples in Latin America. At the end of the course students will:

  • Develop a basic knowledge about society in Latin America to include: geography, demographics, politics, culture, and media.
  • Expand their understanding of sociological perspectives including theory and methods.
  • Enhance their ability to think critically about social relations.
  • Enhance their ability to analyze sociologically the culture around them.
  • Enhance their ability to express themselves in writing and verbally
  • Increase their ability to integrate disciplines and perspectives using a variety of mediums, methods, and modes of expression.

 

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Steven Byrd
sbyrd@une.edu

Minor in Latin American Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Society, Culture and Languages

Liberal Studies

Mission

The liberal studies major challenges students to understand and evaluate human values, cultures and ideas as they are expressed in the various humanities disciplines. In addition, the major invites students to make connections across academic disciplines, historical periods, and diverse cultures. Our faculty believe that the ability to make these connections and to understand from different perspectives is the mark of a truly educated person.

Major Description

Do you like to read and write?  Are you looking forward to taking courses in history and English' and are you curious about philosophy?  Liberal Studies is a multidisciplinary major in the humanities - history (including history of art & history of music), philosophy, literature, political science, religion, and the languages. It is designed for students who are interested in more than one discipline or in some broad topic or theme. Students majoring in liberal studies have primary responsibility for designing their own college education. They investigate ideas through the process of discovery, and discovery is best begun at the point of their own interests and goals. In the absence of restrictive course requirements, but in close concert with a faculty advisor, liberal studies students plan their own broad-based program. During the third and fourth years, the focus turns towards creating a cohesive cluster of courses dealing with a theme, culture, or period. Students may concentrate, for instance, on humanistic views of science and take courses such as science and religion, literature of the sea, and bioethics. There are many possibilities in this flexible major.

The bachelor of arts in liberal studies prepares the graduate for a broad spectrum of career choices in teaching, communications, publishing, government, sales, advertising, public affairs, research, and information management. Moreover it is sound training for law school and graduate work in the humanities. The liberal studies major provides truly practical preparation for a rapidly changing world by developing independence of mind, self-direction, critical thinking and analytic skills, and a continuing desire to learn.

All UNE students take the University Core Curriculum. In addition to the Core requirements, liberal studies candidates in consultation with their advisors will take a minimum of 33 credits in the humanities (history, philosophy, literature, political science, religion, and languages.) At least five courses should be numbered 300 or above. All students will take at least one methodology course in the humanities such as ENG 206 Literary Theory and Criticism, ENG 207 Introduction to Cultural Studies, or HIS 290 History Hands On and are encouraged to take at least one  Humanities Seminar.  In addition, students will enroll in LIL 420 and complete a capstone senior thesis or project,.  Working closely with a faculty member students will write or develop a project on a topic of their own choosing..   All students may also develop an Internship and enroll in LIL 495. 

Depending upon their career interests, students may elect to take courses in other UNE disciplines such as business, creative arts, science, social science, women and gender studies.  Because of the flexibility of the curriculum many liberal studies major double major or minor in other disciplines   A double major in Liberal Studies and Elementary Education is an excellent choice.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses* 33
LIL 420 - Senior Thesis/Project 3
LIL 495 - Internship in Liberal Studies (Optional) 3-9
Individually selected courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Students design their own curriculum in consultation with their advisors. At least five courses at 300 or 400 level, one methodology course in the Humanities and senior thesis or project are required.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to identify and define a problem or issue which can be addressed from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
  2. Students will be able to apply and integrate methods, materials, and/or insights from different disciplines to the solution of a problem, the analysis of an issue or the completion of a project.  This will reflect coursework as well as independent reading and research.  
  3. Students will be able to find and evaluate different views from within a discipline.
  4. Students will be able to conduct primary and secondary research in order to develop well documented, supported, reasoned, and informed conclusions to problems and issues.  
  5. Students will be able to find, use, and evaluate a variety of sources of information.
  6. Students will be able to communicate ideas clearly.
  7. Students will be able to complete an interdisciplinary capstone thesis or project informed by their previous work in different disciplines.
  8. Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of content from at least two disciplines.

Dr. Elizabeth DeWolfe

edewolfe@une.edu

 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Liberal Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

Marine Science

Mission

The mission of the Department of Marine Sciences at University of New England is to enable students to understand the real-world relevance of the marine sciences, foster scientific literacy and critical thinking skills, and lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society.

The Marine Sciences encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, and how it is related to earth systems science, as well as to human interactions with the environment. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology, to chemistry, geology and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet, and beyond. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems, not only in ocean sciences, but in fields as far ranging as meteorology and space exploration

Major Description

The Marine Sciences program offers a baccalaureate education to students interested in all facets of the marine environment.  The classroom curriculum provides a strong background in the marine sciences, including biology, chemistry, physics and geology of the oceans and their surroundings. The program focuses on hands-on activities, internships and research experiences in addition to classroom work.

The marine sciences major is designed to provide students with a strong science foundation upon which to build their marine specialty courses. The program is flexible and students are encouraged to explore many areas of the marine sciences through courses and internships emphasizing "hands-on" experiences. An additional goal of the major is to provide students with an adequate background for entry level career positions and for graduate study in marine science programs, or any field requiring a strong science background. The University is located on the Saco River where it joins the Atlantic Ocean, providing numerous marine, estuarine, and fresh water habitats to study on or adjacent to campus.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the marine sciences courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.  Other options and restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Graduation Requirements:

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Sciences.

Program Completion Timeline:

Students have a maximum of seven years to complete the graduation requirements

Curricular Requirements

Curricular Requirements for track in Marine Biology or track in Oceanography 

  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Marine Biology Track Curriculum 32 - 36
MAR 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
MAR 266/266L - Oceanography I: Biological & Geological 4
MAR 268/268L - Oceanography II: Physical & Chemical 4
Area Courses (see below)  
Organismal course 3-4
Process course 3-4
Physiological course 3-4
Cellular & Molecular course 3-4
MAR 325 - Marine Science Speaker Series 1
MAR 400-Level course 3
Program Required Cognate Courses  32 - 33
Calculus I & Statistics for Life Sciences 7
Introduction to Chemistry I & II 8
Organic Chemistry I and Organic Chemistry II or Organic Chemistry I and Biochemistry 9-10
Physics I & II 8
Program Track Subtotal 64-69
Minimum Required Total Credits 120
  Credits
Oceanography Track Curriculum  26
MAR 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
MAR 266/266L - Oceanography I: Biological & Geological Oceanography 4
MAR 268/268L - Oceanography II: Physical & Chemical Oceanography 4
MAR 366 - Advanced Oceanography I: Biological & Geological Oceanography 3
MAR 368 - Advanced Oceanography II: Physical & Chemical Oceanography 3
MAR 325 - Marine Science Speaker Series 1
MAR 400-level course 3
Program Required Cognate Courses  39 - 40
Calculus I & II and Statistics for Life Sciences 11
Computer Programming 3
Introduction to Chemistry I & II 8
Organic Chemistry I and Organic Chemistry II or Organic Chemistry I and Biochemistry 9-10
Physics I & II 8
Program Track Subtotal 65-66
Minimum Required Total Credits 120
   
Area Courses Credits
Organismal Biology Area  
BIO 204 - Parasitology 4
BIO 319 - Ornithology 4
BIO 232 - Microbiology 4
BIO 234 - Environmental Microbiology 4
MAR 320 - Invertebrate Zoology 4
BIO 330 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4
MAR 331 - Biology of Fishes   4
MAR 355 - Biology of Marine Mammals 4
MAR 375 - Biology of Sharks, Skates, and Rays 4

MAR 442 - Aquatic Invasive Species 

3
Process Area  
BIO 333 - Evolution 3
MAR 335 - Animal/Behavioral Ecology 4
BIO 350 - Ecology 4
MAR 350 - Marine Ecology 4

MAR 432 - Fisheries Biology 

4
Physiology Area  
BIO 203 - Histology 4
BIO 208 - Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 209 - Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 245 - Anatomy, Physiology & Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 340 - Embryology 4
BIO 345 - Anatomy, Physiology & Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 404 - Neuroscience 4
BIO/MAR 421 - Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4
MAR 326 - Experimental Animal Physiology 3
   
Cell and Molecular Area  
BIO 200 - Genetics 5
BIO 207 - Organismal Genetics 4
BIO 365 - Immunology 3
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers Marine Sciences majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7 - 12) in the area of life science. While providing a solid foundation in the biological sciences, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will result in State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 437 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester)
1
   
Education Minimum Required Total Credits 40 - 41

See Education Department for more details.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students demonstrate a strong foundation in the Marine Sciences, including biology, chemistry, physics, and geological aspects of the oceans.
  2. Students will integrate knowledge and skills from all areas of study to address interdisciplinary problems. 
  3. Students communicate effectively in both oral and written skills to convey their scientific knowledge and results to peers, the public, and scientific audiences.
  4. Students will independently design and execute well conceived scientific studies.
  5. Students demonstrate critical thinking skills.
  6. Students demonstrate proficiency in quantitative skills.
  7. Students value ethics in the conduct of science and their lives. 
Minors

A marine sciences minor requires 6 courses, and can follow either of the two tracks in the major, Marine Biology or Oceanography.  

  Credits
Marine Biology Minor 21-23
(MAR 105 -  Biology I: Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms or
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution) and 
MAR 106 Biology II: Cellular/Molecular Biology of Marine Organisms or BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
or
BIO 104 - General Biology and 
(MAR 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms or
  MAR 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular Biology of Marine Organisms)
8
MAR 266 - Oceanography I: Bio/Che 4
MAR 250 - Marine Biology 4
Two additional organismal topics courses (see course listing above) 6-8
  Credits
Oceanography Minor 21-22
MAR 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 266 - Oceanography I: Bio/Chem 4
MAR 268 - Oceanography II: Phy/Geo 4
MAR 366 - Adv Oceanography I: Bio/Chem 3
MAR 368 - Advanced Oceanography II: Phy/Geo 3
One additional Marine Science Course 3-4
Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Sciences.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of seven years to complete the graduation requirements.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Lab Fees

Courses with laboratory components have separate fees that vary depending on the course.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342, or visit the Financial Aid website. 

Dr. Barry Costa-Pierce
bcostapierce@une.edu

Bachelor in Science with a major of Marine Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Marine Sciences

Medical Biology (Medical Sciences)

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history – at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age – students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems, and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies.  Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty.  Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them.  In addition, the medical biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience and experiential learning.  The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog.  The department's medically related programs benefit from interaction with the College of Osteopathic medicine as well as UNE's graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant.  Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The medical biology major is designed to provide a strong foundation in the biological sciences for students who ultimately pursue careers in human medicine, dentistry, other health professions (e.g. physical therapy), biomedical research, or the biotechnology industry. Students in the medical biology major can choose one of two possible tracks: (1) medical sciences track, and (2) pre-physician assistant track.

The medical sciences track provides students with a solid foundation in the biological sciences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels. In addition to the comprehensive introduction to general biology, the courses offered in this track introduce the student to the fields of physiology, biochemistry, cellular biology, and genetics. This track also includes those courses that are pre-requisite courses for entrance into medical and dental schools and graduate programs in Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and other health professional programs. The many laboratory-based courses in this track allow students to become familiar with the most up-to-date laboratory techniques used for biological research, an advantage for students who wish to enter graduate schools in the biomedical sciences or to work in the biotechnology industry. Finally, students in this track have the opportunity to complete off-campus internships for college credit (e.g. in hospital, clinical, or laboratory setting).

This program is designed for: pre-medical students, pre-dental students, pre-veterinary students, students who will eventually enter graduate school in the biological sciences, and students who will eventually enter the biotechnology industry.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives.  All Biology courses previously completed must be no older than eight years.  Other options and restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses 30-33
BIO 105 -Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (included in core requirements) 4
BIO 106 -Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 200-Genetics or BIO 207 Organismal Genetics 4-5
BIO 245-Gen Prin of Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 345-Gen Prin of Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 370-Cell Biology 3
BIO 200 or higher elective (not satisfied by Internship/Research) 3-4
BIO 400 or higher elective (not satisfied by Internship/Research) 3-4
  Credits
Program Required Science and Mathematics Courses 36
Chemistry  
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 310 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry 4
   
Mathematics  
MAT 150-Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I 4
   
Physics  
PHY 110 - Physics I and 4
PHY 111 - Physics II 4
Or  
PHY 210 - University Physics I and 4
PHY 211 - University Physics II 4
   
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Additional Guidelines

BIO 210, BIO 275H, BIO 295, BIO 410, BIO 485H and BIO 495 research and internship courses do NOT meet 200- and 400-level course requirements.

Accelerated 3-4 Option Medical Biology-Medical Sciences Track

For those students interested in attending the University of New England's College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM), an accelerated version of this track offers the opportunity to complete this major upon successful completion of three years of undergraduate work and the first year of medical school.  Qualified CAS undergraduate students who wish to become a doctor of osteopathy (D.O), may apply for early admission to the College of Osteopathic Medicine at the University of New England following their third year. This "3-4 Program" allows mature, qualified CAS students to complete an undergraduate degree and doctor of osteopathy degree in seven years. The program is for students admitted to CAS in the medical sciences track in the medical biology major. Recommended policy and procedures for this program follow:

  • Complete admission requirements of the College of Osteopathic Medicine of the University of New England (see the COM Catalog medical college admission requirements.)
  • Complete CAS graduation requirements for both the medical sciences track in the medical biology major and the CAS Core Curriculum (with the exception of one BIO 400 or higher level course).
  • Successful completion of the first year of COM courses for which 30 hours of credit will be awarded towards meeting the undergraduate degree.
  • Seventy-five percent or 90 credit hours of the total required credit hours for a baccalaureate degree must be completed prior to matriculation in COM.
  • To qualify for the 3-4 Program, students must satisfy a two-year residency which requires that at least two thirds (60 credit hours) of the undergraduate requirements be taken while in CAS.
  • Students entering the 3-4 Program should declare their intention by the end of the fall semester of their second year at the Registration Services office and with their advisor. The form may be obtained online on the Registration Services website.
  • To remain in good standing, students in the 3-4 Program must maintain a UNE cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or better (on a scale of 4.00) for all subjects and a science GPA of 3.00 or better.
  • Students should apply to COM at the beginning of the fall semester of their third year. They will undergo the regular admission process as indicated in the UNECOM catalog and be evaluated by the Admission Committee of COM. Students are strongly advised to seek regular advice, counseling, and support from the Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC). Continuing support of 3-4 students by the PHPAC requires demonstration of academic strength, personal motivation, and sufficient maturity to indicate probable success in the Osteopathic Medical Program.
  • 3-4 Program students who fulfill requirements as described are guaranteed an interview and are assured of receiving full consideration by the Admissions Committee for admission to COM.
  • Students are encouraged to take the MCAT in April of their second year.
  • During their first year at COM, 3-4 Program students will also be CAS students and are therefore encouraged to continue to seek counsel and guidance of PHPAC of CAS.
  • First-year 3-4 COM students will submit a "Petition to Graduate" form to the Registration Services office during the first week of their second semester and will be awarded a baccalaureate degree upon satisfactory completion of the first year at COM. This form may also be obtained online on the Registration Services website.
  • Students must fulfill all other CAS and COM requirements and business office obligations

Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

A.  Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas.

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life - including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, reproduction.
  • Organismal Diversity - including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
  • Interrelations of Organisms and their environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.

B.  Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:

  • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
  • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
  • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).

C. Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:

  • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
  • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
  • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.
Minor

The medical biology minor requires 6 biology courses, including the introductory biology series. In particular, department of biological sciences majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses. 

Medical Biology Minor Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/ Evolution and
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
Or
BIO 104 - General Biology and one of:
(BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/ Evolution
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular

4

4

 

4

4

4

And  
BIO 200 - Genetics 5
BIO 245 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 345 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 370 - Cell Biology 3
Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Stine Brown
sbrown@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Medical Biology- Medical Sciences Track

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Biology

Medical Biology (Pre-Physician Assistant Track - MPA)

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history – at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age – students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems, and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies.  Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty.  Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them.  In addition, the medical biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience and experiential learning.  The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog.  The department's medically related programs benefit from interaction with the College of Osteopathic medicine as well as UNE's graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy and physician assistant.  Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The medical biology major is designed to provide a strong foundation in the biological sciences for students who ultimately pursue careers in human medicine, dentistry, other health professions (e.g. physical therapy), biomedical research, or the biotechnology industry. Students in the medical biology major can choose one of two possible tracks: (1) medical sciences track and (2) pre-physician assistant track.

The pre-physician assistant track is designed for students who wish to eventually enroll in a physician assistant program. This track provides students with a solid foundation in the biological sciences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels. In addition to the comprehensive introduction to general biology, the courses offered in this track introduce the student to the fields of physiology, biochemistry, cellular biology, and genetics. This track includes those courses that are prerequisite courses for entrance into physician assistant schools. In addition, students in this track have the opportunity to complete off-campus internships for college credit (e.g. in the hospital, clinical, or laboratory setting).

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.  Other options and restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42 - 43
   
Program Required Courses 30 - 33
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (included in core requirements) 4
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 200 - Genetics or BIO 207 Organismal Genetics 5 - 4
BIO 245 - Gen Prin of Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 345 - Gen Prin of Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 370 - Cell Biology 3
BIO 200 or higher elective (not satisfied by Internship/Research) 3 - 4
BIO 400 or higher elective (not satisfied by Internship/Research) 3 - 4
   
Program Required Science and Mathematics Courses  32 - 33
Chemistry  
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 310 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry or 4
       CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry 5
 Mathematics  
 MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
 MAT 190 - Calculus I 4
   
Physics   
PHY 110 - Physics I and 4
PHY 111 - Physics II 4
Or  
PHY 210 - University Physics I and 4
PHY 211 - University Physics II 4
   
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)  variable
Minimum Required Total Credits   120

Additional Guidelines

BIO 210, BIO 275H, BIO 295, BIO 410, BIO 485H and BIO 495 research and internship courses do NOT meet 200- and 400-level course requirements.

3-2 Accelerated Pre-Physician Assistant Track (PPA)

An accelerated version of this track offers selected students the opportunity to enroll in the University of New England's master-level Physician Assistant Program one year early (i.e. after their third undergraduate year).  This five-year educational track is designed to combine a medical biology-pre-physician assistant track baccalaureate degree, master of science degree, and physician assistant certificate. The program has two components.

The undergraduate baccalaureate phase of this program includes: general biology (8 credits), general chemistry (8 credits), organic chemistry (5 credits), genetics (5 credits), biochemistry (4 credits), anatomy/physiology/pathophysiology (9 credits), cell biology (3 credits), physics (8 credits), calculus (4 credits), statistics (3 credits), and other science and core curriculum courses.

Pre-PA students are expected to earn and maintain a current Certificate in Basic Life Support. During the first three years of study students must obtain a minimum of 250 hours of direct patient experience (through paid or volunteer work) in a health/human services setting.

In the second phase, students will begin their application for admission into the Master of Science - Physician Assistant Program. 

To be eligible for a guaranteed interview for admission into the University of New England PA program, students, by October 1 of their 3rd year, must submit a competed CASPA application, have maintained a BCP GPA of 3.30 (BCP is the calculated CASPA GPA of all biology, chemistry, and physics courses completed), and an overall GPA of 3.0.

The overall GPA and BCP GPA for students who transfer into the accelerated pre-physician assistant 3-2 track is calculated by CASPA using all college-level courses taken both at UNE and other institutions. This is inclusive of course work that does not transfer into UNE. Transfer students enrolling in the accelerated pre-physician assistant 3-2 track must be in residence as a full-time matriculated undergraduate student for four semesters at UNE.

Enrollment in the accelerated pre-physician assistant 3-2 track does not guarantee admission into the Master of Science - Physician Assistant Program. In the event a student does not proceed into the master's level program, it is the student's responsibility to plan for timely completion of the medical biology-pre-physician assistant track baccalaureate program.

Students from the accelerated pre-physician assistant 3-2 track who are admitted into the Master of Science - Physician Assistant Program will receive a bachelor's degree upon successful completion of the first-year of graduate PA studies. After successful completion of the second year of the graduate PA curriculum, a Physician Assistant Certificate, and a master of science - physician assistant degree will be awarded. Students should consult their academic advisor for additional information regarding the program.

Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

A.  Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas.

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life - including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, reproduction.
  • Organismal Diversity - including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
  • Interrelations of Organisms and their environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.

B.  Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:

  • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
  • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
  • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).

C. Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:

  • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
  • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
  • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.
Minor

A medical biology minor requires 6 biology courses, including the introductory biology series. In particular, department of biological sciences majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Medical Biology Minor Required Courses Credits
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular

4

4

Or  
BIO 104 - General Biology and one of
(BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
MAR150 - Introduction to Oceanography)

4

4

4

4

And  
BIO 200 - Genetics 5
BIO 245 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 345 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 370 - Cell Biology 3
Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Stine Brown
sbrown@une.edu

Bachelor of Science with a major in Medical Biology - Pre-Physician Assistant Track

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Biology

Mental Health Rehabilitation

Minor Description

The Mental Health Rehabilitation Technician (MHRT/Community) Certification is one of the most needed certifications in the state of Maine.  It is required for persons working in positions funded by the Maine Department of Health and Human Services as well as other human service organizations.  The University of New England Psychology Department has been approved by the state to offer a program of study that provides full certification upon graduation.  There are two ways students can achieve this certification at UNE:  (1) they can major in Psychology and take specific course work as electives that will complete the program requirements, or (2) they can declare the minor in Mental Health Rehabilitation.   Upon graduation, students need only to send an official copy of their transcript and the completed paperwork to the Muskie School Center for Learning, and no additional payment is required.  The paperwork to be completed can be downloaded at:  http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/cfl/forms.html   For more information, contact either the Department of Psychology Chair or Professor Cathleen Ferrick at cferrick@une.edu 

Curricular Requirements

Students completing the following 7 courses will be awarded a minor in Mental Health Rehabilitation and are eligible for MHRT/C certification from the state of Maine:   

Course                                                                                                                           Credits

PSY105  Introduction to Psychology                                                                   3
PSY 205   Abnormal Psychology                                                                             3
PSY 250  Lifespan Development                                                                            3
PSY 236  Mental Health and Society                                                                   3
PSY 318  Community Psychology                                                                         3

           OR PSY 300 Psychology Internship I
SOC 240  Race, Class, and Gender                                                                       3
PSY 410  Theories of Clinical/Counseling Psychology                              3

          OR  PSY295 Listening and Communication Skills

 

TOTAL CREDITS:                                                                                                            21

Learning Outcomes

A student with a major in another department may minor in Mental Health Rehabilitation with the approval of the Psychology Department Chair.  The seven courses required for this minor also fulfill the requirements for MHRT/Community Certification*.  The Twenty-one hours of approved course work are indicated below:

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Link to Department page please

Minor in Mental Health Rehabilitation

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Psychology

Neuroscience

Mission

The Department of Psychology offers students a broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on community, social and individual approaches to understanding human behavior.  Students are thus exposed to a combination of theoretical, scientific and practical approaches to solving human problems.  Issues of gender, race, class and culture are emphasized in courses throughout the curriculum.  As a result of required course work and internship experiences, the department graduates students with marketable skills that prepare them for entry-level positions in social services or for graduate study in related areas.  As part of this mission, the Department of Psychology offers four majors: psychology, neuroscience, animal behavior and psychology and social relations.

Major Description

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary major offered by faculty from various departments and colleges with expertise in the neurosciences.  The neuroscience curriculum offers students an opportunity to explore the structure and function of the nervous system.  The major requires a general science background, a number of courses specifically devoted to the brain and nervous system, and an in-depth experience that explores the limits of knowledge in at least one aspect of neuroscience.  The major allows considerable flexibility for students to develop the last two years along the lines of individual preferences and interests, with potential foci in areas of cellular/molecular neurobiology, behavioral neuroscience, or cognitive science.  The majority of students who graduate with a degree in Neuroscience enter graduate or professional programs culminating with careers in medicine/health care, research, and/or education.  

Admissions

Interested students should apply for admission to the neuroscience major.  Upon acceptance to the university students are provisionally admitted to this major.  Upon completion of 60 credit hours (approximately the end of the second year of full-time work) student progress is evaluated by the undergraduate curriculum committee (see below).  Students will then be fully admitted upon meeting the conditions indicated in the Program Standards section below.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

The Neuroscience major is administered through the Department of Psychology with guidance from the Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.  Students interested in pursuing a degree in neuroscience will have a primary advisor in the psychology department and the option of a secondary advisor from among the interdisciplinary faculty who comprise the curriculum committee.

For more information, please contact any of the faculty from the Undergraduate Neuroscience Curriculum Committee listed below:

Glenn Stevenson, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Department of Psychology / Program Coordinator, Neuroscience Major
gstevenson@une.edu

Geoffrey Ganter, Ph.D., Professor
Department of Biology
gganter@une.edu

Ian Meng, Ph.D., Professor
Department of Biomedical Sciences
imeng@une.edu

Michael Burman Ph.D, Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology
mburman@une.edu

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives.  All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of "C-"  must be achieved in all courses used to fulfill the requirements for the Neuroscience  major. See Undergraduate Academic Policy also.

Curricular Requirements
  CREDITS
CAS Core Requirements* 42 - 43
*Math core requirement is MAT 190 Calculus I  
  Credits
Program Required Courses 33-43
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
CHE 110/111 - General Chemistry I & II 8
PSY 225 - Psychology Statistics or MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
NEU 210 - The Brain 4
PHY 110/111 - General Physics I & II 8
NEU 310 - Neurobiology of Mental Illness 3
CHE 210/211 - Organic Chemistry I & II (CHE 310 may substitute for CHE 211) 10
NEU 320 - Principles of Neurobiology 3
NEU 495 - Neuroscience Lab/special Topics 3
Neuroscience Electives (4) (see below) 12 - 20
Minimum Required Total Credits  120
  Credits
Each student will choose four elective courses. No more than 3 may be chosen from either list A or B. No course counted as an elective may simultaneously satisfy program requirements.  
List A  
BIO 200 - Genetics (Human) 5
BIO 245 - General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 330 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4
BIO 340 - Embryology 4
BIO 345 - General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 365 - Immunology 3
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3

BIO 404 - Neuroscience

4

BIO 407 - Developmental Biology

3

BIO 450 - Biology Topics

3
CHE 405 - Medicinal Chemistry 3
   
List B  
PSY 226 - Motivation and Emotion 3
PSY 245 - Evolutionary Psychology 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 275 - Introduction to Techniques in Animal Behavior

3

PSY 285 - Research Methods 3
PSY 335 - Comparative Animal Behavior or BIO 335 Animal Behavior/Behavioral Ecology 3
PSY 362 - Animal Cognition 3

PSY 365 - Biological Bases of Behavior

PSY 370 - Drugs, Society, and Behavior

3

3

PSY 380 - Learning/Conditioning and Behavior Modification or
PSY 382 - Animal Learning and Behavior

3

3

PSY 383 - Memory and Cognition 3
PSY 425 - Advanced Methods in Animal Behavior 3
PSY 440 - Sensation and Perception 3
PSY 490 - Behavioral Neuroscience 3
PHI 370 - Philosophy of Psychology 3
PHI 380 - Philosophy of Mind 3
Learning Outcomes

 I. Learning Goals for NEUROSCIENCE Majors (knowledge base) 

Students who graduate with a Bachelors of Science Degree in Neuroscience at UNE 
will be able to: 

  1. Understand the cellular and molecular structure and function of neurons, including how  neurons communicate 
  2. Understand the organization and function of sensory and motor systems, including transduction mechanisms and encoding properties of the nervous system 
  3. Understand the organization and function of the brain as it relates to behavior and cognition 
  4. Understand the development and mechanisms of plasticity of the nervous system 
  5. Demonstrate a working knowledge of neuroanatomy, including an understanding of how nervous system structure relates to its function 

The program will provide a framework for the historical trends and theoretical 
perspectives in the neurosciences. The goal is to produce independent, self-motivated 
learners who have acquired the analytical and research skills that will help them to think 
creatively while integrating complex ideas. Particular emphasis is placed on developing 
the skills necessary to effectively communicate in both the written and oral format. 
 
Students will acquire the following skills as they complete their degree program in 
Neuroscience: 
 
1. Quantitative skills 
1.1 Ability to represent information in a quantitative format 
1.2 Ability to analyze and interpret quantitative information, including graphs and statistics 
1.3 Ability to quantitatively manipulate data and information 
 
2. Critical and integrative thinking skills 
2.1 Ability to critique and develop experimental designs and methodology 
2.2 Ability to integrate findings from diverse fields to address a research question or develop a testable hypothesis. 
2.3 Ability to read and analyze a primary research paper 
 
3. Research skills 
3.1 Ability to develop a hypothesis and design experiments to test this hypothesis 
3.2 Ability to collect, analyze, and interpret data 
3.3 Ability to perform multiple techniques related to neuroscience research (specific techniques may vary, but include: anatomical techniques, electrophysiology, biochemical techniques, cell culture, behavioral studies, etc.) 

 
4. Communication skills 
4.1 Ability to present information orally in an organized and understandable manner 
4.2 Ability to communicate scientific information in written format for scientific 
publication 
4.3 Ability to communicate scientific information to the lay public in both oral and 
written format 
 
5. Independent critical thinking skills 
5.1 Ability to defend unique views/approaches/answers to well established phenomenon 
and theories based upon objective evidence 
5.2 Ability to overcome barriers/impediments to learning/research. 
5.3 Ability to find answers to questions that may not be specifically addressed in a course

MEASURES 

KNOWLEDGE 
BASE

SKILL 1

SKILL 2

SKILL 3

SKILL 4

SKILL 5

USE OF THE INFORMATION

MCAT or GRE Exam scores for Neuroscience majors who anticipate applying to medical or graduate school 

X

X     X

Data are reported to department annually in aggregate and student are 

given their individual scores.

All data are reviewed as part of program review 

every four years

All students are  required to complete an upper level neuroscience seminar course or independent research in a neuroscience laboratory 

X X X X X X

Data are reported to department in an annual assessment meeting in aggregate and used as part of program review

Graduating student 
survey administered in 
early May of senior 
year 

X X X X X X

Data are reported to 
department in an annual assessment meeting in aggregate and used as part of program review

Internship Evaluation 
Form is required for Neuroscience students 
doing internships

X X X X X X

Data are reported to department in an annual assessment meeting in aggregate and used as part of program review

Minor

A student with a major in another area may minor in Neuroscience with permission of the psychology department chair. A minimum of 25 hours of approved course credit with a grade of "C-" or better is required for the minor in Neuroscience as follows:

Minimum Credits 25
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
CHE 110/111 - General Chemistry I & II 8
NEU 210 - The Brain 4
NEU 310 - Neurobiology of Mental Illness 3
NEU 320 - Principles of Neurobiology 3
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Office at (207) 602-2271 or (207) 602-2371

Bachelor of Science with a major in Neuroscience

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Psychology

Nursing (4 Year Program)

Mission

The mission of the Department of Nursing is to facilitate the education of future professional nurses to be effective clinicians and leaders. As clinicians, graduates are prepared to promote the ability of all persons, families and communities in attaining their highest level of wellness. As leaders, graduates are prepared to use research for evaluating and improving health care approaches and for continued study in nursing.

Philosophy

Nursing, a caring art and science, encompasses the diagnosis and treatment of human responses to health and illness. Nurses use a variety of models to guide people of many cultures toward identifying their own health care and healing needs. Nurses model self care while supporting people in their own pursuit of health. People are born with healing capacities with or without perception of these capacities although a cure is not always certain. The nurse as a health care resource is available to assist people to move toward and maintain health in their human experiences. The society in which the nurse functions are rapidly changing and is technologically oriented. Nurses use knowledge gained from client preferences and values, clinical expertise and best research evidence as well as the integral process to guide their practice. The practice of nursing must be in accordance with established standards of clinical practice and the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics (ANA, 2001) and the Maine Nurse Core Competencies (MPNEP, 2012).

Health, a personally perceived state of wellbeing, is an ever-changing holistic interplay among the physiological, spiritual, psychological, social, cultural, cognitive and emotional dimensions of people. Faculty believes that reflective practice is continuous one wherein the student develops a unique holistic awareness of self and how one’s self affects others.As people grow and develop, they strive to meet the needs of these interconnected dimensions to achieve a sense of harmony and balance between self and environment. Clients, as partners in their care, may be individuals, families, groups or communities.  Faculty value the uniqueness, worth, dignity and integrity of all people and believe that each human being is a dynamic holistic system. 

The essence of professional nursing education lies in the integration of academic and clinical experience. Faculty are committed to a foundation of study grounded in arts, sciences, and humanities that leads to Interprofessional and nursing education. The acquisition of competency based knowledge, skills and attitudes prepare future nurses to meet the healthcare needs of a diverse population. Faculty believe that student centeredness is the cornerstone to optimal learning and are committed to a supportive, caring and interactive environment that takes into account the diversity of culture and experience that students bring to the learning situation. Learning is a collaborative process whereby students and faculty learn from each other, clients, peers, mentors, preceptors as well as other health care professionals.

Degree Description

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing is an academically rigorous four-year professional program. During the first four semesters, students build a foundation of knowledge in science, humanities and related professional disciplines. The student begins the process of knowledge application from theory to actual practice utilizing the sciences and experiential learning.

During the last four semesters students are deeply immersed in nursing course work and clinical experiences which emphasize clinical judgment, health and human functioning, care and therapeutics, person and environment and health care resources. Nursing skill laboratories combined with simulation, and clinical experiences occur in a variety of hospital and community settings. These settings, serving diverse populations, actualize the process of integrating theory to practice.
Upon successful completion of the curriculum, The University of New England awards a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and students are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX).

Accreditation

The nursing program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) and is approved by the Maine State Board of Nursing. The ACEN can be contacted at 3343 Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite850, Atlanta, GA 30326 1-404-975-5000. www.nlnac.org.

Admissions

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Nursing 4-year BSN Program must meet general admission requirements of the University of New England, have a high school diploma or GED, have completed four years of high school English, two years of high school math including Algebra I, two years of science including chemistry and biology. Applicants should have combined reading and math SAT scores of 1000 or higher and have a high school grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 for math and science combined.

Clinical Placement Requirements

  • Completion of all of health requirements including the following immunizations and tests: Tetanus, Diphtheria, Attenuated Pertussis, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Meningococcal, Hepatitis B, Varicella, Tuberculin Skin Testing
  • Other immunizations and tests as required by clinical facilities
  • Background Check
  • CPR at level of health provider
  • HIPAA training module completed
  • Able to meet Technical Standards
Program Academic and Technical Standards

Department Policies

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the university community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the dean of the appropriate College and, if upheld, will result at minimum in a failing grade on the assignment and a maximum of dismissal from the University of New England. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
Actions that destroy or alter the work of another student.
Multiple submissions of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
Plagiarism: the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one’s own.

 HIPAA Compliance

Prior to attending any clinical experience, it is mandatory that each nursing student document yearly completion of the UNE training program explaining their legal responsibilities under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Under this regulation, nursing students are permitted to have access to Protected Health Information (PHI) only when observing and performing direct client/patient care as a part of their training, and must follow approved HIPAA policies on usage of PHI. More detailed information is available in the UNE Department of Nursing Student Handbook, and will also be provided by the UNE HIPAA training program. Students requiring further clarification are referred to the faculty of this course. Students must comply with requirements and expectations for appropriate storage and transmittal of client information. No PHI can leave a covered entity site unless it is de-identified. All HIPAA violations will be reported to the UNE HIPAA Compliance Officer. 

Office for Students with Disabilities

The University of New England will make reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Students need to register with Disability Services and inform their instructors of any academic accommodations. Timely accommodations are dependent on early registration with Disability Services. This office is located in Stella Maris 131 on the Biddeford Campus and on the Lower Level of Ginn Hall on the Portland Campus.

WCHP Course & Instructor Evaluation Policy

Course and instructor evaluations are one of the most important tools that we have for evaluating the quality of your education, and for providing meaningful feedback to course instructors on their teaching. In order to assure that the feedback is both comprehensive and precise, we need to receive it from everyone, so course evaluations are a required element of every course. Students who complete all their evaluations on time will have access to their grades as soon as they are available. For those students who do not complete their evaluations, grades will be masked for approximately two weeks.

Department of Nursing Academic and Progression Standards

Students accepted to the WCHP at the University of New England are subject to two sets of academic guidelines, one to meet minimum qualifications for ongoing enrollment at the University of New England and the other to meet specific program requirements.Freshman and Sophomore Years

Freshman and Sophomore Years (Semesters 1 through 4)

In keeping with the minimum guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows to meet University requirements:

Fall of First Year

1.70

Spring of First Year

1.70

Fall of Second Year

1.70

Spring of Second Year

1.80

  • Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the catalog of the University of New England
  • Students must also achieve a minimum grade of “C” in the following courses: MAT 120, CHE 110, BIO 104, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 309, IHS 220 and NSG 202. Failure to achieve a “C” will result in program-level probation and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  • Failure to earn a “C” or above in any of the above courses requires the student to repeat the course.
  • Failure to achieve a “C” or above a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  • A student may enroll in any of the courses listed above a maximum of two times. Enrollment consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade. Receiving a W from a course is not considered being officially enrolled. 

Junior & Senior Years (Semesters 5 through 8)

  • Students must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.50
  • Students must comply with requirements for attendance and professionalism.
  • Student must comply with policies stated in UNE and Nursing Student Handbooks.
  • Students must obtain a minimum examination final average of 77 (C+) in all 300 and 400 level nursing courses in order to continue to progress through the program.
  • Students must obtain a C or better in all required science and mathematics courses.
  • Students must obtain a minimum final course average of 77 (C+) in all 300 and 400 level nursing courses in order to continue to progress through the program.
  • Students must meet the competencies for satisfactory completion of the clinical component of each nursing course. An unsatisfactory grade (U) in clinical, regardless of the grade in the theoretical component of the course, will result in a course grade no higher than C. In addition, a student cannot progress to the next clinical nursing course.
  • Students must perform in the clinical area in a manner that is deemed safe by the faculty.
  • If student’s exam average is 77 (C+) or greater, his/her final grade will be determined by the calculation as stated in the syllabus for the course. If student’s exam average is less than 77 (C+), the final grade will be determined by the calculation as stated in the syllabus for the course, but not to exceed a C regardless of the earned average.
  • Failure to obtain a minimum grade of 77 (C+) in any 300 or 400 level nursing course would necessitate that the student repeat the course to achieve the minimum grade. A student may enroll in a nursing course twice. To promote retention of previous learning, and to maximize the likelihood of success in the course to be repeated, students who must repeat a nursing course are strongly encouraged to register to audit the nursing course immediately preceding the course to be retaken. 
  • Failure to obtain a minimum grade of C in any required science or math course as described above would necessitate that the student repeat that course until a C is obtained as a final grade.

Dismissal from the Nursing Program at the 100 and 200 course level 

A student may be dismissed from the nursing program for any of the following reasons:

  • Violations of the academic integrity policies
  • Violation of the American Nurses Association “Code for Nurses” guidelines for ethical practice, or the National Student Nurses’ Association “Code of Academic and Clinical conduct.”
  • Failure to maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 in the WCHP Core Courses
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C or higher in a 200 level nursing course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C or higher in a required science or math course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • A documented pattern of unprofessional behavior

Dismissal from the Nursing Program at the 300 and 400 course level

A student may be dismissed from the nursing program for any of the following reasons:

  • Violations of the academic integrity policies
  • Violation of the American Nurses Association “Code for Nurses” guidelines for ethical practice, or the National Student Nurses’ Association “Code of Academic and Clinical conduct.”
  • Failure to maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 2.50
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C+ or higher in a 300 or 400 level nursing course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C or higher in a required science or math course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • A documented pattern of unprofessional behavior.
  • Unsafe practice in the clinical area, as defined by the competency evaluation tool included in each course syllabus.

Students dismissed from the nursing program related to academic deficiencies (low GPA or second failure of a nursing course) may petition the nursing faculty for readmission if they wish to reenter the program. Matters of personal concern to the student will be considered at this time. Faculty will make a recommendation to the Director of the Nursing Department regarding readmission to the nursing program.

Students dismissed from the program may initiate an appeal process as documented in the UNE student manual. Students wishing to appeal an issue should refer to the UNE Student Handbook “Academic and Disciplinary Appeals Policy”.

Technical Standards

Technical standards are all of the nonacademic functional abilities essential for the delivery of safe, effective nursing care. These basic abilities make up the core components of nursing practice, and there is a high probability that untoward consequences may result for clients cared for by nurses who fail to demonstrate these abilities. In compliance with state and federal laws, nursing education programs must attend to these essential functional abilities in the teaching and evaluation of students preparing for the practice of nursing.

This statement of technical standards identifies the functional abilities deemed by the Nursing Faculty at the University of New England to be essential to the practice of nursing, and as such are reflected in satisfactory progression through the nursing program and in the performance-based outcomes which are the basis for teaching and evaluating all nursing student.

Nursing Program Technical Standards

Curricular Requirements
Courses Credits
Core Requirements  
First Year  33
BIO 104 - General Biology 4
BIO 208 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology 4
ENG 110 - English Comp 4
IHS 110 - Introduction to Health Care 2
IHS 120 - Health Care Issues 1
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Explorations Course 3
One (1) Social Global Awareness (SGA) Course 3
One (1) Creative Arts (ART, ARH or MUS ) Course 3
   
Second Year 33
BIO 209 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
BIO 242 - Applied Microbiology 4
CHE 130 - Principles of Chemistry 4
IHS 210 - Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
IHS 220 - Nutrition 3
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
NSG 202 - Introduction to Nursing 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
One Human Traditions Course (276 or 278 with a prefix listed below)
ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC, REL
3
Total Core Requirement Credits 66
Courses Credits
Nursing Curriculum  
NSG 307 - Adult Health I 6
NSG 280 - Adult Health II 6
NSG 327 - Health Assessment 3
NSG 328 - Mental Health 4
NSG 332 - Evidence Based Practice (EBP) I 2
NSG 342 - Pharmacology 3
NSG 351 - Integrating Experience I 1
NSG 352 - Integrating Experience II 1
NSG 408 - Adult Health III 7
NSG 409 - Adult Health IV 3
NSG 420 - Community/Public Health Nursing 3
NSG 425 - Maternal/Child Care 9
NSG 432 - Evidence Based Practice (EBP) II 2
NSG 442 - Integrating Experience III 1
NSG 445 - Leadership 2
NSG 446 - Transition to Practice 1
NSG 452 - Integrating Experience IV 1
NSG 485 - Preceptorship (135 hours) 3
Elective 3
   
Total Nursing Curriculum Credits 61
Total Credits 127
Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, the graduate will be able to: 

  1. Integrate the knowledge and science of nursing with the natural/behavioral sciences, the humanities and interprofessional education to provide holistic care for individuals, families, groups, communities or populations. 
  2. Demonstrate the capacity to practice nursing using an evidence-based and theoretically guided framework. 
  3. Model professional values as a nurse which reflect the integration of ethical and moral principles, social advocacy and legal standards in delivering quality care to all people. 
  4. Utilize data from diverse sources with knowledge and skill in informatics and patient care technology to promote safety and optimal outcomes of care. 
  5. Distinguish the components of nursing leadership and management as applied to healthcare organizations and healthy work environments. 
  6. Model principles of self care while supporting the health and well being of diverse individuals, families, groups, communities or populations. 
  7. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the issues concerning health care delivery to diverse individuals, families, groups, communities or populations. 
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Lab Fees

Laboratory fees are assessed in individual courses that incorporate the skills laboratory, the human patient simulator laboratory, standardized testing and clinical placement fees.

Equipment

Students are responsible for the costs of the following required items: Uniforms and lab jacket; shoes, name tag; bandage scissors; watch indicating seconds; stethoscope.

Transportation

Nursing students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical facilities throughout the program.

Pinning Ceremony

Graduation expenses include a departmental pinning ceremony in May. These expenses vary each year. Students may inquire in the nursing office for an estimate of current costs.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the University Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

Courses

Credits Needed 4 Yr BSN

Nursing

61

General Education

66

Transfer

N/A

Prereqs

0

Total

127

 

Jennifer Morton, D.N.P., M.S., M.P.H., R.N.
JMorton@UNE.edu

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Nursing

Nursing (Accelerated B.S.N. 16 Months)

Mission

The mission of the Department of Nursing is to facilitate the education of future professional nurses to be effective clinicians and leaders. As clinicians, graduates are prepared to promote the ability of all persons, families and communities in attaining their highest level of wellness. As leaders, graduates are prepared to use research for evaluating and improving health care approaches and for continued study in nursing.

Philosophy

Nursing, a caring art and science, encompasses the diagnosis and treatment of human responses to health and illness.  Nurses use a variety of models to guide people of many cultures toward identifying their own health care and healing needs.  Nurses model self care while supporting people in their own pursuit of health.  People are born with healing capacities with or without perception of these capacities although a cure is not always certain.  The nurse as a health care resource is available to assist people to move toward and maintain health in their human experiences.  The society in which the nurse functions are rapidly changing and is technologically oriented.  Nurses use knowledge gained from client preferences and values, clinical expertise and best research evidence as well as the integral process to guide their practice.  The practice of nursing must be in accordance with established standards of clinical practice and the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics (ANA, 2001) and the Maine Nurse Core Competencies (MPNEP, 2012).

Health, a personally perceived state of well being, is an ever-changing holistic interplay among the physiological, spiritual, psychological, social, cultural, cognitive and emotional dimensions of people.  Faculty believes that reflective practice is continuous one wherein the student develops a unique holistic awareness of self and how one’s self affects others. As people grow and develop, they strive to meet the needs of these interconnected dimensions to achieve a sense of harmony and balance between self and environment.  Clients, as partners in their care, may be individuals, families, groups or communities.  Faculty value the uniqueness, worth, dignity and integrity of all people and believe that each human being is a dynamic holistic system.

The essence of professional nursing education lies in the integration of academic and clinical experience. Faculty are committed to a foundation of study grounded in arts, sciences, and humanities that leads to Interprofessional and nursing education. The acquisition of competency based knowledge, skills and attitudes prepare future nurses to meet the healthcare needs of a diverse population. Faculty believe that student centeredness is the cornerstone to optimal learning and are committed to a supportive, caring and interactive environment that takes into account the diversity of culture and experience that students bring to the learning situation. Learning is a collaborative process whereby students and faculty learn from each other, clients, peers, mentors, preceptors as well as other health care professionals.

Degree Description

The Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) is an academically rigorous 16-month professional program for highly motivated and committed students who already have a bachelors degree in a discipline other than nursing. The ABSN is designed to run continuously for 16 months and totals 69 credits. Entry to the program is predicated upon applicants having successfully completed a baccalaureate degree (not in nursing), completion of program pre-requisite course work within the previous 5 years,* a GPA of 3.0 or higher in science, and achievement of other requirements for admission to the University including a background check and health requirements. The ABSN Program mirrors the Department of Nursing's vision, mission, philosophy and program outcomes for BSN education.

Students build on previous academic foundations and are able to engage quickly in nursing course work and clinical experiences that emphasize clinical judgment, health and human functioning, care and therapeutics, person and environment and health care resources. Nursing skill laboratories combined with simulation, and clinical experiences occur in a variety of hospital and community settings. These settings, serving diverse populations, actualize the process of integrating theory to practice. Upon successful completion of the curriculum, The University of New England awards a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and students are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX).

Accreditation

The Nursing programs are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). Further information can be obtained from NLNAC at 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326. 1-404-975-5000. Programs leading to RN licensure are approved by The Maine State Board of Nursing.

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

  • A baccalaureate degree (not in nursing)
  • Completion of program pre-requisite course work*
  • GPA of 3.0 or higher in science
  • General requirements for admission to the University

*Prerequisite Course Work

  • Anatomy & Physiology I & II w/Lab
  • Microbiology w/Lab
  • Chemistry w/Lab
  • Human Growth and Development
  • Nutrition
  • Statistics

Sciences and Statistics must have been taken within 5 years of admission and students must achieve a grade of C or better in the course.

Clinical Placement Requirements

  • Completion of all of health requirements including the following immunizations: Tetanus, Diphtheria, Attenuated Pertussis, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Meningococcal, Hepatitis B, Varicella, Tuberculin Skin Testing
  • Other immunizations and tests as required by clinical facilities
  • Background Check
  • CPR at level of health provider
  • HIPAA training module completed
  • Able to meet Technical Standards
Program Academic and Technical Standards

DEPARTMENT POLICIES

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the university community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the dean of the appropriate College and, if upheld, will result at minimum in a failing grade on the assignment and a maximum of dismissal from the University of New England. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
Actions that destroy or alter the work of another student.
Multiple submissions of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
Plagiarism: the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one’s own.

 HIPAA Compliance

Prior to attending any clinical experience, it is mandatory that each nursing student document yearly completion of the UNE training program explaining their legal responsibilities under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Under this regulation, nursing students are permitted to have access to Protected Health Information (PHI) only when observing and performing direct client/patient care as a part of their training, and must follow approved HIPAA policies on usage of PHI. More detailed information is available in the UNE Department of Nursing Student Handbook, and will also be provided by the UNE HIPAA training program. Students requiring further clarification are referred to the faculty of this course. Students must comply with requirements and expectations for appropriate storage and transmittal of client information. No PHI can leave a covered entity site unless it is de-identified. All HIPAA violations will be reported to the UNE HIPAA Compliance Officer. 

Office for Students with Disabilities

The University of New England will make reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Students need to register with Disability Services and inform their instructors of any academic accommodations. Timely accommodations are dependent on early registration with Disability Services. This office is located in Stella Maris 131 on the Biddeford Campus and on the Lower Level of Ginn Hall on the Portland Campus.

WCHP Course & Instructor Evaluation Policy

Course and instructor evaluations are one of the most important tools that we have for evaluating the quality of your education, and for providing meaningful feedback to course instructors on their teaching. In order to assure that the feedback is both comprehensive and precise, we need to receive it from everyone, so course evaluations are a required element of every course. Students who complete all their evaluations on time will have access to their grades as soon as they are available. For those students who do not complete their evaluations, grades will be masked for approximately two weeks.

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING ACADEMIC AND PROGRESSION STANDARDS

Students accepted to the WCHP at the University of New England are subject to two sets of academic guidelines, one to meet minimum qualifications for ongoing enrollment at the University of New England and the other to meet specific program requirements.Freshman and Sophomore Years

Freshman and Sophomore Years (Semesters 1 through 4)

In keeping with the minimum guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows to meet University requirements:

Fall of First Year

1.70

Spring of First Year

1.70

Fall of Second Year

1.70

Spring of Second Year

1.80

  • Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the catalog of the University of New England
  • Students must also achieve a minimum grade of “C” in the following courses: MAT 120, CHE 110, BIO 104, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 309, IHS 220 and NSG 202. Failure to achieve a “C” will result in program-level probation and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  • Failure to earn a “C” or above in any of the above courses requires the student to repeat the course.
  • Failure to achieve a “C” or above a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  • A student may enroll in any of the courses listed above a maximum of two times. Enrollment consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade. Receiving a W from a course is not considered being officially enrolled. 

Junior & Senior Years (Semesters 5 through 8)

  • Students must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.50
  • Students must comply with requirements for attendance and professionalism.
  • Student must comply with policies stated in UNE and Nursing Student Handbooks.
  • Students must obtain a minimum examination final average of 77 (C+) in all 300 and 400 level nursing courses in order to continue to progress through the program.
  • Students must obtain a C or better in all required science and mathematics courses.
  • Students must obtain a minimum final course average of 77 (C+) in all 300 and 400 level nursing courses in order to continue to progress through the program.
  • Students must meet the competencies for satisfactory completion of the clinical component of each nursing course. An unsatisfactory grade (U) in clinical, regardless of the grade in the theoretical component of the course, will result in a course grade no higher than C. In addition, a student cannot progress to the next clinical nursing course.
  • Students must perform in the clinical area in a manner that is deemed safe by the faculty.
  • If student’s exam average is 77 (C+) or greater, his/her final grade will be determined by the calculation as stated in the syllabus for the course. If student’s exam average is less than 77 (C+), the final grade will be determined by the calculation as stated in the syllabus for the course, but not to exceed a C regardless of the earned average.
  • Failure to obtain a minimum grade of 77 (C+) in any 300 or 400 level nursing course would necessitate that the student repeat the course to achieve the minimum grade. A student may enroll in a nursing course twice. To promote retention of previous learning, and to maximize the likelihood of success in the course to be repeated, students who must repeat a nursing course are strongly encouraged to register to audit the nursing course immediately preceding the course to be retaken. 
  • Failure to obtain a minimum grade of C in any required science or math course as described above would necessitate that the student repeat that course until a C is obtained as a final grade.

DISMISSAL FROM THE NURSING PROGRAM AT THE 100 AND 200 COURSE LEVEL 

A student may be dismissed from the nursing program for any of the following reasons:

  • Violations of the academic integrity policies
  • Violation of the American Nurses Association “Code for Nurses” guidelines for ethical practice, or the National Student Nurses’ Association “Code of Academic and Clinical conduct.”
  • Failure to maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 in the WCHP Core Courses
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C or higher in a 200 level nursing course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C or higher in a required science or math course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • A documented pattern of unprofessional behavior

DISMISSAL FROM THE NURSING PROGRAM AT THE 300 AND 400 COURSE LEVEL

A student may be dismissed from the nursing program for any of the following reasons:

  • Violations of the academic integrity policies
  • Violation of the American Nurses Association “Code for Nurses” guidelines for ethical practice, or the National Student Nurses’ Association “Code of Academic and Clinical conduct.”
  • Failure to maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 2.50
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C+ or higher in a 300 or 400 level nursing course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • Failure to achieve a grade of C or higher in a required science or math course after a prior failure to achieve a satisfactory grade in the same course.
  • A documented pattern of unprofessional behavior.
  • Unsafe practice in the clinical area, as defined by the competency evaluation tool included in each course syllabus.

Students dismissed from the nursing program related to academic deficiencies (low GPA or second failure of a nursing course) may petition the nursing faculty for readmission if they wish to reenter the program. Matters of personal concern to the student will be considered at this time. Faculty will make a recommendation to the Director of the Nursing Department regarding readmission to the nursing program.

Students dismissed from the program may initiate an appeal process as documented in the UNE student manual. Students wishing to appeal an issue should refer to the UNE Student Handbook “Academic and Disciplinary Appeals Policy”.

TECHNICAL STANDARDS

Technical standards are all of the nonacademic functional abilities essential for the delivery of safe, effective nursing care. These basic abilities make up the core components of nursing practice, and there is a high probability that untoward consequences may result for clients cared for by nurses who fail to demonstrate these abilities. In compliance with state and federal laws, nursing education programs must attend to these essential functional abilities in the teaching and evaluation of students preparing for the practice of nursing.

This statement of technical standards identifies the functional abilities deemed by the Nursing Faculty at the University of New England to be essential to the practice of nursing, and as such are reflected in satisfactory progression through the nursing program and in the performance-based outcomes which are the basis for teaching and evaluating all nursing student.

Nursing Program Technical Standards

Curricular Requirements
Courses Credits
   
Spring I (Semester 1) 18
NSG 280 - Adult Health I/Clin/Lab/Sim 8
NSG 327 - Health Assessment 3
NSG 351 - Integrating Experience I 1
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
IHS 110 - Intro to the Health Professions 2
IHS 300 - Interprofessional Education Passport 1
   
Summer I (Semester 2) 17
NSG 309 - Adult Health II/Clin/Lab/Sim 7
NSG 328 - Mental Health 4
NSG 334 - Foundations in Evidence Based Practice 3
NSG 342 - Pharmacology 3
   

Fall I (Semester 3)

17
NSG 424 - Maternal/Child Care/Clin/Lab/Sim 8
NSG 434 - Nursing Research 3
NSG 444 - Accelerated Integrative Experience II 1
NSG 445 - Leadership 2
IHS 310 - Ethics 3
   
Spring II (Semester 4) 17
NSG 407 - Adult Health III/Clin/Lab/Sim 6
NSG 409 - Adult Health IV 3
NSG 420 - Community/Public Health 3
NSG 447 - Transition to Practice 2
NSG 485 - Preceptorship (135 hours) 3
   
Total Credits Required 69
Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, the graduate will be able to: 

  1. Integrate the knowledge and science of nursing with the natural/behavioral sciences, the humanities and interprofessional education to provide holistic care for individuals, families, groups, communities or populations. 
  2. Demonstrate the capacity to practice nursing using an evidence-based and theoretically guided framework. 
  3. Model professional values as a nurse which reflect the integration of ethical and moral principles, social advocacy and legal standards in delivering quality care to all people. 
  4. Utilize data from diverse sources with knowledge and skill in informatics and patient care technology to promote safety and optimal outcomes of care. 
  5. Distinguish the components of nursing leadership and management as applied to healthcare organizations and healthy work environments. 
  6. Model principles of self care while supporting the health and well being of diverse individuals, families, groups, communities or populations. 
  7. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the issues concerning health care delivery to diverse individuals, families, groups, communities or populations. 
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and expenses related to the nursing program. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Lab Fees

Laboratory fees are assessed in individual courses that incorporate the skills laboratory, the human patient simulator laboratory, standardized testing and clinical placement fees.

Equipment

Students are responsible for the costs of the following required items: Uniforms and lab jacket; shoes; name tag; bandage scissors; watch indicating seconds; stethoscope.

Transportation

Nursing students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical facilities throughout the program.

Pinning Ceremony

Graduation expenses include a departmental pinning ceremony in May. These expenses vary each year. Students may inquire in the nursing office for an estimate of current costs.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the University Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

Courses

Credits Needed ABSN

Nursing

69

General Education

3

Transfer

26

Prerequisites

25

Total

123

Leah Coplon, MS, CNM, RN
lcoplon@une.edu
207-221-4407

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Nursing

Ocean Studies and Marine Affairs

Mission

The mission of the Department of Marine Sciences at University of New England is to enable students to understand the real-world relevance of the marine sciences, foster scientific literacy and critical thinking skills, and lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society.

The Marine Sciences encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, and how it is related to earth systems science, as well as to human interactions with the environment. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology, to chemistry, geology and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet, and beyond. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems, not only in ocean sciences, but in fields as far ranging as meteorology and space exploration

Degree Description

The Marine Sciences program offers a baccalaureate education to students interested in all facets of the marine environment. The classroom curriculum provides a strong background in the marine sciences, including biology, chemistry, physics and geology of the oceans and their surroundings. The program focuses on hands-on activities, internships and research experiences in addition to classroom work.

The Ocean Studies and Marine Affairs major is aimed at providing future student leaders a solid grounding in the vital fields of coastal and marine science, as well as resource use, marine governance systems, management, policy, ecosystems ecology, conservation, and sustainable development. This major is suitable for students who are concerned about the marine environment, and are interested in careers in ecosystem and human health interactions, ocean management and political decision making, and marine sustainability science and policies.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the marine sciences courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42
  Credits
Major Requirements 36
MAR 105/105L - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms  
MAR 106/106L - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 150/150L - Elementary Oceanography 4
MAR 250/250L - Marine Biology 4
MAR 316 - Science in Politics/Society 3
MAR 325 - Marine Science Speaker Series 1
MAR 350/350L - Marine Ecology 4
MAR 358 - Marine Pollution 3
MAR 365 - Ocean Ecosystem-Based Management 3
Organismal Course 4
MAR 400-level Course 3
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics 3
   
Program Required Cognate Courses 11
CHE 110/110L - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111/111L - General Chemistry II 4
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 180 - Precalculus (or higher) (in Core)  
   
Electives 31
   
Total 120
Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will demonstrate a strong foundation in the Marine Policy, Planning and Management Sciences, incorporating science knowledge (biology, chemistry, physics, and geology) of the oceans.
  2. Students will be able to integrate knowledge and develop research skills in current marine affairs
  3. Students will be able to research the scientific literature in ocean studies and compose professionally written interdisciplinary reports.  
  4. Students communicate effectively (oral, written, visual) and will be able to convey their interdisciplinary ocean knowledge and results.
Minor
Minor requirements 18 
MAR/BIO 105/105L - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution 4
MAR 106/106L - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular of Marine Organisms 4
       or BIO 105/105L & BIO 106/106L or BIO 104 & elective BIO  
MAR 250/250L - Marine Biology 4
   
Two from the list below: 6 - 7
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics       3
MAR 318 - Introduction to Ocean and Coastal Law and Policy 3
MAR 354 - Ecological Aquaculture 3
MAR 316 - Science and Society 3
MAR 356 - Marine Pollution 4
Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Sciences.

Program Completion Timeline:
Students have a maximum of seven years to complete the graduation requirements

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Barry Costa-Pierce
bcostapierce@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Ocean Studies and Marine Affairs

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Marine Sciences

Philosophy

Mission

By helping students to develop critical and creative reasoning skills, by teaching ethical frameworks, and by bringing the perspective of philosophy to their  to their thinking, philosophy helps students think, argue and communicate more clearly and effectively about themselves, their place in the society, human knowledge, and moral problems.  Philosophy aims at bringing the tools of the discipline to the student to encourage inquiry and the questioning of basic assumptions.

 

 

 

Major Description

Philosophy asks the big questions: Who am I? What is there? What can be known? How should I live? These lead to other questions about the relationship between the mind and the body, appearance and reality, truth and opinion, right and wrong, freedom and determinism, the individual and society, human beings and nature, and God and the afterlife. To ask these questions is to examine our most basic beliefs about human existence and the world we live in. At the same time, philosophy does not provide pat answers, but claims with Socrates that the goal is to live "the examined life." For this reason, the study of philosophy cultivates the skills of clear thinking and effective argumentation.  

Philosophy Minors will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and evaluate philosophical arguments
  • Give, orally or in writing, a philosophical argument
  • Identify and explain philosophical problems along with possible solutions
  • Identify, explain, compare and contrast the views of important philosophers
  • Explain philosophical methods.
  • Give examples of how philosophy bears on their other studies and on human life in general.

Philosophy courses are at the heart of UNE’s core curriculum and satisfy the "Explorations", "Human Traditions",  or  "Advanced Studies" requirements.  Courses at the 100/200 level fulfill the Explorations core requirement, courses numbered 276 and 278 satisfy the Human Traditions requirement, and 300/400 level courses satisfy the Advanced Studies requirement . 

Philosophy connects with many other disciplines, and students from all majors are invited to enroll in our courses and to seek a minor in Philosophy.  For instance, students majoring in Medical Biology may take Philosophy of Biology, Philosophy of Science, and Bioethics.  Psychology majors might be interested in Philosophy of Psychology, Philosophy of Mind, and The Nature of Human Nature.

Students seeking a program of study in Philosophy should choose a major in Liberal Studies with a concentration in Philosophy or develop a personal major.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements

The minor in Philosophy requires the completion of six courses (minimum 18 credits) with the PHI prefix. At least three of the six courses must be numbered 300 or greater.

Philosophy (PHI) courses  
PHI 110 - Problems of Knowledge 
PHI 120 - Living the Good Life 
PHI 125 - Phil of Friendship, Love, Marriage, and Sex 
PHI 150 - Critical Thinking 
PHI 160 - Science, Pseudo Science, and Weird Ideas 
PHI 183 - Free Will and Determinism
PHI 200 - Science and Human Nature
PHI 220 - Individual and Society 
PHI 250 - Thinking Critically About Moral Problems 
PHI 276 - HT I: Virtue and Happiness
PHI 278 - HT II: Knowledge, Sketicism and Reasonable Belief
PHI 302 - Good & Evil, Right & Wrong
PHI 304 - Social and Political Philosophy 
PHI 307 - God, Life and the Hereafter
PHI 315 - Bioethics 
PHI 318 - Chinese Philosophy
PHI 320 - Readings in History and Philosophy of Science
PHI 325 - Topics in Philosophy 
PHI 330 - Environmental Philosophy 
PHI 340- History of Philosophy: Descartes through Kant
PHI 350 - Ancient Philosophy
PHI 351 - Philosophy of Science
PHI 370 - Philosophy of Psychology
PHI 380 - Philosophy of Mind
PHI 401 - Directed Study in Philosophy
PHI 402 - Philosophy of Biology
PHI 408 - Theory of Knowledge
PHI 420 - Advanced Seminar
PHI 430 - What's Really Real
Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and evaluate philosophical arguments     
  2. Give, orally or in writing, a philosophical argument
  3. Identify and explain philosophical problems along with possible solutions
  4. Identify, explain, compare and contrast the views of important philosophers
  5. Explain philosophical methods
  6. Give examples of how philosophy bears on their other studies and on human life in general
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Elizabeth DeWolfe
edewolfe@une.edu 

or

Dr.  Linda M. Sartorelli

lsartorelli@une.edu

Minor in Philosophy

College of Arts and Sciences

Political Science

Mission

Our mission is to recruit professors whose research and teaching interests cross the traditional boundaries that divide many political science departments into separate groups. Our goal to to provide students with a holistic approach to political science that gives full attention to studies in American government, international relations, political theory, and comparative politics in an interdepndent global system. 

Major Description

Political science is the study of government, individual and institutional behavior in the public sector, relations among nation-states, and theories of politics. Political science addresses the fundamental issues confronting modern society - globalization, war, inequity, poverty, the environment - and seeks to evaluate the processes, policies, and theories that have been devised to deal with them. The Political Science program provides basic courses in theory, methods and case studies within the four sub-fields of political theory, comparative politics, international relations and American politics.  The political science major is an excellent choice in and of itself.  It is also an excellent choice for students wishing to study political science or law at the graduate level.

The department also offers Political Science majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7 - 12) in the area of social studies.

Pre-Law Emphasis

The pre-law emphasis allows students interested in studying law to receive special advising and to develop a liberal arts program of study appropriate as preparation for admission to law school and success in the legal profession,and careers and jobs invarious areas such as government, media, business, international affairs, foeirgn service,non- government organizations and teaching. The study of law involves many aspects of social life and integrates many fields of study. Judges and lawyers are expected to handle different litigations, ranging from social to medical, environmental and other applications. Thus, law schools encourage students to have diverse undergraduate majors. UNE students who are majoring in any department can take advantage of the pre-law program.

Although the choice of major is open, law schools expect students to have acquired skills that enable them to think critically, reason logically, and speak and write effectively. The Pre-law Advising Committee will help students build their interdisciplinary program of study that includes not only humanities courses, but also courses in biology, environmental studies, psychology, and management.

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
One of the following courses: 3
PSC 105 - Introduction to Political Science  
PSC 202 - Politics as Social Science  
One course in each of the following areas: 12
Introductory level course in American Politics including:
PSC 101, 106, 203, 205, 207 and 250
 
Introductory level course in Political Theory including:
PSC 100, 120, 200, 206 and 207
 
Introductory level course in International Relations including:
PSC 201 and 240
 
Introductory level course in Comparative Politics including:
PSC 100, 110, 204 and 205
 
One advanced course (300 level or higher) in three of the following areas: 9
Political Theory  
Comparative Politics  
American Politics  
International Relations  
Three Political Science Electives
At least one must be at 300 or 400 level
9
Senior Seminar and Essay 6
PSC 490 - Senior Seminar  
PSC 491 - Integrative Essay  
Minimum Program Required Credits 39
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Secondary Education Certification

The department offers Political Science majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7 - 12) in the area of social studies. While providing a solid foundation in social studies, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will result in State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

Note: students preparing for social studies certification should also complete 24 credits of associated grade 7 - 12 courses they may teach. Although no specific courses are required, students should select courses that are primarily history, with at least one course in psychology, sociology and economics. 

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 438 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3 - 4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
(Part of the internship semester)
1
Education Minimum Required Total Credits 40 - 41
 
Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this major students will:

  1. Have developed a mature political imagination which includes an ability to envision what constitutes an important political question/issue and to understand the various ways in which a political scientist might address such a question/issue.
  2. Have mastered essential facts relevant and necessary to the study of global political life. This involves a working knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and historical dynamics that constitute the contemporary political order. It also includes a broad familiarity with the historical roots of that order.
  3. Be able to think critically, analytically and rigorously about the world of politics.
  4. Have an informed sense of the historical dimension of the various political issues, developments, trends, theories and forms of inquiry relevant to the students’ interests.
  5. Have an enlightened understanding of the multicultural nature of global (but especially American) political life.
  6. Be able to convey information, analyze results and persuasively argue in both written and oral form clearly and effectively.
  7. Be able to conduct sound and rigorous social inquiry using a variety of methodologies and techniques.
  8. Be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.

Direct Measures of Student Learning:

  1. Capstone Course
  2. Senior Thesis 
  3. Oral defense of Senior Thesis 
  4. Internship supervisor evaluations  
  5. Symposium  Presentations 
  6. Annual departmental review of graded assignments and exams and samples of student writing 
  7. Performance on exams

Indirect Measures of Student Learning:

  1. Admission rates into graduate programs  
  2. Alumni and employer satisfaction 
  3. Questions on end-of-course student evaluation forms that ask about the course rather than the instructor 
Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in Political Science with the approval of the Political Science Department Chair. Eighteen hours of approved course work is required. PSC 105 Intro to Political Science or PSC 202 Political Sciences Social Sciences,  two (2) 100-200 level courses and three (3) 300-400 level courses.

A seocnd minor is Health, Law and Public Policy

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Ali Abdullatif Ahmida (Chair)
aahmida@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Political Science

Pre-Pharmacy

Mission

In addition to offering majors in Medical Biology (Pre-Physician Assistant Track - MPA), Medical Biology (Medical Sciences), Biological Sciences, and Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences,  as well as a minors, the Department of Biology administers the university’s pre-pharmacy program. This two-year program of courses provides the necessary coursework to prepare a student to meet the requirements for admission to the four-year professional program leading to the Pharm. D. degree. Completion of the two-year pre-pharmacy curriculum also will prepare students to transfer to a baccalaureate degree program in chemistry or biochemistry should they choose not to seek entry into the pharmacy program.

The Department of Biology's mission has two distinct yet interdependent aspects: to provide major programs that prepare students for careers or advanced study in the biological sciences, and to provide courses for students whose programs require a sound understanding of the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology, ecology and evolution, and cell and molecular biology as a basis for future study in pharmacy, medical, nursing or therapy disciplines, and various field and ecology disciplines.  The Department's programs, and all of its courses, stress the integration of theory and experiment, the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills, and the cultivation of oral and written communication skills. The Department is highly committed to undergraduate research, providing opportunities for students from all disciplinary fields to work closely with faculty mentors on collaborative research projects. In order to fulfill its dual mission, the Department maintains well-equipped holdings of modern instrumentation, affording students the opportunity to gain experience using state-of-the-art equipment in courses and research projects.

Program Description

The College of Arts and Sciences, through the Department of Biology, offers a two-year, undergraduate pre-pharmacy program on UNE's Biddeford Campus.  This pre-professional program will provide students with the minimum coursework required for admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program.  The University's College of Pharmacy offers the Doctor of Pharmacy as the entry-level professional degree that will prepare students for careers as pharmacists and/or pharmaceutical scientists.

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is awarded after successful completion of an additional four years of professional study. A minimum of two years of undergraduate pre-professional education is required for admission, followed by four years of professional studies.

The four-year, professional program (Pharm.D.) is offered by the UNE College of Pharmacy and is located on UNE’s Portland Campus.  For more information about the Pharm. D. program, including admission requirements, please refer to the College of Pharmacy Web page.

Admissions

Pre-Pharmacy Admission Requirements

Preferred conditions for entry into the pre-pharmacy program are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry and physics.  See Undergraduate Admissions requirements.

Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) Program Admissions Requirements

Students interested in applying for admission to the professional pharmacy program (Pharm. D. program) in the University of New England's College of Pharmacy will need to complete successfully a minimum of 72 credit hours of specific undergraduate level courses.  Additional admission requirements for the professional pharmacy program are required and prospective students should contact the College of Pharmacy for additional information.

Transfer Credit

Transfer students are encouraged to apply to the University of New England. See University Undergraduate Admissions Requirements.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
Pre-Pharmacy Track Required Courses  
ENG 110 - English Composition 4
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I (prereq: MAT 180 or test placement) 4
(Explorations) Humanities Course
Prefix must be ARB, ARH, ART, ENG, FRE, HIS, LIT, MUS, PHI, POR, REL, SPA, or WST
3
PSY 105 - Intro to Psychology 3
(SGA) Social/Global Awareness Course with a SOC prefix 3
SPC 100 - Effective Public Speaking 3
Core/Liberal Arts Electives (two courses)
(ADV) Advanced Studies or (ART) Creative Arts or
(HT) Human Traditions 276 or 278 with one of the following prefixes:  ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC or PHI
Only one course from each category may be selected
6
BIO 105 - Biology I: Intro to Ecology/Evolution 4
BIO 106- Biology II: Intro to Cellular/Molecular Bio 4
BIO 208 - Intro Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 209 - Intro Anatomy & Physiology II 4
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry II 5
PHY 110 - Physics I* 4
PHY 111 - Physics II** 4
PHM 100 - Introduction to Pharmacy Practice/Professional Rescuer Training 1
* PHY 210 may be substituted for PHY 110  
** PHY 211 may be substituted for PHY 111  

Note: Some of the courses listed above may be waived with prior credit that meets UNE approved criteria as outlined in the academic catalog (i.e. AP examination scores or transfer credits from regionally accredited institutions of higher education).   Please also note that the pre-pharmacy course sequence is different from the traditional biochemistry undergraduate major course sequence. Students seeking to complete the bachelor of science degree in biochemistry should review the Biochemistry Program information located in the academic catalog at the time of admission.
 

Learning Outcomes
  • Students will be able to describe basic scientific information and concepts.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe and laboratory practices.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate scientific information in both oral and written forms.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in professional programs or continuation of an undergraduate degree program.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Stine Brown
sbrown@une.edu

Undergraduate course of study providing preparation for application to Doctor of Pharmacy program or transfer into Bachelor of Science degree programs.

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Biology

Psychology

Mission

The Department of Psychology offers students a broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on community, social, and individual approaches to understanding human behavior. Students are thus exposed to a combination of theoretical, scientific, and practical approaches to solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture are emphasized in courses throughout the curriculum. As a result of required course work and internship experiences, the department graduates students with marketable skills that prepare them for entry-level positions in social services or for graduate study in related areas. As part of this mission, the Department of Psychology offers three majors with concomitant minors in: psychology, neuroscience, and animal behavior.  Additionally, the department offers minors in Art Therapy and in Mental Health Rehabiliation.  The Mental Health Rehabilitation minor leads to a certificate from the State of Maine Department of Health and Human Services in MHRT/C. 

 

Program Description

The psychology major blends interdisciplinary work with intensive training in psychology to prepare students for a wide range of professional and academic experiences beyond college. The major draws on the extensive experience of our faculty in the areas of human development, clinical psychology, cognitive neuroscience, learning and memory, the biological basis of behavior and animal modeling.

An essential theme of the program is our focus on psychology as a science which is manifested through our coursework in research methodology and statistics. The faculty provides a supportive environment in which students learn the thinking skills important to reading and conducting research. Students support each other as well, working in groups on research projects that often are useful to the UNE community. For example, students have used classroom projects in research methods to investigate student satisfaction with residence halls on campus, and a second project for that same class investigated faculty knowledge of learning disabilities accommodation requirements and policies.  Coursework across the psychology curriculum includes a focus on the scientific method and how psychological science can inform real world problems and practice.

A second essential theme of the psychology major includes the required-internship or field experience work. The internship is a critical part of our students' learning. It is typically completed in the third year and must be taken for an equivalent of three credits. Each credit hour of internship is equivalent to 40 hours of work at the internship site. These experiences provide the student the opportunity to learn experientially and to explore different career directions based on a student's unique interest.  Overall, the internship is an important educational experience and it often leads to the first job after graduation for our students.  Some students elect to take a second internship (if space permits) while others students more interested in the scientific analysis of behavior may choose to take an advanced research course. This would typically entail a student writing a senior thesis or becoming a research assistant in one of the psychology department labs.

 

Admissions

Interested students should apply for admission to the psychology major. Upon acceptance to the university, students are provisionally admitted to this major.  Upon completion of 60 credit hours (approximately the end of the second year of full-time work), student progress is evaluated by department faculty. Students will then be fully admitted upon meeting the conditions indicated in the Program Standards section below. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

 

Program Academic and Technical Standards

A grade point average of 2.75 in major courses is necessary to be fully admitted as psychology majors. A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all psychology courses used toward graduation. Students must also complete the University Core mathematics requirement by the end of the first year. The department strongly recommends that students take PSY 225 and PSY 285 in their sophomore year. The department requires that PSY 225 and PSY 285 be completed by the end of the junior year.

 

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
PSY Majors must take PSY 250 as one of their SGA courses  
PSY Majors must take EXP courses outside of the Psychology Department for their Core requirement  
PSY Majors are encouraged to take MAT 120 or MAT 150 as their Math core  
  Credits
Psychology Program Required Courses  
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 225 - Psychology Statistics 3
PSY 285 - Research Methods 3
PSY 300 - Psychology Internship I 3
PSY 405 - Special Topics Seminar 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 255 - Social Psychology 3
PSY 350 - Theories of Personality 3
PSY 365 - Biological Bases of Behavior 3
PSY 380 - Learning/Conditioning and Behavior Modification or 
PSY 382 - Animal Learning and Behavior
3
PSY 383 - Memory and Cognition 3
3 open PSY or NEU electives (at the 200 level or higher)
These courses might include options such as PSY 212, PSY 215, PSY 226, PSY 235, PSY 236, PSY 252, PSY 275, PSY 295, PSY 310, PSY 335, PSY 340, PSY 345, PSY 360, PSY 362, PSY 370, PSY 400, PSY 410, NEU 210, NEU 310, NEU 320
9
Program Minimum Required Total Credits 42
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120
  Credits

 

 

Psychology with MHRT/C Track*  - Program Required Courses

Students who major in Psychology may choose to take the three courses below as part of either their general electives or as upper division psychology electives to fulfil the requirements for MHRT/C Certification upon graduation.  All other MHRT/C requirements are met within the psychology major curriculum.

 
   
   
   
PSY 236 - Mental Health and Society 3

 

 
   
   
   
   
PSY 410 - Theoris of Clinical/Counseling Psychology or
     PSY 295 - Listening/Communication Skills
3
SOC 240 - Race, Class and Gender 3
   
 Program Minimum Required Total Credits 42
 Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
 Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*For complete details about MHRT/Community Certification see the Psychology Department webpage.

 The department offers Psychology majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their open electives in order to become middle school or high school psychology teachers (grades 7-12). While providing a solid foundation in Psychology, this program includes extensive coursework in education, which, when combined with the secondary teaching internship, will meet the standards for State of Maine teacher certification upon completion of the degree program. This program is approved by the State of Maine Board of Education.

  Credits
Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Culture of Schools 3
EDU 133 - American Education 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 330 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management 3
EDU 346 - Technology in the Secondary Classroom
                 (Part of Internship Semester)
1
EDU 430 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation 3
EDU 436 - Methods of Teaching Secondary English/Language Arts 3
EDU 486 - Secondary Education Practicum 3-4
EDU 492 - Secondary Internship 15
   
Education Total Number of Credits 40-41

 

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their Bachelors Degree Program in Psychology, students will be able to: 
 
GOAL 1: Knowledge Base of Psychology: Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology. 

1.1 Characterize the nature of psychology as a discipline. 
1.2 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding representing appropriate breadth and depth in selected content areas of psychology (e.g., learning and cognition, individual differences, biological bases of behavior,  developmental changes in behavior). 
1.3 Use the concepts, language, and major theories of the discipline to account for psychological phenomena. 
1.4 Explain major perspectives of psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural). 

GOAL 2: Research Methods in Psychology: Understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation. 

2.1 Describe the basic characteristics of the science of psychology. 
2.2 Explain different research methods used by psychologists. 
2.3 Evaluate the appropriateness of conclusions derived from psychological research. 
2.4 Design and conduct basic studies to address psychological questions using appropriate research methods. 
2.5 Follow the APA Ethics Code in the treatment of human and nonhuman participants in the design, data collection, interpretation, and reporting of psychological research. 
2.6 Generalize research conclusions appropriately based on the parameters of particular research methods. 

GOAL 3: Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology: Respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes. 

3.1 Use critical thinking effectively. 
3.2 Engage in creative thinking. 
3.3 Use reasoning to recognize, develop, defend, and criticize arguments and other persuasive appeals. 
3.4 Approach problems effectively. 

GOAL 4: Application of Psychology: Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues. 

4.1 Describe major applied areas (e.g., clinical, counseling, industrial/organizational, school, etc.) and emerging (e.g., health, forensics, media, military, etc.) applied areas of psychology. 
4.2 Identify appropriate applications of psychology in solving problems. 
4.3 Articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues and inform public policy. 
4.4 Apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings as these relate to everyday life. 
4.5 Recognize that ethically complex situations can develop in the application of psychological principles. 

GOAL 5: Information and Technological Literacy: Demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers and other technology for many purposes. 

5.1 Demonstrate information competence at each stage in the following process: formulate a researchable topic; locate and choose relevant sources from appropriate media, use selected sources after evaluating 
their suitability; read and accurately summarize the general scientific literature of psychology. 
5.2 Use appropriate software to produce understandable reports of the psychological literature, methods, and statistical and qualitative analyses in APA or other appropriate style, including graphic representations of data. 
5.3 Use information and technology ethically and responsibly. 
5.4 Demonstrate these computer skills: use basic software programs, search the Web, use proper etiquette and security safeguards when communicating through e-mail. 

GOAL 6: Communication Skills: Communicate effectively in a variety of formats. 

6.1 Demonstrate effective writing skills in various formats (e.g., essays, correspondence, technical papers, note taking) and for various purposes (e.g., informing, defending, explaining, persuading, arguing, teaching). 
6.2 Demonstrate effective oral communication skills in various formats (e.g., group discussion, debate, lecture) and for various purposes (e.g., informing, defending, explaining, persuading, arguing, teaching). 
6.3 Exhibit quantitative literacy. 
6.4 Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills. 
6.5 Exhibit the ability to collaborate effectively. 

GOAL 7: Sociocultural and International Awareness: Recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural and international diversity. 

7.1 Interact effectively and sensitively with people of diverse abilities, backgrounds, and cultural perspectives. 
7.2 Examine the sociocultural and international contexts that influence individual differences. 
7.3 Explain how individual differences influence beliefs, values, and interactions with others and vice versa. 
7.4 Understand how privilege, power, and oppression may affect prejudice, discrimination, and inequity. 
7.5 Recognize prejudicial attitudes and discriminatory behaviors that might exist in themselves and in others. 
7.6 Predict how interaction among diverse people can challenge conventional understanding of psychological processes. 

 

Minors

A student with a major at UNE may minor in Psychology with the approval of the Psychology Department Chair.  Major programs of study with signficant course overlap with psychology minor requirements may be disallowed by the chair.   Eighteen hours of approved course work is required:

  Credits
Psychology Minor Required Courses  
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
Four other Psychology courses at the 200 level or higher.
(May not include PSY 225, PSY 250, PSY 285 or PSY 300
12
Minimum Required Total Credits 18

 

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

 

College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Office at (207) 602-2271 or (207) 602-2371

 

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Psychology

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Psychology

Sociology

Mission

The mission of the Department of Society, Culture and Languages is to offer a broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics.  The department provides a combination of theoretical, scientific, and practical approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture as well as hands on learning are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for entry-level positions in social services or for graduate study in related areas.

Major Description

The major in sociology will provide the student with a broad-base exposure to theories and methods, as well as a wide range of current social issues. The student will also receive extensive interdisciplinary work in the fields of anthropology and psychology. These strong academic foundations will prepare the student for a wide range of academic and professional opportunities. Students from this major have chosen to continue their education in fields including, sociology, social work, law, economics, environmental studies and public health. They have also chosen to work directly with social deviance, criminal justice, as well as other areas of social service.

In addition to the traditional approaches to sociology, there are two unique elements to this program. First, students will complete an internship. This will help students explore experiential learning, applications of sociology to the real world, and undertake career explorations. Second, students will participate in a semester-long applied sociology experience. With this experience a student can choose to study abroad, work in a social service agency, or complete an intensive research project.

Overall, this program will provide students with a strong foundation for understanding today's social issues and problems. The student will also have a wide range of skills and experiences that will enhance their future educational and career opportunities as well as enable them to be a more active and aware citizen.

Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42-43
  Credits
Sociology Core 21
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 225 – Statistics for Social and Behavioral Science 3
SOC 270 - Classical Social Theory 3
SOC 280 - Contemporary Social Theory 3

SOC 285 - Research Methods

3
SOC 300 - Internship 3
SOC 370 - Applied Field Methods in Sociology 3
   
Sociology Electives  12
Elective 1 - Social Global Studies Course 3
Elective 2 - Social Cultural Studies Course 3
Elective 3 - 300 or 400 level elective 3
Elective 4 -  Sociology course at any level of the student's choosing. 3
Applied Sociological Experience (see study abroad and department homepage)   
Option 1 - Study Abroad 9 - 16
   
   
   
   
Option 2 - Internship  9 - 16
   
Option 3 - Capstone Thesis 9 - 16
   
Total Credits in Major  39 - 46
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits)  variable
Minimum Total Required Credits  120
Learning Outcomes
  1. The sociological imagination.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • describe how Sociology is distinct from other social sciences.
    • apply the sociological imagination to social phenomena
  2. The role of sociological theory.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • describe the role of theory in building sociological knowledge.
    • compare and contrast the different theoretical perspectives.
    • apply these theories to social conditions.
  3. The nature of evidence in sociology.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • identify the basic methodological approaches in building sociological knowledge.
    • compare and contrast various research methodologies.
    • design and complete a written research project.
    • critically assess published research.
  4. Data analysis.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • understand the role of data analysis in building sociological knowledge and testing theory.
    • use computer software for statistical analysis.
    • understand appropriate statistical techniques.
    • draw valid conclusions from the data analysis.
  5. How cultural and social structures operate.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • describe different social institutions and their various influences on the individual.
    • explain how the aforementioned institutions are interrelated.
    • evaluate them using sociological theory.
  6. The diversity of human societies.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • describe the significance of variation by race, class, gender, religion and age.
    • explain patterns and variations using sociological theory.
    •  justify policy recommendations to address social inequalities.
  7. Communicate sociology effectively.
    ​Students should be able to:
    • produce well written papers that clearly express sociological knowledge.
    • clearly express sociological knowledge in verbal presentations.
    • demonstrate critical thinking.
Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in Sociology with the permission of the Society, Culture adn Languages Department Chair. Eighteen hours of approved course work is required for the Minor in Sociology as follows:

  Credits
Required Courses for Minor 18
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
Three 3-credit Sociology courses at the 200 level or higher 9
One 3-credit Sociology course at the 300 level or higher 3
One 3-credit Sociology course at any level of the student's choosing. 3
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Sam McReynolds

smcreynolds@une.edu

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Sociology

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Society, Culture and Languages

Sport and Recreation Management

Mission

As a UNE Sport and Recreation Management student, your education prepares you for a variety of careers in the athletic, leisure, recreation and tourism industries. The Sport and Recreation Management degree provides you with a comprehensive education: a solid foundation in program planning/management, finance, marketing, law and leadership; a choice of a concentration in either Sport Management or Outdoor Recreation Management; a minor in Business Administration and at least 480 hours of experiential learning through internships and campus leadership positions.

Major Description
  • The Sport and Recreation Management major requires successful completion of five skill-based, pre-professional courses (15 credits).
  • The Sport and Recreation Management major offers two Concentrations to choose from: Sport Management and Outdoor Recreation Management (15 credits).
  • The Sport and Recreation Management major affords the successful student a Minor in Business Administration (18 credits).
  • The Sport and Recreation Management major requires students to fulfill no less than 480 hours of experiential learning, after completing the Junior Year.  Internships are established working with our Internship Coordinator and are uniquely "tailored" to fit with each student's choice of Concentration (12 credits).
  • The Sport and Recreation Management major reflects a commitment to a Liberal Arts foundation (42 credits).
  • The balance of the Sport and Recreation Management degree requirements are fulfilled with elective courses. Informed and supported by your academic advisor (appointed from within the department), each student chooses from a variety of courses offered by the College (18 credits).
Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards

Students will be retained within the sport management major providing the following criteria are maintained throughout the undergraduate experience:

  1. Grade point of 2.0 in each course required in the Sport and Recreation Management major "Core" (five courses).
  2. Grade point of 2.0 in each course required for the Sport and Recreation Management major "Concentration": Sport Management or Outdoor Recreation Management (five courses).
  3. Grade point of 2.0 in each course required/chosen for the Business Minor (six courses).
  4. Grade point of 2.0 in the required Sport Management or Outdoor Recreation Management Internship credits (the twelve credits can be divided into one or more course experiences).
  5.  Students who receive a grade point below 2.0 in any of  the above situations will be required to repeat the course and earn a grade point of 2.0 or higher before the degree is completed.  A course may be repeated only once.
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements 42 - 43
includes MAT 120 or MAT 150 - Statistics*
*prerequisite for SPT 420 Research Methods
 
  Credits
Major Requirements (Business Foundation) 18
BUAC 201 - Financial Accounting 3
BUAC 203 - Managerial Accounting 3
BUMG 200 - Management 3
Business Elective (see options) 3
Business Elective (see options) 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
   
   
  Credits
Sport and Recreation Management Major Requirements 15

SRM 160 - Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management

3

SRM 325 - Sport and Recreation Marketing

3

SRM 350 - Sport and Recreation Finance

3
SRM 360 - Leadership Dynamics 3
SRM 370 - Law and Ethics in Sport and Recreation Management 3
   
Sport Management Concentration Requirements 15
SPT 330 - Sport Governance 3
SPT 340 - Athletic and Sports Administration 3
SPT 355 - Sport Venue Planning and Management 3
SPT 401 - Seminar in Sport and Recreation Management 3
SPT 420 - Research Methods 3
   

Outdoor Recreation Management Concentration Requirements

15
ORM 335 - Outdoor Recreation Planning and Management 3
ORM 345 - Sustainability and Eco-Recreation 3
ORM 365 - Wilderness Preparation, Safety, and First Aid 3
ENV 345 - Outdoor Environmental Education OR 3
ENV 356 - Terrestrial Wildlife Eco/Conservation OR 3
ENV 376 - Caribbean Sustainable Development 3
ORM 401 - Outdoor Recreation Management Capstone Experience 3
 
Minimum Required Total Credit
 

Internship Experiences

Each of our Sport Management majors is required to complete no less than 480 contact hours at an approved internship site(s) upon attaining Senior Standing (completion of their Junior year). The internship experience is a primary requirement for degree completion.

The internship experiences allow our Sport Management majors to gain pre-professional experience, designed to enhance development of knowledge, skills and abilities in the sport management field. Therefore, the internship serves as preparation for additional experiential learning, graduate school and/or entry level employment.

Common Internship experiences include one or more of the following ”hands-on” activities:

  • Customer interaction and personnel supervision
  • Observation and participation in program leadership.
  • Observe/research/analyze current activities and future trends in the industry
  • Involving the student intern, as applicable in management meetings and communications
  • A “capstone” experience, e.g., marketing plan, fundraising project, special event promotion, etc.; professional presentation, or research/case study in a sport management discipline.
Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge in Sport and Recreation Management: History, Management, Marketing, Financial, Economic, Legal and Ethical by demonstrating an understanding of the concepts and theories.
  2. Demonstrate effective skills in written and oral communications using appropriate technologies.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to integrate the concepts of the core ares of Sport and Recreation Management.
  4. Demonstrate awareness to the importance of the legal and ethical requirements of Sport and Recreation Management activities and programming.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to conduct methodological secondary research into Sport and Recreation Management-related issues; requiring familiiarity with a range of data, research sources, and appropriate technologies.
Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in Sport and Recreation Management with the approval of the Business Department Chair. Eighteen hours of approved course work is required for the Minor in Sport and Recreation Management as follows:

An introductory course in Sport Management                                                    Credits

SPT 160 - Introduction to Sport Management OR                                                          

SRM 160 - Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management                                   3

 

Minimum four 300 or 400 level courses:

SRM 325 - Sport and Recreation Marketing                                                                  3

SPT 330 - Sport Governance                                                                                          3

SPT 340 - Athletic and Sport Administration                                                                   3

SRM 350 - Sport and Recreation Finance                                                                      3

SPT 355 - Sport Venue Planning and Management                                                     3

SRM 360 - Leadership Dynamics                                                                                   3

SPT 370 - Law and Ethics in Sport Management                                                          3

SPT 401 - Seminar in Sport Management                                                                     3

 

Minimum three-credit Sport Management Internship 

SPT 395 – Internship in Sport Management  OR

SRM 395 - Internship in Sport and Recreation Management                                        3

Total Credits                                                                                                                  18

 

NOTESpecific prerequisites are required for the above listed course work. Carefully planned sequencing is important to complete this minor. Select courses carefully in consultation with your academic advisor in the Business Department.

Concentrations

Sport Management Concentration

As a UNE Sport Management graduate you will be prepared for entry-level sport-related career opportunities, or further study at the graduate level.  Your 480 hours of on-the-job training in internships provides you with the opportunity to practice and finesse the many techniques leaned in the classroom. With this preparation comes the skills and ability to serve as an effective leader, passionate about life's work and making a difference in the lives of those you chose to serve through sport and sport-related programming, which can include athletic and sports administration, sport marketing and merchandising, sport venue and event management, or sports information to name only a few choices. This concentration also prepares you to consider a Sport Management graduate degree program.

Outdoor Recreation Management Concentration

The Outdoor Recreation Management concentration at UNE takes full advantage of our location in Maine – the Atlantic Ocean is literally at our doorstep and mountains, lakes, river rapids only a short drive away.Th​is concentration offers students the opportunity to delve into program planning, policies and training needed to help them succeed in an Outdoor Recreation career. Because sustaining the outdoor environment and eco-tourism is key to this program, UNE Outdoor Recreation Management students are encouraged to take part in the UNE Green Learning Community and are expected to take at least one upper level Environmental Studies course that relates well to Outdoor Recreation Management, such as Outdoor Environmental Education, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation or Caribbean Sustainable Development. In addition, the Business minor that is part of the curriculum allows Outdoor Recreation Management students to focus their business interests by taking advantage of such business courses as Sustainable Entrepreneurship, International Management, Global Marketing or Business Finance.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. Richard LaRue (Advising Liason)
rlarue@une.edu

Bachelor of Science in Sport and Recreation Management

College of Arts and Sciences

Business and Communications

Women's and Gender Studies

Mission

Through exploring the social construction of gender in a variety of cultural contexts, women's and gender studies aims to improve understanding of the situations of both women and men. Its goals include not only recognizing women of all backgrounds as whole and productive human beings, but also, through this, providing a more accurate and equitable account of human experience.

Minor Description

The minor in women's and gender studies introduces students to the theories, methods, and issues of the field of women's and gender studies. Complementing and building upon the traditional humanities and social science offerings of the UNE College of Arts and Sciences, the women's and gender studies minor provides an interdisciplinary perspective to students' education by combining the scholarly traditions of many fields of knowledge in new and productive ways.

Admissions

All admitted, matriculated UNE students can declare a minor in women's and gender studies with the permission of the program director.  All students are invited to enroll in women's and gender studies courses.

Transfer Credit
Curricular Requirements

Eighteen credits as indicated below will satisfy the minor in women's and gender studies

Program Required Courses

Credits
WGST 200 - Introduction to Women's Studies 3
WGST 400 - Capstone in Women's and Gender Studies or 
Advanced (300 - 400-level) WGST approved course (see list below)
3
Elective Credits (complete at least four of the courses below) 12
Minimum Required Total Credits  18
 
Electives
ENG 223 - Survey of Women's Literature
ENG 310 - Writing and Women's Health
ENG 327 - Women Writers of the World
ENV 331 - Women and the Environment
HIS 204 - Growing up Female: A History of American Girls
HIS 250 - American Women's History I 1600-1865
HIS 251 - American Women's History II 1865-present
HIS 252 - Gender in Latin American History
HIS 337 - Topics in Women's History
PHI 125 - Friendship, Love, Marriage and Sex
PSC 312 - The Family and Politics
PSC 321 - Women and Politics
PSC 432 - Autonomy and the Politics of Reproduction
PSC 450 - Contemporary Feminist Theories
PSY 215 - Psychology of Gender
SOC 240 - Race, Class, and Gender: Sociological Perspectives
SOC 350 - Deviance
WGST 101/201/301/401 - Topics in Women's and Gender Studies 
WGST 310 - Medieval Women in History and Legend
Women's and Gender Studies elective credit may be given for the following topics courses.  Examples of specific sections for which credit will be given are listed in parentheses.
ENG 216 - Topics in Law & Literature I (Criminals, Idiots and Minors)
ENG 234 - Topics in British Literature (Fallen Angels: New Woman Fiction in England and America)
ENG 326 - Topics in Literature & Health (Madness in Literature)
ENG 435 - Topics in American Literature (Women of the West)
HIS 290 - History Hands On (Sex and Power: Women in the Americas)
HIS 399 - Topics in History (Gender and Sexuality in Latin American History)
LILH 201 - Human Traditions I (Gender and Politics)
PSY 405 - Special Topics Seminar (Psychology of Sexual Orientation)

Elective credit may, in some cases, be available through internships or directed studies when approved by the Advisory Committee for Women’s and Gender Studies. This elective credit must have content that is women and/or gender-focused.

Learning Outcomes

The Women’s and Gender Studies Program has identified an array of valuable learning outcomes associated with its undergraduate minor curriculum.

Among those, the following three represent especially important learning areas for students graduating with a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies from the University of New England.   

Students completing the Women’s and Gender Studies minor will be able to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the key concerns and methodologies of Women’s and Gender Studies
  2. articulate orally and in writing the importance of gender to social and cultural issues, past and present
  3. conduct competent primary and secondary source research in order to develop a basis for informed opinions

Robert F. Alegre, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of History

Affiliated Faculty, Women's and Gender Studies Program

 
ralegre@une.edu

Minor in Women's and Gender Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

History