David A. Sandmire

Dave came to the University of New England in 1994 following completion of his M.D. (University of Wisconsin) and M.A. (History of Medicine/Science, University of Wisconsin) degrees. He teaches courses in anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, cardiovascular physiology, human reproduction, and embryology. His areas of research have included the effects of individual learning styles on collaborative clinical problem-solving, the cardiovascular and neurologic effects of purposeful vs. non-purposeful activity, and, more recently, the study of the emotional and cardiovascular effects of art-making. He has co-authored a book on the use of medical screening tests in preventive medicine as well as a book chapter on the physiology and pathophysiology of aging. Dave's other passions include tennis and genealogy. He lives in southern Maine with his wife and two children.

Clinical Affiliations

Maine

Expertise

physiology

pathophysiology

neuroscience

cardiovascular physiology; impact of learning style on collaborative problem-solving.

Research

Current Research

Dave is currently collaborating with UNE colleagues Ms. Sarah Gorham (Creative and Fine Arts Department), Ms. Nancy Rankin (Psychology Department), and Dr. David Grimm (Biology Department) in an investigation of the effects of art-making on anxiety level and physiologic measures of anxiety (e.g., beat-to-beat variability of heart rate).

Research Interests

Dave has investigated the impact of matching vs. mismatching individual Kolb learning styles on collaborative problem-solving. He has also investigated the cardiovascular and electroencephalographic effects of purposeful vs. non-purposeful activity of equal intensity.

Selected Publications

Sandmire, D.A., Gorham, S.R., Rankin, N.E., and Grimm, D.R. (2012). The Influence of Art Making on Anxiety. Journal of the American Art Therapy Association, 29(2):68-73;

Sandmire, D.A. (2010), The Physiology and Pathology of Aging, chapter three of Gerontology for the Health Care Professional, Regula Robnett and Walter Chop, eds. (Boston: Jones and Bartlett).

Sandmire, D.A., O'Brien, J.C., Brown, D.G., Lemieux, S.M., Meyer, S.A., and Moutinho, S.D. (2008). Cardiovascular and Electroencephalographic Response to Purposeful versus Non-purposeful Activity in Children. Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 22(4);

O'Brien, J.C., and Sandmire, D.A. (2008). Cardiovascular and Electroencephalographic Response to Purposeful versus Non-purposeful Activity in Adults. Occupational Therapy in Health Care, 22(4);

Johnson, D. and Sandmire, D. (2004). Medical Tests that can Save your Life: 21 Tests your Doctor won't Order unless you know to Ask (New York: Rodale and St. Martin's Press), ISBN #157954732x;

Sandmire, D.A. and Boyce P.F. (2004). Pairing of Opposite Learning Styles Among Allied Health Students: Effects on Collaborative Performance. Journal of Allied Health, 3(2):156-63;

Sandmire, D.A., Vroman, K, and Sanders, R. (2000). The Influence of Learning Styles on Collaborative Performance of Allied Health Students in a Simulated Clinical Exercise. Journal of Allied Health, 29(3):143-9;

Sandmire, D.A. (2000). Clinical Case Studies in Anatomy and Physiology, in McGraw-Hill's subscription-based Applied Biology Learning Website. (http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/abio/);

Sandmire, D.A. (1999), The Physiology and Pathology of Aging, chapter three of Gerontology for the Health Care Professional, Walter Chop and Regi Robnett, eds. (Philadelphia: F.A. Davis).

Other Scholarly Activity

Physiological and Autonomic Effects of Art Making in College-aged Students  (Poster Presentation, Northeast Undergraduate Research Symposium [NURDS], University of New England, Biddeford, ME, March 2, 2013)

The Influence of Art Making on Anxiety (Oral Presentation, National Conference of the American Art Therapy Association [AATA], Washington, D.C., July 7, 2011)

Physiological Effects of Purposeful versus Non-purposeful Activity in Children and Adults (Poster presentation, 2009 Annual Conference of the American Occupational Therapy Association, Houston, TX, April 25, 2009)

Sabbatical Presentation:  Case Studies as a Pedagogical Hook, Physiological Correlates of Purposeful vs. Non-Purposeful Activity, and Preliminary Planning of an Interdisciplinary Study of the Writing Skills of Children with Asperger’s Disorder"  (Oral Presentation, University of New England, Biddeford, ME, January 30, 2008)

Student-driven Research in the Classroom:  Fostering Collaborative Learning and Critical Thinking without ‘Back-seat Driving’"  (Oral Presentation, International Alliance of Teacher-Scholar’s Eli Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, April 8, 2006)

A problem-based, Contextually-driven Biology Course to Enhance Learning and Promote Scientific Literacy"  (Oral Presentation, presented with Debra McDonough at the International Alliance of Teacher-Scholar’s Eli Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, Towson University, Towson, MD, April 2, 2005)

From Concepts to Reality:  Getting the most from Case Studies"  (Oral Presentation, International Alliance of Teacher-Scholar’s Eli Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA, March 14, 2003)

The Influence of Learning Styles on Collaborative Problem-Solving"  (Oral Presentation, co-presented with UNE senior physical therapy student Pauline Boyce at the International Alliance of Teacher-Scholar’s Eli Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, February 12, 2000)

The Collaborative Case History:  A Tool to Improve Learning and Retention in a Content-rich Course"  (Oral Presentation, International Alliance of Teacher-Scholar’s Eli Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, Towson State University, Towson, MD, April 17, 1999)

Do Like Minds Work Better Together?:  The Influence of Individual Learning Styles on Group Tasks"  (Oral Presentation, International Alliance of Teacher-Scholar’s Eli Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, September 13, 1997)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funded Grants

University of New England College of Arts and Sciences travel grants (1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2011)

University of New England College of Arts and Sciences and Presidential mini-grants (2001-2002, 2006, 2011)

David Sandmire

David A. Sandmire

,

M.D., M.A.

Professor

Interim Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

Morgane Hall
103

dsandmire@une.edu

(207) 602-2849

Eligible for Student Opportunities