Business Administration

Bachelor of Science with a major in Business Administration

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Business

Beth C. Richardson, JD, Chair
brichardson@une.edu

Mission

The mission of the Department of Business is to provide competent, supportive faculty and to offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to cope with and thrive in an ever-changing world. More specifically, the department strives:

  • to prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in business, the communications professions and society;
  • to develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems;
  • to help students achieve their personal and career goals; and
  • to prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level.
Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in business administration is designed to supplement the University's liberal arts core curriculum. In particular, its goals are:

  • to facilitate students' acquisition of a basic business knowledge base in the functional areas of business including, but not limited to, accounting, business law, economics, finance, management, and marketing;
  • to facilitate students' acquisition of technical skills and competencies in computer information systems and quantitative techniques;
  • to provide professional job search and experience;
  • to facilitate students' ability to integrate their knowledge of the functional areas of business with their technical skills and competencies and their professional experiences and to apply that knowledge and those skills.
Accreditation

All degree programs offered by the Department of Business are accredited by The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).  The Business Administration Degree Program in the Department of Business and Communications is additionally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Admissions
Transfer Credit
Program Academic and Technical Standards
  1. Business majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all Business Core required courses and all business elective courses.
  2. Business minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all four required courses and the two business elective courses.
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
CAS Core Requirements (Includes MAT 120) 42-43
  Credits
Program Required Courses 45
BUAC 201 - Financial Accounting 3
BUAC 203 - Managerial Accounting 3
BUEC 203 - Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 - Microeconomics 3
BUFI 302 - Personal Finance 3
BUFI 315 - Financial Management 3
BUMG 200 - Management 3
BUMG 311 - Business and Society Relations 3
BUMG 325 - Legal Environment of Business 3
BUMG 495A - Internship in Business Administration 3
BUMG 498 - Strategic Management 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMK 335 - Global Marketing 3
CITM 100 - Introduction to Microcomputer Software 3
MAT 110 - Quantitative Reasoning 3
  Credits
Business Elective Required Courses 15
Choose FIVE of the following courses*  
BUEC 380 - Economic Development of the United States  
BUEC 385 - Health Economics  
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics  
BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics  
BUFI 322 - Investments  
BUMG 301 - Organizational Behavior  
BUMG 302 - Human Resource Management  
BUMG 328 - Employment Law  
BUMG 360 - Leadership  
BUMG 400 - Management Seminar  
BUMG 495B - Internship in Business Administration  
BUMK 301 - Services Management  
BUMK 310 - Advertising  
 BUMK 312 - Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management  
BUMK 405 - Sales Management  
*One BUEC, and one BUMG and one BUMK required as business electives  
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)  
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

 

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing by applying concepts and theories appropriately. 
  2. Demonstrate effective skills in written and oral communications using appropriate technologies.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to integrate the concepts of the core areas of business.
  4. Demonstrate awareness to the importance of the ethical requirements of business activities.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to conduct methodological, secondary research into business issues, which may relate to general business or to a specific business function, which requires familiarity with a range of data, research sources and appropriate methodologies.

Concentration Learning Outcomes

The Management Concentration covers the organizational, operational and sales aspects of management, as well as introduces non-profit management techniques.

Upon completing the concentration in Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an ability to apply general Management know-how in practical business situations.
  2. Develop an understanding of business that reflects the moral responsibility of management to all relevant stakeholders and the natural environment.
  3. Understand the nature and dynamics of social behavior relating to organizational performance in order to develop strategies to become effective in organizations.

The Marketing Concentration focuses on developing strategic and tactical marketing skills, including those used in both digital media and global environments.

Upon completing the concentration in Marketing, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of how marketing initiatives by business and not-for-profit organizations impact society and the economy.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the strategic and tactical use of the primary decision making areas of marketing used by organizations.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of traditional and digital channels of distribution.
  4. Understand the uses of traditional and digital promotional methods.
  5. Understand the strategic importance of global marketing and be able to develop tactics for an organization’s global marketing thrusts.

The Economics Concentration focuses on understanding the impact of the economy on individuals, society and global business development.

Upon completing the concentration in Economics, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of economic thought regarding the incentives.
  2. Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  3. Demonstrate the assumptions and limitations of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  4. Understand the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using the Keynesian model.
  5. Understand the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economy development with reference to theory and empirical data.

The International Business Concentration focuses on understanding the role that cultural differences, globalization and worldwide trends play in the global marketplace.  A semester abroad is required.

Upon completing the concentration in International Business, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate detailed familiarity with the impact of the global economy on US businesses and organizations, utilizing appropriate terminology and concepts.
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of cultural differences in the conduct of business and/or daily life within major global markets during a study abroad experience.
  3. Demonstrate global awareness through an understanding of international business concepts and trends and an ability to internationalize domestically developed business methods and practices.

The Sustainable Entrepreneurship Concentration focuses on applying the concepts of sustainability to the creation of a new venture with triple bottom line responsibility and ecological value.

Upon completing the concentration in the Sustainable Entrepreneurship, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding and the application of the concepts of sustainability and sustainable entrepreneurship and distinguish sustainable entrepreneurship from traditional economic entrepreneurship as well as from social entrepreneurship.
  2. Evaluate and articulate the rewards and risks of undertaking sustainable entrepreneurship by measuring the economic, social and environmental risks and rewards (triple bottom line) of a new venture and measuring and comparing the short-term economic risks and returns of the venture with the long-term expected benefits.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the ecological problems facing local and global communities as well as the ability to recognize business opportunities for entrepreneurs that arise as a result of the trend of identifying and resolving those ecological problems; Undertake this demonstration by applying those skills necessary to investigate and evaluate all the various aspects of the business and policy environment that have an impact on sustainable entrepreneurship decisions, including an evaluation of corporate behavior in the context of sustainability.

The Health Sector Management Concentration focuses on understanding how U.S. healthcare policy and systems impact business in the health sector.

Upon completing the concentration in Health Sector Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to integrate core general management skills with sophisticated understanding of the institutions of the US health care sector.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of US health care economy and markets and those factors that significantly influence decision-making both at the policy level and at the level of the organization.
  3. Utilize the terminology and concepts of health sector systems such as governmental programs, managed care, and information management to recognize and explain the importance of cost, access and quality to providers, payers and vendors.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the legal systems and processes impacting healthcare, including governmental regulation, tort litigation and reform, non-discrimination and privacy legislation and access/equity of care movements in both the federal and state governments.
Minor(s)

Minor in Business Administration

A student with a major in another department may, with the permission of the Business and Communications Department Chair, minor in Business Administration.

  Credits
Required Courses  
BUAC 201 - Financial Accounting 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMG 200 - Management 3
BUEC 204 - Microeconomics 3
Business Electives 6
Total Credits  18

Minor in Economics

A student with a major in another department may, with the permission of the Business and Communications Department Chair, minor in Economics.

  Credits
Required Courses  
BUEC 203 - Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 - Microeconomics  3
BUEC 380 - Economic Development of the U.S. 3
BUEC 385 - Health Economics 3
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics 3
Total Credits  18
 
Economics Minor Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop an understanding of economic thought regarding the incentives faced by individuals and how incentives resolve in real world situations.
  2. Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  3. Demonstrate the assumptions and limitations of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  4. Understand the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using the Keynesian model.
  5. Understand the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economy development with reference to theory and empirical data.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Notice and Responsibilities Regarding this Catalog

This Catalog documents the academic programs, policies, and activities of the University of New England for the 2013-2014 academic year. The information contained herein is accurate as of date of publication August 12, 2013.

The University of New England reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes of any nature in its programs, calendar, or academic schedule whenever it is deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the rescheduling of classes with or without extending the academic term, canceling of scheduled classes or other academic activities, in any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably practicable under the circumstances.

While each student may work closely with an academic advisor, he or she must retain individual responsibility for meeting requirements in this catalog and for being aware of any changes in provisions or requirements.