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Susan McHugh publishes article on Inuit sled dog massacre by Canadian police

smchughSusan McHugh, Ph.D., professor and chair of English, published an article in The Global Animal, a special issue of English Studies in Canada, the journal of the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English.  The article, titled "'A Flash Point in Inuit Memories': Endangered Knowledges in the Mountie Sled Dog Massacre," explores how the demise of one of the oldest kinds of dogs in the Americas – descended of the creatures confirmed by recent genetic studies to have accompanied humans crossing the Bering Strait at least 13000 years ago – became interlinked with the coerced settlement of traditionally nomadic Inuit people in the second half of the twentieth century.

Drawing on eyewitness testimonies gathered by the Qikiqtani Truth Commission, one of the few First-Peoples-initiated justice inquiries to date, the essay argues that more is at stake in the debates surrounding reports that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police slaughtered Inuit sled dogs by the thousands from the 1950s into the 1970s, effectively incarcerating their owners in communities created by the government.

McHugh's essay "powerfully unmasks the ethos of government policies that devastate Inuit culture by eradicating valuable forms of interspecies companionship in the Canadian arctic," according to the special issue's guest editors Karen Ball and Melissa Haynes, who note the far-reaching implications of this case study.  "In defiance of narratives that construct the global animal as the passive object of political agendas, McHugh insists on the value of interspecies partnership in defending against our uneven exclusion from the legal protections afforded by a law that supposedly extends to all citizens."

The essay is part of McHugh's research into the role of human-animal relationships in historical and other narratives of mass killing.


Posted on: 3/13/2014

Marilyn Gugliucci serves as lead author on chapter outlining gerontology curriculum guidelines

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Director of Geriatrics Education and Research in the College of Osteopathic Medicine Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., as chair of the Association for Gerontology/Geriatrics in Higher Education (AGHE) Health Professions Geriatrics Curriculum Guidelines Task Force, completed and published a chapter titled “Foundational Gerontology/Geriatrics Curricula Guidelines for Health Related Programs” in  Standards and Guidelines for Gerontology Programs – Fifth Edition.  Other authors of this chapter are Elyse Perweiler (Rowan University), Shirley A. Weaver (National AHEC), Nancy E. Richeson (USM), & Patricia A. Hageman (University of Nebraska Medical Center).

The rationale for establishing the Task Force in 2011 was based on the (1) compounding affects of the dramatic increases in the numbers of older adults, (2) increased demand for health care providers competent to provide health-promoting/self-empowering care for older adults, (3) general lack of explicit geriatrics content across disciplines, and (4) lack of geriatrics/gerontology guidelines for health care provider education programs.

The Task Force contained 21 members from U.S. colleges and universities representing dentistry, social work, recreation therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, nursing, medicine, physician assistant, and other allied health professions.

The Charge to the Task Force was to:
•    Develop a set of basic core geriatrics/gerontology competencies appropriate for all health professions students;
•    Promote development of geriatrics/gerontology curriculum guidelines for health disciplines;
•    Facilitate review and endorsement of these curriculum guidelines

The Task Force has successfully accomplished its charge.

The chapter citation is:

Gugliucci, M.R.; Perweiler, E.; Weaver, S.A.; Richeson, N.E.; & Hageman, P.A. (2014) “Foundational Gerontology/Geriatrics Curricula Guidelines for Health Related Programs,” Chapter in: Standards and Guidelines for Gerontology Programs – Fifth Edition. Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, Washington, DC.



Posted on: 3/12/2014

Stephan Zeeman receives Fulbright grant

szeemanStephan Zeeman, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Marine Sciences, has been awarded a 2014-2015 Fulbright U.S. Scholar grant to Indonesia by the United States Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

More details of Dr. Zeeman’s prestigious award will be announced in the near future.

Posted on: 3/12/2014

Karen Pardue selected as chair of New England Board of Higher Education’s Maine Delegation

kpardueKaren Pardue, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, associate dean for Undergraduate Education, Westbrook College of Health Professions, was selected last weekend to serve as chair of the Maine Delegation for the New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) for a two-year term.

NEBHE works across the six New England states to promote greater educational opportunity and services for New England residents. It seeks to engage leaders in the development of best educational practices and to promote regional higher education policy, effective use and sharing of educational resources, and leadership to strengthen relationships between higher education and economic well-being in New England.  


Posted on: 3/11/2014

Ursula Röse invited to speak at the Gordon Research Conference ‘Plant Volatiles’

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A student works with Assistant Professor Ursula Röse
Ursula Röse, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biology, was an invited speaker at the Gordon Research Conference “Plant Volatiles,” which was held January 26-31, 2014, in Ventura, California.

Röse’s talk on the "Inducibility of Volatile and Non-Volatile Compounds in Brown Macroalgae and Their Effect on Herbivore Behavior" included her work with two undergraduate student co-authors, Janithri Wickranamayake (Biology ‘14) and former undergraduate student Kyle Martin (Biology ’13), who is currently working on his Ph.D. in plant biology at Cornell University.

Röse’s research focuses on Fucus vesiculosus, a brown macroalgae in the intertidal zone in Biddeford Pool, and snail and isopod herbivores that induce the emission of halocarbons as well as non-volatile compounds.  


Posted on: 3/10/2014

Noah Perlut to makes two presentations

nperlutNoah Perlut, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies, gave two talks, one at the Hanover Conservancy in Hanover, New Hampshire, on March 10, 2014, which was jointly sponsored by the Hanover Conservancy and the Mascoma Chapter of the New Hampshire Audubon Society; and another on March 11th at the Merryspring Nature Center in Camden, Maine.

At both events Perlut presented “The Influence of Agricultural Management on Grassland Songbird Ecology and Evolution.”  He discussed his research exploring the impacts of haying and grazing on grassland songbirds, particularly Bobolinks and Savannah Sparrows that have been breeding in Vermont for the last 13 years.

Perlut has found that the timing and intensity of management affects not only these birds’ reproductive success but also their annual survival and mating systems.  His current work focuses on these birds' entire life-histories, tracking both adult and young birds through their annual migration, in order to understand the pressures they face on the breeding grounds, during migration, and while wintering.

Posted on: 3/10/2014

Michael Cripps co-authors article in ‘Composition Forum’

mcrippsMichael J. Cripps, associate professor in the Department of English, co-authored an article published in the current issue of Composition Forum: A Journal of Pedagogical Theory in Rhetoric and Composition. The article, "Writing Program Building in a Compromised Space: Relative Agency in a Small College in a University System," appears in the Program Profile section of the spring 2014 (Volume 29) issue of the journal. Cripps' co-author, Heather M. Robinson, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of English and director of the, writing program at York College of the City University of New York.

Through a review of ten years of writing program initiatives and decision points at York College of the City University of New York, Cripps and Robinson argue that writing program administrators adopting a stance of relative agency can help shape the structures that support undergraduate writing even as upper-level administrative demands exert pressures that compromise those structures.

The article treats two watershed moments in the recent history of the City University of New York (CUNY) as bookends: the end of remediation in CUNY's senior colleges in 1999 that brought to CUNY a university-wide Writing Across the Curriculum mandate while eliminating developmental writing, and CUNY's 2013 Pathways initiative that mandated a university-wide general education program across all CUNY colleges. The analysis demonstrates the relative agency of writing program administrators as they helped shape, adapt, and preserve central elements of writing in the college curriculum.

Composition Forum is an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal published by the Association of Teachers of Advanced Composition with the support and financial assistance of Pennsylvania State University.

Posted on: 3/07/2014

Professors Robert Alegre and Jennifer Tuttle to present with UNE students at Maine Women's and Gender Studies Conference

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Robert Alegre
Professor Jennifer Tuttle
Jennifer Tuttle
Robert Alegre, Ph.D., assistant professor of history, and Jennifer Tuttle, Ph.D., professor of English and Dorothy M. Healy Chair of Literature and Health, will present jointly with UNE student Shannon Cardinal (English/History/Education majors '16) and recent UNE graduate Brett Peterson (Psychology/Sociology majors '13) at the Maine Women's and Gender Studies Conference on March 8, 2014, at the University of Maine - Augusta.

Alegre, Tuttle, Cardinal, and Peterson will present a panel on “Humanities Approaches to Experiential Learning in Women’s and Gender Studies.” UNE students pursuing the minor in Women’s and Gender Studies, as well as UNE students more generally, have many opportunities for experiential learning outside the classroom; not surprisingly, given UNE’s association with the health sciences, recent examples focus on issues of women’s health, with students interning at Sexual Assault Services of Southern Maine and working to improve women’s health services in Sekondi, Ghana.  Less familiar are the opportunities for students to learn and apply practical skills via the humanities.

The presentations will focus on two humanities internship examples: Cardinal's work for Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, a venue for feminist literary history; and Peterson's work for AddVerb Productions, a nonprofit organization that uses performance to address a wide range of social issues, from domestic violence to LGBT youth culture.

Posted on: 3/07/2014

Charles Ford contributes chapter to new book

CFord2Charles W. Ford, Ph.D., professor of health sciences in the Department of Nursing/Health Services Management, Westbrook College of Health Professions, has had a chapter accepted for a forthcoming book Cultures of Education Inclusion, which is scheduled for international publication in the second half of 2014. The chapter, "The Distance Professor," is a result of a presentation he made at a conference in Paris.

The presentation was selected by an academic panel which reviewed several hundred submissions from approximately 40 countries as part of the selection process.

Ford has been engaged in distance education since the mid-nineties working with Florida Gulf Coast University initially, followed by the Master’s in Education program at UNE.  He now works with an array of Health Professional students in elective courses.   He also has been engaged with the Doctor of Physical Therapy program in an online management course since its inception.

Posted on: 3/06/2014

Publication by Marilyn Gugliucci recognized among top 10 cited and downloaded articles

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., served as lead author on an article published in the Taylor and Francis Publishing Company’s Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics Education in 2012. This article, “Learning by Living: Life Altering Medical Education Through Nursing Home Based Experiential Learning,” was recently recognized by Taylor and Francis Publishing as one of the top 10 cited articles during 2012-2013. This article was also recognized as one of the top 10 downloaded articles 2013.

The Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics Education is the official journal of the Association for Gerontology/Geriatrics in Higher Education (AGHE).

Posted on: 3/05/2014

Marilyn Gugliucci attends AGHE Conference

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Marilyn Gugliucci, right, with Angela Baker, director of AGHE
Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., director of Geriatrics Education and Research in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, recently returned from the 40th Annual Association for Gerontology/Geriatrics in Higher Education (AGHE) Annual Meeting held in Denver Colorado, where she gave two presentations and was recognized for her leadership in the organization.

Gugliucci was presented with a Waterford Crystal Blanc Prizma by the AGHE President for her work on designing, developing, implementing (2009) and then co-chairing the AGHE Academic Consultation Program (2010-2014). She co-chaired this program with Paul Roodin, Ph.D., SUNY Oswego.

Gugliucci’s presentations included a Pre-Conference Workshop titled: “Practical Assistance for the Program of Merit Application Process.” The AGHE Program of Merit is equated with program accreditation. As there is currently no accreditation body for Gerontology Programs the Program of Merit designation provides gerontology programs and those health disciplines that include geriatrics/gerontology content in the curriculum with an AGHE stamp of approval. Programs must apply and submit a comprehensive program review as part of the application process. Co- faculty in the session included Alice McDonnell, Marywood University; Jennifer Kinney, Miami University of Ohio; and Bradley Fisher, Missouri State University.

In her role as AGHE Fellow and the 2012 winner of the Hiram Friedsam Mentorship Award, Gugliucci organizes an AGHE Fellow Mentorship Session with AGHE student leader, Tara McMullen, Ph.D. candidate.  Twelve AGHE Fellows “speed mentor” students of all levels and emerge faculty in this two-hour session.  This is the second year for this highly successful event.

Posted on: 3/05/2014

Bilsky laboratory co-authors publication in 'Journal of Medicinal Chemistry'

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Ed Bilsky
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Denise Giuvelis
Members of the laboratory of Edward Bilsky, vice president for research and scholarship, director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences and professor of pharmacology, along with long-time collaborators at the University of Arizona, recently published an article titled “Can Amphipathic Helices Influence the CNS Antinociceptive Activity of Glycopeptides Related to β-Endorphin?” in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Co-authors include two UNE alums: Lindsay St. Louis (Neuroscience ‘13), who is currently working on her master’s degree in Pain Research, Education and Policy at Tufts University, and Denise Giuvelis (Medical Biology ‘08), laboratory manager and senior research scientist in the Bilsky laboratory and co-coordinator of UNE’s behavioral neuroscience core.

The study extends the researchers’ previous work in understanding the chemistry and pharmacology of endogenous opioid peptides and how they interact with membranes and receptors.

Read the article online ahead of print

Posted on: 3/05/2014

Ed Bilsky speaks at Tufts

bilsky142Edward Bilsky, Ph.D., vice president for research and scholarship, director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences and professor of pharmacology, was a featured speaker at the Tufts University School of Medicine Pain Research, Education and Policy lecture series on February 25, 2014.

Bilsky’s presentation was titled “Lighting the Song With Sense and Color: An Interprofessional Humanistic Approach to Relieving Pain in America.” Among other things, the talk highlighted the progress that UNE is making in its efforts around pain research and interprofessional education.

Posted on: 3/05/2014

Courtney Bain to be published in ‘Journal of Dental Hygiene’

CBainA manuscript by Courtney Bain, IPDH, MS, assistant clinical professor in the Dental Hygiene Program, has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Dental Hygiene.

The manuscript is titled “Curriculum Change in Dental Hygiene Education Recommended by Independent Practice Dental Hygienists.”

Posted on: 3/04/2014

John Streicher and students present research at NEURON

jstreicherJohn Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences in the College of Osteopathic Medicine and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences, and his students presented their research at the 25th annual Northeast Under/graduate Research Organization for Neuroscience (NEURON), which was held on February 23, 2014, at Quinnipiac University in North Haven, Connecticut.

The NEURON conference is a student-centered regional research conference, designed for undergraduate and graduate students to showcase their work and develop as scientists. About 350 attendees were present, showcasing about 100 original research posters over a broad range of neuroscience topics, from spider brain morphology to detailed behavioral studies in rodents.

Streicher’s students included UNE 2013 alumni and current Streicher lab technicians Justin LaVigne and Katie Edwards, presenting their work on endogenous opioid and cannabinoid signaling and kappa opioid receptor regulation of cancer cell proliferation, respectively.

UNE class of 2014 students Katherine Pangilinan and Kyle Hong presented their work on the roles of Phosphatidylethanolamine-Binding Protein and Annexin A4, respectively, in regulating mu opioid receptor signaling.

The last Streicher lab presenter was class of 2015 student Nathan Mullen, who presented his work on the identification of activated kappa opioid receptor signaling complex proteins. These projects represent the breadth of study in the Streicher lab, focused on the regulation of opioid receptor signal transduction cascades, and using this knowledge to create novel strategies for drug discovery for the treatment of chronic pain.

Posted on: 3/04/2014

Anouar Majid speaks at Oslo’s House of Literature

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Anouar Majid (third from left) with ambassador attendees

Anouar Majid, Ph.D., vice president for Global Affairs and director of the Center for Global Humanities, recently gave a lecture in Oslo, Norway’s House of Literature, the largest organization in Europe dedicated to promoting interest in literature, reading and issues of free speech.

Majid talked about the need to encourage critical thinking in Islamic thought.

The lecture was attended by approximately 350 people, including the ambassadors of Iraq and Spain, as well as a high official from Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs.   


Posted on: 3/04/2014

Michele Polacsek presents at Healthy Eating Research grantee meeting

mpolacsekOn February 27, 2014, Michele Polacsek, Ph.D., M.H.S., associate professor for the School of Community and Population Health, presented a poster describing her school food marketing research at the 8th annual Healthy Eating Research grantee meeting in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

This annual meeting convenes food and nutrition researchers and policy makers from across the nation to present research findings and contribute to the obesity research and policy agenda for the coming year.


Posted on: 3/03/2014

Cathy Plourde publishes in ‘Making Connections’

cplourdeCathy Plourde, director of Add Verb Productions, recently published an article in Making Connections, the magazine of the National Eating Disorders Association, the nation's most prominent eating disorders prevention and intervention organization.

In the article, Plourde explores how arts for healing and advocacy intersect and where they are separate activities.

Read the article

Posted on: 3/03/2014

Karen Houseknecht to serve as NIH expert scientific reviewer

khouseknecht2Karen Houseknecht, Ph.D., professor in the College of Pharmacy, will serve as an expert scientific reviewer for a National Institutes of Health Study Section titled "Xenobiotic and Nutrient Disposition and Action (XNDA)" in Bethesda, Maryland, on March 5, 2014.

As a member of this study section, Houseknecht is serving as reviewer of competitive grant proposals for 2014 grant cycle.

Posted on: 3/03/2014

James Sulikowski to speak at New England Aquarium

jsulikowskiOn May 6, 2014, James Sulikowski, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Marine Sciences, will speak at the New England Aquarium as part of its Aquarium Lecture Series.

Sulikowski is one of eight shark experts, taking part in the event titled “Shark Research Confessions:  Introductions and Adventures in the Field with New England Shark Experts.”

The speakers will provide an overview of their work as well as information on shark biology and their career paths.

The lecture series is free and open to the public.

For more information

Posted on: 2/28/2014

Lara Carlson receives Department of Veteran Affairs faculty appointment

lcarlsonLara Carlson, Ph.D., FACSM, assistant professor in the Department of Applied Exercise Science and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences (CEN), will be active with the Department of Veterans Affairs to promote health, implement patient education information and self-management, and conduct research.

Carlson has been given a faculty appointment by the Department of Veterans Affairs and will be directly working with veterans on topics such as managing diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, as well as the importance of adherence to regular exercise and adopting a nutritionally prudent diet. Undergraduate students with a background in nutrition, sports medicine or exercise science will also be able to gain hands-on experience working with Carlson and this unique population.

Carlson noted that the appointment is personally meaningful.  She stated that “one way to support the many veterans who have unselfishly served our nation is to use her expertise and time, with the help of our outstanding UNE students, to ensure our veterans receive all the support they need, and have earned.”

Posted on: 2/27/2014

David Livingstone Smith to present at UNH on dehumanization

smithDavid Livingstone Smith, Ph.D., professor of philosophy, will speak at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) on March 21, 2014, on the topic of dehumanization.

Smith’s talk, simply titled, “Dehumanization,” will address the act of conceiving of other people as subhuman creatures and will explore various theories of this conception.

The presentation is sponsored by UNH’s Department of Philosophy.

Posted on: 2/26/2014

Historian Eric G.E. Zuelow assumes editorship of Journal of Tourism History

ezuelowEric G.E. Zuelow, Ph.D., associate professor of European history, recently assumed the position of editor-in-chief of the Journal of Tourism History, the primary international venue for tourism history scholarship.  Zuelow previously served as the book reviews and deputy editor for the publication.

“Tourism is an incredibly vibrant and exciting area to study,” noted Zuelow.  “It is about identities, economies, technological innovations, international linkages, place formation, environmental change, and even things we take for granted such as what landscapes we find beautiful or what stories about the past we find engaging.  The reality is that tourism is an integral part of the modern world; indeed, it played a very significant role in shaping the world as we know it.”

According to Zuelow, tourism is the globe’s largest service sector industry, valued at about $1.4 trillion in 2013.  It directly employs more than 54 million people worldwide.  Equally significant, revenues are increasing at more than 2.5% annually despite the recession that started in late 2008.

“The thing about tourism is that it has been growing steadily since World War II,” said Zuelow.  “There just aren’t many industries that grow, employing more and more people, making more and more money, year in and year out.  What is more, projections call for continued growth for the foreseeable future.  If I were looking for a really viable career with huge opportunity, I’d think tourism.”

With so much economic development, it is little wonder that tourism is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of scholarly study and nowhere more so than among historians.  Toward this end, the Journal of Tourism History aims to provide “an international outlet for the publication of articles and reviews covering every aspect of the history of tourism. It is interdisciplinary in ethos, looking outwards from a historical core to engage with the full range of cognate disciplines and theoretical approaches, and welcomes overviews and comparative as well as contextualized case-studies, covering all areas of the world and all approaches to historical study.”

Zuelow hopes that his position as editor of the journal will benefit UNE students either through his regularly offered history of tourism course or more directly by employing students as research assistants.  Zuelow has already enlisted occupational therapy major Kelsey Heck (UNE ’16) to assist him, and he hopes to encourage still more student involvement in the future. “This might be a great way to teach students about how knowledge is produced and about how publishing works.”

Routledge, long one of the leading global publishers of academic journals, monographs, and edited collections, publishes the Journal of Tourism History three times each year.  It is produced in conjunction with the International Commission for the History of Travel and Tourism.

Posted on: 2/24/2014

Shelley Cohen Konrad authors chapter in new book

scohenkonradShelley Cohen Konrad, Ph.D., SCSW, associate professor in the School of Social Work and director of the Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education (CEIPE), has authored a chapter in a new book, Leadership Development for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).

The book discusses historical and current perspectives on leadership in health care.

Posted on: 2/24/2014

Praphul Joshi and Nananda Col publish editorial in ‘International Journal of Diabetes Research’

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Praphul Joshi
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Nananda Col

Praphul Joshi, PhD, MPH, BDS, assistant professor in the School of Community and Population Health, and Nananda Col, MD, MPP, MPH, FACP, research professor in the College of Osteopathic Medicine and faculty in the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences, published an editorial in the International Journal of Diabetes Research titled “Chronic Pain Self-Management: An Unmet Need among People with Diabetes.”

The editorial reviews the self-management behaviors of people with diabetes, such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising regularly, adhering to prescription medication schedules, and obtaining regular foot and eye exams, and the barriers that they face with regards to performing these behaviors effectively.

Noting that chronic pain affects about 40% of adults with diabetes, the authors discussed a study by Krein et al in 2005 that found that chronic pain was a major limiting factor in the performance of self-care behaviors for patients with diabetes, even after controlling for general health status and depressive symptoms. At present, few diabetes self-management programs address chronic pain. The authors concluded that "Patients with diabetes and chronic pain represent an important high-risk group with special needs who could greatly benefit from a practical and generalizable disease self-management program tailored to their needs."


Posted on: 2/21/2014

John Streicher publishes in ‘Neuropsychopharmacology’

jstreicherJohn Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, and faculty for the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences, co-authored an article titled “Clozapine acts as an agonist at serotonin 2A receptors to counter MK-801-induced behaviors through a βarrestin2-independent activation of Akt” that was accepted for publication in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

The article explores a unique property of the atypical anti-psychotic clozapine. Clozapine has a classical anti-psychotic effect by acting as an antagonist at the serotonin 2A receptor (5HT2AR). However, at the same time, clozapine acts as an agonist at the 5HT2AR to activate certain (but not all) downstream signaling pathways. This dual agonist/antagonist activity may be responsible for some of the unique effects seen with the atypical anti-psychotics.

In this study, Streicher and colleagues, including senior author Laura Bohn of The Scripps Research Institute in Florida, found that while both serotonin and clozapine activate the 5HT2AR, induce receptor internalization, and activate the downstream kinase Akt, this activity required the signaling regulator βarrestin2 for serotonin activity, but not for clozapine activity. In addition, they found that clozapine antagonism of MK-801 and PCP induced behaviors in mice did not require βarrestin2, but did require Akt.

The study, thus, demonstrated how clozapine uniquely activates a specific signaling pathway to induce its effects, which may explain in part the beneficial effects seen with the atypical anti-psychotics. In addition, this study demonstrated that clozapine is a functionally selective drug, with both agonist and antagonist properties.

The article will be available as an e-publication prior to full publication.

Posted on: 2/18/2014

Lara Carlson and Michael Lawrence co-author article published in ‘Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research’ with student Casey Cottle

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Lara Carlson
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Michael Lawrence

Lara Carlson, Ph.D., FACSM, assistant professor in the Department of Applied Exercise Science and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences (CEN), and Michael Lawrence, M.S., motion analysis lab manager, co-authored an article with Casey Cottle, first author, a 2012 graduate of UNE’s Applied Exercise Science program and a current student in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program.

The article has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, the official research journal of the National Strength and Conditioning Association.


In the paper, the authors discuss sled towing as a popular method of training to shave precious seconds off of sprint times, noting that, in the past, researchers have struggled to identify a loading scheme that is most appropriate to improve sprint performance in the acceleration phase.

The purpose of the study was to examine different loading schemes of assigned percentages of body weight (BWT) to see if they would produce significantly greater propulsive ground reaction force impulse (GRF), peak propulsive GRF, or greater propulsive rate of force development (RFD) than in un-weighted sprint starts. The study concluded that loading with 20% BWT was sufficient to increase propulsive GRF impulse.

Read the article ahead of print

Posted on: 2/17/2014

Department of Physical Therapy well-represented at 2014 Combined Sections Meeting of the American Physical Therapy Association in Las Vegas

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Mike Sheldon

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Amy Litterini

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Adrienne McAuley

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Sally McCormack-Tutt



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Erin Hartigan

Several faculty and graduates of the Doctor of Physical Therapy program recently presented educational sessions or aspects of their research and scholarship at the 2014 Combined Sections Meeting (CSM) of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) in Las Vegas, Nevada.

As Regional Course Chair for the APTA Oncology Section, Amy Litterini, PT, DPT, assistant clinical professor, coordinated pre-conference courses on Pediatric Oncology and Advanced Principles of Breast and Genitourinary Cancers.  Litterini was also appointed to APTA’s CSM Steering Committee for 2015 and to the role of Vice President of the Oncology section.  In this role, she will represent the Oncology Section in the APTA’s House of Delegates.

Sally McCormack-Tutt, PT, DPT, MPH, attended the Certified Clinical Instructor Program (CCIP) Trainers Meeting as a trainer and member of the APTA Advisory Workgroup for the CCIP.

As Chair of the Research Committee for APTA’s Section on Health Policy and Administration, Mike Sheldon, PT, Ph.D., moderated the Section’s platform sessions, coordinated the review and selection of Section’s best platform and best poster presentation, and led the review of the Section’s research grant proposals.  Sheldon was also officially sworn in as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy.

Presentations at the meeting included:

C. Chiarello and Adrienne McAuley: “A Comprehensive Approach for the Evaluation of and Intervention of Diastasis Recti Abdominis”

Adrienne McAuley (Moderator): “Entry-Level Clinical Experiences in Women’s Health”

Brian Bisson (DPT class of 2013): “The Functional Movement Screen In‐line Lunge’s Relationship to Limb Dominance, Power, Speed, and Balance Measures”

Robert Morrison (DPT class 0f 2012): “Proper Transitioning to Barefoot/Minimal Footwear Running”

Sally McCormack-Tutt: “Implementing Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) During Clinical Experiences”

Michael  Sheldon: “Influences on the Relationship Between Policy Need and State Agency Policy Responses to Address Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders”

Erin Hartigan, Ph.D., DPT, OCS, assistant professor; Stephanie Di Stasi, PT, Ph.D., OCS; and Lynn Snyder- Mackler, PT, ScD:  "Quadriceps muscle activity of the ACL-reconstructed limb predicts internal knee extensor moments during gait"

Posted on: 2/17/2014

Devon Sherwood selected as nominee to Pharmacy Quality Alliance workgroup

dsherwood1Devon Sherwood, Pharm.D., BCPP, assistant professor in the College of Pharmacy, has been selected as an American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) nominee to a workgroup of the Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA).

PQA’s mission is to develop and implement pharmacy performance measures in order to improve the quality of medication management and use across health care settings with the goal of improving patients’ health.

Posted on: 2/17/2014

Gayle Brazeau interviewed by Tidesmart Talk with Stevoe Radio

gbrazeau4College of Pharmacy Dean Gayle Brazeau, Ph.D., was interviewed by Tidesmart Talk with Stevoe Radio for a show that aired on February 1, 2014, on WLOB 1310 AM.

Brazeau discussed how the role of the pharmacist has changed, the accreditation process, and how UNE is training graduates to partner with their patients to better serve them.

Listen to the interview

Posted on: 2/10/2014

Stacey Thieme and Jenifer Van Deusen participate in creation of video to improve health care of the intellectually and developmentally disabled

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Stacey Thieme
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Jenifer Van Deusen
Victoria (Stacey) Thieme, D.O., UNECOM director of Community Preceptor Programs and faculty in the Department of Primary Care, and Director of Curriculum Jenifer Van Deusen, M.Ed., collaborated with  Community Partners, Inc. (CPI) to release an educational video aimed at improving the health care of people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) and autism.

The video promotes communication between people with disabilities and their doctors and other health care providers. The four segments include an Introduction to I/DD, Preparing for a Doctor’s Office Visit, Roundtable Discussions with Medical Students and DSPs (Direct Support Professionals), and Review.

View the four video segments

Posted on: 2/06/2014

Julie Longua Peterson publishes research article in ‘Self and Identity’

jpeterson6Julie Longua Peterson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, recently published an article with co-author Tracy DeHart titled “In defense of self love:  An observational study on narcissists’ negative behavior during romantic relationship conflict.”  The article will appear in Self and Identity.

This research suggests that narcissists are not only hostile in response to relationship conflict but also likely to manipulate relationship perceptions in ways that maintain feelings of power and perpetuate a game-playing style of love.

The article is a part of Peterson’s research program examining the role of the self in relationship functioning.

Read the article.

Posted on: 2/04/2014

Jim Cavanaugh and former students author new article exploring companion confidence in the balance of older adults

jcavanaughJim Cavanaugh, Ph.D., PT, associate professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, and former students Julia Dunfey, DPT, PT, '12 and Megan Wyand, DPT, PT, '12, have authored a new article titled "Companion Confidence in the Balance of Community-dwelling Older Adults: Implications for Physical Activity Promotion."

The article, which appears ahead of print in the Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, was based on research conducted by Dunfey and Wyand under Cavanaugh's direction as part of their UNE doctoral training.  Cavanaugh recently discussed the publication in an interview appearing on ElderBranch, an online resource for seniors.  

Posted on: 2/04/2014

Michele Polacsek receives Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant

mpolacsekMichele Polacsek, Ph.D., MHS, associate professor of public health in the School of Community and Population Health, was awarded a $170,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Healthy Eating Research program to begin February 2014.

The research award will address youths’ exposure to the marketing of unhealthy foods through regulation, policy, and effective industry self-regulation. Little is known about school-based digital marketing and how to help schools comply with model marketing standards. The project aims to: 1) assess whether school marketing environments in Portland, Maine, align with the federal regulations on competitive foods, pre and post a one-academic year compliance support intervention; 2) understand the different forms of digital food and beverage marketing that may occur in school settings; 3) provide support to schools in Portland to update their school marketing policies so they align with the new standards; and 4) conduct an ongoing participatory evaluation of assistance efforts and create recommendations for school marketing standards nationwide.

Polacsek will be working with partners locally and nationally to carry out the project aims.


Posted on: 2/03/2014

India Broyles co-authors new article

IBroylesIndia Broyles, Ed.D., director of the Master’s in Medical Education Leadership program; Peggy R. Cyr M.D., M.S., MEdL, (MMEL ‘10);  Kashi A. Smith Ph.D.; and Christina Holt are authors of a new article titled “Developing, Evaluating, and Validating a Scoring Rubric for Written Case Reports.”

The article was published in the International Journal of Medical Education.

Full Citation:
“Developing, Evaluating, and Validating a Scoring Rubric for Written Case Reports,” (IJME), February 10, 2014; 5:18-23, DOI: 10.5116/ijme.52c6.d7ef

Posted on: 2/03/2014

Marilyn Gugliucci serves on panel at Summit on Aging event

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Last week there was a sold-out house at the Civic Center in Augusta for the Maine Summit on Aging - an event organized by the Maine Council on Aging (MCOA). Marilyn Gugliucci, Ph.D,. Director, Geriatrics Education and Research, is a founding board member of the MCOA and on the Summit planning team; she also serves as the MCOA secretary.

The Summit brought together a diverse, dynamic group of professionals and advocates who gathered to be proactive about meeting older adult needs for support and services and making it known that Maine’s older adults, as a group, are a tremendous resource to the state and our communities.

Gugliucci participated on a panel in one of the afternoon sessions.  The session was titled “Higher Education’s Role in Advancing Resources in the Field of Aging.”

By the end of the day, which was bookended by a video opening by Senator Susan Collins and a talk by Senator and former Governor Angus King (who announced that his 70th birthday is coming up), those attending had developed plans to address high priority issues and leverage the power of Maine’s oldest-in-the-nation population.


Posted on: 2/03/2014

Anne-Marie Davee receives Harry Faust Leadership Award from Bicycle Coalition of Maine

AMDaveeAnne-Marie Davee, MS, SNAP-Ed Nutrition Program Coordinator for UNE’s School of Community and Population Health (SCPH), was recently awarded the Harry Faust Leadership Award from the Bicycle Coalition of Maine.

In November 2011, she took part in the coalition’s Community Spokes training where she developed her community mobilization skills and received a toolkit with in-depth information on advocacy, and bike/ped programs, policies, and projects.

During the summer of 2012, Davee put this training to use when she helped create the task force with the intention of assessing community access to walking, biking, and hiking. This data has been used to develop a plan to support active living among residents and visitors to the Freeport area. Davee has been instrumental in involving hundreds of residents and neighbors in the planning process. The Task Force has received over 700 completed surveys seeking input from locals to inform the active living plan.

A Freeport resident, Davee is a founding member and chair of the Freeport Active Living Task Force.

Posted on: 1/31/2014

Jennifer Stiegler-Balfour publishes book chapter with student co-authors

JStiegler-BalfourJennifer Stiegler-Balfour, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology, co-authored a chapter in a new book titled Applying Science of Learning in Education: Infusing Psychological Science into the Curriculum.

The edited book addresses important concepts, principles and theories in cognitive psychology and their application related to the science of learning.

Along with co-author Victor Benassi, Ph.D., professor of psychology and director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at the University of New Hampshire, Stiegler-Balfour’s chapter on “The Influence of Guiding Questions on Skilled- and Less-Skilled Readers’ Understanding of Written Discourse" features two student co-authors, Heather Tatsak (Psychology ‘13) and Andrea Taatjes (Psychology ‘13) and describes the results of a study assessing the effect of guiding questions on comprehension and retention levels of expository text.

The results indicated that participants who scored lowest on a reading assessment measure benefited the most from the guiding questions indicated by significantly higher rates of delayed recall.

Posted on: 1/30/2014

Ruth Dufresne presents on Maine Public Health Association Tobacco Webinar

rdufresneRuth Dufresne, SM, research associate in the School of Community and Population Health (SCPH), served as a speaker on the Maine Public Health Association Tobacco Webinar Series on January 16, 2014.

The webinar focused on "Tobacco Use and Control Data--The Maine Story." Dufresne presented on the Healthy Maine Partnerships’ (HMP) youth tobacco prevention impact evaluation on behalf of the HMP Evaluation Team, which includes Allison Morrill, JD, Ph.D., associate research professor in the SCPH.

The presentation covered the preliminary results of bivariate comparisons of tobacco-related dependent variables from the 2011 Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey by two groups of HMPs, grouped according to a high or low intensity of youth tobacco prevention focus during fiscal years 2007-2011.

In 2011, in the areas where the HMPs had a higher intensity youth tobacco prevention focus during fiscal years 2007-2011

•    Fewer youth smoked or intended to smoke
•    Fewer youth were exposed to secondhand smoke
•    The retail environment was less conducive to youth tobacco sales
•    Social norms were more anti-tobacco/smoking
•    Youth had a heightened perception of risk

All but one of these findings have less than 1% margin of error.

Posted on: 1/24/2014

Susan Gray presents at Joint Mathematics Meetings of American Mathematical Society and Mathematical Association of America

sgraySusan Gray, Ed.D., associate professor and chair in the Department of Mathematical Sciences, presented a paper on January 15, 2014, at the Joint Mathematics Meetings of the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America in Baltimore, Maryland.

Developed in collaboration with co-authors from Regis and Merrimack Colleges in Massachusetts, the paper is titled, “Does the Type of Variable Affect Undergraduates’ Interpretations of Algebraic Expressions?”  This research examines and compares college students’ uses and interpretations of generic and first-letter variables and categorizes the types of responses according to a framework developed by the authors.

Posted on: 1/23/2014

Cathy Plourde to present workshop at Kennedy Center’s American College Theatre Festival

cplourdeCathy Plourde, director of Add Verb, UNE's theatre for health and wellness program, has been invited to present a workshop at the Kennedy Center's American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF), which will be hosted in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts during the last week of January, 2014.

Plourde’s workshop will work with college students from across the Northeast on devising social-issue based performance.

Plourde has volunteered for KCACTF Region 1 since 1999, serving as a respondent to festival performance entries and adjudicator for the Irene Ryan Acting Competition.

Posted on: 1/22/2014

Jennifer Tuttle edits new issue of 'Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers'

Professor Jennifer TuttleJennifer Tuttle, Ph.D., Dorothy M. Healy Chair of Literature and Health, serves as editor-in-chief of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers.

Issue 30.2 appeared in December of 2013, including a cluster of essays on cross-racial collaborations and challenges in feminist literary studies, meditations on archival research and literary recovery work, an analysis of the newly available archives of Mexican American writer María Cristina Mena, a profile of little-known writer Ellen Mackay Hutchinson, book reviews, and a reprint of a recently discovered story by Kate Chopin.  

A full table of contents with abstracts is available here.

Posted on: 1/22/2014

Beth Richardson’s presentation named Best of Conference at ACBSP

brichardsonBeth Richardson, JD, associate professor and chair in the Department of Business Administration Chair, gave a presentation titled “Students as Teachers: Providing Digital Solutions to Organizational Problems Through Experiential Collaboration,” which was named Best of Conference at the American Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) Region 1 conference in San Juan Puerto Rico.

Richardson will offer the same presentation during the ACBSP Annual Conference in Chicago in June when a Best of Conference will be selected from the regional winners.

Posted on: 1/22/2014

Michael Daley and Owen Grumbling present at MBAA International Conference

mdaley
Michael Daley
ogrumbling
Owen Grumbling
Michael Daley, Ph.D., professor of economics in the Department of Business Administration, will present his paper titled “Sustainable snowmaking in an age of global warming: An ecological economic perspective” at the 2014 MBAA International Conference in the Business, Society and Government Consortium program in Chicago in March of 2014.

Daley, together with Owen Grumbling, Ph.D., professor of environmental literature in the Department of Environmental Studies, will also present “Rescuing Economics from the Discipline” at the conference.

Posted on: 1/22/2014

Teresa Dzieweczynski publishes in 'Animal Behavior' journal with student co-authors

tdzieweczynskiTeresa Dzieweczynski, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Psychology and the undergraduate research coordinator of the College of Arts and Sciences, published an article in the most recent issue of the journal Animal Behavior.

The article, "The effects of 17a-ethinyloestradiol on boldness and its relationship to decision making in male Siamese fighting fish," has three student co-authors, Olivia Hebert (Medical Biology '13), Lindsey Lavin (Animal Behavior '14), and Jodi Marks (Animal Behavior '16).  The article is the sixth publication for Hebert and the first for Lavin and Marks based on their work with Dzieweczynski.

This study is the first to find that endocrine disrupting chemicals can disrupt behavioral syndromes and lays the foundation for the assessment of other pharmaceuticals on behavioral syndromes and boldness in Siamese fighting fish and other aquatic organisms.

Posted on: 1/17/2014

Jennifer Gunderman-King joins School of Community and Population Health

jgkingJennifer Gunderman-King, M.P.H, has been hired as assistant lecturer in the School of Community and Population Health.

Gunderman-King’s educational background includes a B.S. in health policy and management along with a minor in biology from Providence College, Rhode Island; and a master’s degree in public health accompanied with a certificate in maternal and child epidemiology from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

“We are thrilled to welcome Jennifer as a full-time faculty member,” says Denise Bisaillon, Ed.D., associate professor and director for graduate programs in public health at UNE. “She brings with her a wealth of experience and knowledge that will strengthen our program and enrich the UNE student experience.”

Gunderman-King has a strong background within the public health industry including major contributions in Maine. She has served as district public liaison within the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention; director of research management at Onpoint Health Data in Maine, and infectious disease epidemiologist for the Maine Bureau of Health.

For the past two years, Gunderman-King has also taught several courses within the Online Master of Public Health program, including Principles of Public Health, Environmental Health, and Occupational Health.

Posted on: 1/15/2014

Joe Kunkel to speak at UMaine School of Marine Sciences

jkunkelJoe Kunkel, Ph.D., research professor in the Department of Marine Sciences, will be a guest speaker at the University of Maine Orono School of Marine Sciences (SMS) on February 28, 2014.

Kunkel will speak on “An Apatite for Lobster” as part of the SMS Seminar Series.

The talk will be teleconferenced to the Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

Posted on: 1/14/2014

Praphul Joshi publishes paper on diabetes self-management intervention

pjoshiPraphul Joshi, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the School of Community and Population Health, published a paper on diabetes self-management intervention.

The article, titled “Louisiana Diabetes Excellence Initiative: Accomplishing Excellence in Diabetes Self-Management in a Rural Community,” appears in the International Journal of Diabetes Research.

The paper outlines the evaluation of diabetes self-management interventions implemented as a part of Louisiana Diabetes Excellence Initiative using mixed methods. It highlights the need for patient education and tailored interventions for diabetes among rural communities.

Full Citation:
Joshi. P, Pourciau. C, Bhoi. A, Kinchen. L. Louisiana diabetes excellence initiative: Accomplishing excellence in diabetes self-management in a rural community. International Journal of Diabetes Research. Vol. 2 No. 6, 2013, pp. 91-95. doi: 10.5923/j.diabetes.20130206.01.


Posted on: 1/14/2014

Nancy Simpson selected as certification item writer for American Nurses Credentialing Center

nsimpsonNancy Simpson, RN, MSN, CNE, associate professor in the Department of Nursing, has been selected as a certification item writer for the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

In this prestigious role, she will work with national experts in gerontology nursing to develop, refine and validate the national certification exam.

Simpson will attend an intensive writing workshop at the American Nurses Association headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland, later in January.

Posted on: 1/14/2014

Lara Carlson attends 2014 NASCAR Summit; invited to present at next year’s Summit

lcarlsonLara Carlson, Ph.D., FACSM, assistant professor in the Department of Applied Exercise Science, attended the 2014 annual NASCAR Summit, which was held in Concord, North Carolina, January 5-7, 2014. The Summit addressed topics related to operations, safety, and emergency medical services for all respective NASCAR tracks in preparation for the upcoming 2014 NASCAR season, which kicks off in February with the Daytona 500.

The event was by invitation only. Carlson, whose recent research involving the physiological responses of stock car drivers during competitive racing, was contacted about attending the Summit after the New York Times ran a story about her latest research last summer. Carlson’s research addresses the thermoregulatory stress and cardiovascular challenges during competitive stock car racing. Like the goals of most sport science research with all competitive athletes, strategies can be developed to minimize stress on the body during motorsports competition to improve driver performance and safety.

Presentations in the medical track included treatment of pit crew athletes when they become injured, the kinematics in rollover crashes and the injuries sustained by drivers, pathophysiology and mechanism of sternal fractures and dislocations from seat restraints, and how to recognize and treat these injuries and comorbidities to prevent loss of life.

Carlson had an opportunity to speak with Sam Hornish Jr., a three-time IndyCar Series champion and current NASCAR driver for Joe Gibbs Racing.

NASCAR representatives invited Carlson to present her driver research at next year’s 2015 Summit meeting.   

Posted on: 1/13/2014

Vanessa O’Donnell attends workshop at Harvard’s Neuroimaging Core

VOdonnellVanessa O’Donnell, manager of the Microscope Core Facility (MCF,) attended a workshop at the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center Enhanced Neuroimaging Core December 16-18, 2013.

The workshop was titled “Digital Image Analysis with ImageJ."

O’Donnell’s participation in the workshop was sponsored by Ed Bilsky, Ph.D., vice president for Research and Scholarship and director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences; the COBRE Imaging Core, which is supported by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Amy Davidoff, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and director of the Histology Imaging Core; and James Vesenka, Ph.D., professor of physics and the MCF director.

Posted on: 1/09/2014

Tamara King publishes in ‘Pain’ journal

tking6Tamara King, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences, served as collaborator on an article titled “Artemin Induced Functional Recovery and Reinnervation after Partial Nerve Injury,” which was published in the November 2013 issue of Pain.

The article investigates the effect of systemic administration of the glial-derived neurotrophic factor, Artemin, on functional recovery of peripheral nerves following injury.  It has previously been shown that systemic Artemin can promote regeneration of dorsal root nerve fibers back into the spinal cord, but whether regeneration occurs in the periphery had not been demonstrated.

Nerve injury induced by transection, ligation, or crush, produces thermal and tactile hypersensitivity. Treatment with Artemin transiently reversed these measures of nerve-injury induced pain, with the hypersensitivity returning within 1 week of termination of Artemin treatment.

However, in animals that underwent a nerve crush, but not a full nerve transection or ligation, thermal and tactile sensory thresholds returned to normal levels by six weeks.  This finding suggests that in injury models in which regeneration is possible (crush versus transection or ligation), Artemin can promote regeneration and that this regeneration restores sensation to normal status, reversing the injury-associated pain.

This work unravels a potential therapy to promote peripheral nerve regeneration following injury and it also shows that the ability to promote regeneration may aid in treating injury-associated pain.

Posted on: 1/07/2014

Tamara King co-authors article on neuropathic pain in the 'Journal of Pain'

tking6Tamara King, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences, co-authored an article titled “Descending Facilitation Maintains Long-Term Spontaneous Neuropathic Pain,” which was published in the August 2013 issue of the Journal of Pain.

The article looks at the mechanisms giving rise to the long-lasting spontaneous pain, or pain at rest, which is a hallmark feature of neuropathic pain.  While hypersensitivity to touch and cold is a well-described consequence of nerve injury, the chronic nature of neuropathic pain is poorly understood.   The authors’ studies show that thermal hypersensitivity resolves within 35 to 40 days following nerve injury but tactile sensitivity remains elevated even after 580 days (about 19 months).

This long-term hypersensitivity to touch appears to result from an increased number of neurons being activated in the spinal cord, an indication of spinal sensitization.  The effect is blocked by a lesion to the dorsolateral funiculus, part of a descending pathway from the brain to the spinal cord that modulates incoming neuronal activity from peripheral tissues.

The study’s finding, therefore, indicates that such descending pathways play a role in sensitizing the spinal cord following nerve injury and making it more responsive to potentially painful and even benign stimuli.

Similarly, the authors use a conditioned place preference paradigm to investigate spontaneous pain, or pain at rest, that is not evoked by tactile or thermal stimuli.  They found that 40-60 days following nerve injury, animals show a significant preference for a chamber that is paired with blockade of descending pain facilitatory pathways from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM).

These findings demonstrate that spontaneous pain persists after recovery of thermal hypersensitivity, suggesting different underlying mechanisms driving these pain states.  In addition, the data indicate that nerve-injury induced tactile hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain persist longer than thermal hypersensitivity and that both are maintained by descending facilitation.

Posted on: 1/07/2014

Lynne Rothney-Kozlak publishes article for Premier Healthcare Solutions’ 'Economic Outlook' journal

lrothneykozlakLynne Rothney-Kozlak, M.P.H., an adjunct instructor for the School of Community and Population Health and president of Rothney-Kozlak Consulting, LLC, recently published an article titled “Patient Reported Measures: The Next Frontier of Provider Accountability.” The article was written for the fall 2013 edition of Premier Healthcare Solutions’ (a member-owned national alliance of over 2,500 non-profit health systems) Economic Outlook journal.

Rothney-Kozlak’s believes that patients’ perspective on their health status and the effectiveness of the health care they receive has increasingly been the focus of the health policy community. While patient advocates have certainly succeeded at shining a light on what is needed within transformative efforts to better support patients, health services research has demonstrated that more engaged patients do better at managing their diseases and well-being on their own. This usually translates to more appropriate utilization patterns, less unnecessary in-patient services, better health outcomes, and more satisfied patients.

Over time, purchasers and accreditors of health care services have escalated their expectations that provider performance evaluation includes the patients’ experience, as captured through surveys.  As such, these patient-centered policies will have an ever greater impact on how health care services are contracted for and reimbursed. The triad of improving health, patient experience, and cost of care is the root of how providers will be held accountable in the future.

Given that backdrop, Rothney-Kozlak’s article explores the context of patient reported measures, the current landscape with respect to provider accountability for patients’ holistic health and experience, the complexity of data collection methodology considerations, and what the future likely holds.

Read the article (pages 26-31).

Posted on: 1/07/2014

Susan Hillman appointed to Board of Maine Audubon

shillmanSusan Hillman, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Education, has been unanimously appointed to the Board of Trustees of Maine Audubon, the state’s largest wildlife conservation organization.

Maine Audubon works to conserve Maine’s wildlife and wildlife habitat by engaging people of all ages in education, conservation and action. It offers over 200 programs throughout the year, which reach over 10,000 people.

Posted on: 12/19/2013

Michael Sheldon elected to Board of Directors of ACAPT

Michael R. SheldonMichael Sheldon, PT, Ph.D., director of the Department of Physical Therapy, was recently elected to the Board of Directors of the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy (ACAPT).

According the ACAPT website, the council's purpose is to “advance the enterprise of academic physical therapy by promoting the highest standards of excellence…The Council intends to take a leadership role in establishing the direction of physical therapist education and have the responsibility and accountability to duly reflect the interests and needs of the academic and clinical physical therapist educational community.”  

Posted on: 12/19/2013

Matt Vassar publishes in ‘Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions’

MVasserMatt Vassar, Ph.D., instructor for the Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership, and his colleague Matthew Holzmann, recently published an article in the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.

“The retrospective chart review: important methodological considerations” was published online on November 30, 2013. 

Read the article.

Posted on: 12/19/2013

Cheryl Nimmo earns doctorate

cnimmoCheryl Nimmo, CRNA, DNP, MSHA, assistant program director of Didactic Education and assistant clinical professor in the Master of Science Nurse Anesthesia Program, was awarded her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, on Friday, December 6, 2013.

Nimmo has been a practicing CRNA for 34 years.

Posted on: 12/17/2013

Ed Bilsky’s biotech company gets patent for non-addictive, low side effect drug for pain relief

bilsky142Biousian Biosystems Inc., a biotechnology company founded by Ed Bilsky, Ph.D., vice president for Research and Scholarship and director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences, announced that it has received a patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for a series of highly selective and potent delta opioid receptor agonist drugs for the treatment of acute and chronic pain.

One of the molecules covered by the patent is BBI-110078, the company’s lead drug, which is positioned as a best-in-class pain reliever.

BBI-11008 is an orally available drug that relieves pain with the effectiveness of opioids but exhibits markedly reduced toxicities and side effects (such as respiratory distress and gastrointestinal immobility), and it shows no evidence of causing addiction.

Bilsky stated:  “Delta opioid receptors were first described in the 1970s, but multiple efforts to develop a highly selective agonist with drug-like properties have failed.”  He describes the lead molecule as having “therapeutic utility across a broad range of pain indications, including neuropathic pain, inflammatory pain, cancer pain and migraine.”

Posted on: 12/17/2013

David Livingstone Smith becomes blogger for Stanford’s Community of Thinkers

smithDavid Livingston Smith, Ph.D., professor philosophy, has become a blogger for Stanford University’s Community of Thinkers, which is associated with the award-winning radio program Philosophy Talk.

The program deals both with fundamental problems of philosophy and with the works of famous philosophers, especially as they relate to our contemporary, day-to-day lives.

The Philosophy Talk motto is, “the program that questions everything, except your intelligence.”

Posted on: 12/16/2013

Judith Kimball serves as emcee for ‘Backstage at the Nutcracker’

jkimballJudith Kimball, PhD, OTR/L, professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy, was the master of ceremonies at two performances of Maine State Ballet’s “Backstage at the Nutcracker” at the Merrill Auditorium in Portland on December 3, 2013.  Over 2,000 school children attended.

Kimball demonstrated many of the “secrets” behind this large production. Some of the things the children learned were: how to create snow indoors and how to shovel it, how to make the production’s Christmas tree appear to grow, the definitions of “backdrops” and “scrims,” the history of “The Nutcracker,” which was first performed in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1892, and about the many different occupations and over 300 people needed to put on the performance.

The students were surprised that there were no cars, TVs, computers, or movies in1892, and that entertainment was live theater, to which people traveled by horse and sleigh or buggy.

Kimball told the story of the ballet, and it was brought to life by the Maine State Ballet  dancers.

Channel 8 produced a short news piece on the backstage event.

Posted on: 12/16/2013

David Livingstone Smith to present at ‘Legacies of the Shoah’ symposium

smithDavid Livingston Smith, Ph.D., professor of philosophy, gave a keynote presentation at a symposium titled “Legacies of the Shoah:  Understanding Genocide, War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity” at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) in Tacoma, Washington, February 20-21, 2014.

The symposium is a joint collaboration by PLU’s Holocaust Studies Program and the university’s Wang Center for Global Education.

Smith is the author of several books, including Less than Human: Why We Demean, Enslave and Exterminate Others.

Watch a video of Smith's presentation and visit the symposium’s website for information about speakers, exhibitions, and events.

Posted on: 12/16/2013

Susan Jarmuz-Smith publishes column on ‘collaboration in the cloud’

sjarmuzsmithSusan Jarmuz-Smith, M.S., assistant lecturer in the Department of Psychology, published her latest Practical Tech column titled, "Collaboration in the Cloud," in the National Association of School Psychologists' monthly publication The Communique.

The article covers security concerns during transmission and storage of data in the cloud and school psychologists' obligation to protect student confidentiality. The article supports the goal of the monthly column, which is to provide practical technology guidance to practicing school psychologists.

Posted on: 12/11/2013

James Sulikowski delivers keynote speech on sharks at GOMMEA meeting

jsulikowskiJames Sulikowski, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Marine Sciences, served as keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the Gulf of Maine Marine Education Association (GOMMEA), which was held on November 20, 2013, at the University of New England.

The theme of the meeting was sharks, and members of GOMMEA watched a shark dissection performed by UNE students.  Members also toured the Marine science Center and Marine Animal Rehabilitation and Conservation (MARC) program.

Sulikowski’s talk was on the topic of sharks found in the Gulf of Maine.

Posted on: 12/10/2013

Marilyn Gugliucci helps lead YCCAC to Maine Health Access Foundation grant

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142The Maine Health Access Foundation (MeHAF) has awarded a Thriving in Place Grant to the York County Community Action Corporation (YCCAC), of which Marilyn Gugliucci, Ph.D., UNECOM's director of Geriatrics Research and Education, is on the leadership team.

The tripartite team includes YCCAC, Southern Maine Agency on Aging, and the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine.  The grant focused on care coordination, infrastructure enhancements and evidence-based and evidence-informed practices to assist older adults in underserved towns in York County to thrive in their homes.

Through monthly planning sessions, research, community assessment and online discussion, the planning group will work together to identify gaps and coordinate services to support local residents whose chronic disease, disability and/or advanced age put them at risk for hospitalization or institutionalization.

Posted on: 12/10/2013

Marilyn Gugliucci presents at Gerontological Society of America’s meeting

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., UNECOM Department of Geriatric Medicine, completed her term as the Chair of the 1,700 member Health Sciences Section for the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) at the close of the Annual Scientific Meeting last week. Now, as immediate past chair, she will be assisting the Health Sciences section chair, chairing the Health Sciences Section Awards and Nomination Committees. She will continue to serve on the GSA Council for one more year.

While at the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting, Gugliucci chaired the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (a unit of GSA) Presidential Symposium titled: “The Gerontological Imperative: Preparing a Workforce through Education and Training.”  Gugliucci’s presentation, “Accreditation for Gerontology Programs: Will it Aid in Addressing Workforce Issues?” was the symposium closing presentation. Graham Rowles, Ph.D., University of Kentucky, presented on Gerontological Illiteracy and Janet Frank, PhD, UCLA, presented on Gerontological Competency Based Education.

Frank, Rowles and Gugliucci are leading the national efforts to create an accreditation body for gerontology programs in higher education. Currently there is no accreditation body for these programs and the GSA Council and Executive Committee voted in favor (at their meetings in November) to have an accreditation body created.

Posted on: 12/10/2013

Richard Owens participates in Princeton symposium on ballad writing

RowensRichard Owens, an adjunct instructor in the Department of English, participated with English poet Tom Pickard and critic Meredith Martin in “Outlaw Music,” a one-day symposium exploring the poetic and political implications of ballad writing in the 21st century.  The symposium was held on November 6, 2013, at Princeton University.

In addition to an afternoon round table discussion addressing contemporary balladry, the event featured readings from Pickard and Owens.

A finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, Pickard read from Ballad of Jamie Allan (Flood Editions 2007), a ballad narrative recounting the life of eighteenth-century Northumbrian piper, balladeer and horse thief Jamie Allan.

Owens read from his bluntly titled collection Ballads (Habenicht Press 2012), a volume containing more than 100 short ballads, many of which earlier appeared in a number of publications throughout the U.S., Canada and the U.K., including Cambridge Literary Review, Poetry Wales, Shearsman, the 2012 edition of the annual anthology Best British Poetry (Salt Publishing 2012), and online through the Poetry Foundation.

Read more about the symposium.

Posted on: 12/10/2013

UNE and USM research teams join forces in state SIMS grant proposal

rdeprez
Ron Deprez
UNE’s School of Community and Population Health, Research Division, collaborated with USM’s Muskie School of Public Service, Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy, to develop a grant proposal to evaluate the Maine State Innovations Model Systems (SIMS) – a $33 million three-year grant awarded to the State of Maine by the Federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

The evaluation of SIMS will involve innovative interventions focused on the Triple Aim goals of improving the health of Maine’s population, improving the patient’s experience of care, and achieving better care at lower cost, with the attendant goal of systems change.  Research staff from both institutions collaborated under the leadership of Ronald Deprez, Ph.D., M.P.H., director of Research Programs, SCPH, and Andy Coburn, Ph.D., from USM, to construct a robust evaluation proposal.

Other UNE faculty and staff members of SCPH involved in this effort include: Praphul Joshi, Ph.D., M.P.H., B.D.S., assistant professor; Carry Buterbaugh, Ph.D., assistant research professor; Allison Morrill, J.D., Ph.D., Healthy Maine Partnerships Evaluation; Kira Rodriguez, M.H.S., research associate; Hank Stabler, M.P.H., research associate; Gary Cattabriga, director of Analytics; Ida Batista, research associate; and Nicole O’Brien, M.A., research assistant. The grant proposal for the evaluation component of SIMS, submitted on November 22, 2013, totals almost $3 million over approximately three years for both institutions.

In an increasingly changing healthcare landscape, SCPH research and evaluation efforts are critical to understanding these changes through health systems and population health evaluation. The joint effort between the UNE and USM shows the ability to draw on Maine’s local capacity and furthers public health research in the state by bringing together a skilled team with diverse expertise.

Posted on: 12/10/2013

Susan McHugh Joins Editorial Board of Environment and History

smchughSusan McHugh, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of English, will join the Editorial Board of the scholarly journal Environment and History for a three-year term beginning in January 2014.

Environment and History is an interdisciplinary journal which aims to bring scholars in the humanities and biological sciences closer together, with the deliberate intention of constructing long and well-founded perspectives on present day environmental problems.

Noting McHugh's deeply interdisciplinary work in literary and biological extinction narratives, incoming Editor in Chief Karen Jones said, "It is fabulous to add a prominent human-animal studies scholar to the Board."

Posted on: 12/04/2013

Jennifer Tuttle publishes article in the journal ‘Western American Literature’

jtuttleJennifer Tuttle, Ph.D., Dorothy M. Healy Professor of Literature and Health and professor of English, published the essay "'New England Innocent' in the Land of Sunshine: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and California" in Western American Literature, the premiere journal on literatures of the U.S. West.

Tuttle's essay, which draws on fifteen years of archival research, provides new and significant evidence of Gilman's California orientation, makes sense of her contradictory attitudes toward the Golden State, and argues that a western regional framework is necessary to understand the life and work of this important early feminist author.

Posted on: 12/04/2013

Michael Burman and colleagues present research on fear conditioning at Society for Neuroscience meeting

mburmanMichael Burman, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences (CEN), presented research from his lab in a presentation at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego on Nov 10, 2013.  The title of the presentation was “Fear conditioning activates different neural circuitry at PD 17 and PD 24 in the rat.”

Joining Burman in the presentation were Alex Deal and Kristen Erickson, outreach coordinators for CEN’s K-12 outreach program, which places UNE faculty, staff, and students in K-12 schools to teach grade appropriate, interactive training modules in neuroscience topics.

Posted on: 12/03/2013

Michael Burman and colleagues present at Society for Neuroscience meeting

mburmanMichael Burman, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences (CEN), made a poster presentation titled "University of New England Center for Excellence in Neuroscience Outreach Program” at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego on Nov 10, 2013.

Joining Burman in the presentation were Ed Bilsky, Ph.D., vice president for Research and Scholarship, director of CEN, and professor of pharmacology, as well as Alex Deal and Kristen Erickson, outreach coordinators for CEN’s K-12 outreach program, which places UNE faculty, staff, and students in K-12 schools to teach grade appropriate, interactive training modules in neuroscience topics.

Posted on: 12/03/2013

Michele Polacsek gives two presentations at American Public Health Association Annual Meeting

mpolacsekMichele Polacsek, Ph.D., M.H.S., associate professor of public health in the School of Community and Population Health, conducted oral presentations on two of her current projects at the 141st American Public Health Association Annual Meeting & Expo in Boston, on November 6, 2013.

The first presentation demonstrated the results of a follow-up study of the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative (MYOC) performed in 2012. Co-authors on the study include Liam O’Brien, Ph.D. of Colby College; Jonathan Fanburg, M.D., M.P.H., of MaineHealth; Victoria Rogers, M.D., of Maine Medical Center; and Steven Gortmaker, Ph.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health.

The second study presented focused on Polacsek’s work leading efforts to conduct a Health Impact Assessment for a sugar sweetened beverage excise tax for the state of Maine. Her co-authors on the study included Karen O’Rourke, M.P.H., of UNE’s School of Community and Population Health, and Michael Long, Sc.D., a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health Prevention Research Center.

Posted on: 12/03/2013

Michael Burman publishes paper in 'Journal of Neuroscience Methods'

mburmanMichael Burman, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences (CEN), served as first co-author on a paper that was recently published in the January 2014 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience Methods.

The paper discusses the development of new methodology using animal models to facilitate the study of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

Other authors of the paper were Lei Lei, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biology and CEN; Miles Hughes (Animal Behavior ‘13); and Cassandra Simmons (Animal Behavior ’15).

Posted on: 12/02/2013

Anouar Majid elected to Board of Directors of Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies

amajidAnouar Majid, Ph.D., vice president for Global Affairs, director of the Center for Global Humanities, and vice president for Communications, has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) for a three-year term beginning January 1, 2014.  The term is renewable for a second three-year period.

A formal announcement of Majid's election will be made at the offices of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) at the Smithsonian Institution on December 2, 2013, in Washington, D.C.

TALIM, the only U.S. National Historic Landmark outside the United States, functions as a museum, research library, conference facility, and community center, and hosts a language program.  Its Board is composed of eminent scholars, diplomats, and personalities from the private sector. Through its grants, conferences, research library, public visitor and social outreach programs, TALIM provides a bridge of communication and understanding between the U.S., Morocco, and countries around the world.

Posted on: 11/27/2013

Alicia Peters presents at Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association

apetersAlicia Peters, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Society, Culture, & Languages, presented a paper at the 112th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), held in Chicago, Illinois, on November 22, 2013.

“Transgressing ‘The Typical’: Re-Claiming the Human Trafficking Narrative,” explored the ways survivor narratives call into question assumptions about the privileged position of “sex trafficking” and reveal the aspects of trafficking that survivors, themselves, assign the greatest meaning, transgressing notions of the “typical” trafficking victim.

Posted on: 11/25/2013

Dora Mills receives Child Advocate Award from American Academy of Pediatrics Maine Chapter

DMills (2)Dora Anne Mills, M.D., M.P.H., vice president for Clinical Affairs and director of the School of Community and Population Health, was awarded the Child Advocate Award by the American Academy of Pediatrics at the annual meeting of the organization’s Maine Chapter in Portland on November 2, 2013. The award's plaque states that it is given "in recognition of outstanding service to advance the health of Maine's children.”

Drs. Steve Feder and Janice Pelletier, chapter President and vice president, surprised Mills with the award after she gave the keynote address at the meeting.

Mills responded, "I am extremely touched by this recognition, and I also want to recognize all of Maine's pediatric providers, who work tirelessly on the front lines every day with Maine children and their families to improve the health of our state. I feel tremendous gratitude to the community of pediatric providers who have always responded so graciously to my many requests over the years and are always available at the other end of the phone (or email). Thank you! I am also very proud to count myself among you, as a board-certified pediatrician, a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and a member of the Maine Chapter."

Posted on: 11/22/2013

David Line Denali presents at American Public Health Association Annual Meeting

dlinedenaliDavid Line Denali, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the School of Community and Population Health, presented a session at the 141st Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Public Health Association (APHA), held in early November in Boston.  Line Denali’s presentation focused on water conservation efforts in public health.

"Think Global, Act Local" was the motto of this year's APHA Meeting. The intent was to examine ideas and practices from around the globe and consider them when planning local public health efforts.

Line Denali's presentation reviewed global water conservation in public health strategic plans and discussed how decisions made locally can impact health globally. For instance, having water embedded in products is a detriment to many areas where water is scarce, especially southeastern Asia. A reevaluation of the ways in which water is consumed can significantly affect global health.

Line Denali lives in Arizona and was a county Public Health Emergency Preparedness Division Manager before devoting himself to teaching full-time. During his experience creating strategic plans, he realized that the likelihood of running out of water was far greater than the likelihood of a terrorist attack.

Posted on: 11/22/2013

David Livingstone Smith’s 'Less than Human' part of Duke University display on Nuremberg Trials

dsmith-smallThe J. Michael Goodson Law Library at Duke University has displayed UNE Philosophy Professor David Livingstone Smith's award-winning book Less Than Human:  Why We Demean, Enslave, and Exterminate Others as part of a display on the Nuremberg Trials.

The Goodson Law Library's J. Marshall Doswell, Jr. Nuremberg Trials Collection is a collection of books and memorabilia relating to the trial and its legacy. Currently on display in the Riddick Rare Book and Special Collections Room are recent additions to the collection. Most books on display have a legal theme and many were written by attorneys involved in the trials; several focus on the psychological aspects of defendants' lives and the nature and causes of evil. Still others examine the legacy of the trial and how it led to a heightening of social consciousness and increased moral and political recognition of the idea that a court of law is capable of sanctioning the commission of international crimes. Read more about the display.

Smith's Less than Human was winner of the Cleveland Foundation's 77th Annual Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for non-fiction. Smith is also the author of Why We Lie:  The Evolutionary Roots of Deception and the Unconscious Mind and The Most Dangerous Animal:  Human Nature and the Origins of War.

Posted on: 11/21/2013

Ali Ahmida presents on Arab uprisings at international conference

aahmidaAli Ahmida, professor and chair of the Department of Political Science, was invited to Boston University to present a paper at an international conference titled “The Arab Uprisings:  Accomplishments, Failures and Prospects” on November 15, 2013.  The conference was sponsored by Harvard and Boston Universities.

Ahmida’s presentation was titled "Post February 17 Revolution: The Challenges of Transitional Justice, Truth and National Reconciliation in Libya."

Posted on: 11/19/2013

Matthew Anderson presents paper at annual meeting of Italian Association for the Study of Law and Literature in Verona

mandersonMatthew Anderson, Ph.D., professor in the Department of English, presented a paper, "A Brief for the Defense," on November 15, 2013, at the annual meeting of The Italian Association for the Study of Law and Literature (AIDEL), hosted by the University of Verona, in Verona, Italy.

The paper offered a reading of a lyric by contemporary American poet Jack Gilbert.

Posted on: 11/19/2013

Dora Anne Mills presents at American Public Health Association Annual Meeting

DMills (2)Dora Anne Mills, M.D., M.P.H., vice president for Clinical Affairs and director of the School of Community and Population Health, presented a session at the 141st Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Public Health Association (APHA), held recently in Boston.

Mills’ presentation focused on her research concerning the impact of the 1918 influenza pandemic in Maine and on the lessons from that era that are applicable today, such as the best way to manage an influenza epidemic like the H1N1 pandemic of 2009.

Her research on the 1918 pandemic is based on approximately 2,000 pages of newspaper articles from the time period and archives from the state library.

Mills’ experiences managing the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, as the director for public health in Maine, made clear to her how many of the lessons from 1918 are still applicable today.

In her presentation, she focused on three such lessons, including: the roles of policy; the balance of authority between federal, state, and local governments; and on the different vulnerabilities seen in rural and urban areas.

The APHA's Annual Meeting is the largest public health conference in the country, with over 13,000 attendees.


 

Posted on: 11/18/2013

Amy Keirstead presents seminar at Bishop’s University

akeirsteadAmy Keirstead, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Physics, presented a seminar at Bishop’s University in Lennoxville, Quebec, on November 1, 2013. The talk, titled “Once Upon a Photon: Using Photochemistry to tell the Ionic Liquids Story,” provided an overview of Keirstead’s research activities at UNE that investigate the use of ionic liquids for a variety of green chemistry and nanotechnology applications.

The presentation included work carried out by a number of UNE student researchers: Robyn Gaudet (Chemistry, ’13), Annie Leslie (Neuroscience, ’13), Sean Naughton (Biochemistry and Medical Biology, ’13), Amber Zablowsky (Medical Biology, ’11), Tyler Rioux (Medical Biology, ’13), Emily Wells (Chemistry, ’14), Lindsey LaPointe (Chemistry-Secondary Education, ’15), Peter Caradonna (Biochemistry and Medical Biology, ’13) and Regina Scalise (Chemistry, ’13).

Other collaborators were Jerome Mullin, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Chemistry of Physics, and Henry Tracy, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Southern Maine.

Keirstead was visiting Bishop’s as an alumna, having completed her Bachelor’s Degree in Honours Chemistry in 2000.

She spent time following the seminar discussing UNE’s vibrant undergraduate research culture with Bishop’s students and faculty.  

Posted on: 11/18/2013

Amy Keirstead presents research findings at the 41st Ontario-Quebec Physical Organic Mini-Symposium

akeirsteadAmy Keirstead, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Physics, gave an oral presentation at the 41st Ontario-Quebec Mini-Symposium, held November 1-3, 2013, in Montreal, Quebec.

Her presentation, titled “1,1-Dimethyl-2,3,4,5-tetraphenylsilole as a Molecular Rotor Probe to Investigate the Microviscosity of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids,” included contributions from UNE student co-authors Regina Scalise (Chemistry‘13) and Peter Caradonna (Biochemistry and Medical Biology ’13) as well as Jerome Mullin, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Chemistry and Physics, and Henry Tracy, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Southern Maine.

This work is part of Keirstead’s ongoing research program that investigates the use of ionic liquids for a variety of green chemistry and nanotechnology applications and was funded by the Maine Space Grant Consortium Education and Seed Research grant.

Posted on: 11/18/2013

Lara Carlson inaugurated by NEACSM for unprecedented second term as president

lcarlsonOn November 15, 2013, Lara Carslon, Ph.D., FACSM, was inaugurated, for an unprecedented second term, as president of the New England chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine (NEACSM) at NEACSM’s annual fall conference, held in Providence, Rhode Island.

Carlson’s presidency is for a three-year term.  Her previous presidency began in 2006.

In 2011, Carlson received the Honor Award, the highest honor bestowed by the NEACSM.

Posted on: 11/18/2013

India Broyles presents at CARO-ACRO in Montreal

IBroylesIndia Broyles Ed.D., associate professor for medical education and director of the Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership (MMEL) program, and Jasbir Jaswal, M.D., an MMEL student, presented a poster/discussion session titled “Competency-based Applied Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics Residents” at the annual joint scientific meeting of the Canadian Association of Radiology Oncology (CARO-ACRO) and the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists, held September 18 – 21, in Montreal, Canada.

Posted on: 11/14/2013

Gayle Brazeau named to '2013 Next list' and featured in Mainebiz article

Brazeaumainebiz
Gayle Brazeau with "2013 Next" award at the Mainebiz reception along with Dora Anne Mills, President Danielle Ripich, Cynthia Forrest and other UNE faculty and staff

Gayle A. Brazeau, Ph.D., dean of the UNE College of Pharmacy, was named to Mainebiz's "2013 Next List" as one of 10 people shaping the future of Maine's economy. 

Brazeau, along with the other nine people on the “2013 Next List,” was honored at a Mainebiz reception in Freeport on November 12, 2013.

Earlier, she was interviewed by the Mainebiz publication, a news source for Maine businesses, and was featured in an article titled “Gayle Brazeau shepherds Maine’s next generation of pharmacists into service.”

The article refers to Brazeau as having a “reputation as a community builder who brings together various constituencies, including companies, pharmacists, other academics, as well as students and their families, to improve the UNE (pharmacy) program.”

Posted on: 11/13/2013

Dora Anne Mills presents keynote at American Academy of Pediatrics

DMills (2)Dora Anne Mills, M.D., M.P.H., vice president for Clinical Affairs, presented the keynote speech at the annual conference of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which was held in Portland, Maine, on November 2, 2013.  The conference was attended by pediatric health care providers from across northern New England.

Mills' speech focused on the impact of health policy on pediatric health and the importance for all health care providers to get involved with policy at the local, state, and/or federal level. She reviewed the impact of policies on some of the major health successes of the last century and outlined the leading health issues of the present, emphasizing that policy is a crucial strategy necessary to address them.

Mills also discussed the role of data, anecdotes, visuals, credibility of the argument, and, most importantly, relationships with policymakers and health care providers.

She ended her speech by underscoring the extent to which health policy is integral to the mission of health care providers.

Mills is a pediatrician and a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and also serves as the director of UNE's School of Community and Population Health.

Posted on: 11/13/2013

Cathy Plourde and Sue St. Pierre present physician training video at Maine Public Health Association Annual Meeting

cplourde
Cathy Plourde
Cathy Plourde, director of Add Verb Productions, and Sue St. Pierre, DO, course director in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, presented at the 29th Annual Meeting of the Maine Public Health Association in October.

Plourde and St. Pierre presented video segments that demonstrated their work in developing a training video to be used in the health care sector for addressing domestic violence as a health factor in patients and clients.

Their work, which was funded by the Bingham Program, will be released for wider use in the coming months and features video content to help primary care providers work with patients in exam rooms to recognize and speak about violence and health.

The training videos will also be made available on UNE Digital Commons.  The scenes were performed by professional and community actors as well as UNE staff, faculty and students.

Posted on: 11/11/2013

UNE Research Team presents at American Public Health Association's 141st Annual Meeting

CPlourdePHerrickAPHA
Lilia Bottino, Cathy Plourde and Peter Herrick share data with interested conference attendees.
Behavioral research on Add Verb Productions’ You the Man was selected by the Family Violence Prevention Caucus and the APHA Committee on Women's Rights for two different poster sessions on dating violence, sexual assault and bystander engagement in violence prevention.

Additionally the Committee on Women's Rights selected the team's work on Add Verb’s production The Thin Line for an oral presentation.

The longitudinal studies, now in their fourth year, and have been the work of Nancy Shore, Ph.D., M.S.W., M.P.H., associate professor in the School of Social Work; Peter Herrick, M.S.Ed, assistant director of Sponsored Programs; Cathy Plourde, M.A., program director of Theater and Social Change, Add Verb Productions; Gary Cattabriga, director of Analytics; and Allison Morrill, J.D., Ph.D., Healthy Maine Partnerships Evaluation in the School of Community and Population Health; with student participation from School of Social Work students Lilia Bottino ‘14, Elisa Orme ‘13, and Carin Stromgren ‘13.

Posted on: 11/11/2013

Alethea Cariddi speaks at Efficiency Maine Annual Symposium

acariddi2Alethea Cariddi, UNE’s Sustainability Coordinator, spoke at the Efficiency Maine Annual Symposium on November 6, 2013.

The event featured two panel discussions, one from the customer perspective and one from the contractor perspective, as well as an address from Maine Energy Commissioner, Tom Welch.

Cariddi presented on a building automation control project for which UNE received funding in 2011 from Efficiency Maine.  The project was successful in reducing energy consumption, cost and resulting greenhouse gas emissions.

In attendance were approximately 100 contractors and business leaders, state legislators on the Energy Committee and board members of the Efficiency Maine Trust.

Posted on: 11/11/2013

Marilyn Gugliucci gives keynote address at Opportunity Alliance Senior Volunteers, Foster Grandparents, and Senior Companions Annual Meeting

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., professor in UNECOM’s Department of Geriatric Medicine and director for Geriatrics Education and Research, was the keynote presenter at The Opportunity Alliance Senior Volunteers, Foster Grandparents, and Senior Companions Annual Meeting, which was held in Portland, Maine, on November 1, 2013.

Gugliucci’s talk was focused on gerotranscendence – rising above past paradigms and challenging negative societal views of aging.

There were 125 older adults in attendance. The oldest, age 91, drove from Bridgton, Maine, for the meeting and was celebrating 19 years as a Foster Grandparent for at risk youths.

The Opportunity Alliance works with people to build better lives and stronger communities. They provide advocacy, leadership, and support to identify and address the needs of individuals, families, and communities. 

Posted on: 11/11/2013

Ali Ahmida to participate in Program on Arab Reform and Democracy

aahmidaAli Ahmida, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Political Science, has been invited to participate in the fifth annual conference of the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford University, which will take place in collaboration with Koc University of Istanbul, Turkey, March 27-28, 2014.

The conference, Political Change in the Arab World: Internal Dynamics and Regional Actors, will examine the internal dynamics of and the role of regional actors in the political transitions in the Arab world. Scholars, policymakers and practitioners from across the region, as well as international experts, will attend.

Some of the key issues discussed will include transitions in Tunisia and Egypt; political Islam; violent conflicts and their aftermath; monarchies in transition; and the role of Turkey as a regional player.  Ahmida will speak about the Libyan transition and its accompanying security challenges.

Posted on: 11/11/2013

UNE’s Student Academic Success Centers receive Level 2 International Tutor Training Certification

The University of New England’s Student Academic Success Centers, located on both the Biddeford and Portland campuses, recently received Level 2 International Tutor Training Program Certification through the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA).

Attainment of the certification involves a rigorous application, which demonstrates the University’s commitment to training tutors who provide learning support with professionalism, integrity, content mastery, and respect for individual differences.  The certification is recognized internationally, and UNE is one of only three programs in the state of Maine to achieve the Level 2 Certification.

The Biddeford and Portland Student Academic Success Centers at UNE provided a total of nearly 6,000 tutoring sessions in the last academic year.

Posted on: 11/08/2013

John Stubbs publishes article in ‘Fluid Phase Equilibria’

jstubbsJohn Stubbs, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Physics, recently published an article titled "Solute extraction via supercritical ethane from poly(ethylene glycol): A Monte Carlo simulation study" in the journal Fluid Phase Equilibria.

Posted on: 11/07/2013

John Streicher authors article accepted by 'Journal of Biological Chemistry'

jstreicherJohn Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences, authored an article titled “Development of functionally selective, small molecule agonists at kappa opioid receptors” that was accepted for publication in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

The article explores a property of the κ-Opioid Receptor (KOR) known as “functional selectivity” or “signaling bias,” in which a molecule binding to the receptor can specifically activate one downstream signaling pathway over another.

The KOR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), and while it has the potential to induce analgesia and helps decrease drug-taking behaviors, KOR activation also has unpleasant side effects.  KOR signaling is mediated via G protein pathways and βarrestin pathways, and previous work in the field has suggested that βarrestin2 signaling is responsible for the negative side effects of KOR activation.

In this article, Streicher and his colleagues present their development of two novel chemical classes of KOR agonists that are biased against βarrestin2 signaling and for G protein signaling. These compounds also demonstrate analgesic properties in vivo, much like other KOR agonists.

Future work with these compounds will focus on determining if these drugs produce analgesia without typical KOR negative side effects. This work has the potential to introduce an entirely new class of analgesic drugs without the side effects typical of opioids such as morphine.

The article is scheduled for publication in January and is available as an e-publication.

Posted on: 11/07/2013

John Streicher presents research from UNE’s drug discovery and screening program at Academic Drug Discovery Consortium

jstreicherJohn Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences, presented research from UNE’s drug discovery and screening program at the Academic Drug Discovery Consortium annual meeting, which was held October 9-11, 2013, in Nashville, Tennessee.

The poster presentation, titled “Drug Discovery at the University of New England: Identifying New Drugs for the Treatment of Chronic Pain,” showcased research from the drug discovery pipeline that is being developed at UNE.

Under the leadership of the Office of Research and Scholarship, headed by Vice-President for Research and Director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences Ed Bilsky, Ph.D., and by the Center of Biomedical Research and Excellence (COBRE) program, headed by Ian Meng, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences,  this pipeline is being developed to discover new drugs for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases from the earliest chemistry to final clinical testing in human patients.

The research highlighted at this conference includes medicinal chemistry from Cassia Mizuno, Ph.D., assistant professor in the College of Pharmacy; in vitro drug screening from Streicher and his In Vitro Drug Discovery Core; in vivo behavioral testing from Bilsky and the COBRE Behavioral Core; and pharmacokinetics/drug metabolism work from Karen Houseknecht, Ph.D., professor in the College of Pharmacy.

The presentation, therefore, demonstrated UNE’s drug discovery capabilities and the progress of several drug discovery projects that seek to discover new drugs for chronic pain. The presentation also showcased UNE’s capabilities for potential academic or industrial researchers who are interested in collaboration or contract research work.

Read more about UNE's drug discovery core.

Posted on: 11/07/2013

Ruth Dufresne presents poster presentations at American Public Health Association

rdufresneRuth Dufresne, M.S., research associate for the School of Community and Population Health, along with staff from the Maine CDC Partnership For A Tobacco-Free Maine, presented her work at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting on November 5, 2013.

The group presented two posters titled “Evaluation of a Community Initiative to Increase Tobacco-Free Recreation Policies in Maine” and “Evaluation of a Community Initiative to Reduce Point-of-Sale Tobacco Advertising in Maine.”

The posters addressed the objectives, challenges and opportunities, implementation and evaluation methods, and results for the tobacco-free recreation policy initiative and the point-of-sale tobacco advertising initiative.

Posted on: 11/06/2013

Susan Jarmuz-Smith publishes new column in ‘The Communique’

sjarmuzsmithSusan Jarmuz-Smith, M.S., assistant lecturer in the Department of Psychology, published her latest Practical Tech column titled, "Using Data Collection to Improve Student Outcomes," in the National Association of School Psychologists' monthly publication The Communique.

The article covers basic strategies for gathering data about the effectiveness of technology-based interventions with a focus on verifying that the financial outlay of technology tools actually leads to improvements in student outcomes. The article supports the goal of the monthly column, which is to provide practical technology guidance to practicing school psychologists.

Posted on: 11/06/2013

Jennifer Tuttle chairs plenary session at American Women Writers of Color Conference

Professor Jennifer TuttleJennifer Tuttle, Dorothy M. Healy Professor of Literature and Health and editor of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, chaired a plenary session sponsored by Legacy at the recent American Women Writers of Color Conference, November 1-3, 2013, in Ocean City, Maryland.

The session, on the theme of “The Racialized Private Text and African American Women’s Archives,” examined how private writing, such as letters and diaries, by women of color can illuminate, revise, or upend received narratives of American literature and history.

Presenting on the panel were Danielle Skeehan, Sam Houston State University, on “Black Atlantic Seamstresses and the Practice of Letters in the Early Caribbean;” Katie Simon, Georgia College, on “Harriet Wilson, the ‘Colored Medium,’ and the Problem of the Spiritualist Archive;” and Jennifer M. Wilks, University of Texas – Austin, on “Hidden in Plain Sight: Translating the French Language Diaries of Mary Church Terrell.”

Posted on: 11/06/2013

A. Christine Brown publishes in ‘Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology’

sbrownA. Christine Brown, Ph.D., chair and professor in the Department of Biology, recently published an article in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology.  The article was co-authored by Joseph Sungail (M.S. Marine Sciences ’10), who served as first author; Kimbereley Alpert (Marine Biology ’08); and Juliet Maurukas (Marine Biology ’09).

The article is titled “Prey selection by Gulf of Maine green crabs (Carcinus maenas), rock crabs (Cancer irroroatus) and American lobsters (Homarus americanus): A laboratory study.”   It examines prey selection preferences among juvenile green crabs, rock crabs and American lobsters in a laboratory setting with a limited selection of prey items.

The results of the study suggest, somewhat contrary to expectations, that while the three species have different claw morphologies, they select similar prey when presented with a size range of mussels and barnacles. This overlap of resource utilization could have implications for all three species. The simplified model utilized in the lab gives a base line of non motile prey preferences in an “ideal situation.”

Posted on: 11/05/2013

Teresa Dzieweczynski published in 'Behavioral Ecology'

tdzieweczynskiTeresa Dzieweczynski, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Psychology, published an article in the most recent issue of the journal Behavioral Ecology. The article, "Male behavioral type affects female preference in Siamese fighting fish," has three different student co-authors, Lindsay Forrette (Animal Behavior '13), Krystal Mannion (Animal Behavior and Marine Science '15), and Alyssa Russell (Animal Behavior '12).

This study is one of the first to explicitly link differences in male personality to differences in female choice in fishes. The article is also a component of Dzieweczynski's research program on examining the causes, mechanisms, and consequences of individual variation in fish behavior.

Posted on: 11/01/2013

Shelley Cohen Konrad presents at Council on Social Work Education annual meeting

scohenkonradUniversity of New England's Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education Director Shelley Cohen Konrad, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Social Work, will present this week at the annual meeting of The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in Austin, Texas.  CSWE is a nonprofit national association representing more than 2,500 individual members as well as graduate and undergraduate programs of professional social work education.

Cohen Konrad will present on “Social Work Leadership and Interprofessional Education” in collaboration with Barbara L. Jones, Ph.D., M.S.W., University of Texas at Austin; Jayashree Nimmagadda, Ph.D., M.S.W., LICSW, Rhode Island College; Maureen Rubin, Ph.D., M.S.W., M.A., University of Nevada, Reno; and Anna M. Scheyett, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW, University of South Carolina.

Other UNE attendees at the CSWE conference include Danielle F. Wozniak, M.S.W., ACSW, Ph.D., director of the School of Social Work and Kerry Dunn, J.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Social Work.

Posted on: 11/01/2013

James Sulikowski receives cash award on behalf of UNE from Marine Anglers for Conservation and Research

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L-R: Dick Michaud, James Sulikowski, John Hammond
James Sulikowski, Ph.D., associate professor of marine biology, was presented a $7,500 check by Marine Anglers for Conservation and Research Director Dick Michaud and Vice President John Hammond II in support of the University of New England and the Marine Anglers for Conservation and Research, Cooperative Research program, which provides scholarships for marine science student summer research residencies.  



Posted on: 11/01/2013

Stephen Burt is curator of art exhibition at Biddeford's Engine

PastPresentFuture198Stephen Burt, associate professor and chair, UNE Department of Art and Communications, is the curator for the exhibition Past-Present-Future, featuring works by the artists Elinore Hollinshead, Fritz Drury and Rimer Cardillo, which will be on display at the Engine gallery at Engine, 265 Main Street, Biddeford.

Burt writes that "while each of these artists utilize different methods and materials they all find inspiration in nature, a nature seen through the lens of memory, dreams, and portents of an imagined (or feared) future. They create work of substance that speaks not to the style of the moment but to a larger vision in which the history of images is an important part. Each also shares a commitment to instruction that is a testament to a generosity of spirit, sharing their skills and knowledge with new generations of artists."

Opening reception is Nov. 8th, 5-8pm. The exhibition runs through Nov. 30th.

Posted on: 10/31/2013

Marilyn Gugliucci participates in Society of Hospitalized Medicine initiative on Acute Care of Older Persons

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., professor and director of Geriatrics Education and Research, traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the Society of Hospitalized Medicine (SHM) initiative on the Acute Care of Older Persons (ACOP) in Washington, D.C.  Gugliucci is the delegate for the Gerontological Society of America (GSA), within which she is the chair for the Health Sciences Section. Her work was conducted October 28-30, 2013.

The SHM is leading a project to identify uncertainties (stated in the form of research questions) about the treatment of older adult patients in the acute care setting that are important to patients, care-givers, and clinicians. The project began in May 2013, and efforts generated 1,299 questions, which were reduced to 114 questions.  The meeting in Washington, D.C., was focused on reducing the list to 10 final questions, which required rephrasing, to be used for funding consideration.

The questions focus on older adult hospitalized patients and various aspects of assessments, treatments, medication management, transitions of care, caregiver engagement, and focused outcomes.

The SHM project is supported by the Association of Specialty Professors and the John A. Hartford Foundation. Twenty national organizations were included in the initiative. Besides the GSA, select organizations include the Alzheimer’s Association, American Academy of Neurology, American College of Cardiology, American College of Surgeons, American Geriatrics Society, American Hospital Association, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, National Institutes of Health, National Alliance for Caregiver, and Society of Critical Care Medicine, among others.

The project will be completed by December 2013.

Posted on: 10/30/2013

Marilyn Gugliucci speaks at Maine Association for Family and Consumer Sciences

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., professor and director of Geriatrics Education and Research, was the invited speaker for the Maine Association for Family and Consumer Sciences (AFCS) evening program on October 25, 2013.

The mission of the AFCS is to provide leadership and support for professionals whose work assists individuals, families, and communities in making informed decisions about their well-being, relationships, and resources to achieve optimal quality of life.

Gugliucci’s 90 minute presentation focused on what adult children and communities can do to contribute to older adult well-being.

Posted on: 10/30/2013

Dora Mills leads retreat at meeting of Maine Primary Care Association

DMills (2)Dora Anne Mills, M.D., M.P.H., vice president for Clinical Affairs, led a three-hour discussion and retreat on interprofessional collaborative team-based practice with the medical and dental directors of Maine's community health centers at the annual meeting of the Maine Primary Care Association, held in Bar Harbor, Maine, on October 23, 2013.

After presenting what UNE is doing to educate health professional students in the competencies of interprofessional team-based practice, Mills led a discussion with the directors about how these competencies and strategies apply to their own practices, using a variety of scenarios and questions. Joining her was Ronald Chenette, D.M.D., M.P.H., associate clinical professor of UNE's College of Dental Medicine.

Posted on: 10/30/2013

Commentary on motorsports safety by Lara Carlson published in American College of Sports Medicine’s bulletin

lcarlsonLara Carlson, Ph.D., FACSM, assistant professor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Performance, recently published a commentary in the Sports Medicine Bulletin, a weekly news and information resource from the American College of Sports Medicine, in which she addresses health and safety concerns for motorsports drivers and provides scientific evidence to counter the claim that motorsports driving is not physically challenging.

“The 200 mph Athlete,” by Carlson is one of two Active Voice commentaries authored by members of the ACSM’s task force examining health and safety issues in motorsports.

Carlson is a member of the Board of Trustees for the New England chapter of the ACSM (NEACSM) and has been elected to serve a second term as its president.

Read the commentary.

Posted on: 10/29/2013

Charles Thompson’s artwork on exhibit

cthompsonCharles Thompson, M.F.A., professor of art in the Department of Arts and Communications, will have an art show October 30-December 7, 2013, at the Saccarappa Gallery in Westbrook, Maine, located at 861 Main Street.

An opening reception is scheduled for November 2nd, 5:00-8:00 p.m.

Posted on: 10/28/2013

Jennifer Morton presents poster on behalf of CHANNELS (UD7 HRSA) at the Institute of Medicine

jmorton2Jennifer Morton, DNP, MPH, APHN, interim director and associate professor of the Department of Nursing and project director of the CHANNELS program, presented a poster on the assessment and evaluation process of the Interprofessional nature of the Community, Health, Access, Navigate, Network, Education, Leadership and Services (CHANNELS) project at the Global Forum on Innovations in Health Professions Education at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), held in Washington, D.C., on October 11, 2013.

The University of Missouri, The Ohio State University, Xavier University, and UNE were selected from a competitive peer review among all 27 Health Services Research Administration (HRSA) awardees to present their innovative methodologies and early findings.  Additionally, presenters served as guests to the Global Forum proceedings whereby recommendations were developed for Interprofessional Education (IPE) standardized assessment processes.

Posted on: 10/28/2013

Shelley Cohen Konrad and Karen Pardue deliver Mary Switzer lecture

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Shelley Cohen Konrad
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Karen Pardue
Shelley Cohen Konrad, Ph.D., LCSW, associate professor in the School of Social Work and director of the Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education (CEIPE), and Karen Pardue Ph.D., R.N., ANEF, associate dean for Undergraduate Education in the Westbrook College of Health Professions and associate professor of nursing, delivered the Mary Switzer lecture to the fall meeting of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professionals on October 24, 2013, in Orlando, Florida.

The Switzer lecture is an invited keynote honoring the pioneering vision of Mary Switzer who advanced team-based vocational rehabilitation services.  Cohen Konrad and Pardue addressed the contribution of Interprofessional Education  (IPE) in shaping today's health professional and the imperative for learning experiences addressing the competencies of communication, values/ethics, teamwork, knowledge of diverse roles, collaborative leadership and patient centeredness in contemporary health profession curricula.

Posted on: 10/25/2013

Andrew Golub serves on accreditation team for Commission on Institutions of Higher Education

agolubAndrew Golub, dean of Library Services, recently served on an accreditation team for the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

The team, chaired by Lynn Pasquerella, president of Mount Holyoke College, conducted a site visit to Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts October 20-23, 2013.

Posted on: 10/24/2013

Jeanne Hey joins Thornton Academy’s Board of Trustees

jheyJeanne Hey, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, was inducted to the Board of Trustees of Thornton Academy on September 26, 2013.

Founded in 1811, Thornton Academy, in Saco, Maine, is a semi-private high school and middle school and is one of the oldest independent schools in the nation.  It is also is one of the oldest public-private partnerships in the country, opening its services in 1889 to local communities, who contracted with Thornton’s Board of Trustees for the education of their communities’ children.

Hey is a resident of Saco, and one of her two sons is currently a student at Thornton Academy.

Posted on: 10/24/2013

Michele Polacsek and Karen O’Rourke present at annual Maine Public Health Association

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Michele Polacsek
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Karen O'Rourke
Michele Polacsek, Ph.D., M.H.S., associate professor of public health, and Karen O’Rourke, M.P.H., assistant professor of public health, both of the School of Community and Population Health, presented their work as part of a panel discussion titled “Why We Need a Sugar Sweetened Beverage Revolution: The Maine Response.”  The presentation addressed the work they have  done through the Maine Prevention Research Center to conduct a Health Impact Assessment on a Sugar Sweetened Beverage excise tax for the state of Maine. Polacsek is leading the assessment with help from O'Rourke.

The process has involved convening several stakeholder groups, conducting stakeholder interviews, and assessing the existing literature, as well as conducting analyses to help understand the potential health effects and other impacts of such a tax on Maine populations. The purpose of performing this Health Impact Assessment is to improve the quality of public policy decision-making with regards to a potential Sugar Sweetened Beverage excise tax.

A Health Impact Assessment is a collection of procedures and tools through which policies can be evaluated based on their potential effects on the health of a population and the distribution of those effects within the population.

Read more about the Health Impact Assessment.

Posted on: 10/23/2013

Karen Houseknecht presents at Maine Primary Care Association Workshops and Conference

khouseknecht2On October 24, 2013, Karen Houseknecht, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, will give a joint presentation at the 2013 Conference Workshops and Annual Conference of the Maine Primary Care Association (MCPA), which is being held in Bar Harbor, Maine.

The title of the presentation is "Healthcare Reform: The Imperative of Relationship.”  Joining Houseknecht in the presentation are collaborative partners Holly Gartmayer-DeYoung, CEO of Eastport Health Care; Georgie Kendall, an Eastport Community Member; and UNE physician Assistant student, Abigail Raymond.  They will discuss the new course "Cultural Competency in Healthcare"  (PHS 234/IHS 534), which was launched in the spring of 2013.

The focus of the innovative new course is to increase faculty and student awareness of unique cultures of communities; to provide insight on health disparities in the U.S. with specific emphasis on the impact of rural poverty, racial bias and unemployment on access to healthcare and health outcomes; and to practice building and working in community as an inter professional team.

The new course combines didactic approaches as well as immersion in art, literature, film, writing and reflection as well as a week-long immersion experience in Washington County, Maine, where students are exposed to the extraordinary gifts and challenges faced by the diverse population of that region.

This course is the work of a collaborative teaching team comprised of UNE faculty and staff in the College of Pharmacy and the Westbrook College of Health Professions, leaders from the Passamaquoddy Reservation, leaders from Eastport Healthcare, Inc. and Eastport Community members.

Posted on: 10/23/2013

Shelley Cohen Konrad named Distinguished Scholar and Fellow

scohenkonradShelley Cohen Konrad Ph.D., LCSW, associate professor in the School of Social Work and director of the Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education, was elected to the Distinguished Fellowship in the National Academies of Practice as a Distinguished Scholar & Fellow.

The designation as a Distinguished Fellow with the National Academies of Practice is a very high honor that acknowledges Cohen Konrad’s outstanding achievements and signifies her recognized and valued contributions to the field of social work.  

Posted on: 10/22/2013

Barry Costa-Pierce to present on ecological aquaculture at UMaine

BCostaPierce2Barry Costa-Pierce, Ph.D., FAAAS, Henry L. & Grace Doherty Professor, chair of the Department of Marine Sciences, and director of the Marine Science Center, will speak at the University of Maine on October 29, 3013, at an event sponsored by Maine’s Sustainability Solutions Initiative and the Aquaculture Research Institute.

Costa-Pierce’s lecture is titled “Ecological Aquaculture:  The Evolution of the Blue Revolution.”  He will discuss ecological aquaculture as an alternative model of aquaculture development that uses ecological principles as the paradigm for the development of aquaculture.


Posted on: 10/18/2013

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi to moderate forum at Health Literacy Research Conference

skurtzrossiSabrina Kurtz-Rossi, M.Ed., adjunct professor for UNE’s School of Community and Population Health, will moderate a Health Literacy Association open forum discussion at the Health Literacy Research Conference (HARC) in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, October 29, 2013.

The session will review the steps taken to date to explore the concept of forming a health literacy professional association and propose a vision for moving forward. It will also encourage open discussion as well as generate concrete ideas and commitments to move the idea from concept to reality.

Kurtz-Rossi recently participated in a Twitter Chat sponsored by Health Communication Health Literacy & Social Science (HCHLITSS) on “What Can a Health Literacy Association Do for You?” to generate ideas and interest in the topic.

Read the transcript of the Twitter Chat

Posted on: 10/18/2013

Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies undergraduate curriculum to serve as cornerstone of presentation at the Society for the Study of Occupation

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L-R: Kathryn Loukas, Mary Anne Moisan, Caryn Husman, and Katie Hawke
The Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies (HWOS) undergraduate curriculum of the Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) will be the cornerstone of an upcoming professional forum presentation at the Society for the Study of Occupation conference in Lexington, Kentucky, Oct. 17-19, 2013.  This society in its 13th year was created as an interdisciplinary, international group of scholars and researchers dedicated to the science of occupation.

Kathryn Loukas, OTD, M.S., OTR/L, FAOTA, clinical professor of Occupational Therapy; Mary Anne Moisan, adjunct professor of HWOS and OT; Caryn Husman, M.S., coordinator of the HWOS Program; and Katie Hawke, M.S., assistant lecturer in Applied Exercise and Sport Performance and common curriculum coordinator for the WCHP undergraduate program, will be presenting a 90 minute Forum Presentation titled, “Delivering on the Promise of Occupation-Based Undergraduate Education: Occupational Science, Interprofessional Education, Health and Wellness.”  WCHP Associate Dean Karen Pardue’s leadership, input, and outcome data will be included in this presentation and proceedings.

The Forum will highlight the process of building the Interprofessional Health Science core and the HWOS curriculum as an undergraduate program to replace the former five-year occupational therapy Undergraduate to Master’s Degree Program.

An undergraduate degree program dedicated to the study of occupation as a health and wellness dimension is an innovative idea that has attracted much attention and student enthusiasm. The liberal arts core, interprofessional focus, broad professional applications, and ability for students to adopt a minor or be involved in global education opportunities will be highlighted.  The Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies program is currently in its third year of implementation as undergraduate students at UNE embrace the study of occupation.  

Posted on: 10/16/2013

Marilyn Gugliucci gives two research presentations at the Congress of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society

Marilyn_Gugliucci_142Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., professor and director for Geriatrics Education and Research, presented two UNECOM Department of Geriatric Medicine research projects at the Ninth Congress of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) in Venice Lido, Italy, Oct 1-4, 2013.

Gugliucci's October 2nd presentation was titled “Balancing Act: Impact on Proprioception and Falls Among Rural Community Dwelling Older Adults.” The next day, she presented “Learning by Living: Life Altering Medical Education Immersion Research.”

Gugliucci has presented at the EUGMS in the past in Vienna, Austria, when conducting research with colleagues at Boston University.

The abstracts for her presentations in Italy were published.  The citations are as follows:

Gugliucci, M. & Cowles, A. (2013) Balancing Act: Impact on Proprioception and Falls in Community Dwelling Rural Elders. Abstract, European Geriatric Medicine, Vol 1, Suppl. 1, p. S63.

Gugliucci, M. (2013) Learning by Living: Life Altering Medical Education Immersion Research. Abstract, European Geriatric Medicine, Vol 1, Suppl. 1, p. S144.

Read the October 2nd presentation here.

Read the October 3rd presentation here.






Posted on: 10/16/2013

Jennifer Tuttle presents at Western Literature Association conference

Professor Jennifer TuttleJennifer Tuttle, Ph.D., Dorothy M. Healy Professor of Literature and Health, presented this week at the annual conference of the Western Literature Association in Berkeley, California.

Tuttle's paper, "'and the land was fair before them': Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland and the Panama Pacific International Exposition," offers a new reading of Gilman's 1915 utopian novel.

While Gilman's fiction has traditionally been read as reflecting her affiliation as an Easterner, Tuttle's recent work recovering Gilman's Western orientation demands a new reading of her best known work of long fiction.  Her presentation argues that the novel was the textual counterpart of the Exposition itself, which occurred in San Francisco at the same time that Gilman's novel was appearing serially.  Both the novel and the world's fair proposed model societies localized in California that would realize the aims of U.S. imperialism.

Tuttle’s presentation is part of a longer essay, "Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the U.S. West," which is forthcoming in a volume titled A Woman's Place: The Geographies of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, edited by Jill Bergman.

Posted on: 10/15/2013

Colin Willis presents at Symposium on Signal Transduction in the Blood-Brain Barriers

cwillisColin Willis, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology and an investigator for the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) for the Study of Pain and Sensory Function, presented both a seminar and a poster at the 16th International Symposium on Signal Transduction in the Blood-Brain Barriers, which was held in Sumeg, Hungary, September 12-14, 2013.

The oral presentation, titled “Integrin Receptor Mediated Oxidative Stress Modulates Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity,” featured work performed by UNE student Ryan Camire (Nursing ’15), Shannon Malloy, a summer volunteer, and Holly Beaulac, a research assistant.  Demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica are associated with breakdown of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity, and this breakdown is mediated at least in part by integrin receptors.

Current MS therapies target integrin receptors; however, selecting which receptor to target is made difficult by the fact that many different types of integrin receptors play a part in disease pathogenesis.  Therefore, discovering common downstream mediators presents a better option for targeted therapy, which is the goal of the present study.

Using treatment with 3-chloropropanediol to induce pathological features of demyelinating disorders, including loss of BBB integrity, Willis and his lab found that expression of a key protein in the oxidative stress pathway, hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), increased both in the brain of the live animal and a cultured cell line.  The increase in HO-1 expression was prevented using integrin receptor blockers, suggesting that it is a downstream component of the integrin-mediated pathway and could, therefore, present a new avenue of exploration for treating BBB dysfunction in demyelinating disorders such as MS and Neuromyelitis Optica.

The poster presentation featured work by Stephanie Brule (Neuroscience, ’14) and Holly Beaulac, research assistant.  This research explores the paradoxical phenomenon of medication overuse headache (MOH), in which headache results from frequent use of drugs, called triptans, designed to treat migraines.

In particular, Willis and his lab explored the hypothesis that triptan-induced disruption of BBB integrity contributes to the development of MOH.  By examining expression of proteins that are major constituents of the BBB, they showed that treatment with sumatriptan, a drug used to treat migraine, does lead to loss of BBB integrity.   They also showed that this loss of BBB integrity correlates with changes in an intracellular signaling pathway, known as the Akt signaling pathway.

Willis believes that further exploration of triptan-induced alterations in the BBB and the underlying signaling pathways will enhance the understanding of migraine pathology and potentially unravel new possibilities for migraine therapy.

Posted on: 10/10/2013

Carry Buterbaugh attends national grantee meeting for Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration grant

Carry Buterbaugh, M.S., Ph.D., research assistant professor in the School of Community and Population Health (SCPH), attended the national grantee meeting for the Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grant in Phoenix, Arizona, in September 2013.

In partnership with Ruth Anne Spence, M.P.A., Ph.D., research associate professor in the SCPH, Buterbaugh is presently conducting evaluation research for the Community Health and Counseling Service, which has two PBHCI sites located in Maine--in Washington County and Bangor.

Through this national initiative, Buterbaugh and Spence are participating in a cost-study designed to estimate the costs of providing integrated primary health care in community-based behavioral health settings.

Maine is only one of five sites in the United States that has been selected for involvement in this cost-study. At the national grantee meeting in Phoenix, representatives of each of the five selected sites presented and discussed their proposed cost-studies.  

Posted on: 10/09/2013

Susan Jarmuz-Smith publishes latest column in ‘The Communique’

sjarmuzsmithSusan Jarmuz-Smith, M.S., assistant lecturer in the Department of Psychology, published her latest Practical Tech column titled, "Five Things You Can Do Right Now," in the National Association of School Psychologists' monthly publication The Communique.

The column covers five practical tech tools and strategies related to filtering mail, search strings, visualizing system performance, and cleaning up unneeded software and files.

The article supports the goal of the column, which is to provide practical technology guidance to practicing school psychologists.

Posted on: 10/08/2013

Anna Bass publishes in ‘PLoS ONE’

abassAnna L. Bass, Ph.D., assistant research professor in the Marine Science Center, co-authored a recent publication with former UNE Marine Science Center Post-doctoral Associate Louise Kregting, Ph.D., and former UNE Marine Science Center Director Philip Yund, Ph.D. The manuscript was published in the online journal PLoS ONE.

The research examined the effects of oscillatory water flow on green sea urchin fertilization in an experimental flume. Information regarding the effect of hydrodynamic factors on broadcast spawners, such as green sea urchins, is important for modeling fertilization during broadcast spawning events in highly energetic coastal environments.

Contrary to suggestions that turbulent wave action would always result in a decrease in fertilization rates, the authors detected significant fertilization even under various flow conditions.

In addition, the body surface of the animal was also determined to be a site of significant fertilization rates under energetic wave conditions.

Full citation:

Kregting LT, Bass AL, Guadayol Ò, Yund PO, Thomas FIM (2013) Effects of oscillatory flow on fertilization in the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. PLoS ONE 8(9): e76082. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0076082.

Posted on: 10/08/2013

Todd Vanderah and Ed Bilsky labs publish findings in ‘Life Sciences’ journal

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Todd Vanderah
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Ed Bilsky
The laboratories of Todd Vanderah, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology in the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences (CEN), and Edward Bilsky, Ph.D., vice president for research and scholarship, professor of pharmacology, and director of CEN, recently published their research findings in opioid pharmacology and drug development in the scientific journal Life Sciences.

The article, titled "Novel fentanyl-based dual μ/δ-opioid agonists for the treatment of acute and chronic pain," builds upon Vanderah’s and Bilsky’s previous research on interactions between two different types of opioid receptors named Mu and Delta and how these receptors may cross-talk to produce superior analgesia, or pain relief.

Posted on: 10/07/2013

William Bograkos serves as conference chair for AOAAM at Osteopathic Medical Conference and Exposition and presents lecture

wbograkosCol. William Bograkos, MA, DO (’85), FACOEP, clinical professor of medical military science, family practice and emergency medicine in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, recently served as conference chair for the American Osteopathic Academy of Addiction Medicine (AOAAM) at this year's Osteopathic Medical Conference and Exposition, which was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 30-October 4, 2013.

On the first day of the conference, AOAAM and the Association of Military Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (AMOPS) joined forces to address the White House Joining Forces initiative.  Bograkos presented a lecture titled "Homecoming: TBI and Psychological Health."

This lecture will be repeated at UNECOM's Veterans Day Continuing Medical Education event on November 23, 20213.
 

Posted on: 10/07/2013

Karen Houseknecht to present at American Society for Bone and Mineral Research annual meeting

khouseknecht2Karen Houseknecht, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, will give a presentation the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research annual meeting, which will be held in Baltimore, Maryland, Oct 4-7, 2013.

The presentation, titled "Second generation antipsychotic drugs have direct effects on the skeleton via G-protein coupled neural receptors: Implications for bone and energy metabolism,” is the focus of Houseknecht’s National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded research grant and highlights her collaboration with Dr. Cliff Rosen at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute.

Other UNE authors on the paper include Rachel Mayer and Shail Patel, both students in the College of Pharmacy, as well as John Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical sciences and the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences, Dan Brazeau, Ph.D., associate research professor in the College of Pharmacy, and Deborah Barlow, a College of Pharmacy research technician.

Posted on: 10/07/2013

Ed Bilsky presents at annual Osteopathic Medical Conference and Exposition

Bilsky142Edward Bilsky, Ph.D., vice president for Research and Scholarship, professor in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, and director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences, presented this week at the annual Osteopathic Medical Conference and Exposition in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Bilsky's presentation was titled "Neurobiology of Chronic Opioid Administration: Implications for Chronic Pain Management and Addiction Medicine." The talk presented some of the latest findings from the laboratory and the clinical literature on the effects that chronic opioid administration can have on the nervous system and body.

The presentation was part of an afternoon session jointly sponsored by the American Osteopathic Academy of Addiction Medicine and the American Osteopathic College of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Posted on: 10/04/2013

Owen Grumbling receives Robert G. Shafto Award for conservation leadership

ogrumblingOwen Grumbling, Ph.D., professor of environmental literature in the Department of Environmental Studies, recently received the Robert G. Shafto Award for outstanding conservation leadership in Maine from the Maine Association of Conservation Commission. The award is given once a year to an individual conservation commissioner who has demonstrated outstanding conservation leadership.

Grumbling has chaired the Wells Conservation Commission for thirty years and is the 2006 recipient of the New England Environmental Protection Agency’s  “Lifetime Service to the Environment and Human Health” award.

In 1985, Grumbling worked with town officials to establish the Wells Land Bank, a town fund to purchase conservation land.  It is believed to be the first such fund in the state.  Through donation of land and purchases, the town has created conservation areas ranging in size from two to seven hundred acres, known as “Wildlife Commons” – a term Grumbling borrowed from the traditional New England concept of grazing land shared by residents of a town.  The Wildlife Commons provide homes for wildlife while being available for public uses such as hunting, fishing, skiing, and hiking.

Wells has also worked with its partner, the Great Works Regional Land Trust, to mount private capital campaigns in order to secure important conservation areas, most recently the near-300 acre property now known as the Perkinstown Wildlife Commons.

Posted on: 10/03/2013

Owen Grumbling presents to Hutton Institute in Scotland on land conservation in Maine

ogrumblingOwen Grumbling, Ph.D., professor of environmental literature in the Department of Environmental Studies, gave a seminar on August 13, 2013, on the structure of land conservation in Maine to the staff of the James Hutton Institute in Scotland, an international research center focused on environmental sustainability with an historical emphasis on agricultural improvement.  The seminar was broadcast via CCTV to the Hutton Institute’s research facility at Dundee, Scotland.

Grumbling’s seminar, "Conservation of habitat, forest, green space in the state of Maine, USA: structures, policies, and foundational values," called for interdisciplinary study, combining science with social science and the humanities, in order to define and accomplish conservation goals in Maine.

Read more about the seminar.

Grumbling is a past recipient of the New England Environmental Protection Agency’s “Lifetime Contribution to the Environment and Human Health” award.

Posted on: 10/03/2013

Lara Carlson to serve as associate editor to academic journal

lcarlsonAssistant Professor Lara Carlson, Ph.D., FACSM, CSCS, in the Department of Applied Exercise Science, has accepted the position of associate editor of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (JSCR).

JSCR is the official research journal of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). According to its mission, it is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to research concerning sport and exercise demands, ranging from the underlying biological basis for exercise performance to the effects of training programs on physical performance.

The research addresses a variety of disciplines such as exercise endocrinology, physiology, biomechanics, and nutrition. The list of associate editors includes leading experts in the field, including Editor-In-Chief William J. Kraemer, Ph.D., CSCS, FNSCA, FACSM, professor in the Departments of Education, Physiology and Neurobiology, and Medicine at the UCONN School of Medicine.

Posted on: 10/01/2013

Susan McHugh delivers three talks in Europe

smchughSusan McHugh, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of English, was hosted in Europe to give three talks last week.

She delivered the keynote address, titled "When Species Meet on Killing Fields," on September 23, 2013, as part of the Würzburg Summer School for Cultural and Literary Animal Studies.  A public audience included fellows funded by the VolkswagenStiftung, a foundation dedicated to the support of the humanities, social sciences, and science technology in higher education and research.  The talk was hosted at Würzburger Residenz, a rococo palace that is now a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site.

Funded through a Swedish national grant, McHugh also presented two different talks at Uppsala University, the oldest university in Scandinavia.   For the literature faculty, she gave a lecture titled “Literary Animal Studies.”

She later led the seminar “Narrating Bio-cultural Extinctions” at the Centre for Gender Research, newly located in the Linnean Gardens.   Named for Carolus Linnaeus (Carl von Linnaé), whom scientists recognize as the father of modern taxonomy, the Linnean Gardens are the world’s oldest botanical gardens.


Posted on: 10/01/2013

Barry Costa-Pierce donates 18-volume set of the new 'Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology' to UNE Library

Barry A. Costa-Pierce, Ph.D. FAAAS, UNE Henry L. & Grace Doherty Chair of Marine Sciences, has generously presented an entire print set of Springer’s new 18-volume set Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology c2013, as a gift to the UNE Library Service’s Reference collection. 

Costa-Pierce is a section editor for Encyclopedia and also a contributor to its content: “An Introduction to Ocean Farming and Sustainable Aquaculture Science and Technology.” He is director UNE's Marine Science Center, professor & chair, Department of Marine Sciences, Fellow American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Posted on: 10/01/2013

Denise Bisaillon facilitates discussion on U.S. health care after viewing of ‘Escape Fire’

dbisaillonAs part of a national initiative led by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI), Denise Bisaillon, Ed.D., associate professor in the School of Community and Population Health, facilitated a discussion with second-year medical students at the College of Osteopathic Medicine on the Biddeford campus after the film Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare was shown on both UNE campuses on September 17, 2013.

There was a lively conversation after the film about the forces breaking down the U.S. health care system and the great need to turn to disease prevention rather than disease management.

This event was sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education.

Read about the film

Posted on: 9/27/2013

Geoffrey Bove presents at Symposium in Wound Healing and Fascia

gboveGeoffrey Bove, DC, PhD, associate research professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, participated in the Symposium in Wound Healing and Fascia, sponsored by the Fascia Research Society.

A long time contributor to the Fascia Research Congresses, Bove helped organize this event as well, which was held at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, in New York City, on August 18, 2013.

Bove prepared and presented dissections of the lower limb and the abdominal contents, focusing on normal and pathological connective tissues.

Posted on: 9/27/2013

Edward Bilsky presents research at Arrowhead Pain Therapeutics Summit East

bilsky142Edward Bilsky, Ph.D., University of New England vice president for research and scholarship and professor in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, presented this week at the 7th annual Arrowhead Pain Therapeutics Summit East in Boston Massachusetts.

Dr. Bilsky's presentation was entitled "New Approaches for Preclinical Assessment of Analgesic Efficacy and Side Effects." The talk presented some of the latest approaches in inducing nociceptive (pain) states in animals, measuring the consequences of the pain on behavior and other relevant endpoints, and assessing analgesic candidates as part of the drug development process. The presentation featured data from the UNE laboratories of Dr. Bilsky, Glenn W. Stevenson, Ph.D. associate professor of psychology, Tamara King, Ph.D. assistant professor of biomedical science, Lei Lei, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, and Ling Cao, M.D., Ph.D. assistant professor of microbiology. It described new methods for measuring spontaneous and affective components of pain, as well as pain suppressed behaviors.

Arrowhead's Pain Therapeutics Summit East is the U.S.’s premier pain conference covering the field of pain research and therapeutics. Leaders from the pharmaceutical, biotech, device and medical communities attend this conference to learn about the latest advances in the treatment of various types of pain and to network with colleagues from industry, the non-profit sector, academia, the medical community, government and investors.

Posted on: 9/27/2013

John Streicher presents research from UNE’s drug discovery and screening program at Academic Screening Workshop

jstreicherJohn Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences, presented research from UNE’s drug discovery and screening program at the Academic Screening Workshop 2013, which occurred September 17-18 in Baltimore, Maryland.

The poster presentation, titled “Drug Discovery at the University of New England: Identifying New Drugs for the Treatment of Chronic Pain,” showcased research from the drug discovery pipeline that is being developed at UNE. 

Under the leadership of the Office of Research and Scholarship, headed by Vice-President for Research and Director of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences Ed Bilsky, Ph.D., and by the Center of Biomedical Research and Excellence (COBRE) program, headed by Ian Meng, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences,  this pipeline is being developed to discover new drugs for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases from the earliest chemistry to final clinical testing in human patients.

The research highlighted at this conference includes medicinal chemistry from Cassia Mizuno, Ph.D., assistant professor in the College of Pharmacy; in vitro drug screening from Streicher and his In Vitro Drug Discovery Core; in vivo behavioral testing from Bilsky and the COBRE Behavioral Core; and pharmacokinetics/drug metabolism work from Karen Houseknecht, Ph.D., professor in the College of Pharmacy.

The presentation, therefore, demonstrated UNE’s drug discovery capabilities and the progress of several drug discovery projects that seek to discover new drugs for chronic pain. The presentation also showcased UNE’s capabilities for potential academic or industrial researchers who are interested in collaboration or contract research work.

Read more about research core facilities at UNE, including the drug discovery core and the behavioral core.

Posted on: 9/24/2013

Karen Pardue speaks at National League for Nursing Education Summit in D.C.

pardueKaren Pardue, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, associate dean for Undergraduate Education, was the invited speaker at the National League for Nursing Education Summit in Washington, D.C., on September 20, 2013.

The title of her lecture was “Learning to Collaborate: Design and Evaluation of Interprofessional Education.” 

Posted on: 9/24/2013

Chris Rizzo appointed the NATA Executive Committee for Education

crizzoChristopher Rizzo, MS, ATC, LAT, CSCS, assistant clinical professor and clinical education coordinator has been appointed to the National Athletic Trainer's Association (NATA) Executive Committee for Education as a member of the Interprofessional Work Group.

The work group’s task is to develop a white paper on "Interprofessional Education/Practice (IPE/IPP) in Athletic Training."  The white paper will provide information to institutions, educators, clinicians and other professions about the advantages of including athletic training in collaborative education and practice initiatives. Chris believes that “concepts of collaborative practice such as communication and knowledge of roles and responsibilities are critical to the education of athletic trainers because of the broad spectrum of health care providers that we work with in a clinical setting.”

Chris has been a member of National Athletic Trainer's Association for 15 years, and he is excited about the opportunity to bring his experiences to this paper, and to share the IPE initiatives currently underway at UNE.  As part of the work group, he will “learn what other programs are doing with respect to IPE and bring that back to the university.”

The white paper will be completed by the fall of 2014 and submitted to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), the accrediting body of UNE’s Athletic Training Program.

Posted on: 9/23/2013

Dora Anne Mills featured speaker at Saul O. Sidore Lecture at UNH

DMills (2)Dora Anne Mills, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.P., vice president for Clinical Affairs and director of the School of Community and Population Health, was a featured speaker at the Saul O. Sidore Lecture held at the University of New Hampshire on September 19, 2013.

The Sidore Lecture Series offers programs that raise critical and sometimes controversial issues facing society to those living in New Hampshire. This year's series is focused on public health and the challenges to people's liberties.

Mills presented on the relevant lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, including: the challenges of balancing health information privacy with the public's right to know; achieving fair and equitable distribution of vaccine in the face of disease surge and a severe vaccine shortage; and balancing the roles and responsibilities of federal, state, county, and local governments.

Mills also drew contrasts to challenges to personal liberty faced in the 1918 influenza pandemic. As Maine's Public Health Director, Mills led Maine's response to the 2009 pandemic and had conducted research earlier on Maine's response to the 1918 pandemic.

Her lecture was delivered before an audience of about 100 and was recorded for further distribution.

Read more about this year’s lecture series

Posted on: 9/23/2013

Leah Coplon appointed to Maine Women’s Policy Board

lcoplonLeah Coplon, CNM, RN, assistant professor in the Department of Nursing, was recently appointed to the Maine Women’s Policy Board (MWPB), a grass roots lobbying and outreach/education organization dedicated to improving maternal and child health (MCH).

Coplon will travel to Miami, Florida, in October on behalf of MWPB at the Annual Rowe Board Meeting.  Her representation is focused on advancing curriculum related to MCH for Schools of Nursing in Maine and the nation.

Posted on: 9/20/2013

John Streicher authors article in ‘Journal of Biological Chemistry’

jstreicherJohn Streicher, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical sciences, authored an article titled “Functional Selectivity of 6’-Guanidinonaltrindole (6’-GNTI) at κ-Opioid Receptors in Striatal Neurons” that was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry on August 2nd, 2013.  (J Biol Chem. 2013 Aug 2;288(31):22387-98)

The article explores a property of the κ-Opioid Receptor (KOR) known as “functional selectivity” or “signaling bias” in which a molecule binding to the receptor can specifically activate one downstream signaling pathway over another.   The KOR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), and while it has the potential to induce analgesia and helps decrease drug-taking behaviors, KOR activation also has unpleasant side effects.  KOR signaling is mediated via G protein pathways and βarrestin pathways, and previous work in the field has suggested that βarrestin2 signaling is responsible for the negative side effects of KOR activation.

In this article, Streicher and colleagues demonstrate that the drug 6’-GNTI specifically induces G protein pathways over βarrestin pathways and that this specificity persists in striatal neurons.  This demonstration of functional selectivity at the KOR, especially the revelation that it exists in the endogenous, neuronal setting, has major significance for drug discovery and could pave the way toward designing improved pain therapies for the KOR that specifically target pain without producing unwanted side effects.  

Posted on: 9/20/2013

Carolyn Bradley to present at 17th Annual Evidence Based Practice in Nursing Conference

CBradleyCarolyn Bradley, MSN, RN, CCRN, assistant professor in the Department of Nursing, will present at the 17th Annual Evidence Based Practice in Nursing Conference, “Revolutionizing Nursing Practice through Education,” on Friday, October 4, 2013, in Hartford, Connecticut.

Carolyn’s podium presentation titled “The Perceptions of Adult Hospitalized Patients Regarding Family Presence during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation” is the culmination of extensive data collection at Yale New Haven Hospital.
 

Posted on: 9/19/2013

Kelley Strout participates in intensive training at Hartford Institute

kstroutKelley Strout, Ph.D., RN, assistant professor in the Department of Nursing, was selected as one of 14 emerging nurse researchers/leaders nationwide in the area of gerontology to participate in a week long intensive training at the Hartford Institute at New York University.

This week long research training institute in July paired participants with mentors in the field and will provide ongoing support for research activities.

Strout completed her dissertation last spring at Northeastern University.  Her research agenda is focused on perceptions of wellness in elder populations.

Posted on: 9/19/2013

Jennifer Stiegler-Balfour publishes article in the Journal of ‘Teaching Psychology’

JStiegler-BalfourJennifer Stiegler-Balfour, assistant professor of psychology, co-authored an article in the latest issue of the Teaching of Psychology journal. The article, “Supporting Our Junior Faculty: Assessing the Concerns and Needs of Early Career Psychologists,” describes the results of a nationwide online survey of early career psychologists (ECPs).

Results indicated that the top concerns of ECPs involved finding a balance both between work and family and between the three major aspects of an academic position: teaching, research, and service. Further, the article utilizes these findings to provide practical suggestions for those attempting to understand and help today’s early career faculty in meeting the many demands of an academic psychologist career.

Download the full article.

Posted on: 9/19/2013

Susan-Jarmuz-Smith authors column in National Association of School Psychologists’ monthly ‘Communique’

sjarmuzsmithSusan Jarmuz-Smith, M.S., assistant lecturer in the Department of Psychology, was invited to author a new column this year, titled “Practical Tech,” for the National Association of School Psychologists' monthly publication, The Communique.

Her first article, published in September 2013, was titled "School Psychologists' Top Eight Bad Tech Habits."

Posted on: 9/16/2013

Charles W. Ford volunteers at hospital in Honduras

CFord2Charles W. Ford, Ph.D., professor of health sciences, who teaches health service management courses, served on a team of 42 volunteers working in a hospital in the mountainous regions of central Honduras from August 31 to September 7, 2013.

The volunteers from five states provided medical, dental and facility services ranging from emergency surgery to routine procedures to facility improvements in a non-governmental hospital serving as a regional medical center three hours from the capital.

Posted on: 9/16/2013

Corliss Chastain’s artwork on display in Gardiner, Maine

cchastainCorliss Chastain, MFA, adjunct faculty member in the Department of Arts and Communications, will display her work in “Something Small Under the Blankets: Fine Art Prints in 4 Square Inches,” an exhibit at Circling the Square Fine Art Press in Gardiner, Maine, September 20-October 26, 2013.

Gallery hours are Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. or by appointment.  The public is welcome to attend the opening reception on Friday, September 20th, 5:30-8:00 p.m.

Posted on: 9/16/2013

Stephen Burt displays drawing in Popul Vuh exhibition

sburtStephen Burt, BFA, MFA, chair and associate professor in the Department of Arts and Communications, created a drawing titled “The Shooting of Seven Macaw by Hunahpul and Xbalanque,” which has been accepted into the exhibition “An Illustrated Popol Vuh” at McNeese University in Lake Charles, Louisiana.  The exhibit will run from October 10 through November 8, 2013.

The Popol Vuh is a 16th century account of creation mythology composed by the K’iche’ Maya of the Guatemalan highlands.  Like other mythologies, the stories describe the actions of the deities and the creation of the world and human beings.  The exhibit seeks to illustrate the mythology collection by displaying works by contemporary artists that either literally or conceptually illustrate aspects of the stories.  Displayed in narrative fashion, the works, of various media-types, wrap around the gallery space in an attempt to express the story in a visual fashion.

Posted on: 9/13/2013

David Smith to speak at the Arcus Foundation in New York

dsmithThe Arcus Foundation in New York City presents a conversation with David Livingstone Smith, Ph.D., UNE professor of philosophy, Sept. 30th at the New York Society for Ethical Culture. The program, titled "Less than Human: The Ethics of our Treatment of Others," is part of the 2013 Arcus Forums series. 

Joining Smith in dialogue will be Annette Lanjouw, VP of Arcus' Great Apes Program and highly-regarded author and primatologist, and Jay Michaelson, VP of Arcus' Social Justice Program and scholar of environmental and religious ethics. More on the talk.

Smith was named the winner of the 77th Annual Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for nonfiction for his 2011 book Less Than Human:  Why We Demean, Enslave, and Exterminate Others.  Other publications include The Most Dangerous Animal:  Human Nature and the Origins of War (2007) and Why We Lie:  The Evolutionary Roots of Deception and the Unconscious Mind (2004).

Posted on: 9/11/2013

Emily Dornblaser and Gayle Brazeau co-author chapter in 'Encyclopedia of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology'

edornblaser
Emily Dornblaser
gbrazeau
Gayle Brazeau

Emily Dornblaser, Pharm.D., assistant clinical professor in the College of Pharmacy, and Gayle Brazeau, Ph.D., dean of the College of Pharmacy, co-authored a chapter titled “Dosage Forms: Parenterals” in the recently published fourth edition of the Encyclopedia of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology.  Dornblaser served as first-author.

The chapter is an update of a previously published version.  It reviews traditional routes of administration of parenteral products and features significant updates to the use of vascular access devices, IV infusion sets, infusion pumps and devices. It includes a comprehensive review of the types of parenteral dosage forms including new information on the microsphere formulation.

Also contained in the chapter is a brief review of the packaging considerations used for parenteral products as well as the newer injection systems used for delivery of the product. These include new needless systems used in the preparation of IV products.

A review of regulations surrounding the preparation of IV products is included as well.

Full citation:

Emily K Dornblaser Susan L Way Gayle A Brazeau. Dosage Forms: Parenterals.  In Enclyclopedia of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Fourth Edition.  Taylor and Frances: New York, published online: 23 Aug 2013; 884-897

Posted on: 9/05/2013

David Livingstone Smith contributes to book ‘The Politics of Species’

smithAn article by David Livingstone Smith, Ph.D., professor in the Department of History and Philosophy, is included in the book The Politics of Species: Reshaping our Relationships With Other Animals (Cambridge University press, 2013), edited by Raymond Corbey and Annette Lanjouw.

Smith’s article is titled "Indexically yours: why being human is more like being here than like being water."

Posted on: 9/03/2013

Stacey Thieme receives AGHE Part Time Faculty Recognition

SThiemeVictoria (Stacey) Thieme, DO, UNECOM director of Community Preceptor Programs & Faculty in the Department of Primary Care, has been awarded the 2013-14 Association for Gerontology/Geriatrics in Higher Education (AGHE) Part Time Faculty Recognition.

The AGHE leadership states: “Nationwide, reliance on part-time and/or adjunct faculty to teach gerontology/geriatrics is very high. Without the efforts and dedication of these individuals curriculum on aging would not be as robust as it is.”

Posted on: 9/03/2013

Susan Jarmuz-Smith receives Hyman-Lambert Memorial Scholarship

sjarmuzsmithThis summer, Susan Jarmuz-Smith, an assistant lecturer in the Department of Psychology, was awarded the Hyman-Lambert Memorial Scholarship.  This prestigious national award in the field of school psychology was presented by the American Academy of School Psychology at the convention of the American Psychological Association in Hawaii.

Jarmuz-Smith was selected from a competitive national field of applicants for her accomplishments in research, teaching, and service to the field.

In addition to being a faculty member at the University of New England, Jarmuz-Smith is also a doctoral candidate in school psychology at the University of Southern Maine.

Posted on: 9/03/2013

Nancy MacRae presents workshop in Slovenia for OT practitioners

nmacrae2Nancy MacRae, associate professor, Occupational Therapy department, and Dr. Karen Jacobs, from Boston University, presented a two-day workshop in Slovenia for occupational therapy practitioners from that country as well as Croatia, and Austria. 

The workshop was entitled: Building a Mosaic of Health and Well-being with Occupational Therapy.

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Workshop participants against the background of Lake Bled

Jacobs re-presented her Slagle lecture on Words, Images, and Action, and spoke about marketing and entrepreneurship. MacRae presented on interprofessional education and practice, using a fall prevention program for older adults as an exemplar, and aging and sexuality. This was the first national occupational therapy conference in that country.


Posted on: 8/26/2013

Joseph Kunkel authors article in Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

jkunkelJoseph G. Kunkel, Ph.D., research professor at the Marine Sciences Center, authored an article recently published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. The paper titled "Modeling the Calcium and Phosphate Mineralization of American Lobster Cuticle" describes the mineral properties of the lobster cuticle that must be taken into count in building a model of the lobster cuticle which is realistic.

Posted on: 8/22/2013

Short story by Steven Byrd published in the Owen Wister Review

sbyrdThe Owen Wister Review, the University of Wyoming's journal of arts and literature, has published a short story by Steven Byrd, Ph.D., associate professor of Spanish & Portuguese and director of UNE's Latin American Studies minor. 

The short story, "Garota," is a fictional account of the composing of the famous Brazilian song "Garota de Ipanema" ("The girl from Ipanema"), which was written by Antonio Carlos Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes in the early 1960s. The story also deals with some of the social and political issues of Brazil of that time.

Posted on: 8/19/2013