Professional Catalog

Professional Catalog

Financial Information for Professional Programs

Financial Information for Professional Programs

Professional Tuition and Fee Rates (2019-2020 tuition and fees are subject to change)
 

College of Dental Medicine

Application Fee (non-refundable) $55
General Services Fee Yr. 1 (semester, non-refundable) $350
General Services Fee Yrs. 2-4 (semester, non-refundable) $230
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $145
Program Fee Yr. 1 (semester, non-refundable) $5,600
Program Fee Yrs. 2-3 (semester, non-refundable)

$3,734

Program Fee Yr. 4 (semester, non-refundable) $2,734
Tuition (academic year) $66,550
Tuition - Advanced Standing (academic year) $85,763

College of Osteopathic Medicine

Application Fee (non-refundable) $55
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $390
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Malpractice Insurance (annual, non-refundable) $115
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable) $740
Tuition (academic year) $58,430

College of Pharmacy

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $350
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Malpractice Insurance (annual, non-refundable) $70
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable) $1,075
Tuition (academic year) $41,090

Explanation of Fees
 

Malpractice Insurance

A group insurance policy is purchased and provided by the University of New England for those students involved in clinical training rotations in the amount of $1,000,000/$3,000,000.

General Services Fee

This mandatory fee is billed to graduate students enrolled in 7 or more credits and provides the following services:

  1. Graduation activities including cost of banquet, speakers, pinnings, hoodings, and diplomas.
  2. Student Government activities including support for clubs, programs, cultural events, etc.
  3. Orientation programs designed to introduce new students to UNE.
  4. Student Health Center services.
  5. Access to University facilities: Finley Recreation Center featuring a gymnasium, fitness center, intramurals, recreation, and wellness programs and/or access to Campus Center featuring a gymnasium, running track, pool, fitness center with racquetball courts, snack bar, and bookstore.
  6. Athletic events including intramural programs and all intercollegiate home games.
  7. Transcripts are available at no charge.

Health Insurance

Graduate students are required to enroll in UNE's Student Medical Insurance Plan unless proof of comparable insurance can be demonstrated. Please refer to the health insurance brochure for additional information.

Parking Fee

Students, Faculty, and Staff wishing to park a vehicle on campus must purchase a parking permit from www.thepermitstore.com.  Enter your destination as University of New England.  Permit prices vary.  Failure to register a vehicle will result in a fine and having your vehicle towed from campus.

Payment Information

OVERPAYMENTS

The University is required to refund overpayments to students resulting from Title IV Financial Aid payments in accordance with Federal Regulations. Students may elect to have their overpayment directly deposited into a checking or savings account. 

Note:  It is customary for students to borrow from several sources or to sign agreements with third party payers such as the Armed Forces, State, or Federal governments to cover their educational costs as well as living expenses.  The University realizes that payments are not always received in a timely fashion because of delays at the bank or governmental agencies.  In the event that the student finds that he/she will not have adequate resources for living expenses, a petition for exception to our refund policy can be submitted.  This petition will need to be evaluated by the Student Financial Services Center and must clearly demonstrate financial hardship.  The University will refund up to one month of living expenses, as determined by the Student Financial Services Center, in anticipation of student loan and/or government checks.

WITHDRAWAL TUITION REFUND POLICY

A student who intends to withdraw from the University will be required to go through the withdrawal process.  He/she must first see their College's Academic Dean to obtain the necessary forms.  Verbal notice is not sufficient.  For purposes of computing refunds, the date of withdrawal recorded by the Dean after receipt of withdrawal forms will be used by Student Financial Services to compute any refunds due to the student.

Note:  Refunds are not permitted for withdrawals during summer remedial courses.

PAYMENT OPTIONS

Students may pay the college charges as they fall due each semester or in accordance with UNE's Monthly Payment Plan offered through Tuitionpay. They may also arrange to pay the total due by using a mixture of these payment arrangements.

The payment dates in the UNE sponsored payment plans cannot be deferred for the convenience of students using student loans or other tuition payment programs. Both long and short-term financial arrangements should be made far enough in advance to assure payment on the required dates. Special problems or emergency situations can be discussed with the Student Financial Services Center at any time.

Option I: Payment by Semester

Approximately six weeks prior to the start of a semester, bills will be sent for the tuition, room and board, and fees. Payment of this bill is due by the start of the semester. The payment due is the total of all the semester charges less any previous payments or financial aid credits.

Option II: Monthly Payment Plans

The Ten-Pay Payment Plan spreads the full year charges over ten months beginning June 1st. This plan is offered through Tuitionpay and is designed to relieve the pressure of “lump sum” payments by spreading the cost over 10 months. There is an application fee. There are no interest charges.

In addition to these options for payment, UNE accepts MasterCard, VISA, and Discover.

Applicants are urged to apply by May 15th. Applications made after the start of the program (June 1st) must be accompanied by an initial payment sufficient to become current with the regular 10-month payment schedule. Applications for the 10-month plan will not be accepted after September 15th.

LATE PAYMENT CHARGE

The balance due each semester will be considered overdue if not paid by the specified date, and any unpaid balance will be subject to a late charge of 12% per annum or 1% per month. Students with unpaid bills will not be able to register for courses or be placed on the official school roster nor can they attend classes until they have received clearance from the Student Financial Services Center. Students with overdue accounts are not eligible for academic credit, transcripts, or degrees.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE TUITION CREDIT POLICY:

In the event a student desires to apply for a leave of absence, a Leave Form must be submitted to their college's Academic Dean.  The form will include the reason for leaving as well as the expected date of return.  An approved leave of absence will result in credit towards the student’s tuition using the Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy.  Failure to return on the agreed upon date will result in a withdrawal.   

Refunds for Maryland Residents

MARYLAND

University of New England's Refund Policy follows the Federal Return of Title IV Aid Refund Policy for Maryland residents. If a student withdraws from UNE prior to the 60% point in the semester (based on calendar days from the first day of the semester through the last scheduled day of the semester), eligible charges due or paid will be refunded on a pro rata basis within 40 days of termination date. Some fees are non-refundable, and therefore, not pro-rated. Fees not refunded are: General Service (one-time fee), Application (one-time fee), and Technology (charged each semester fee). Financial aid awarded (if any) will be returned to the federal, state and, University of New England programs on a pro rata basis. Outside scholarship or non-federal loan assistance will not be returned unless specifically requested by the provider.  After the 60 percent point in the semester, financial aid will not be reduced for any withdrawal nor will any refund be granted. This policy applies to all university withdrawals whether student initiated or administrative withdrawals.  Students should note that withdrawal may or may not result in an actual refund of money to the student. Circumstances may occur in which the student still owes money to the University even after appropriate withdrawal credit.

MARYLAND STUDENTS- PROPORTION OF TOTAL COURSE, PROGRAM OR TERM COMPLETED AS OF WITHDRAWAL OR TERMINATION DATE

TUITION REFUND

Less than 10%

90%

10% up to but not including 20%

80%

20% up to but not including 30%

60%

30% up to but not including 40%

40%

40% up to but not including 60%

20%

more than 60%

No Refund

CONTACT STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES WITH SPECIFIC QUESTIONS.

COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE and COLLEGE OF DENTAL MEDICINE

Fall Tuition Refund

June 1 to Orientation 90%
During the first and second week of classes 50%
During the third and fourth week of classes 25%
After the fourth week of classes  None

Spring Tuition Refund

During the first and second week of classes 50%
During the third and fourth week of classes 25%
After fourth week of classes  None

Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, suspension, or dismissal.

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

Tuition Refund

During the first two weeks 80%           
During the third week 60%
During the fourth week 40%
Over four weeks None

Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, suspension, or dismissal.

 

 

Important Notes

  1. Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  2. The Board of Trustees, however, reserves the right to make changes in tuition and fees at any time.
  3. For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies. People's United Bank, which is our preferred bank, provides a full-service ATM machine located in the Campus Center and in the Alfond Forum on the Biddeford Campus, and in the breezeway between Proctor and Hersey Halls on the Portland college campus.  For those students who have People's United Bank checking accounts, ATM transactions are free of charge. Checks may also be cashed daily ($75 maximum) at the Student Accounts Office on the Biddeford Campus. 
  4. The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. The sign-up form is available on the Web. 
  5. The University will not be responsible for the loss of property on or off campus although it strives to safeguard students' property on campus.
  6. Students are expected to pay for textbooks at the beginning of the semester. Books, supplies, and other items available at the University Bookstore may be paid for with cash, check, Master Card, VISA, and Discover.
  7. A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester.

Academic Policy and Regulations

Academic Policy and Regulations

Petition to Graduate and Receipt of Diploma

In the last year of enrollment, students who anticipate completion of all degree requirements must submit an online petition to graduate. Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and are required to earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate. The Petition to Graduate form is available via the "Apply to Graduate" link in UOnline. The completed form sets into motion all final processing towards: verification of the degree completion, correct spelling of name on the diploma, correct mailing address, and indication of plans to participate in the commencement ceremony.

If a mailing address should change after submission of the form, the student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's office of a new address. It is the goal of the office to verify/post degree completions and mail out diplomas within six to eight weeks of a student's completion of studies.

Commencement is held at the end of each spring semester (usually May) and students who successfully complete all degree requirements per academic policy are considered to be in the "Class of...[that particular year]." Student names must be approved, on recommendation of the faculty, by the Board of Trustees prior to being authorized a degree and diploma from the University of New England.

Under some circumstances, verification of degree completion may be possible for students who complete all of their degree requirements prior to the end of the semester. Requests of degree completion letters should be made to the Office of the University Registrar.

 Guidelines for submission of the petition to graduate form are as follows:

IF GRADUATION IS ANTICIPATED BY THE END OF: SUBMIT THE PETITION TO GRADUATE BY:
Summer Semester June 30th
Fall Semester September 30th
Spring Semester January 30th

The degree awarded date will correspond to the term where the last course requirement was completed and graded.  The exception is where one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided).  In the case of late completion of course requirements (e.g due to an "Incomplete" grade), the degree will be awarded in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.  Further information regarding graduation procedures can be obtained through the Office of the University Registrar or by launching the following link: http://www.une.edu/registrar/graduation.

Federal Definition of the Credit Hour 

Federal regulation defines a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutional established equivalence that reasonably approximates not less than 

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester.
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practical, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Registration and Enrollment Confirmation

Students matriculated in any undergraduate program must be pre-approved to register for courses, or change course registration, through their advisor.  First-time students will be registered by the Registrar's office staff and will go through a new student orientation where they receive their course schedule. Returning students can preregister for courses at dates established in the University's Academic Calendar.

Course registration must be confirmed through Registrar's office. This is accomplished only after matriculated students have cleared all other offices on campus, i.e., Student Accounts, Financial Aid, Health Center, Security, or other offices through which arrangements must be made in order to become fully enrolled at the University. All students must confirm their enrollment at the beginning of each semester within certain time lines by methods identified by Registrar's office. Instructions regarding enrollment confirmation are e-mailed to each student. 

Course changes are allowed during a designated add/drop period only, as specified on the current academic calendar. Detailed instructions as well as designated time lines regarding the add/drop process are e-mailed to each student. Tuition and/or financial aid may be adjusted, depending on number of credit hours enrolled.

Reinstatement

Reinstatement to the University after a Leave of Absence will require written communication from the student's official UNE Email stating they wish to be reinstated as a student for a given term.  In some cases, if leave exceeds allotted leave time, the student will need to contact Admissions to complete a re-admission application.  If a re-admission application is required, this will change the student's catalog year and possibly their degree requirements.

Class Attendance

All students are expected to attend all classes for which they have registered. Attendance policies regarding unexcused absences are established and announced by the individual instructor for his/her classes. If a student is absent to the extent that his/her work is adversely affected, the instructor will report the student's absence to the department chair/program director with comments on the status of the student in the course. Ordinarily, for each course, absences per semester should not exceed the number of times that the course meets weekly.

Whenever a student is specifically reported in writing by an instructor to the department chair/program director as being excessively absent from class, the instructor, with the approval of the department chair/program director, may drop the student from that course with an appropriate grade.

When a student misses class for any religious observances, it is an excused absence. The student should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. Before the absence, the student is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty to arrange to obtain all information contained in each missed class. The student must plan, at the discretion of the faculty member, to take any missed exam either prior to or following the scheduled exam time. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Athletic Competition and Class Attendance

When an athlete misses class for a scheduled varsity intercollegiate competition, it is an excused absence. The student athlete should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. This policy does not apply to students on clinical rotations.

When such absences occur, the student athlete is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty and making arrangements to obtain all information and/or training contained in each missed class. The athlete must make arrangements to take exams scheduled for a day of absence early or late, at the instructor's preference. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Faculty are not required to remediate student athletes as a result of these absences.

Incomplete Policy

An incomplete (I) grade notation may be given by the instructor to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The I grade notation must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days following the end of an eight-week session. Until changed, the I grade notation defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative *F grade for the course. Some programs have established more restrictive or differing policy regarding incomplete grades. Students should consult the program in which they are enrolled for exceptions to this policy. Once an I grade notation is removed, academic standing will be updated according to good standing or probationary standards. If one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided due to an "I" grade), then the degree awarded date (if applicable) will be posted in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.  Students receiving Incompletes are not eligible for Dean's List.

Course Withdrawal Policy*

In the fall and spring semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

*A Withdrawal from a course(s) at any point after the Add/Drop period will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse.  A withdrawal which changes a student’s enrollment status could impact re-payment of loans/deferment of loans.

 

Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence for a specified period of time, not to exceed one (1) academic year, may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form available from the respective program/school director, Student Affairs, Registrar's Office or online. A student who is on an approved leave of absence has the status "active/not enrolled" and may not may enroll in courses for credit at another institution. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. A student returning from a leave of absence should contact the Registrar's Office well in advance of  returning semester so that status changes are made allowing the student to access courses. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Students with Financial Aid should meet with a Financial Aid representative prior to completing leave of absence paperwork.

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or Registrar (undergraduate) to indicate change of plans.

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available online.  Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

Repeat Course Policy

A student may repeat a course in order to improve his/her grade. However, only the second or last course taken will receive credit on the student's transcript, and only the second or last grade received will calculate into the cumulative GPA.

Course Work at Another Institution

Matriculated students who wish to transfer college-level course work taken at other institutions must obtain permission to do so prior to enrolling in the course at another institution. The student should work closely with his/her advisor regarding this process. Request for Course Work at Another Institution forms are available from Registration Services. A minimum grade of "C-" must be earned for the course in order for it to be accepted by the University of New England (further restrictions may apply - check with department regarding transfer-back policy). 

Important note regarding transfer credits: while credits may transfer based on these criteria, grades and/or grade points do not transfer into the student's UNE academic record. Grades for accepted transfer courses are identified on the UNE transcript with a "TR" symbol in the grade column, which denotes credit accepted but no GPA calculation value.

Semester and Term Grade Reports

Semester and term grade reports are issued after examinations have been held at the close of each semester or term and are viewable on UOnline. Semester and term grades reported by faculty members to the Registrar's office are final. Notices of deficiency, if reported, will be viewable at mid-semester on UOnline. 

Student Records and Transcripts

Academic Records- Complete records and related documents are maintained in Registrar's office, Decary Hall for 5 years after separation from the University. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment to the Family Educational and Privacy Act (FERPA), students have the right to review and inspect all official records, files, and data, including all material that is incorporated into each student's cumulative record folder. However, the Department of Health and Human Services has said that clarifying amendments provide that letters of recommendation submitted on the basis of a pledge of confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975 need not be shown to students, and that a student may be allowed but not required to waive his/her right of access to letters of recommendation received after that date. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment, post-secondary institutions must provide students not only access to official records directly related to them, but also an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. It is the right of students to file a complaint with the Department of Health and Human Services concerning an alleged failure by an educational agency or institution to comply with section 438 of the Act that guarantees such rights. University students wishing to review their records may do so by providing a written request to Registration Services at least 48 hours in advance of the desired appointment.

Student Conduct Records - Student conduct records and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students in the Student Affairs offices on each campus. Student conduct records/files are maintained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

  1. All student conduct and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of no less than four years after separation from the University. Records may be destroyed at that time. Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time or permanently if specified in the terms of disciplinary sanctions.
  2. Disciplinary records may be voided by the Dean of Students Office with the concurrence of an Appeals Committee for good cause based upon written petition by student(s).
  3. Denials of petitions to void disciplinary records may be appealed to the vice president of academic affairs.

Student Access and Annual Notification

FERPA (see above) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. The student should submit a written request, that identifies the records which they wish to inspect, to Registrar's office.  The office will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students should write to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will accompany this notification.
  3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task; or the Veterans Administration for students registered for various GI Bill® programs. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failure(s) by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information and Disclosure

The University normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including directory information. Two exceptions to this policy are:

THE USA PATRIOT ACT

Section 507 of the USA PATRIOT ACT amends FERPA by permitting educational agencies and institutions to disclose - without the consent or knowledge of the student or parent - personally identifiable information from the student's education records to the Attorney General of the United States or to his designee in response to an ex parte order in connection with the investigation or prosecution of terrorism crimes.  In addition, the school is not required to record such disclosures.

THE SOLOMON AMENDMENT

The Solomon Amendment explicitly states that military recruiters must be given equal access to that provided other recruiters.  UNE is therefore obligated to release data included in the list of "student recruiting information," upon request. 

For this purpose, directory information is defined as:

  • Student's Full Name
  • Address
  • Phone Number
  • UNE Email Address
  • Date and place of birth
  • Classification and level
  • Dates of Attendance
  • Enrollment Status
  • Most Previous educational institution attended
  • Participation in sports
  • Height/Weight for members of an athletic team
  • Major
  • Degree Received
  • Picture

Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing.  Request forms are available in the Office of the University Registrar and Student Affairs Offices at either campus. Requests to restrict release of directory information will remain in effect until revoked in writing by the student.

Response Time and End-of-Term Processing

Due to production demands in registration services (both campuses), requests for student records services cannot be processed on demand. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

At the end of each fall and spring semester, Registration Services must process significant volumes of grades, completions, and verifications after all final grades are submitted by instructors. This end-of-term processing is not finished for a minimum of two weeks after the last final exam.

For students graduating at the end of spring semester: degree verification, posting, and diploma printing/mailing must be done after end-of-term grades are processed. Diplomas are not normally mailed for a minimum of six-eight weeks after the last final exam. Students are advised to anticipate waiting these periods of time, and should plan ahead when working with employers, graduate schools, agencies, or licensing bureaus when ordering transcripts, grade reports, or degree verifications.

Transcripts

No official transcript will be issued until all financial obligations have been met.
Transcripts are issued only at the written and signed request of the student. The purpose of this policy is to protect the privacy of the individual concerned and to minimize the possibility of the use of another's transcripts for fraudulent purposes. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

Official transcripts are normally issued directly to other educational institutions or prospective employers designated by the student. Official transcripts issued to the student for purposes of transport to another party can be provided in a sealed envelope but will be considered unofficial if opened by the student. Unsealed transcripts issued directly to students are considered unofficial and may be stamped Issued to Student.

Please note: GI Bill® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government Website at http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill

Dental Medicine

Mission

The mission of the UNE College of Dental Medicine is to improve the health of Northern New England and to help shape the future of dentistry through excellence in education, discovery, and service.

Program Description

The College offers the Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) as the professional degree that prepares students for careers as dentists in a variety of practice settings. Students will matriculate with an undergraduate education (minimum 3 years, Bachelor's degree preferred). The DMD degree is awarded after successful completion of four years of professional study in the College of Dental Medicine.

The first two years of the program focus on integrated biomedical sciences and dental sciences including extensive utilization of dental simulation and early clinical experiences. Students will work closely with faculty and peers while attaining foundational biomedical knowledge and its relationship to patient care. Students commence dental patient simulation in the first term of the program in order to attain, practice, and eventually demonstrate competency in all of the clinical disciplines of dentistry. 

Students engage in clinical experiences across all four years of the program, commencing during the first semester of the program primarily through peer-to-peer experiences. During the second year, students begin to provide limited patient care and then progress to providing comprehensive patient care in the University-based dental clinic in Portland, Maine with continued didactic and seminar studies. As their clinical education continues, students will be responsible for providing comprehensive general dental care to their family of patients. Throughout their clinical experiences, students will practice as associates in a group practice led by clinical faculty mentors and will provide patient care commensurate with their individual level of education and training.

The College of Dental Medicine has also established a robust community-based education program that encompasses extramural experiences throughout all four years of the DMD program. Students are introduced to service learning in their first year and enter into community-based dental education venues in their second year. Their community-based experiences, which emphasize the development of communication skills through direct patient contact, take place in a variety of settings, and students interact with many at-risk populations (e.g., pregnant mothers, infants/toddlers/children from lower socio-economic backgrounds, special needs patients, and senior citizens who are housed in long-term care facilities). As dental students progress through the DMD curriculum, they transition into providing more comprehensive patient care at these extramural sites.

The fourth year of the program focuses on clinical practice in a distributed, community-based clinical network across Northern New England (Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont) and beyond. Specifically, students participate in up to three clinical externships across the region in federally qualified community health centers, Veteran’s Administration dental clinics, other non-profit clinics, etc. The College of Dental Medicine shares UNE's global initiatives and philosophy to strengthen our students' competencies in the global economy and prepare them to work successfully in a demographically changing United States by embedding their education and training in a variety of diverse cultural environments. International practice and research opportunities allow our students to find common solutions to diverse access to care issues.

In addition to the experiences in the biomedical sciences, dental sciences, and clinical sciences, students will develop knowledge and skills in the areas of professionalism, practice management, public health, and research and scholarship. Students become sophisticated consumers of science through the hands-on, application-oriented professional academic program in which faculty serve as facilitators of knowledge and students are engaged in learning.

The College is committed to providing a safe and effective environment in which students can learn; apply knowledge; develop skills and values; provide patient and community-centered, evidence-based care in an interprofessional practice model; and develop to the level of an independent, competent oral health care provider.

Accreditation

The College of Dental Medicine is fully accredited by CODA, the Commission on Dental Accreditation.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
First Year  
1st Semester (Fall)  
DMD5101: Foundations of Biomedical Sciences 6
DMD5140: Clinical Dentistry 1 8
DMD5155: Foundations of Patient Care 1 8
DMD5165: Introduction to Dental Sciences 6
DMD5170: Principles of Epidemiology 2
DMD5195: Professional Development 1 1
TOTAL 31
   
2nd Semester (Spring)  
DMD5201: Biomedical Systems 1 6
DMD5245: Clinical Dentistry 2 8
DMD5265: Foundations of Patient Care 2 12
DMD5285: Principles of Public Health 2
DMD5295: Professional Development 2 1
TOTAL 29
   
Second Year  
1st Semester (Summer)  
DMD6100: Prosthodontics 1 8
DMD6101: Biomedical Systems 2 3
DMD6160: Clinical Dentistry 3 12
DMD6165: Foundations of Patient Care 3 12
DMD6190: Patient Care 1 4
DMD6195: Professional Development 3 1
TOTAL 40
   
2nd Semester (Fall)  
DMD6200: Prosthodontics 2 8
DMD6201: Biomedical Systems 3 4
DMD6260: Clinical Dentistry 4 8
DMD6265: Foundations of Patient Care 4 7
DMD6285: Patient Care 2 4
DMD6295: Professional Development 4 1
TOTAL 32
   
3rd Semester (Spring)  
DMD6300: Prosthodontics 3 8
DMD6301: Applied Biomedical Sciences 2
DMD6340: Clinical Dentistry 5 8
DMD6375: Social and Behavioral Health 4
DMD6389: Patient Care 3 16
DMD6395: Professional Development 5 1
TOTAL 39
   
Third Year  
1st Semester (Summer)  
DMD7110: Professional Development 6 1
DMD7120: Orthodontics 3
DMD7130: Patient Care 4 36
TOTAL 40
   
2nd Semester (Fall)  
DMD7210: Professional Development 7 1
DMD7230: Patient Care 5 36
DMD725#: Elective Seminar 2
TOTAL 39
   
3rd Semester (Spring)  
DMD7310: Professional Development 8 1
DMD7330: Patient Care 6 36
DMD735#: Elective Seminar 2
TOTAL 39
   
Fourth Year  
1st Semester (Summer)  
DMD8100: Patient Care 7 39
DMD8110: Professional Development 9 1
TOTAL 40
   
2nd Semester (Fall)  
DMD8200: Patient Care 8 39
DMD8210: Professional Development 10 1
TOTAL 40
   
3rd Semester (Spring)  
DMD8300: Patient Care 9 39
DMD8310: Professional Development 11 1
TOTAL

40

Academic and Technical Standards

Academic Program Standards:

Complete confidence in the honor and integrity of the health professions student and health care professional is essential. Such confidence depends entirely on the exemplary behavior of the individual health care provider in his/her relations with patients, faculty, and colleagues. Strict honesty as a personal way of life should be nurtured during the period of education for professional service. The dental student shall conduct all aspects of his/her life with honor and integrity. This includes accountability to oneself and to relationships with fellow students, future colleagues, faculty, and patients who come under the student’s care or contribute to his/her training and growth, as well as members of the general public. This applies to personal conduct that reflects on the student’s honesty and integrity in both academic and non-academic settings, whether or not involving a University sponsored activity. Upon accepting admission to the University, each student subscribes to and pledges complete observance to the University Conduct Policies as outlined in the University of New England Student Handbook program. A violation of these standards is an abuse of the trust placed in every student and could lead to suspension or dismissal.

Technical Standards – abilities and skills:

Candidates for the Doctor of Dental Medicine program must have the intellectual, emotional, and physical abilities, with or without accommodations, to acquire the knowledge, technical, and clinical skills needed to successfully complete the curriculum in order to pursue a career in dentistry. The essential academic standards presented in this document are pre-requisite for matriculation, subsequent promotion from year to year, and ultimately graduation from the University of New England, College of Dental Medicine. These standards pertain to all matriculated students. All required courses in the curriculum are necessary in order to develop essential skills required to become a competent Dentist. 

Students, including students with disabilities, must have the capacity to manage their lives and anticipate their own needs.  Students must be able to demonstrate the following abilities and skills with or without reasonable accommodation(s). 

  • Observation: A student must be able to observe a patient accurately, at a distance and close up, interpreting non-verbal communications while performing dental operations or administering medications. A student must be able to perform dental examinations and treatments that require the use of sight and touch. He or she must be able to see fine detail, focus at a variety of distances, and discern differences and variations in color, shape, and texture that are necessary to differentiate normal and abnormal soft and hard tissues. He or she must be able to use tactile senses to diagnose directly by palpation and indirectly by sensations transmitted through instruments. A student must also possess the visual acuity to read charts, records, radiographs, small print, and handwritten notation.
  • Communication: A student must be able to: communicate effectively and sensitively with patients; convey and exchange information at a level allowing development of a health history; identify problems; explain alternative solutions; and give directions during treatment and post-treatment. A student must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with all members of the healthcare team. A student must have sufficient facility with English to: retrieve information from texts and lectures and communicate concepts on written exams and patient charts; elicit patient backgrounds; describe patient changes in moods, activity, and posture; and coordinate patient care with all members of the health care team. A student must be able to communicate in lay language so that patients and their families can understand the patient’s conditions and, thereby, be more likely to comply with treatment and preventative regimes.
  • Motor, Strength, and Mobility: A student must possess sufficient motor functioning to execute movements essential to providing oral health care to patients. A student must possess the motor skills to perform palpation, auscultation, and other diagnostic maneuvers; basic laboratory tests; and diagnostic and restorative procedures. Such actions require coordination of gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium, and functional uses of the senses of touch and vision. A student must be able to perform basic life support including CPR, to transfer and position patients with disabilities, to physically restrain himself or herself around the patient and chair in a sitting or standing position. A student must promote and support the ability of coworkers to perform prompt care. A student must be able to operate controls, use high-speed or low-speed dental hand pieces for tooth preparation, and use hand instrumentation including scalpels for surgical procedures. A student must be able to maintain strength, posture and reach and manipulate equipment to all positions in order to control the operating environment.
  • Sensory: A student must be able to acquire a predetermined level of required information through demonstrations and experiences in basic and dental science courses. Such information includes, but is not limited to, information conveyed through: a) physiologic and pharmacologic demonstrations, b) microscopic images of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states; and c) demonstration of techniques using dental models. A student must be able to acquire information from written documents, and to evaluate information presented as images from paper, films, slides, or video. A student must be able to benefit from electronic and other instrumentation that enhances visual, auditory, and somatic sensations needed for examination or treatment.
  • Cognitive: A student must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, integrate, and synthesize. A student must be able to comprehend three dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures. Problem solving requires all of these intellectual abilities. A student must be able to perform these problem-solving skills in a timely manner.
  • Behavioral and Social:  A student must possess the emotional health required for full use of his or her intellectual skills, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients. A student must be able to endure physically-taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. He or she must be able to adapt to changing environments, display flexibility, and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interests, and motivations are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational processes. A student must be able to manage apprehensive patients with a range of moods and behaviors in a tactful, congenial, personal manner so as not to alienate or antagonize them. A student must be able to interrelate among colleagues, staff, and patients with honesty, integrity, respect, and nondiscrimination.

Disabilities

Graduates of the DMD program must have the knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical, administrative, and leadership situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care.

The University of New England, College of Dental Medicine acknowledges and complies with Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 1990, as amended, and requires minimum technical standards be present in students accepted into the Doctor of Dental Medicine program. The College will engage in an interactive process with applicants with disabilities, but the College reserves the right not to matriculate any applicant who cannot meet the technical Standards set forth in this section, with reasonable accommodations.

Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities will be considered on an individual basis, but a student in the Doctor of Dental Medicine program must be able to perform in an independent manner. Every applicant is considered without regard to disability. Once accepted, students must complete all elements of the curriculum with or without reasonable accommodations.  In the case of a documented disability, the College must be fully satisfied that the applicant can make progress throughout the curriculum.

Throughout the DMD program, a student will be expected to maintain the technical standards and demonstrate them through their coursework, interaction with peers and faculty, and in their professional experiences. Students who fail to demonstrate the technical standards while in the program will be evaluated and appropriate action (e.g., remediation, counseling, or dismissal) will be taken. Because this expectation is separate from the academic achievement, simply maintaining a passing status is not sufficient. Additionally, individuals who would constitute a direct threat to the health or safety of others are not considered suitable candidates for continued matriculation.

Applicants are not required to disclose the nature of their disability(ies), if any, to the Admissions Committee. However, any applicant with questions about these technical standards is strongly encouraged to discuss his/her specific issues(s) with the Student Access Center prior to the interview process. If appropriate, and only upon the request of the applicant, reasonable accommodations will be provided.

When a letter of acceptance to the DMD program is mailed, a detailed copy of the Technical Standards for completion of the curriculum will be included. The applicant will be asked to respond in writing whether he/she can meet the standards with or without accommodation. The provision of or request for an accommodation for a disability is always voluntary for the student. An applicant should be able to evaluate him or herself for compliance with these Technical Standards. In the event that accommodation is requested, the student must submit documentation of disability with the proposed accommodation from a certified specialist to UNE’s Student Access Center. A continuing student who develops a disability should request accommodations based on the limitations of the disability through the Student Access Center. Individuals unable to meet the Technical Standards for the DMD program may be unable to progress and/or complete the DMD program. 

The College’s Admissions Committee will consider the applicant based on the criteria for admission of all applicants. An applicant who discloses a disability and requests accommodation in the admission process may be required to submit, in writing, the request for accommodation and pertinent supporting documentation. The pertinent information may include a history of accommodations granted previously in other education programs. Request for accommodation may be initiated with UNE’s Student Access Center.  

For more information on disabilities and accommodations, please contact the UNE Student Access Center.

Academic Policy

(Academic policies have been revised for the Class of 2023, entering in the fall of 2019. Students who are remediating Year 1 (D1) will re-enter Year 1 under these new policies.)

Academic and Professional Standards Committee

The College of Dental Medicine’s Academic and Professional Standards Committee (APSC) is charged with the development, distribution, and implementation of policies to aid in the evaluation of dental student academic, clinical, and professional development. The APSC is responsible for overall consideration of student progress and making recommendations to the Dean regarding promotion, potential disciplinary and corrective actions, and completion of graduation requirements of each student. The APSC will convene to review student progress at the conclusion of each academic term, generally within 15 business days. Students who have not successfully maintained academic, clinical, ethical, and/or professional standards will be invited to meet with the APSC to offer additional information for the committee to consider prior to making a recommendation to the Dean. The APSC shall follow guidelines in full accord with the rules of the University of New England and the requirements of due process. The Dean of the UNE CDM will appoint faculty and staff to the APSC and designate a chair of the committee.

The APSC may also be convened to address a student’s alleged violation(s) of an ethical and/or professional standard, University Conduct Code, or for other circumstances that the Dean deems appropriate. The review of the matter by the committee will be afforded due consideration and process as governed by University policy.

A student under review by the APSC will be notified in writing of the reason and given the opportunity to meet with the committee at a specified date, time, and location. The student will inform the chair at least one day before the meeting if he or she wishes to be present at the APSC meeting. The student will be afforded at least 15 minutes, though time allotted may be increased at the discretion of the committee chair. The student may request that the committee consider other sources of information, such as witness testimony or other supporting documents. The student may ask a UNE faculty representative to accompany him or her to the meeting. The faculty representative cannot address the APSC in any way during the student’s comments, though they may confer with the student. If available, a designee from Graduate and Student Affairs will be present at the meeting should the student need additional consultation. The student and faculty representative will not be present for deliberations; however, the Graduate and Student Affairs designee will participate in the deliberations. The APSC will have an opportunity to review the additional information, if presented, and will then make a recommendation to the Dean. The Dean will make the final decision and inform the student in writing. The Dean, or designee, will review the decision with the student.

Grading Policies

All courses within the curriculum are evaluated as Pass/Fail. Students should refer to the course syllabus for the grading policy specific to each course.

The grade designations on the transcript are:

  • Pass (P): Student earned an overall grade of 69.5 or above and met all requirements stated in the course syllabus
  • Fail (F): Student earned an overall grade of 69.4 or below or did not meet all requirements stated in the course syllabus
  • Incomplete (I): Student has completed a majority of the work in a course but extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control have resulted in the student being unable to finish all required work for issuance of a final grade. Examples of valid extenuating circumstances may include illness, family emergency, or other non-academic and urgent matters. University policy states that all grades of "I" will automatically convert to an "F" after four to six weeks, depending on the duration of the academic term in question.
  • Pass (P) with notation "F grade remediated" beneath the course title: Student has completed a course remediation (see Course Remediation)

Letters of Commendation (LOC) are awarded to students achieving superior performance in a course, as determined by the Course Director and outlined in the course syllabus. A student will not be eligible for an LOC in a course they have to remediate or retake. LOCs are not noted on the official transcript.

Official grades are submitted to the Registrar by Course Directors, at which time the online student records system is updated. Official grade reports and unofficial transcripts will be available on the student records system throughout the academic year. Class rank is not reported on transcripts.

Students must earn a grade of "Pass" in all courses. Students who receive a "Fail" in a course will be reviewed by the APSC. The APSC, after consultation with the Course Director, may recommend one of the following to the Dean, who makes the final decision:

  1. Remediate the course
  2. Repeat the course
  3. Repeat the academic year
  4. Dismissal from the program

The student will be notified of the decision in writing by the Dean or his/her designee. Notification must be either sent by USPS mail or hand-delivered to the student.

Promotion

Promotion is defined as academic and professional progression from one academic year to the next. The APSC will recommend students to the Dean of the College for promotion. Students may be ineligible for progression from one academic year to the next if any of the following apply:

  • The student has a grade of "I" or "F" in a required course without an approved remediation plan
  • The student has a grade of "I" or "F" in the remediation of a previously failed class
  • Failure to meet or maintain ethical and/or professional standards as outlined in the Code of Professional Conduct found in the Student Handbook
  • Failure to meet or maintain technical standards
  • Unpaid tuition and fees
  • Failure to meet the National Board Dental Examinations Policy found in the Student Handbook

An essential element of the academic program is professionalism. Professionalism will be emphasized throughout the curriculum and is a stand-alone element in determining academic advancement and achievement. Students may be ineligible for progression from one academic year to the next if the student has unprofessional conduct violations.

The promotion process does not preclude the APSC from considering or recommending an adverse action (e.g., dismissal, repeat the year, etc.) to the Dean as a result of a student review at any other APSC meeting (e.g., mid-year, etc.) if the student has failed to meet or maintain the academic, clinical, technical, ethical, and/or professional standards deemed appropriate by the APSC.

Course Remediation

Remediation is the process for addressing deficiencies in a student’s knowledge, skills, and/or professional behavior. The educational objectives that underlie remedial teaching and evaluation should be the same as the educational objectives that underlie regular courses in the curriculum.

Grades earned during an attempted remediation of a course will be reviewed critically by the APSC and the Dean of the College of Dental Medicine. Failure to earn a passing grade may result in dismissal from the College or repeating the academic year. Upon successful completion of remediation, a "Pass" will be reported to the Registrar’s Office and become part of the official student transcript, along with the notation "F grade remediated."

Decisions regarding remediation will be made on an individual basis after considering all pertinent circumstances. The decision will be made by the Dean of the College of Dental Medicine, based upon the recommendation of the APSC. The APSC will base its recommendation on the student’s academic record and other considerations after consultation with the student’s faculty advisor/Group Practice Leader, Course Director, Dean (or his/her designee), clinical preceptor, and the student involved, as is appropriate.

Probation or Academic Suspension

Probation is a serious warning that student’s academic performance or professional conduct must improve in order for the student to continue enrollment at the College of Dental Medicine.

Students may be placed on Probation or Academic Suspension for the following reasons:

  1. Inadequate academic progress as determined by the Academic and Professional Standards Committee. This includes, but is not limited to, receiving an "F" in any course.
  2. When directed to repeat a year for academic reasons.
  3. Violating the Code of Professional Conduct as outlined in the Student Handbook.

Students on probation are expected to remove themselves from all elected officer responsibilities and leadership roles in co-curricular activities associated with the University and/or with professional associations.

Students on probation must meet with a faculty member designated by the APSC at least once a month. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the faculty member to arrange these meetings.

The APSC will review all students on academic probation at each end-of-term APSC meeting to consider removal of probation status for those students that have successfully remediated a course failure or improved academic, clinical, or professional performance. Probation status for students found responsible for behavioral, ethical, and/or professional standard violations will be for a specified period of time (up to one academic year per incident). In those cases, probation will expire at the specified date identified in the letter from the Dean that specified probationary status.

Students on academic suspension are not registered as an active matriculate and should use this time to remediate the deficiency for which the academic suspension was levied.

Dismissal

The University may require withdrawal at any time it deems necessary to safeguard its standards of scholarship, conduct, and orderly operations. The Dean of the CDM, after due consideration and process, may dismiss a student at any time before graduation if circumstances of legal, moral, behavior, ethical, professional, health, or academic nature justify such an action. The APSC is charged with reviewing student academic, clinical, ethical, and professional performance. The APSC may recommend dismissal of a student to the Dean in order to satisfy its obligation to maintain student performance standards. A student may be considered for dismissal when, but not limited to, any one or more of the following circumstances apply:

  • Received a grade of "Fail" in one or more course(s)
  • Received a grade of "Fail" in a remediated course, or for a failure to remediate a course
  • Violating the Code of Professional Conduct as outlined in the Student Handbook
  • Failure to meet or maintain Technical Standards as outlined in the Student Handbook
  • Failure to meet the National Board Dental Examinations Policy found in the Student Handbook

Graduation

To be eligible for graduation, a student must:

  • Not be on academic suspension or probation
  • Have earned a grade of "Pass" in all required coursework and have no outstanding grades of "I" or "F"
  • Meet the National Board Dental Examinations Policy found in the Student Handbook
  • Have successfully completed all prescribed academic requirements, including:
    • All courses/modules (including clinical externship)
    • Final Student Progress Review meeting with Group Practice Leader
    • Have demonstrated competency for all UNE CDM Competency Statements
    • Have completed the UNE CDM Graduate Exit Survey
    • Completed and submitted a UNE CDM DMD Graduation Sign-Out Sheet
  • Have demonstrated appropriate ethical, professional, and personal conduct, as defined in the UNE Student Handbook and the College of Dental Medicine Academic Standards, thus making it appropriate to award the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine
  • Be expected to march with his/her class in the graduation ceremony, unless the Dean has granted special permission
  • Have complied with all the legal and financial requirements of the University and College

Extended, Returning, or Repeating Fourth-Year Students

Students who are deficient in meeting expectations at the time of review for graduation will be categorized as follows:

A. Extended Fourth-Year Students: Students who will complete all expectations by mid-August of the following academic year and are expected to graduate in August.

B. Returning Fourth-Year Students: Students who will complete all expectations by mid-December of the following academic year and are expected to graduate in December.

C. Repeating Fourth-Year Students: Students who will complete all expectations within one year of the original graduation date and are expected to graduate in May of the following academic year.

Students will be responsible for any tuition and registration fees. It will be the student’s responsibility to complete the application to graduate. Please consult the UNE Registrar’s website.

Student Appeal Process

Academic Progression Appeal

A student may submit a written appeal of an academic progression decision based on one or both of the two grounds described in the UNE Student Handbook. Please refer to the UNE Student Handbook for the detailed policy and process information regarding this type of appeal. In a case where the adverse decision was rendered by the Dean, the written appeal must be received by the Provost within 7 business days of the date that the adverse decision was communicated to the student. The appeal must be based on: 1) new evidence that could not have been presented to the APSC at the time of original decision, or 2) procedural errors in the original process that had a substantial impact on or otherwise prejudiced the original determination. The Provost will have 15 business days to review the appeal request and will notify the student in writing of the outcome. The Provost may choose to uphold the adverse decision or return the matter to the Dean for reconsideration. The UNE Student Handbook is available online at http://www.une.edu/studentlife/handbook.

Grade or Penalty Appeal (excluding academic progression appeal)

Assignment of Grades

The academic standards for successful completion of a course and assignment of a grade are established by the Course Director and guided by the UNE CDM Academic Guidelines. The Course Director bears the responsibility of ensuring that written academic standards are outlined in the course syllabus that is provided to each student at the beginning of each course. The Course Director assigns final grades based upon these published academic standards.

Basis for Appeal

Every effort should be made to resolve a difference over a grade (e.g., grade within a course or a final course grade) or penalty (e.g., exclusion from a course, lab, or clinical experience) on an informal basis through a discussion between the student and the Course Director. It is up to the Course Director’s discretion whether or not to change the grade/penalty after discussion with the student and a review of the circumstances.

If the above informal procedure does not resolve a dispute concerning a grade to the student’s satisfaction, the student may submit a written appeal of the grade or penalty. This appeal mechanism is limited to possible errors in calculating or recording a grade/penalty and to allegations of mistakes or arbitrary or capricious grading. "Arbitrary or capricious" grading means (1) the assignment of a grade/penalty to a student on some basis other than performance in the course; (2) the assignment of a grade/penalty to a student by application of standards different from the standards that were applied to other students in that course; or (3) the assignment of a course grade/penalty based on a substantial and unreasonable departure from the written academic standards for that course.

The appeal mechanism is not intended for review of the instructor’s evaluation of the student’s academic performance. If a student feels the course was poorly designed, they received poor instruction, or students were graded too severely (provided that all the students in the class were graded in the same fashion), these concerns are more appropriately communicated on end-of-semester course evaluations. Furthermore, the appeal mechanism is not to be used to dispute the published academic standards for a course, which are the prerogative of the Course Director under which the course is administered.

It is the responsibility of the student to substantiate the assertion that an incorrect final grade has been assigned.

Appeal Process

  1. The first level of the appeal is the academic course from which the grade or penalty was issued. Within 5 business days after receipt of the grade or penalty in question, the student must request, in writing, a review by the Course Director. The student should then meet with the Course Director to discuss his or her concerns and to present any evidence that an erroneous or arbitrary or capricious final grade has been assigned. The Course Director should document this meeting and send a follow-up email to the student that outlines the basis for the decision to either uphold or change the grade or penalty.
  2. If the student's concerns are not resolved through a meeting with the Course Director, the student may submit a written appeal to the Associate Dean of Curriculum Integration and Analytics (ADCIA) within 5 business days after the receipt of the grade appeal decision from the Course Director (see Student Grade/Penalty Appeal Form). This written appeal must contain information to substantiate the student’s assertion, including a copy of the course syllabus and other pertinent material to support the argument that a grade/penalty change is warranted. The ADCIA will review the appeal to determine if there were errors made or arbitrary or capricious grading/penalties. If the ADCIA believes the aforementioned to be true, s/he will notify the Course Director and solicit a response. The ADCIA will then decide to (1) uphold the grade with stated reasons or (2) recommend a change in grade with stated reasons. A written decision will generally be communicated within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the appeal. The decision of the ADCIA is final.
Learning Outcomes

Competencies for the New General Dentist

(Adopted from the American Dental Education Association)

(Journal of Dental Education July 2011)

The general dentist is the primary oral health care provider supported by dental specialists, allied dental professionals, and other health care providers. The practice of general dentistry requires a dentist to possess the ability to incorporate understanding, skills, and values in an integrated response to clinical and other professional situations. The competency statements describe the performance of the University of New England College of Dental Medicine graduates as they enter dental practice settings rather than that of students in individual courses. This document is viewed by the College as dynamic; as the practice of dentistry evolves, the College will revisit its competency statements. 

Domains
1. Critical Thinking
2. Professionalism
3. Communication and Interpersonal Skills
4. Health Promotion
5. Practice Management and Informatics
6. Patient Care
          a. Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
          b. Establishment and Maintenance of Oral Health

1. Critical Thinking

Graduates must be competent to:

1.1. Evaluate and integrate emerging trends in health care as appropriate.
1.2. Utilize critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
1.3. Evaluate and integrate best research outcomes with clinical expertise and patient values for evidence-based practice.

2. Professionalism
Graduates must be competent to:

2.1. Apply ethical and legal standards in the provision of dental care.
2.2. Practice within one’s scope of competence and consult with or refer to professional colleagues when indicated.

3. Communication and Interpersonal Skills
Graduates must be competent to:

3.1. Apply appropriate interpersonal and communication skills.
3.2. Apply psychosocial and behavior principles in patient-centered health care.
3.3. Communicate effectively with individuals from diverse populations.

4. Health Promotion
Graduates must be competent to:

4.1. Provide prevention, intervention, and educational strategies.
4.2. Participate with dental team members and other health care professionals in the management and health promotion for all patients.
4.3. Recognize and appreciate the need to contribute to the improvement of oral health beyond those served in traditional practice settings.

5. Practice Management and Informatics
Graduates must be competent to:

5.1. Evaluate and apply contemporary and emerging information including clinical and practice management technology resources.
5.2. Evaluate and manage current models of oral health care management and delivery.
5.3. Apply principles of risk management, including informed consent and appropriate record keeping in patient care.
5.4. Demonstrate effective business, financial management, and human resource skills.
5.5. Apply quality assurance, assessment, and improvement concepts.
5.6. Comply with local, state and federal regulations including OSHA and HIPAA.
5.7. Develop a catastrophe preparedness plan for the dental practice.

6. Patient Care

A. Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning
Graduates must be competent to:

6.1. Manage the oral health care of the infant, child, adolescent, and adult, as well as the unique needs of women, geriatric, and special needs patients.
6.2. Prevent, identify, and manage trauma, oral diseases and other disorders.
6.3. Obtain and interpret patient/medical data, including a thorough intra/extra oral examination, and use these findings to accurately assess and manage all patients.
6.4. Select, obtain, and interpret diagnostic images for the individual patient.
6.5. Recognize the manifestations of systemic disease and how the disease and its management may affect the delivery of dental care.
6.6. Formulate a comprehensive diagnosis, treatment and / or referral plan for the management of patients.

B.  Establishment and Maintenance of Oral Health
Graduates must be competent to:

6.7. Utilize universal infection control guidelines for all clinical procedures.
6.8. Prevent, diagnose, and manage pain and anxiety in the dental patient.
6.9. Prevent, diagnose, and manage temporomandibular disorders.
6.10. Prevent, diagnose and manage periodontal diseases.
6.11. Develop and implement strategies for the clinical assessment and management of caries.
6.12. Manage restorative procedures that preserve tooth structure, replace missing or defective tooth structure, maintain function, are esthetic, and promote soft and hard tissue health.
6.13. Diagnose and manage developmental or acquired occlusal abnormalities.
6.14. Manage the replacement of teeth for the partially or completely edentulous patient.
6.15. Diagnose, identify, and manage pulpal and periradicular diseases.
6.16. Diagnose and manage oral surgical treatment needs.
6.17. Prevent, recognize, and manage medical and dental emergencies.
6.18. Recognize and manage patient abuse and/or neglect.
6.19. Recognize and manage substance abuse.
6.20. Evaluate outcomes of comprehensive dental care.
6.21. Diagnose, identify, and manage oral mucosal and osseous diseases.

Glossary of Terms

Competency: a complex behavior or ability essential for the general dentist to begin independent, unsupervised dental practice; it assumes that all behaviors and skills are performed with a degree of quality consistent with patient well-being and that the general dentist can self-evaluate treatment effectiveness.

Critical thinking: the process of assimilating and analyzing information; this encompasses an interest in finding new solutions, a curiosity with an ability to admit to a lack of understanding, a willingness to examine beliefs and assumptions and to search for evidence to support these beliefs and assumptions, and the ability to distinguish between fact and opinion.

Curriculum guidelines (content): the relevant and fundamental information that is taught for each category of foundation knowledge; these are to be used as curriculum development aids and should not be construed as recommendations for restrictive requirements.

Domain: a broad, critical category of activity for the general dentist.

Emerging technologies: current and future technologies used in patient care, including technology for biomedical information storage and retrieval, clinical care information, and technologies for use at the point of care.

Evidence-based dentistry: an approach to oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinically relevant scientific evidence relating to the patient’s oral and medical condition and history integrated with the dentist’s clinical expertise and the patient’s treatment needs and preferences.

Foundation knowledge and skills: the basic essential knowledge and skills linked to and necessary to support a given competency; these would serve to help guide curriculum in dental schools, assist educators in removing irrelevant, archaic information from current curricula, aid in including important new information, and help test construction committees develop examinations based upon generally accepted, contemporary information.

General dentist: the primary dental care provider for patients in all age groups who is responsible for the diagnosis, treatment, management, and overall coordination of services related to patients’ oral health needs.

Health promotion: public health actions to protect or improve oral health and promote oral well-being through behavioral, educational, and enabling socioeconomic, legal, fiscal, environmental, and social measures; it involves the process of enabling individuals and communities to increase control over the determinants of health and thereby improve their health; includes education of the public to prevent chronic oral disease.

Informatics: applications associated with information¬ and technology used in health care delivery; the data and knowledge needed for problem-solving and decision making; and the administration and man-management of information and technology in support of patient care, education, and research.

Interprofessional health care: the delivery of health care by a variety of health care practitioners in a cooperative, collaborative, and integrative manner to ensure care is continuous and reliable.

Management: includes all actions performed by a health care provider that are designed to alter the course of a patient’s condition; such actions may include providing education, advice, treatment by the general dentist, treatment by the general dentist after consultation with another health care professional, referral of a patient to another health care professional, and monitoring the treatment provided; it may also include providing no treatment or observation.

Patient-centered care: the ability to identify, respect, and care about patients’ differences, values, preferences, and expressed needs; relieve pain and suffering; coordinate continuous care; listen to, clearly inform, communicate with, and educate patients; share decision making and management; and continuously advocate disease prevention, wellness, and promotion of healthy lifestyles, including a focus on population health.

Problem-solving: the process of answering a question or achieving a goal when the path or answer is not immediately obvious, using an acceptable heuristic or strategy such as the scientific method.

Special needs care: an approach to oral health management tailored to the individual needs of people with a variety of medical conditions or physical and mental limitations that require more than routine delivery of oral care; special care encompasses preventive, diagnostic, and treatment services.

Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another Dental Medicine program
  • Transfer credits will be reviewed and awarded on a case by case basis

ADVANCED STANDING


Advanced Standing Track Overview

The UNE CDM offers an Advanced Standing Track (AST) for dentists who have completed the equivalent of a DMD or DDS program in a non-U.S./Canadian accredited dental school. AST students will have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge of the dental profession as practiced in the United States and earn a CODA-accredited U.S. Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree. The AST is a full-time 29-month (7-semester) track that begins in January and finishes in May two years later. Upon successful completion of the AST, graduates are eligible to take appropriate state or regional dental licensure examinations and may subsequently be eligible to practice dentistry in the United States.

The AST consists of didactic courses, pre-clinical simulated courses, and clinical courses involving direct patient care. Students receive extensive clinical experience in the UNE Oral Health Center. In addition, there may be opportunities for AST students to participate in clinical externships at clinical sites in northern New England. Upon matriculation, AST students join the second-year DMD class and study an intense didactic and preclinical curriculum. AST students are not required to take any basic science courses but instead the preparatory semester is designed to integrate students into the second-year class, calibrate students to the first two years of CDM curriculum, and ensure students may safely begin patient care in our Oral Health Center in the summer semester.

Advanced Standing Track Curriculum

During the first semester, AST students will be enrolled in DMD6300: Prosthodontics, DMD6340: Clinical Dentistry 5, DMD6375: Social and Behavioral Health, DMD6301: Applied Biomedical Sciences, and DMD6395 Professional Development 5 with the regularly enrolled second-year students. Additionally, AST students will be enrolled in an intense preparatory course, DMD6400: Advanced Standing Essentials of Clinical Dentistry. This course, in addition to addressing individualized curricular needs, calibrates students to the first two years of the traditional track curriculum and prepares students for entry into CDM’s clinical education program. It includes instruction and skills assessments from the following courses in the first two years of the DMD curriculum: DMD5140: Clinical Dentistry 1, DMD5155: Foundations of Patient Care 1, DMD5170: Principles of Epidemiology, DMD5195: Professional Development 1, DMD5245: Clinical Dentistry 2, DMD5265: Foundations of Patient Care 2, DMD5285: Principles of Public Health, DMD5295: Professional Development 2, DMD6100: Prosthodontics 1, DMD6160: Clinical Dentistry 3, DMD6165: Foundations of Patient Care 3, DMD6190: Patient Care 1, DMD6195: Professional Development 3, DMD6200: Prosthodontics 2, DMD6260: Clinical Dentistry 4, DMD6265: Foundations of Patient Care 4, DMD6285: Patient Care 2, DMD6295: Professional Development 4, and DMD6389: Patient Care 3. From the summer semester until graduation, the AST students participate in the same curriculum as regularly enrolled students.

Exemptions: Holding a dental degree from a foreign institution and having passed the National Dental Board Exams Part I and II will exempt AST students from enrolling in the following courses: DMD5100: Embryology and Histology, DMD5145: Systems 1, DMD5165: Introduction to Dental Sciences, DMD5180: Medical Microbiology, DMD5185: Medical Immunology, DMD5200: Human Anatomy, DMD5215: Systems 2, DMD6105: Systems 3, and DMD6212: Systems 4.

Advanced Standing Track Eligibility

To be eligible for admission, applicants must have a dentist degree from a non-U.S./Canadian dental school.

Advanced Standing Track Application Process

UNE CDM participates in the ADEA CAAPID (Centralized Application for Advanced Placement for International Dentists). The following are requirements to apply to the program:

  1. Completed CAAPID application
  2. School-issued document confirming the conferred foreign dental degree (BDS, DDS, DMD, Odontology, etc)
  3. English Language Proficiency as verified by submission of official TOEFL score report
  4. Passage of NBDE Part I and Part II, preferably taken within the last 5 years
  5. Original dental school, non-dental school and all postgraduate program transcripts. Official, detailed, course-by-course evaluation by World Education Services (WES) or Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE)
  6. Letters of evaluation
  7. Completed supplemental application
  8. Non-refundable application fee of $100

Additional Requirements: At the time of application, candidates must provide proof of U.S. citizenship (U.S. passport, U.S. birth certificate, or Certificate of Naturalization) or proof of permanent residence (Green Card), or other appropriate immigration documentation. It is the candidate’s responsibility to maintain their legal status for the duration of their enrollment in the AST program.

Interview and Bench Test: Interviews will be conducted on an invitational basis. Only candidates with completed ADEA CAAPID and supplemental applications will be considered for interview. Interviews for the AST will consist of a bench test, writing sample, and face-to-face interviews with UNE CDM faculty and staff. The fee to complete the interview and bench test will be $500 and must be received by the UNE College of Dental Medicine before the interview date.

Translation of Documents: Applicants must submit an original, official, certified English translation of ALL documents that are not prepared in the English language. Photocopies are not acceptable. Each translator must provide an original declaration with each translation attesting to his or her fluency in the particular language and certify under penalty of perjury that the translation is complete and accurate to the best of his or her ability.

See UNE CDM Advanced Standing Track or ADEA CAAPID Program Overview for further information.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

 

program admissions requirements
 

COURSEWORK PREREQUISITES

  • Doctor of Dental Medicine
    • Sciences
      • General Biology with lab (4 semester, 6 quarter credits); Zoology acceptable to fulfill requirement
      • Human Anatomy with lab (4 semester, 6 quarter credits)
      • Microbiology with lab (4 semester, 6 quarter credits)
      • General Chemistry with lab (4 semester, 6 quarter credits)
      • Organic Chemistry with lab (4 semester, 6 quarter credits)
      • Biochemistry (3 semester, 4.5 quarter credits)
      • Additional Biology, Chemistry, Physics (12 semester, 18 quarter credits)
    • Other
    • English Composition/Technical Writing (3 semester, 4.5 quarter credits)
    • Recommended Courses:
      • Human Physiology and Immunology strongly recommended
      • Others:
        • Pharmacology
        • Histology
        • Genetics
        • Physics
        • Business, Computers
        • 3-Dimensional Art (e.g., sculpture)
        • Communications
        • Ethics
        • Public Health
    • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of "C" or better ("C minus" grades not acceptable)
    • No AP credits may be applied toward meeting prerequisites
    • Upper level courses in any of the necessary prerequisite subject areas completed with a “C” or better will be acceptable
    • Online courses offered through UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites are acceptable to fulfill prerequisites
    • Prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned at the time of application, but must be completed prior to enrollment
      • Planned or in-progress coursework must be included in your AADSAS application at time of submission; not doing so will result in the applicant not meeting minimum requirements
      • Transcripts for coursework and/or degrees after the submission of your AADSAS application must be submitted from the school attended directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions prior to matriculation

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Doctor of Dental Medicine, 4-year Professional Degree program
    • Completion of minimum 90 semester (135 quarter) credits at a U.S. regionally accredited institution or international equivalent, at time of enrollment, however; a baccalaureate degree is preferred
    • U.S. Dental Admission Test (DAT): required to be taken by October 1 of the application year and official scores submitted directly to ADEA AADSAS from the American Dental Association
    • Community Service: applicants strongly encouraged to demonstrate community service through volunteerism or service-oriented employment
    • Clinical Dental Experience: required minimum of thirty (30) hours dental experience
    • Two (2) letters of reference to be submitted via AADSAS
      • One letter from a science professor
      • Recommended second letter be from a dentist
      • Committee letters accepted in place of the two (2) required letters (must be submitted via AADSAS to be reviewed by admissions committee)
      • Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable
    • Only those applicants who meet minimum requirements will be considered for admission
    • Just meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee an interview or acceptance
    • Average GPAs/hours experience/test scores for students accepted into the program are well above minimums
    • Meet all health immunization requirements (Student Health Care)
    • Obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status
    • Before or upon matriculation, accepted candidates will be expected to
    • Before or upon matriculation, accepted candidates will be required to pass a criminal background check and/or drug screening, as well as periodically throughout the program as required by clinical affiliations
    • All candidates must meet Academic and Technical Standards of the Dental Medicine profession
  • Advanced Standing Doctor of Dental Medicine for International Dentists
    • To be eligible for admission, applicants must have a dentist degree from a non-U.S./Canadian dental school
      • Provide school-issued document confirming the conferred foreign dental degree (BDS, DDS, DMD, Odontology, etc.)
      • English Language Proficiency as verified by submission of official TOEFL score report through ADEA CAAPID, only; recommended minimum scores are indicated below:
        • Written examination: 585
        • Computer examination: 240
        • Internet-based examinations: 95
      • Passage of both NBDE Part I and Part II exams is mandatory
      • Preferably taken within the last five (5) years
      • Official scores must be submitted through ADEA CAAPID
      • Advanced Dental Admission Test (ADAT) will be accepted if submitted via ADEA CAAPID but is not required
      • Original dental school, non-dental school and all postgraduate program transcripts; official, detailed, course-by-course evaluation by World Education Services (WES) or Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE)
      • In English, from each of the following individuals:
        • Dean or chief/senior administrator of the applicant’s dental school (Dean level preferred)
        • Dental school clinical instructor who is able to evaluate the applicant’s potential
        • One professional reference who can attest to the applicant’s character, conduct, and professional ability, if applicable
      • Must be written within the last two (2) years
      • Written in English, or translated by a certified US translator, at the applicant’s expense
      • Include evaluator’s current contact details
      • Three (3) letters of evaluation required, with no more than four (4) accepted; only those letters submitted via ADEA CAAPID will be accepted
      • Completed supplemental application
      • Non-refundable supplemental application fee of $100
    • Additional requirements:
      • At time of application, candidates must provide proof of US citizenship (US passport, US birth certificate, or Certificate of Naturalization) OR proof of permanent residence (Green Card) or other appropriate immigration documentation
      • Candidate’s responsibility to maintain their legal status for the duration of their enrollment in the AST DMD program
    • Interview and Bench Test:
      • Interviews will be conducted on an invitational basis only
      • Candidates with completed ADEA CAAPID and supplemental applications, only, will be considered for interview
        • Interviews will consist of a bench test, writing sample, and face-to-face interviews with UNE CDM faculty and staff
        • Fee to complete the interview and bench test will be $500 and must be received by UNE CDM prior to the interview date

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Doctor of Dental Medicine, 4-year Professional Degree Program
    • Applications for admission are accepted through the Associated American Dental Schools Application (AADSAS) only 
      • AADSAS application portal opens at the beginning of June
      • Applications must be electronically submitted to AADSAS by November 1 deadline for UNE
      • Given the normally heavy volume of applications, it is strongly encouraged candidates submit and complete application as early as possible in the cycle to ensure consideration for invitation to interview
      • Upon receipt of an invitation to complete the UNE Dental Medicine supplemental application with the electronic submission of the supplement fee, please make your payment by the deadline listed in the invitation
    • On-campus interviews are required for admission and are by invitation only
      • Applicants are selected for interviews on a rolling basis
      • Campus interviews are scheduled from September through January
      • UNE follows the AADSAS “traffic” rules and accepted candidates are notified by mail on or after December 1 and until the class has been filled
    • International applicants and applicants with international degrees
      • Must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. regionally accredited institution (International Admissions)
      • Must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university
        • UNE accepts several methods of English Language Proficiency 
        • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application
  • Advanced Standing Doctor of Dental Medicine for International Dentists
    • Application for AST DMD is through ADEA CAAPID (Centralized Application for Advanced Placement for International Dentists) only
      • Complete the CAAPID application and electronically submit prior to the posted deadline, June 1, 2019
      • Given the normally heavy volume of applications, candidates are strongly encouraged to submit and complete the CAAPID application as early as possible in the cycle to ensure consideration for invitation to interview
      • Upon receipt of an invitation to complete the UNE Dental Medicine supplemental application with the electronic submission of the supplement fee, please make your payment by the deadline listed in the invitation
      • On-campus interviews are required for admission and are by invitation only
        • Applicants are selected for interview on a rolling basis
        • Campus interviews will be scheduled for July – August
      • Original dental school, non-dental school and all postgraduate program transcripts; official, detailed, course-by-course evaluation by World Education Services (WES) or Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE)
      • All documents, including transcripts, evaluations, and letters of reference must be written in English, or translated by a certified US translator, at the applicant’s expense
      • All well-qualified applicants will be considered regardless of visa and residency status
      • For additional information concerning student visas please visit Student Visas
      • No exceptions will be made for the requirements listed above
      • Only applications submitted in their entirety will be considered for admission
      • Applications must be submitted and completed to ADEA CAAPID by the June 1, 2019, deadline in order to be considered for admission

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies are established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants to the university and its programs
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum and/or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • No transfer credit granted

ADVANCED STANDING (please see application and admissions details in the admissions section of this page above)

  • UNE College of Dental Medicine offers an advanced standing track (AST) for dentists who have completed the equivalent of a DMD or DDS program in a non-US/Canadian accredited dental school
  • AST students have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge of the dental profession as practiced in US and to earn a CODA-accredited US Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) degree
  • DMD AST is a full-time 29-month (7-semester) track that incorporates the latest in dental practices in public health, health policy and business, while providing care to a wide variety of patients
  • The program begins in January of each year when the AST students join the second-year class and study an intense didactic and preclinical curriculum that incorporates aspects of the first two (2) years of the curriculum for regularly enrolled students
  • Preparatory spring semester is designed to integrate students into the second-year class, calibrate students to the first two years of CDM curriculum, and ensure students may safely begin patient care in our Oral Health Center in the summer semester
  • Graduates of the DMD AST are eligible to take appropriate state or regional dental licensure examinations and may subsequently be eligible to practice dentistry in the U.S.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

 

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

University of New England
Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions
716 Stevens Avenue
Portland, ME 04103
207-221-4225 or 800-477-4863, ext. 4225

Doctor of Dental Medicine

College of Dental Medicine

Osteopathic Medicine

Mission

The University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNE COM), fosters health care leaders across the continuum in undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education, to advance exceptional osteopathic healthcare locally and globally through education, research, scholarship, practice and community health.

  1. Core Values

  • Foster, nurture, and support the education of outstanding medical practitioners.
  • Maintain our caring, collegial environment.
  • Foster integrity and accountability through a strong ethical base.
  • Advance our commitment to the heritage and principles of osteopathic medicine.
  • Facilitate learning, critical thinking, research and scholarship.
  • Creatively shape the future while preserving our heritage.
  • Promote an innovative, interprofessional and entrepreneurial culture.
  • Utilize evidence-based methods, practice-focused research, scholarship, critical thinking and a variety of learning modalities to improve health education and healthcare outcomes.
  • Excel in practice-focused research in health, function and medical education.
  • Actively seek internal and external collaboration to further our mission.
  1. Vision

The University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNE COM), will become a recognized leader in educating primary care physicians for Maine, New England, and the nation by developing into:

  • A medical school that offers a state of the art curriculum, dynamic clinical rotations, and unique GME.
  • A major contributor in clearly defined, and well-focused medical research.
  • A strong clinical program that serves our community through collaborative and entrepreneurial efforts.
  • An organization that offers leadershiup to our profession and our community.
  • A catalyst for inter-professional education and service.
  • A trusted partner in health care for our community.

 

Program Description

The degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO), granted to graduates of osteopathic medical schools, demonstrates to the public that these physicians have received a unique and distinctive medical education grounded in the general principles of osteopathy as articulated by its founder, Dr. Andrew Taylor Still and the American Osteopathic Association.

Consistent with osteopathic philosophy and training, the majority of osteopathic physicians practice primary care specialties. Their patient centered focus on holistic medicine, one of the basic tenets of their osteopathic heritage, directs them to provide both preventive and curative services to patients on a comprehensive and continuing basis.

In addition to the primary care specialties (e.g., Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine), many osteopathic physicians choose residency training in other medical and surgical specialties, and in settings such as active military practice, hospitalist care, and academic health centers. All 50 states in the USA and more than 50 countries offer unlimited medical licensure to qualified osteopathic physicians.

  1. Curriculum Overview

NOTE: Medical education is continuously evolving in alignment with best practices for learning and teaching. To maintain the most up-to-date, productive learning environment for our students, the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNE COM) reserves the right to revise and amend as appropriate the policies and practices described in this catalog.

The UNE COM curriculum is designed to foster osteopathic primary care and other specialized physicians who are skilled in health promotion and illness prevention, as well as the delivery of health care to the ill. To that end, UNE COM provides an innovative, contemporary, patient-focused curriculum that cultivates life-long, self-directed, evidence-based learning and professional development in our graduates.

Our progressive, integrated four-year curriculum aligns educational activities with the principles of adult learning to maximize the attainment and retention of knowledge, skills, and attitudes crucial to the delivery of health care in the 21st century.

  1. Pre-Clerkship Education

UNE COM students spend the first two years of the program on the University of New England (UNE) campus in Biddeford, Maine. The curricullum is designed with a strong emphasis on the application of knowledge and skills. It consists of a series of large and small group learning activities, combined with independent experiential learning in physicians’ offices, hospitals, extended care facilities and health centers. Scheduled learning sessions include traditional didactic lectures, interactive problem solving sessions, facilitated case-based learning, patient case study discussions, hands-on laboratory exercises, panel discussions, demonstrations, and clinically focused encounters with standardized and real patients. Learning activities are constructed to provide a strong foundation in the basic biomedical and social sciences as well as clinical skills as they apply to the rapidly changing practice of medicine. A thorough grounding in the manual skills of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) is provided in the first two years, and supplemented, reinforced, and expanded in Years 3 and 4.

Student preparation before class and active participation in class is a consistent element in the learning dynamic throughout the curriculum. An open, free-flowing dialog between faculty and students is valued and encouraged.

Progressive, level-appropriate mastery of the seven Core Competencies identified by the American Osteopathic Association serves as the educational outcome of the curriculum. The competencies include:

  1. Osteopathic Principles and Practice: The student will understand and apply osteopathic principles to patient care.
  1. Medical Knowledge: The student will demonstrate knowledge of established biomedical, epidemiological, social, and behavioral sciences and their application to patient care.
  1. Patient Care: The student will have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to provide compassionate, appropriate and effective patient care.
  1. Interpersonal and Communication Skills: The student will demonstrate interpersonal and communication skills that result in respectful and effective interactions with patients, families, and colleagues.
  1. Professionalism: The student will demonstrate a commitment to conducting themselves in an ethical and sensitive manner.
  1. Practice-Based Learning and Improvement: The student will demonstrate the ability to investigate and evaluate patient care practices using scientific evidence and apply these to patient care.
  1. Systems-Based Practice: The student will demonstrate an awareness of and responsiveness to the larger context and systems of health care, to provide care of optimal value.

High quality laboratory and educational facilities provide a stimulating venue for the mastery of the seven AOA competencies. The specially constructed Leonard Hall redefines the teaching and learning environment by creating an intentional space that fosters group dialogue, case-based study, and interactive connection using emerging technologies. The Harold Alfond Center for Health Sciences houses laboratories and lecture halls that place UNE COM at the national forefront of health and life sciences education. The Donor Lab (including cadaveric dissection) is among the most advanced facilities in the world. The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OP&P) Lab is spacious and well designed with the latest technological support. The Clinical Performance Center is an interactive clinical skills teaching, testing and evaluation facility with well-established Standardized Patient and Patient Simulator Programs.

Capitalizing on the University’s support of multiple degree programs in the health and allied health professions, including medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant and social work, we work closely with our health profession collegues to engage in intensive interprofessional education and collaboration.

  1. Clerkship Education

The last two years of predoctoral training focuses on experiential learning in a clinical setting to further develop individual and team learning and to expand clinical acumen. The entire third year curriculum is conducted, over a twelve month period, at one of our designated Clinical Campuses.

The UNE COM Clinical Campuses form a consortium of community based education sites, to provide students with a strong general medicine foundation. Each clinical campus consists of one or more healthcare facility within a specific geographic region, that allows coordinated delivery of the core academic training experience. The clinical campus provides the patient base, didactic and experiential learning opportunities, supervisory infrastructure, and longitudinal evaluation necessary for the accomplishment of the educational goals of core clerkships. The College’s Clinical Campuses are located in the New England states, as well as in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Year 3 students are assigned to clerkships in the six core disciplines at one of the College’s Clinical Campuses. Reflecting its focus on primary care, UNE COM clinical campus training programs are based in community hospitals, private physician offices, and community health centers throughout the northeast, that represent environments in which many UNE COM graduates will eventually practice. Ambulatory care programs train students in office practice and familiarize them with the collaborative roles and skills of non­-physician health care providers.

While community hospitals form the core of the Year 3 and Year 4 clinical rotations, affiliations with specialty focused facilities allow students to pursue a range of clinical experiences. Many of these hospitals also provide Graduate Medical Education (GME) as members of the Northeast Osteopathic Medical Education Network (NEOMEN) (see below). Year 4 students continue their learning with selective and elective clinical rotations at UNE COM-approved programs of their choice.

Please see the Core predoctoral clinical clerkship affiliates for more information. The list of Clinical Campuses is subject to change and may vary from year to year.

  1. Postgraduate Education

UNE COM enjoys an educational affiliation with a number of postgraduate internship and residency programs, through partnerships in the Northeast Osteopathic Medical Education Network (NEOMEN). As academic sponsor of some independent programs the College serves as a liaison with the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) to assure compliance with accreditation criteria required for AOA approval of the training programs, as well as advising and assisting with transition to ACGME accreditation. As postgraduate medical education transitions to the new single accreditation system under the American Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) these affiliations will remain in place. UNE COM graduates apply to these and other postgraduate programs for internship and residency training. These affiliations exemplify the breadth and depth that these collaborative arrangements offer our graduates for postgraduate training.  

Please see postgraduate affiliates for more information on the Northeast Osteopathic Medical Education Network.

  1. Concurrent Graduate Degree Program

UNE COM offers medical students the opportunity of pursuing a concurrent graduate degree in Public Health while pursuing the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree.

Accreditation

The College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM) is an academic program of the University of New England (UNE). UNE is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE), whose mission is to establish and maintain high standards of education through the doctoral level. Accreditation by NECHE signifies that UNE meets or exceeds those high standards.

  1. Predoctoral Medical Education

The College of Osteopathic Medicine receives accredited from the American Osteopathic Association Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (AOA COCA), the only national accrediting agency for predoctoral osteopathic medical education in the United States.

Being granted full accreditation signifies that the College of Osteopathic Medicine meets or exceeds the COCA standards for educational quality and is deemed to have the qualifications to confer the degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) to its graduates.

  1. Postdoctoral Medical Education

Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institutions (OPTIs) are academic sponsors providing an enhanced quality assurance mechanism for all AOA-approved postdoctoral training programs. While an OPTI ensures a seamless continuum of osteopathic medical education, it also requires continuous educational assessment.

As a sponsor of independent postgraduate internship and residency programs through its OPTI, known as the Northeast Osteopathic Medical Education Network (NEOMEN), UNE COM serves as a liaison with the American Osteopathic Association, the only accrediting agency for osteopathic postdoctoral medical education, to assure compliance with accreditation criteria required for AOA approval of affiliated postdoctoral training programs.

NOTE: The AOA, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) have agreed to establish a single accreditation system for graduate medical education programs in the US, with AOA-accredited training programs transitioning to ACGME accreditation between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2020. Our affiliations with residency programs will remain in place as we move through this transition.

  1. Continuing Medical Education

UNE COM’s Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association and the Maine Medical Association and provides postdoctoral medical education to both osteopathic (DO) and allopathic (MD) physicians. Each agency grants accreditation based on the demonstrated ability to plan and implement CME activities in accordance with accreditation requirements. UNE COM is one of a handful of providers to hold the distinction of maintaining this dual accreditation and sponsor collaborative CME activities for these two physician groups.

The College of Osteopathic Medicine maintains its accreditations with continued adherence to required sets of criteria and its commitment to continual quality review and improvement of its programs and services.

  1. Articulation Agreements

The College of Osteopathic Medicine has established articulation agreements with both undergraduate institutions and post-baccalaureate programs.

Qualified students enrolled in the Medical Biology- Medical Sciences track at the University of New England College of Arts and Sciences (UNE CAS) may apply for early admission to the College of Osteopathic Medicine following their junior year. The 4 Plus 4 Program provides the opportunity for mature, qualified UNE CAS students to complete an undergraduate degree and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree in seven years.

UNE COM has established agreements enabling qualified students from the following institutions to have preferential consideration in applying to UNE COM. They are:

  • University of Hartford, West Hartford, Connecticut
  • Springfield College, Springfield, Massachusetts
  • University of Maine, Orono, Maine

In addition, UNE COM and the following institutions have entered into agreements whereby qualified individuals who have previously completed a baccalaureate degree can fulfill the required prerequisite courses at their Post-baccalaureate institution and be considered for admission:

  • Tufts University Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program, Medford, Massachusetts
  • University of Vermont Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program, Burlington, Vermont
Curricular Requirements Years 1 and 2
  1. UNE COM Courses – Year 1

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge IA – 14 Credits

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge IA (OMK IA) is a multidisciplinary course designed to introduce medical science knowledge that underpins the practice of osteopathic medicine. The OMK IA curriculum integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences, focusing on a different clinical presentation each week. The overall aim is to allow the first year osteopathic medical student to integrate and apply this knowledge in the solution of clinical problems. Additionally, the student develops cognitive skills and attitudes that support continual acquisition of medical knowledge.

Osteopathic Clinical Skills IA ­- 14 credits

The aim of Osteopathic Clinical Skills IA (OCS IA) is to transform learners into student physicians who demonstrate superior clinical skills and medical professionalism, and embody empathetic, patient centered medical care in preparation for clinical clerkship training. OCS IA provides students with a solid knowledge of clinical anatomy as the basis for competent and safe performance of physical examination and osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM); instructs learners in the art and skill of medical history taking; provides an understanding of human structure and function in order to formulate a clinical temporal profile leading to a differential diagnosis; and represents the foundation of osteopathic knowledge and skills that will be developed longitudinally throughout the learner’s medical education and practice.

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge IB - 14 credits

OMK IB is a continuation of OMK IA and builds on the knowledge, skills and attitudes developed by the medical scholar in the earlier course.

Osteopathic Clinical Skills IB - 14 credits

The aim of OCS IB is to continue the transformation of learners into student physicians who demonstrate superior clinical skills and medical professionalism, and embody empathetic, patient centered care. OCS IB is a continuation of OCS IA and builds on the knowledge, skills and attitudes developed by the medical scholar in that course.

  1. UNE COM Courses – Year 2

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge IIA – 16 credits

This semester long course integrates foundational underlying biomedical scientific principles with the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to address most common and/or important patient presentations. Using a combination of interactive and didactic presentations, case study discussions, laboratory sessions, panel discussions, and ‘grand rounds’ conferences, the structured learning activities reinforce and expand the student’s understanding of critical biomedical and clinical elements of health care explored in the first year UNE COM courses. The Osteopathic principles of body­-mind­-spirit integration, structure­-function relationship and the body's inherent ability to self­regulate, heal, and maintain health, are prominent themes in the course content.

Osteopathic Clinical Skills IIA – 12 credits

This course is the two-year longitudinal continuation of the OCS I course that begins in Year 1. The course is designed to reinforce and expand the student’s knowledge and osteopathic clinical skills to ensure safe and competent practice during clinical training rotations in Years 3 and 4. OCS IIA introduces the student to more advanced methods of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment and extends the integration of key concepts into the clinical practice of primary care. Learning activities parallel topics and areas of focus of the OMK II series of courses and include standardized patient experiences, osteopathic manual medicine skills sessions, geriatric mentors with seniors, clinical skills assessment, and differential diagnosis.

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge IIB – 16 credits

This semester long course continues the integration – begun in previous OMK courses – of the foundational underlying biomedical scientific principles with the most common and/or important patient presentations related to a variety of body systems.

Osteopathic Clinical Skills IIB – 12 credits

This course continues the two-year longitudinal OCS course that begins in year 1 and builds on the knowledge, skills and attitudes explored in the first semester of Year 2. The course is designed to reinforce and expand the student’s osteopathic clinical skills and knowledge, and facilitate their development into exceptional third year medical students.

The following table provides a more detailed view of the UNE COM Courses in Years 1 and 2:

YEAR 1 CURRICULUM

Blocks 1-6

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge

I-A, 14 credits

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge

I-B, 14 credits

The above integrated courses include the following Biomedical Science Disciplines: Biochemistry, Physiology, Pharmacology, Genetics, Microbiology (Bacteriology, Virology, Immunology, and Parasitology), Pathology, Molecular and Cell Biology, Medical Ethics and Legal Aspects of Medicine, Preventative Medicine and Public Health, and Research

Osteopathic Clinical Skills

I-A, 14 credits

Osteopathic Clinical Skills

I-B, 14 credits

The above integrated courses include: Anatomy (including Embryology and Histology), Osteopathic Principles and Practice, Clinical Skills, Physical and Differential Diagnosis, Preventative Medicine and Public Health, Standardized Patient Experiences, Clinical Experiences (or Preceptorship), and Humanities

YEAR 2 CURRICULUM

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge

II-A, 16 credits

Osteopathic Medical Knowledge

II-B, 16 credits

The above integrated course includes the following Systems: Neuroanatomy, Psychiatry, Hematology, Oncology, Pulmonology, Cardiology, and longitudinal integration of Geriatrics, Pediatrics, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Infectious Disease, Radiology, Differential Diagnosis and Case Based Learning, Medical Ethics and Legal Aspects of Medicine, Preventative Medicine and Public Health, Research, and Medical Informatics

The above integrated course includes the following Systems: Gastrointestinal, Renal, Urology, Reproductive (Obstetrics and Gynecology), Endocrinology, Musculoskeletal, Dermatology, and longitudinal integration of Geriatrics, Pediatrics, Pharmacology, Microbiology, Infectious Disease, Radiology, Differential Diagnosis and Case Based Learning, Medical Ethics, Health Policy, Research, and Medical Informatics

Osteopathic Clinical Skills

II-A, 12 credits

Osteopathic Clinical Skills

II-B, 12 credits

The above integrated course includes  Osteopathic Principles and Practice, Clinical Skills, Physical and Differential Diagnosis, Geriatrics Practicum, Clinical Experiences (or Preceptorships), Standardized Patient Experiences, Simulation Experiences, and Humanities

 

Curricular Requirements Years 3 and 4
  1. UNE COM Courses – Years 3 & 4

The student is required to complete 82 weeks of clinical training in Years 3 and 4. UNE COM defines three categories of clinical requirements:

  • Core: Required Discipline; The student is assigned by the UNE COM Office of Clinical Education; Core rotations are typically referred to as “clerkships.”
  • Selective: Required Discipline; Site selected by the student, subject to approval by the Office of Clinical Education.
  • Elective: Discipline and Site selected by the student, subject to approval by the Office of Clinical Education.

The following table shows the distribution of requirements. Students must complete Cores before commencing 4th year Selectives and Electives:

3rd YEAR REQUIREMENTS

WEEKS

4th YEAR

REQUIREMENTS

WEEKS

Core Family Medicine

6

Selective Internal Medicine  or Pediatrics

4

Core Internal Medicine

12

Selective Surgery

4

Core Obstetrics/Gynecology

6

Selective Emergency Medicine

4

Core Pediatrics

6

Selective Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine

4

Core Psychiatry

6

Electives

18

Core Surgery

6

Total Weeks Year 4

34

Selective Community Health

4

 

 

1 Elective

2

 

 

Total Weeks Year 3                          48

 

Total Clerkship Weeks Years 3 and 4

82

Family Medicine

Core Family Medicine is a hospital and/or ambulatory experience that enhances the student’s understanding of patient and family dynamics in illness and health, the physician/patient relationship, and the careful and economical use of medical therapeutics, technological and laboratory investigation, and hospitalization. Special attention is given to the patient interview, directed physical examination, and patient education.

Internal Medicine

The student completes 12 weeks of Core Internal Medicine (general or mix of general plus subspecialty) and may complete one or more additional rotations in Internal Medicine subspecialties; typically in a hospital setting. Applying principles learned in the preclinical years, and working within a multi­disciplinary team, the student learns to formulate a differential diagnosis based on the history and physical, prioritize a problem list, identify appropriate diagnostic tests, develop a treatment plan, and present patients to supervising physicians and in team meetings. Of critical importance is further developing and refining the ability to communicate effectively with patients and members of the treatment team.

Obstetrics and Gynecology

This clerkship is intended to provide practical clinical exposure in the diagnosis and management of the female patient with normal and pathologic obstetric and gynecologic processes. Gynecologic procedures, surgery, labor and delivery, fetal evaluation and monitoring, pre-­operative evaluations and post­-operative care are emphasized.

Pediatrics

In addition to the required Core clerkship, the student may complete one or more additional rotations. Emphasis is on primary care of the newborn to the adolescent. In hospital and/or ambulatory settings, the student gains greater understanding of the continuum of child development, including physical, social, and emotional aspects, as well as the role of family dynamics. The student develops communication skills with both the pediatric patient and the family and, as appropriate, refines his/her skill at educating the child, parents and other caregivers in health promotion.

Psychiatry

The student learns to recognize, screen for, and assess key symptoms of common mental illnesses, using the mental status examination as the basis for differential diagnosis and therapy. Additional content areas include cognitive, psychomotor and affective development, risk assessment, substance abuse issues, and impact of mental illness on patients and families.

Surgery

The student must complete one Core in General Surgery and one Selective in General Surgery or a surgical subspecialty. This clerkship is an introduction to the principles and practice of surgery. The student will experience the totality of care from the patient’s pre­surgical visit through the surgical encounter and post­-operative recovery.

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine

Osteopathic philosophy and principles are intrinsic to the entire curriculum and are incorporated throughout the clinical portion of the student’s education. In the fourth year, the student completes a total of 4 weeks of osteopathic manipulative medicine in order to gain in-depth experience by working with a practitioner who is well versed in these principles and utilizes them in the clinical care environment.

Community Health

This primary care rotation focuses on medically underserved populations in the US, either urban or rural. Expanding on the Family Medicine experience under the supervision of medical personnel, the student will diagnose and treat patients, often in the absence of sophisticated diagnostic tools. The student also will participate in health screening, preventive care, and patient education.

Emergency Medicine

The knowledge and skills gained by the student in Core rotations come together in the fast-­paced emergency department. In conjunction with ER personnel, the student will evaluate and treat patients of all ages who are experiencing medical, surgical or psychiatric emergencies.

  1. Graduation Requirements

The Board of Trustees of the University of New England confers the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree upon those students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for graduation and who have been recommended for graduation by the faculty of the College.

Every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine must:

  1. Be of good moral character and meet the standards for professional behavior and conduct as described under academic and technical standards.
  1. Have met and completed the academic requirements of the College, including passage of COMLEX-USA Level 1, 2PE and 2CE, within six academic years (or within 150% of the standard time) for the awarding of the degree and have been enrolled at this College for at least the last two years.
  1. Be free of indebtedness to this College, the University, and their affiliates.
  1. Have demonstrated the ethical, personal, and professional qualities deemed necessary for the successful and continuing study and practice of osteopathic medicine.
  1. Have been recommended by the faculty for graduation.
     
  2. Be present at the UNE COM Physicians Hooding Ceremony of his/her class at the time the degree is conferred, unless otherwise excused by the Dean.
Academic and Technical Standards

All students enrolled in the University are encouraged to acquaint themselves with the scholastic regulations, the general and specific requirements of the academic program, and the operational policies that govern the program of study.

  1. Student Rights and Responsibilities

As part of its review, the UNE COM Committee on Admissions evaluates each applicant in the areas of personal and academic integrity and personal values. An invitation to join the UNE COM community indicates that the institution believes that the applicant has a well-developed set of values and a high level of integrity. The faculty and administration are committed to fostering this integrity and to developing students' increasing awareness of the multifaceted demands of professionalism ­as student physicians who are ultimately responsible for their own learning, as people who need to reflect and reappraise themselves consistently and honestly, and as future physicians who must learn to cope with an ever-­evolving set of demands.

Student physicians are expected to behave professionally and ethically with respect and integrity, to face new situations and people with open minds, to maintain their intellectual and personal curiosity, and to meet their obligations. These expectations form the basis of student responsibilities.

Likewise, student rights are based on the premise of reciprocity. Students should expect to be met with the same sense of integrity, respect, and openness.

  1. Standards for Professional Behavior and Conduct

In order to evaluate acceptable demonstration of professional behavior and conduct for graduation, the UNE COM faculty has adopted the following standards.

Each student enrolled in the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine is expected to:

  1. Behave in a responsible, reliable and dependable manner (e.g., manage time well; be on time for assignments, meetings, and appointments; plan ahead and follow through with commitments; cooperate with person(s) in charge of programs; and take responsibility for absences or missed assignments).
  1. Demonstrate personal integrity, honesty, and self-discipline (e.g., be consistent and truthful, to show appropriate personal control; take on tasks that he/she can manage; be honest in reports and self-evaluations).
  1. Project a professional image in manner, dress, grooming, speech, and interpersonal relationships that is consistent with the medical profession's accepted contemporary community standards (e.g., maintain awareness of personal hygiene; wear a white coat and name tag, if expected; notify preceptor or other leader in case of emergency absence or calls; apologize if unable to notify in advance; be respectful of other students and patients when doing physical diagnosis or treatment).
  1. Recognize his/her personal limitations and biases, whether they are intellectual, physical or emotional and to strive to correct them (e.g., overcome negative behaviors such as procrastination; learn to be a team member; adapt to new situations; and avoid discriminatory conduct or speech).
  1. Demonstrate the professional and emotional maturity to manage tensions and conflicts which occur among professional, personal, and family responsibilities, seeking professional help if necessary (e.g., meet with supposed antagonists to resolve misunderstandings; get needed help from faculty advisors, tutors, counselors, learning assistance professionals and other qualified persons; show ability to prioritize appropriately one’s personal, professional, and academic expectations and activities).
  1. Demonstrate the ability to exercise sound judgment and to function under pressure (e.g., request help when needed and to avoid endangering others; respect the difference between physician and physician-­in-­training (i.e., doctor and student doctor); remain focused on the task at hand; remember that as a student doctor he/she represents UNE COM and the osteopathic profession to the greater community at large).
  1. Demonstrate the ability to learn from mistakes and failures and to heed admonitions and warnings from officers of UNE COM and of clinical supervisors (e.g., be responsive to feedback and constructive criticism regarding professional behavior and attitude, and understand the seriousness of academic and disciplinary warnings).
  1. Demonstrate compassion and respect toward others (e.g., work cooperatively with differences and diversity in personalities and in cultural backgrounds as well as with differences in social and in economic status; and respect the privacy and individual choice of others).
  1. Demonstrate consistent respect for administrators, faculty, staff, and fellow students of the University.

These standards are taken very seriously and evaluated regularly. Failure to abide by these standards may result in academic warning, probation, or dismissal.

  1. Registration

The University conducts an annual registration for students during the start of each academic year. The Office of the University Registrar handles registration for students in Years 1 and 2 with information regarding student status and courses from the COM Office of Academic Affairs. The Office of the University Registrar enrolls medical students in Years 3 and 4 using information on student status from the Office of Clinical Education. Each student is registered in a “place holder” course until the Registrar receives rotation grades. As the completed rotations are processed, the “place holder” is removed and the actual rotation and grade are entered into the academic record. Students are required to confirm their enrollments as classes/educational activities begin through U-­Online. The Registrar sends directions for this process to all students as each semester begins.

During the registration process, students must finalize payment of tuition and related fees, as delineated in the section entitled Tuition and Fees, including filing appropriate documents with Registration Services, Financial Aid, Business Affairs, and the Office of Recruitment, Student and Alumni Services. In addition, all new, incoming students are required to undergo a complete physical examination, meet UNE COM immunization requirements, and complete the medical questionnaire provided by the University as a prerequisite to enrollment. Failure to comply with meeting immunization requirements may result in the inability to register for courses, receive course grades or proceed with clinical assignments.

  1. Academic Records

Complete records and related documents are maintained in Registration Services, Decary Hall. Under the terms of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), students have the right to review and inspect all education records pertaining to their academic enrollment. However, letters of recommendation submitted on the basis of a pledge of confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975 need not be shown to students, and a student may be allowed but not required to waive his/her right of access to letters of recommendation received after that date. FERPA requires post-­secondary institutions to provide students not only access to official records directly related to them, but also an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. It is the right of students to file a complaint with the Department of Education concerning an alleged failure by an educational agency or institution to comply with section 438 of the Act that guarantees such rights.

University students wishing to review their records may do so by providing a written request to Registration Services.

  1. Student Access and Annual Notification

FERPA affords students certain rights with respect to their education records, specifically the right to:

  1. inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. The student should submit to Registration Services a written request that identifies the records s/he wishes to inspect. The office will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.
  1. request the University to amend the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. The student should write to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record s/he wishes to be changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will accompany this notification.
  1. consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff) ; a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as attorney, auditor, or collection agent) ; a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task; or the Veterans Administration for students registered for various GI Bill programs. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  1. file a complaint with the US Department of Education concerning alleged failure(s) by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
US Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202­4605

FERPA permits the University to disclose "directory information" without a student's consent. Directory information is defined as: name, address, e­mail address, telephone listing, photograph, date and place of birth, level of education, academic major, degrees, honors and awards received, and educational institutions in which a student was enrolled.

Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing on a ‘per­-academic­-year’ basis. Request forms are available in Registration Services or Office of Recruitment, Student and Alumni Services. Requests must be submitted prior to September 30 (if first-time enrollment for academic year is fall semester) or January 30 (if first-time enrollment for academic year is spring semester) to affect a "withhold" status.

  1. Student Enrollment Status

The University of New England classifies student credit load status for the purposes of financial aid loan deferments. Enrollment classifications.

  1. Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examinations

The Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examinations (COMLEX-­USA) are administered by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) and are divided into three levels. Levels 1 and 2 (which consists of 2 parts) are completed during the predoctoral years and Level 3 is given to qualified graduates during their first year of postgraduate (residency) training. In particular, the Level 2 examination consists of two independent components – a Cognitive Evaluation (Level 2-­CE) and a Performance Evaluation (Level 2-­PE). The former predominantly tests a student’s knowledge base and the latter predominantly his/her clinical skills. Students are eligible for the Level 1 examination after achieving a minimum COMSAE Phase 1 score of 500, having advanced to Year 2, and after approval from the College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM). Students become eligible for the Level 2 examinations after successfully passing COMLEX Level 1, achieving a minimum COMSAE Phase 2 score of 500, having advanced to Year 3, and after approval from the COM. Students must have a passing score on COMLEX-USA Level 1 in order to begin rotations at clinical campus sites. Students must take and pass both components of the Level 2 examination as a condition of graduation.

Students are allowed a maximum of three attempts to pass COMLEX-­USA Level 1 and each component of COMLEX­-USA Level 2. Any student who fails to pass any individual component of the COMLEX-USA examination series after three attempts will be recommended for dismissal from the college.

Students are allowed a maximum of six years to complete all of the College of Osteopathic Medicine curriculum, including passage of COMLEX-USA Level 1, and Level 2 PE and CE. At the conclusion of six years, students who have not met all requirements will be recommended for dismissal from the college.

Note: Registration and scheduling of the exams is the responsibility of the student. Students should also plan to register and take the COMLEX-­USA Level 1 and 2 (PE and CE) with sufficient time allowed to receive exam results and be able to comply with any deadlines for clinical rotations or graduation. Graduating Year 4 students are required to schedule a date for their COMLEX-­USA Level 2PE by May 31st of their 3rd academic year and COMLEX-USA Level 2CE by July 31st of their 4th academic year preceding their anticipated graduation date in order to receive scores in time to meet residency ranking and graduation requirements. This may require registration and scheduling with NBOME up to 12 months in advance.  It is recommended that these exams be taken earlier in order to ensure that the exams are passed with sufficient time to allow for retesting if necessary.

  1. Laptop Requirement

The College has instituted a mandatory laptop computer requirement. Specifics regarding the minimum configuration are updated and made available annually.

  1. Course Grade Reporting

The process of determining grades and the criteria for passing a course are described explicitly in each course syllabus ratified by the Curriculum Advisory Committee (CAC) and posted prior to the beginning of the course.

A final course grade is determined by the course director and must comply with the standards and principles endorsed by the Curriculum Advisory Committee.

Academic Policy
  1. Attendance

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine creates a variety of venues to support high quality learning and teaching, which the attendance policy strives to support by honoring students' varied learning styles and by allowing faculty and course directors to maintain the integrity of the curriculum. Working in conjunction with the teaching faculty of a course, the course director(s) will specify which educational sessions are mandatory or optional and post this information in the course syllabus or student calendar well in advance of the session.

  1. Academic Standing

The Committee on Student Progress (CSP) is responsible for making recommendations to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (ADAA) or the Associate Dean for Clinical Education (ADCE) on matters related to student performance, including disciplinary, professional conduct, and academic matters. As it deems necessary, the CSP may identify students experiencing academic (includng behavioral) difficulties and inform appropriate faculty and administrative personnel of such to initiate corrective or remedial action which needs to be taken. Annually, CSP makes recommendations to the Dean on the promotion of students to the next class. Also, each year CSP recommends to the faculty, through the Dean, the awarding of the degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine to those students who have satisfied all graduation requirements.

The CSP may review the status of a student whenever the student's performance is found to be unsatisfactory in the accumulation of knowledge or skills and/or personal growth. For example, the student’s academic progress may be reviewed for any of the following reasons:

  1. Unexcused absence(s) from class, laboratory, or clinical experience.
  1. Failure to obtain a satisfactory grade in every unit of study such as a course, preceptorship, clinical rotation (clerkship) or other educational activities.
  1. Failure to obtain a satisfactory grade in either the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Self-Assessment Examination (COMSAE), or Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination (COMLEX).
  1. Failure to abide by the Standards for Professional Behavior and Conduct or to exhibit the behavior, ethics, or professional manner deemed necessary, in the judgment of the Committee on Student Progress, for the continued study and later practice of osteopathic medicine.
  1. Personal or medical reasons; in assessing personal growth, such factors as morals, emotional stability, integrity, general conduct, reliability, judgment, and rapport with patients is considered.

After discussion and deliberation on any matter, CSP may decide by majority vote to make one of the following recommendations to the Dean:

  1. No significant deficiency exists, and the student is promoted, with such oral or written caution to the student as may be recommended.
  1. A significant deficiency exists and one or several of the following actions must be taken according to the severity of the deficiency, the student's overall achievement and circumstances surrounding the deficiency (illness, family emergency, etc.):
  1. Student is to take remedial examination(s) after an appropriate interval recommended by the course director(s) and approved by a majority vote of the Committee on Student Progress.
  1. Student is to undertake special projects or studies required to address the perceived deficiency.
  1. Student is placed on academic or disciplinary probation for a stated period of time.
  1. Student is required to repeat the course(s), preceptorship(s), clerkship(s), or other educational activity in which there is a deficiency.
  1. Student is required to repeat the academic year.
  1. Student is recommended for a leave of absence or suspension from the College.
  1. Student is recommended for dismissal from the College.
  1. Withdrawal/Dismissal

A student who is required to repeat an academic year or is suspended or dismissed from the College may appeal this decision to the Dean according to the guidelines in the University Student Handbook. The Dean may, at his/her discretion, convene a Faculty Appeals Committee for a review of the decision. The charge of the Faculty Appeals Committee will not be to repeat the deliberations of the Committee on Student Progress, but rather to determine whether or not the following conditions apply to the original decision:

  1. New information is available at this time that was not available to the original recommending committee (CSP), or
  1. Evidence exists that the decision the recommending committee reached was capricious or arbitrary, or
  1. Consequence of the deliberation (e.g., dismissal, etc.) is unusually harsh or unfair.

If the Faculty Appeals Committee upholds the original recommendation, the decision is final and there is no further appeal. If the Faculty Appeals Committee does not uphold the requirement to repeat the year, suspension or dismissal, it will recommend to the Dean such other requirements, as it deems appropriate.

Probation: Placement of a student on academic probation or disciplinary probation indicates the student’s failure to maintain satisfactory academic or behavioral performance. While on probation, the student will not represent the college at outside events and will be asked to curtail elected office responsibilities until their performance improves. In addition, a student on academic probation must pass all units of study; a student on disciplinary probation must discontinue the behavior leading to probation and maintain a record of exemplary behavior. Students who violate the conditions of probation as listed above will be reviewed again by CSP, which will make such recommendations to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (ADAA) or the Associate Dean for Clinical Education (ADCE) as it sees fit.

An application for voluntary withdrawal from the College must be submitted in writing to the Dean. The Dean may grant a leave of absence due to financial difficulties or for personal, medical, or family problems.

  1. Academic Progress Policy
  1. Course Failures
  1. All students are expected to meet the requirements for passing by the end of a course.
  1. Any student who is assigned a grade of Failure (F) for a course, including for failure to meet criteria for professional behavior, will meet with CSP.
  1. Based upon the student’s overall academic performance, CSP will, in consultation with the Course Director for the failed course, make one of the following recommendations:
  1. repeat the course when it is next offered, or
  1. repeat the entire academic year, or
  1. dismissal from the college.
  1. Course Retesting or Remediation Policy
  1. The syllabus of the original course, which requires Curriculum Advisory Committee (CAC) approval, will specify the dates and duration of any allowable retesting or remedial activity.
  1. All courses that allow for remedial activity and reassessment prior to issuing a final course grade following unsuccessful achievement of criteria for passing must develop, describe and publish in the course syllabus a plan for re­assessment and/or remediation.
  1. With permission of CSP, a UNE COM student who is assigned a final grade of Failure (F) in a course which allows retesting or remediation may enroll in a formal remediation activity approved by the Curriculum Advisory Committee and the course director.
  1. Permission to pursue retesting or remedial activity will be based upon:
  1. the criteria for eligibility published in the course syllabus and
  1. the student’s overall performance in all other UNE COM courses (concurrent and previous).
  1. The remediation activity will:
  1. be constructed and monitored by the original course director, or, if it is conducted at a remote site, monitored by the original course director;
  1. be listed with the Registrar as a separate course; and,
  1. carry a tuition charge.
  1. The syllabus of the original course, which requires CAC approval, will specify the dates and duration of the remedial activity.
  1. Upon successful completion of the retesting or remedial activity, the student will be given a grade of Pass (P) for the course.
  1. Failure on the assessment following the completion of a retest or remediation activity will result in the student being considered for one of the following actions:
  1. repeat the course when it is next offered, or
  1. repeat the academic year, or
  1. dismissal from the college.   
Learning Outcomes

To graduate with the degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, students must demonstrate achievement of the AOA COM competencies:

  1. Osteopathic Principles and Practice: The student will understand and apply osteopathic principles to patient care.
  1. Patient Care: The student will have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to provide compassionate, appropriate and effective patient care.
  1. Medical Knowledge: The student will demonstrate knowledge of established biomedical, epidemiological, social, and behavioral sciences and their application to patient care.
  1. Practice­-Based Learning and Improvement: The student will demonstrate the ability to investigate and evaluate patient care practices using scientific evidence and apply these to patient care.
  1. Interpersonal and Communication Skills: The student will demonstrate interpersonal and communication skills that result in respectful and effective interactions with patients, families, and colleagues.
  1. Professionalism: The student will demonstrate a commitment to conducting themselves in an ethical and sensitive manner.
  1.  Systems-­Based Practice: The student will demonstrate an awareness of and responsiveness to the larger context and systems of health care, to provide care of optimal value.
HuMed

Exceptional UNE undergraduate students aspiring to a career in medicine or dentistry may apply to the University of New England HuMed program which provides the opportunity that spans their junior and senior years as an undergraduate and their four years in UNE’s College of Osteopathic Medicine or College of Dental Medicine. UNE HuMed makes it possible to deepen student learning in English, History, or Liberal Studies while they prepare for a career as a dentist or an osteopathic physician. Requirements are described at http://www.une.edu/humed.

During their years as an undergraduate in UNE’s College of Arts and Sciences, students complete the requisite coursework in the natural sciences to prepare for their graduate education, while earning a Bachelor of Arts in English, History, or Liberal Studies.  As a HuMed student, they are not required to take the DAT or the MCAT.  Instead, the College of Osteopathic Medicine requires individuals to take the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude test (UKCAT). In both programs, students have an assurance of acceptance contingent upon fulfilling the HuMed curricular requirements and passing the interview process.

Admissions

DOCTOR OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE (DO) ADMISSIONS 

COURSEWORK PREREQUISITES

  • Science
  • General Biology (with labs, 8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
  • General Chemistry (with labs, 8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
  • Physics (with labs, 8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
  • Organic Chemistry (with lab, 4 semester or 6 quarter credits)
  • Biochemistry (3 semester or 4 quarter credits)
  • Upper-level coursework with labs, acceptable to fulfill general science requirements
  • Other 
    • Behavioral Science (6 semester or 9 quarter credits)
    • UNE COM will accept coursework classified as behavioral science by AACOMAS (AACOMAS Official List)
  • English/Humanities (6 semester or 9-10 quarter credits)
    • UNE COM will only accept coursework in the following subjects, as classified by UNE COM English/Humanities Prerequisite Subject List
  • Additional recommended coursework
  • Anatomy, Cell/Molecular Biology, Genetics, Math/Statistics, Microbiology, Physiology
  • AP/IB Test Credits
  • Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) test credit accepted toward all prerequisite requirements; no other test credit accepted
  • To use test credit for your prerequisite requirement it must be listed on your undergraduate transcript, separately by subject, or a breakdown must be provided by your undergraduate institution
  • Prerequisite Policies
    • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C minus” grades, not acceptable); Pass/Fail coursework not accepted for prerequisite requirements
  • All prerequisite coursework must be completed by January 1, 2020; no exceptions made to this policy
    • All planned or in progress prerequisites must be listed on the AACOMAS application of submission
    • Applicants who do not list prerequisite coursework that is planned or in-progress will be withdrawn for not meeting the minimum requirements

 

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Completion of 90 semester hours or 75% credit towards a baccalaureate degree to be earned at a U.S. regionally accredited college or university, or international equivalent, at time of application
    • Degree must be earned and awarded prior to matriculation
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.8 and minimum science GPA of 2.8, at time of application, as calculated by AACOMAS (factoring in all courses taken with no forgiveness for repeated coursework)
    • Average overall and science GPAs for those accepted into UNE COM are well above the published minimums
  • Minimum score of 490 on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) 
    • Scores from January 2017 through December 2019 only
    • No January 2020 scores accepted this cycle
    • Score report sent directly from AAMC to AACOMAS, code # 600
    • Average MCAT scores for those accepted into UNE COM are well above the published minimums
  • Only applicants meeting minimum requirements will be considered for admission
    • Just meeting minimum requirements, however, does not guarantee an invitation to submit supplemental application fee, further review, or an invite to interview
    • Qualified applicants will be invited to submit the non-refundable supplemental application fee ($55.00) to be considered for further application review
  • Letters of recommendation
  • UNE COM prefers letters of recommendation be submitted through AACOMAS
  • Letters are also accepted through Interfolio or mailed directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions by the letter writer
  • UNE COM requires a minimum of three letters of recommendation.  From these letters we seek a holistic description of the applicant including information on engagement as a student (especially teamwork within academic settings), interpersonal skills, character, and professionalism.
  • Recommended sources include: 
    • Pre-health committee letter 
    • Pre-health advisor letter 
    • Faculty members with a substantial knowledge of the applicant 
    • Direct supervisor with substantial knowledge of the applicant
    • Health Care Professionals with a substantial knowledge of the applicant, preferably physicians
    • A letter from an Osteopathic Physician (D.O.) is recommended but not required
  • Letters of recommendation from friends or family members will not be accepted toward the UNE COM letter requirements

 

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service AACOMAS only 
    • AACOMAS application portal opens annually in early June
    • Applications must be electronically submitted to AACOMAS by the February 1st deadline
    • For more information and detailed instructions for completion of the application visit AACOMAS
  • On-campus interviews are required for admission and are by invitation only
    • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made after interview sessions
  • Accepted applicants are required to place a $500, non-refundable first deposit, in accordance with the AACOMAS Traffic Rules
    • A second deposit of $1,500 will also be required, refundable through May 1
    • Deposit(s) will be forfeited if applicant does not matriculate
  • International applicants and applicants with international coursework or degrees (including Canadian applicants):
    • Must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. regionally accredited institution (International Admissions)
      • Applicants from English-speaking Canadian institutions must have transcript evaluations submitted directly to UNE’s Office of Graduate Admissions
      • All other international applicants must submit transcript evaluations to AACOMAS
    • Must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university
      • UNE accepts several methods of English proficiency
      • If an applicant cannot prove English proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application
  • Before or upon matriculation, accepted/deposited students will be expected to:
    • Meet all health immunization requirements
    • Pass criminal background checks and drug screenings prior to matriculation , and periodically throughout the program as required by the College of Osteopathic Medicine and clinical training sites
    • Meet Academic Policies and Technical Standards of the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies are established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants to the university and its programs
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum and/or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

 

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Students in good standing at other Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine may apply for transfer admission into the third year of the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine program at UNE
  • For more information on the transfer process please contact the Office of Graduate Admissions

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing placement available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

 

Financial Information
  1. Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include required background checks, books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog. A student may incur additional tuition expense if their course of study extends beyond four (4) years.

  1. Special Examination Fee

All students are required to take and pass the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination (COMLEX) Level 1, Level 2-CE, and Level 2-PE in order to graduate. All fees are determined by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) and are paid directly to the Board by the student.

  1. Leave of Absence Tuition Credit

In the event a student desires to apply for a leave of absence, a Withdrawal/Leave Form must be submitted to the Dean's Office. The form will include the reason for leaving, as well as the expected date of return. An approved leave of absence during the on-campus portion of the curriculum will result in a refund per the Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy.

A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester.

Notes

  • Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE COM since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  • UNE will continue to make every effort to contain costs from the date they are announced through the current academic year. The Board of Trustees, however, reserves the right to make changes in tuition and fees at any time.
  • For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies.
  • The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. 
  1. Financial Aid

The Student Financial Services Office at the University of New England is committed to providing students with information about the different education financing options available. This information is available on the Student Financial Services website. The website describes the financial aid application process, the types of financial assistance available, and other important information for financing your medical education.

Admissions Office
University of New England
College of Osteopathic Medicine
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, Maine 04005-9599
1-800-477-4UNE or 207-602-2212

Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine

College of Osteopathic Medicine

Pharmacy

Mission and Core Values

Mission

To provide an exemplary, learner centered pharmacy education and advance the practice of pharmacy through interprofessional collaboration, research, patient care and service. 

CORE VALUES 

The College operates by a set of values that emphasize:

  • Learner-centered approaches
  • Professional and servant leadership
  • Diversity and inclusiveness
  • Lifelong learning, discovery, and creativity
  • Collegiality and mutual respect
  • Integrity and accountability
  • Continuous quality improvement
Program Description

Overview

The College offers the Doctor of Pharmacy as the professional degree that prepares students for careers as pharmacists in a variety of practice settings. A minimum of two years of undergraduate pre-professional education is required for admission which can be completed at UNE or elsewhere.  The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is awarded after successful completion of four years of professional study in the College of Pharmacy located on UNE’s Portland Campus in Portland, Maine.  To apply or to learn more about our exciting professional pharmacy program, please call (800) 477-4UNE, or email gradadmissions@une.edu

Students applying to UNE for the pre-professional course of study will be admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences.  Coursework within the pre-professional years will be accomplished at UNE’s Biddeford Campus in Biddeford, Maine.

Pharmacy is one of the most highly respected healthcare professions in the United States.  We believe that our program makes a difference in providing competent practitioners to serve the health needs of our citizens.  In addition to achieving the Doctor of Pharmacy degree, all graduates of the program will be further certified to immunize patients, perform Medication Therapy Management, and communicate to patients about Point of Care Testing options.  These certifications are offered by national pharmacy associations and the UNE COP has incorporated them into the curriculum.

interprofessional education

Vision
We envision interprofessional learning as a cornerstone of education for healthcare professions.

Mission
The mission of the UNE College of Pharmacy Interprofessional Education (IPE) program is to prepare healthcare professionals to provide patient and community care in a collaborative team environment. We integrate with UNE's diverse collection of programs in the healthcare professions to provide opportunities for students to learn from and with one another. Collaborative patient- and community-centered practice is cultivated to improve the effectiveness of healthcare and patients quality of life.

Goals

  1. ​Establish collaborative relationships with other health professions and community partners to foster student-centered learning environments reflective of IPEC competencies (communication; teamwork; roles and responsibilites; values, ethics, and population health).
  2. Create, implement, and assess the curriculum and co-curricular activities guided by IPEC competencies. 
  3. Collaborate with faculty, students, and staff from other health professions and community partners on research and scholarly activities.
  4. Advance the development of the next generation of leaders in IPE/IPP

Research Objectives

The College of Pharmacy strives to achieve balance in its research efforts between discovery of clinically relevant drugs or drug delivery systems and pre-clinical and clinical development of these entities. Our primary area of focus will be the discovery and development of new drug molecules. Other areas of research activity will include therapeutic biomarkers, drug delivery methods, nutraceuticals, herbal medicines, and strategies for assessing individual variations in drug response, nutritional status or inborn errors of metabolism. We educate our pharmacy students about the drug discovery process and the necessary regulatory compliance required for drug development. Our students will understand the basic science, thought process, and strategies for the generation of new drug discoveries. They will also be familiar with the safety, the formulation, and the delivery of new drug entities. They will have instruction on the principles of proper clinical trial design and the process by which a new drug product is introduced into commercial use.

 

Accreditation

University of New England College of Pharmacy’s Doctor of Pharmacy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60503, 312/664-3575; FAX 312/664-4652, web site www.acpe-accredit.org.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits

1st Year

 
Fall Semester  
PHAR 101 -   Integrated Group Learning I 2
PHAR 103 -   Abilities Lab I 2
PHAR 111 -   Foundations of Medicinal Chemistry 1
PHAR 113 -   Foundations of Pharmacology 2
PHAR 115  -   Introduction to Pharmacy 1

PHAR 117 -  Foundations of Drug Information

1

PHAR 119 - Foundations of Pharmacy Calculations 1
PHAR 121 - Biochemistry 3
PHAR 123 - Pharmaceutics 3
Total  16
   
Spring Semester  
PHAR 102 -  Integrated Group Learning II 2

PHAR 104 -  Abilities Lab II

2

PHAR 112 - Foundations of Pharmacogenomics 2
PHAR 120 - Medical Immunology 3
PHAR 122 - Pharmacokinetics 3
PHAR 124 - Evidence Based Medicine & Biostatistics 4
Total  16
   
Summer   
PHAR 140 -  Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I 4
   

2nd Year

 
Fall Semester  
PHAR 201 -  Integrated Group Learning III 2
PHAR 203 -  Abilities Lab III 2
PHAR 205 -  Drugs and Disease I - Introduction to Drugs and Disease 4
PHAR 207 - Drugs and Disease II - Cardiovascular I 3

PHAR 209 -  Drugs and Disease III - Cardiovascular II

2

PHAR 231 - Healthcare Systems and Quality

3

Elective 2
Total  18
   
Spring Semester   
PHAR 202 - Integrated Group Learning IV 2
PHAR 204 -  Abilities Lab IV 2
PHAR 206 - Drugs and Disease IV - Endocrine & GI 3

PHAR 208 - Drugs and Disease V - Infectious Disease I

3

PHAR 210 - Drugs and Disease VI - Infectious Disease II

3

PHAR 230 - Social Behavior, Outcomes, and Population Health

3

Elective 2
Total  18
   
Summer  
PHAR 240 - Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II 3
   

3rd Year

 
Fall Semester  
PHAR 301 -  Integrated Group Learning V 2
PHAR 303 -  Abilities Lab V 2

PHAR 305 - Drugs and Disease VII - Renal

2

PHAR 307 - Drugs and Disease VIII - Pain/Inflammation

2

PHAR 309 - Drugs and Disease IX - Oncology

3

PHAR 331 -  Pharmacy Management and Leadership 3
PHAR 342 - Interprofessional Experience 3
PHAR 340 - Longitudinal IPPE 1

Total

18

   
Spring Semester   
PHAR 302 - Integrated Group Learning VI 2
PHAR 304 - Abilities Lab VI 2
PHAR 306 - Drugs and Disease X - Neuro/Psych I 2
PHAR 308 - Drugs and Disease XI - Neuro/Psych II 3
PHAR 310 - Drugs and Disease XII - Respiratory, Mens/Womens Health 3
PHAR 330- Pharmacy Law & Ethics 3

Elective

2

Total 17
   

4th Year

 
Summer, Fall, Spring  
PHAR 400 -  Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (6 x 6 weeks) 36
Total Credit Hours  146

Pharmacy Practice Experiences

The process of experiential education provides the student with the ability to integrate first-hand practical experience with their didactic and laboratory course work.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE)
All course requirements in the first and second professional years must be successfully completed before a student may participate in an IPPE. The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) will consist of two courses, one of four weeks duration, and one of three weeks duration. The four week course will occur in a community (retail) pharmacy while the other will occur in an institutional (hospital) pharmacy. The community course experience, totaling 160 hours is four credits; while the institutional course, totaling 120 hours, is three credits.  A one-credit hour course, PHAR 340, registered for in the third year, is required to provide the additional credit hour needed for the full 300 hours of IPPE experience. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences in community and institutional pharmacy settings begin early in the professional curriculum and are interfaced with didactic course instruction. This provides an introduction to the profession and continues in a progressive manner preparing the pharmacy student for the advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE)
All first through third year courses must be successfully completed before a student may participate in an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE). The APPE will begin immediately following the third year and continue throughout the fourth year.  These experiences will consist of six, six-week assignments for a total of 36 credit hours (1440 contact hours). Each student will be required to successfully complete four required experiences in the following patient care settings: inpatient acute care medicine; outpatient or ambulatory care, community pharmacy, and institutional pharmacy, as well as, two elective experiences in various practice environments.

certificates and dual degrees

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health program combined with the Doctor of Pharmacy degree provides students with the core public health concepts they need enhance their pharmacy knowledge to manage populations of patients, in addition to providing individualized care. Participants who complete this program may decide to pursue a graduate degree in public health; as these 18 credit hours are the foundation courses for UNE Online’s Master of Public Health degree.

Academic and Technical Standards

Academic Program Standards

Pharmacy students must complete all Doctor of Pharmacy program requirements and receive a passing grade in all courses and clinical rotations to be eligible for graduation. The graduating student must have a cumulative grade point average of a 2.0 or better.  

Matriculation and Continued Enrollment Requirements

In addition to receiving a passing grade in all course and clinical rotations, a student is expected to read, understand, accept and adhere to the following requirements.  Failure to comply with these requirements by stated deadlines is considered unprofessional conduct and may impact or delay the student's graduation.

  1. COP Code of Professional Conduct
  2. UNE COP Name Badges - College Name badges are issued to students upon matriculation. Students are expected to wear these name badges at all times to identify themselves as members of the College of Pharmacy community
  3. Immunizations - Students are required to have appropriate immunizations before they matriculate into and as they progress through the PharmD program
  4. CPR Training - All College of Pharmacy students are required to have current CPR certification. The training program needs to be the American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers (CPR and AED) Program or the American Red Cross CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer & Health Care Provider.  An online or blended course will not be accepted.  A copy of your CPR card must be uploaded to the student’s RxPreceptor account along with the expiration date
  5. Pharmacy Intern License - Students must be able to meet the Maine State Board of Pharmacy Licensing requirements to obtain a valid Maine Pharmacy Intern License, which is required to complete experiential courses in the State of Maine. Inability to obtain and maintain a valid license may prevent a student from continuing in the program and completing the requirements for graduation.  In accordance with the Maine Board of Pharmacy rules and regulations, any change in your name, address, email address, criminal convictions, disciplinary actions, or any material change set forth in your original application for licensure must be reported to the Board of Pharmacy within 10 days. Failure to follow this requirement may result in an immediate suspension of your intern license and a possible civil penalty/fine
  6. HIPPA - Students must be in compliance with UNE HIPAA requirements to attend classes and rotations
  7. PCOA Assessment - All P2 and P3 students are required to take the PCOA exam.
  8. Communication skills - Passing a written and verbal English proficiency test.
  9. NAPLEX Review Week - All P4 students are required to take part in the College of Pharmacy NAPLEX Review week during the week between the end of the spring term of the graduation year and the UNE Commencement and COP Hooding ceremonies
  10. Electronic Portfolio - Students will maintain an electronic portfolio as directed by College policy, faculty and faculty advisors
  11. Health Insurance - This is a requirement of all students at the University of New England COP.

    The insurance must cover inpatient and outpatient services for injuries sustained or diseases contracted while on rotations. Proof of this coverage must be provided to the COP Dean’s Office when requested

  12. Drug Screening - Rotation sites may request drug screens. Information obtained in drug screens may inhibit students from completing introductory or advanced practice experiences and thus may delay or hinder graduation.  Students must pay for these tests

  13. Background checks - The College may be required to provide information from background checks on each student who participates in IPPE and APPE rotations. Any disqualification of a student by a practice facility could prevent the student from undertaking clinical rotations that are required to complete the pharmacy program at the University of New England.  Students may have to pay for these checks

  14. Transportation - All students must provide their own transportation to off-campus pharmacy practice experience sites

  15. Laptop Computers - Students must have laptop computers, meeting College of Pharmacy minimum specifications, upon arrival to campus to attend required sessions/classes

  16. College sponsored professional events - All students are expected to be in attendance at the following events: White Coat, Professional Transition, University of New England Commencement and College of Pharmacy Hooding Ceremonies

Technical Standards

All students must be able to meet the following University of New England (UNE) College of Pharmacy technical standards.  A student accepted into the Doctor of Pharmacy program must have abilities and skills in five categories: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, and behavioral/social. Standards are developed as criteria to achieve the Doctor of Pharmacy degree in preparation for licensure as a practicing pharmacist and for postgraduate professional training and education in any of the varied fields of pharmacy. Further, the safety of the patient, on whom the pharmaceutical education process is largely focused, must be guarded as the final and ultimate consideration.

The University of New England, College of Pharmacy acknowledges Section 504 of the 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation Act and PL 11-336, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 19903, and requires minimum technical standards be present in students accepted into the Doctor of Pharmacy program. The College of Pharmacy will engage in an interactive process with applicants with disabilities but the College of Pharmacy reserves the right not to admit any applicant who cannot meet the Technical Standards set forth below, with reasonable accommodations. Applicants are not required to disclose the nature of their disability(ies), if any, to the Admissions Committee. However, any applicant with questions about these technical standards is strongly encouraged to discuss his/her specific issue(s) with the Student Access Center prior to the interview process. If appropriate, and upon the request of the applicant, reasonable accommodations will be provided. 

Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities will be considered on an individual basis, but a student in the Doctor of Pharmacy program must be able to perform in an independent manner. Every applicant is considered without regard to disability. Once accepted, students must complete all elements of the curriculum with or without reasonable accommodations. In the case of a documented disability, the College of Pharmacy must be fully satisfied that the applicant can make progress through the curriculum. Students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program must have the functional use of the senses of vision and hearing. A student's skills will also be lessened without the functional use of the senses of equilibrium and smell. Additionally, they must have sufficient exteroceptive senses (touch, pain and temperature), and sufficient motor functions to permit them to carry out the activities described in the sections that follow. Doctor of Pharmacy students must be able to integrate information received from multiple senses quickly and accurately. They must also have the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze and synthesize data. Graduates of the College of Pharmacy must have the knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical, administrative and leadership situations and to render a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical care. 

Throughout the pharmacy program, a student will be expected to maintain the technical standards and demonstrate them through their coursework, interaction with peers and faculty, and in their professional experiences.  Students who fail to demonstrate the technical standards while in the program will be evaluated and appropriate action (e.g., remediation, counseling, or dismissal) will be taken.  Because this expectation is separate from academic achievement, simply maintaining a passing GPA is not sufficient. 

While the College of Pharmacy recognizes that certain disabilities can be accommodated without compromising the standards required by the college and the integrity of the curriculum, the use of a trained intermediary means that a student's judgment must be mediated by someone else's powers of selection and observation, and is not acceptable.  Additionally, those individuals who would constitute a direct threat to the health or safety of others are not considered suitable candidates for continued matriculation.

The following skills are required, with or without accommodation:

Observation

Students must be able to observe demonstrations and conduct exercises in a variety of areas related to contemporary pharmacy practice, including but not limited to monitoring of drug response and preparation of specialty dosage forms. Students must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic and pharmaceutical sciences, medical illustrations and models, microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathological states. A student must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand, noting nonverbal as well as verbal signals. The student must be able to observe and interpret presented information. Specific vision-related requirements include, but are not limited to the following abilities: visualizing and discriminating findings on monitoring tests; reading written and illustrated material; discriminating numbers and patterns associated with diagnostic and monitoring instruments and tests; observing the activities of technical staff operating under their supervision; reading information on a computer screen and small print on packages or package inserts; distinguishing shapes, colors, markings, and other characteristics of small objects (e.g. different dosage forms); and competently using instruments for monitoring drug response. Observation requires not only the functional use of the sense of vision, but other sensory modalities as well such as hearing and other somatic senses. For example, observation can be enhanced in some situations by the use of the sense of smell.

Communication

A pharmacy student should be able to speak, to hear and to observe patients and other health care professionals in order to elicit both verbal and non-verbal information, and must be able to communicate effectively with and about patients. Communication includes speech, reading, writing and computer literacy. The student must be able to perceive and respond appropriately to all types of communication including telephone communications (verbal, non-verbal, written) from faculty, staff, peers, patients, caregivers, family of patients, the public, and all members of the health care team. 

Specific requirements include but are not limited to the following abilities; reading, writing, speaking and comprehending English with sufficient mastery to accomplish didactic, clinical and laboratory curricular requirements in a timely, professional and accurate manner; eliciting a thorough medication and medical history; and communicating complex findings in appropriate terms that are understood by patients, caregivers, and members of the healthcare team. Each student must be able to read and record observations and care plans legibly, efficiently and accurately. Students must be able to prepare and communicate concise but complete summaries of individual activities, decisions and encounters with patients. Students must be able to complete forms or appropriately document activities according to directions in a complete and timely fashion. 

Motor

Pharmacy students must have sufficient motor function to carry out basic laboratory techniques and skills to accomplish basic pharmacy practice tasks utilizing both gross and fine motor skills. These include but are not limited to; compounding prescriptions, filling prescriptions, counting prescription medications, administering medications, preparing intravenous products, and administering intramuscular and subcutaneous injections. The student must be able to conduct a physical assessment of a patient by palpation, auscultation and other diagnostic maneuvers. Other motor activities include performing first aid and/or cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the clinical setting. 

The student must be able to transport him or herself to off-site settings and experiential locations in a timely manner. Students must be able to respond promptly to urgencies within the practice setting and must not hinder the ability of their co-workers to provide prompt care. Examples of such emergency treatment reasonably required of pharmacists include arriving quickly when called, rapidly and accurately preparing appropriate emergency medication, and the preparation of sterile intravenous medications. 

Students must be able to use computer-based information systems and have sufficient motor function and coordination required for manipulation of small and large objects. The student must have the ability to move and position another person in a manner that will facilitate physical assessment or other diagnostic lab testing. Lastly, students must exhibit the physical and mental stamina needed while standing or sitting for prolonged periods of time.

Intellectual

A student should possess sufficient intellectual, conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities to complete a rigorous and intense didactic and experiential curriculum. These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, decision-making, judgment, information integration, and solution synthesis. In addition, the student should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relations of structures. Especially important is the appropriate and rapid calculation of dosages for a variety of patient-specific conditions such as renal or hepatic failure, obesity, cardiac or respiratory arrest, etc. Additionally, calculations involving appropriate dilution or reconstitution of drug products, electrolytes, etc. must be made accurately and quickly. Students must be able to retain and recall critical information in an efficient and timely manner. Students must be able to identify and acknowledge the limits of their knowledge to others when appropriate and be able to recognize when the limits of their knowledge indicate further study or investigation before making a decision. Students must be able to interpret graphs or charts describing biologic, economic or outcome relationships. They must be able to learn through a variety of modalities including, but not limited to, classroom instruction, small group activities, individual study, preparation and presentation of reports, and use of computer technology. Students are expected to be fully alert and attentive at all times in classroom and clinical settings. 

Behavioral and Social

A pharmacy student must possess the physical and emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the care of patients, and the development of effective relationships with patients. Students must adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the academic and clinical environments with appropriate coping responses. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest, and motivation are qualities that are assessed during the admission and education process. The student must recognize and display respect for differences in culture, values, and ethics among patients, faculty, peers, clinical and administrative staff and colleagues. The student must be able to identify and demonstrate appropriate behavior to protect the safety and well being of patients, faculty, peers, clinical and administrative staff and colleagues. Lastly, the student should handle situations appropriately and professionally when those situations may be physically, emotionally, or intellectually stressful, including those situations that must be handled promptly and calmly. At times, this requires the ability to be aware of and appropriately react to one's own immediate emotional responses and environment.

When a letter of acceptance to the University of New England College of Pharmacy is mailed, a detailed copy of the Technical Standards for completion of the curriculum will be included. The applicant will be asked to respond in writing whether he/she can meet the standards with or without accommodation. An applicant should be able to evaluate him or herself for compliance with these Technical Standards. In the event that accommodation is requested, the student must submit documentation of disability with the proposed accommodation from a certified specialist to UNE's Student Access Center. A continuing student who develops a disability should request accommodations based on the limitations of the disability through the Student Access Center. Individuals unable to meet the above Technical Standards may be unable to progress and/or complete the Pharm.D. program. 

Students must be able to meet the Maine State Board of Pharmacy licensing requirements to obtain a valid Introductory (IPPE) and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) License. These licenses are required to complete off-campus experiential courses. Inability to obtain a Maine IPPE or APPE License may prevent completion of experiential courses and prevent a student from continuing in the program and completing the requirements for graduation. Students completing their experiential education in other states must meet the licensing requirements of that state. 

The College of Pharmacy's Admissions Committee will consider the applicant based on the criteria for admission of all applicants. An applicant who discloses a disability and requests accommodation in the admission process may be required to submit, in writing, the request for accommodation and pertinent supporting documentation. This pertinent information may include a history of accommodations granted previously in other educational programs. Requests for accommodation may be initiated with UNE's Student Access Center.

For more information on disabilities and accommodation, please contact the UNE Student Access Center.

Honors

 

Honors Designations

COP Graduation honors are awarded to candidates for the full-time Pharm.D. degree who have distinguished themselves by virtue of high academic achievement while enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy program at the University of New England College of Pharmacy. Grades from didactic and IPPE courses are included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point for a designation. Students who have been or are on academic probation at any time during the entire program will not be eligible for graduation with honors regardless of their GPA. Any student who receives a failing grade in didactic (D or F) or experiential (C- or below) courses will be excluded.

Grade Point Average Honor
> 3.8 Summa Cum Laude
3.7-3.79 Magna Cum Laude
3.6-3.69 Cum Laude

Course Load

A pharmacy student must be registered for at least 10 credits to be classified as full-time status. Being enrolled in less than 10 credits will result in part-time student status. Maintaining less than a 6- or 10-credit load may affect financial aid, scholarship receipt, or insurance verifications. It is the student's responsibility to monitor their own enrollment status

Academic Policy

Grading Policy

Upon completion of a course of study, the faculty member in charge of that course submits a grade for each student to the Registrar. The Doctor of Pharmacy program uses a standard letter grade format (A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D, and F).  Starting with the 2015-2016 academic year, the minimum passing grade for didactic courses is a C-. The minimum passing grade for IPPE and for APPE is a C. Any course that receives a grade less than minimum for passing will require remediation of the course, as dictated by the Student Progression Committee.

Incomplete Grade Policy

An incomplete grade (I) is given to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond their control, is not able to complete the work on time. The incomplete grade must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and usually does not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester. The incomplete grade defers computation of credits for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of a failing grade (F) for the course.

Course Add/Drop or Withdrawal Policy

Under special circumstances, students may withdraw from a Doctor of Pharmacy program core course without penalty up to 2/3s of the way through the semester if the student is passing the course based on accumulated grades to that point in the course. After that time, a student receives either a WP, for Withdraw Passing, or a WF, for Withdraw Failing, depending on accumulated grades to that point.  Students contemplating course or curriculum withdrawal should seek the advice of their advisor or the Associate Dean for Student Services.  

Repeat Course Policy

Courses in the Doctor of Pharmacy program are offered once per year. Any course that receives a grade less than the minimum for passing will be classified as 'failed' and will require repeat of the course as dictated by the Student Progress and Academic Policy Committees.

Upon completion of a repeated course, a new listing and assigned grade are placed on the student's transcript. The original course listing and grade remain on the student's transcript. All courses are listed chronologically on the transcript by semester or academic period in which they are enrolled.

Non- Matriculated Audit Course Policy*

Any non-matriculated student, with prior consent of the instructor, may enroll in a course for an audit grade ("AU"). This must be done at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor.   Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible (i.e., once enrolled for "AU" the grade becomes permanent on the person’s academic record). A person who wishes later to be graded for such a course must matriculate into the pharmacy program and then re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the person is expected to attend classes regularly but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count towards enrollment status (i.e., part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veterans benefits, etc. Audit courses carry zero credit.   

*This applies to non-matriculated students. Matriculated students may not audit a course.

Learning Outcomes

CURRICULAR PHILOSOPHY

The goal of the UNE COP curriculum is to create a student-centered learning experience that cultivates highly competent pharmacy practitioners.  The pharmacist of the twenty-first century will be prepared to deliver optimal patient-centered care in a collaborative, interprofessional enviroment.  Didactic and experiential learning experiences integrate foundational knowledge for optimizing patient care and therapeutic outcomes in health systems, community practice, and research settings.  Students will interact with health care professionals and students from other disciplines in order to function effectively as part of an interprofessional team.  The curriculum promotes the core values of UNE COP including professionalism, servant leadership, diversity, and lifelong learning.  To cultivate critical thinking as well as clinical reasoning, modes of instructional delivery include interactive lectures, laboratories, case studies, and group problem solving and discussion.

Upon completion of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum, students will achieve the following outcomes:

  1. Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient-centered care
  2. Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert
  3. Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems
  4. Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness
  5. Describe how population-based care influences patient centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence based best practices
  6. Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution
  7. Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding
  8. Assure that patients' best interests are represented
  9. Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs
  10. Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care
  11. Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group or organization
  12. Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth
  13. Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position
  14. Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals
  15. Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers and society
Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits may be awarded to students who transfer to UNE from another Doctor of Pharmacy program  
  • The Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Pharmacy, with input from program faculty, will review courses and award transfer credits on a case by case basis

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing is available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning
Admissions

COURSEWORK REQUIREMENTS

  • Science (labs required)
    • Cellular Biology (4 semester or 6 quarter credits)
    • Human Anatomy & Physiology (8 semester or 12 quarter credits) OR
      • Human Anatomy, 4 semester or 6 quarter credits AND
      • Physiology, 4 semester or 6 quarter credits (Animal and Exercise Physiology not acceptable)
    • General Chemistry I & II (8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
    • Organic Chemistry I & II (8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
  • Sciences (no lab required)
    • Physics I (3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits)
    • Microbiology (3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits)
  • Math (3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits)
    • College Calculus
    • Statistics for Life Sciences
  • Other (3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits)
    • English Composition
    • Social Science (Psychology/Sociology/Economics/Anthropology)
    • Public Speaking
    • Humanities/Liberal Arts
    • Social/Global Awareness
    • General Education (anything but a science or math course)
  • AP credit is accepted to fulfill prerequisite coursework
    • Must appear as transfer credit on the undergraduate transcript
    • Maximum of 10 Advanced Placement credits only
  • All math and science courses should be completed within five (5) years of anticipated enrollment into the Doctor of Pharmacy program
  • All candidates must complete a minimum of two (2) years of pre-professional coursework from a U.S. regionally accredited institution or international equivalent (total of 58 semester or 87 quarter credits) 
  • Successfully complete all prerequisite coursework with a grade of "C” or better ("C minus" grades are not acceptable)
  • Prerequisite coursework may be in progress or planned at the time of application, but must be completed by August 1 with official transcript including grade submitted to Office of Graduate Admissions by August 15, the year of enrollment into the PharmD program
    • Please include any in-progress or planned coursework in your PharmCAS application or it will be assumed that you are not planning to complete the course, thereby making you ineligible for admission
    • Transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the fall and/or spring term prior to the PharmD program start must be submitted to PharmCAS to be verified during the Fall and/or Spring academic update periods
    • Transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the summer term and not verified by PharmCAS must be submitted directly to UNE’s Office of Graduate Admissions as soon as they are available, and prior to enrollment

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Minimum overall GPA of 2.5, required (2.75 is preferred)
    • Calculated by PharmCAS, factoring all courses taken and grades earned from all colleges attended (no forgiveness for repeated coursework for better grade)
  • Minimum Math/Science prerequisite GPA of 2.5, required (2.75 preferred)
    • Calculated by UNE  using the best grade received (if there are retakes) for each math/science required course only, and using the PharmCAS universal computation scale for quality points
    • Non-math/science required coursework is not included in the prerequisite math/science GPA calculation
  • Maintain good academic and social standing through the completion of all requirements for enrollment
  • Successful completion of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) by the end of January of the year of matriculation into the PharmD program
    • Use PharmCAS code 104 to have scores reported directly to PharmCAS; do not have official scores sent to UNE Graduate Admissions 
    • Please Note: the PCAT requirement will be waived for any applicant with a 3.2 or higher cumulative GPA and a 3.2 or higher math/science prerequisite GPA, using the PharmCAS universal computation scale for scoring quality points​
  • Two (2) letters of reference are required as part of the application
    • One letter required from a science professor who can speak to your academic ability to be successful in a doctoral level graduate program
    • One letter recommended but not required from a Pharmacist with whom you have worked or observed
    • Letters of reference from family members and friends are not acceptable
  • Health care related experience is recommended
  • Only those applicants who meet minimum requirements will be considered for admission
    • Just meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee an interview or acceptance
    • Average GPAs for students accepted into the program are well above our published minimums

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admissions are accepted through the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) only
    • PharmCAS application portal opens annually in mid-July
    • Candidates are strongly encouraged to submit and complete applications as early as possible in the cycle
    • Please follow all application instructions carefully in order to meet deadlines to complete your application with all supporting documentation (i.e. official transcripts and PCAT scores, letters of reference, etc.)
    • Applications must be electronically submitted to PharmCAS by the posted deadline (on the UNE website, as well as in the PharmCAS directory)
  • On-campus interviews are required for admission and are by invitation only 
    • Admissions are rolling and decisions for admission are made after each interview session and continue until the program starts
    • Candidates on the waitlist are offered admission as seats become available
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees
    • Must have their international transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited U.S. institution  (International Admissions) 
    • Must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university
      • UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency (English Language Proficiency) 
      • If the applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required to be submitted as a part of the completed application (Use PharmCAS code 8246 to have TOEFL scores reported directly to PharmCAS)
  • Before or upon matriculation, accepted/deposited students will be expected to meet
    • All health immunization requirements (Student Health Care)
    • Obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status 
  • Before matriculation, accepted/deposited students will be subject to passing a criminal background check prior to matriculation as well as periodically throughout the program as required by clinical affiliation

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies are established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants to the university and its programs
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum and/or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits may be awarded to students who transfer to UNE from another Doctor of Pharmacy program  
  • The Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Pharmacy, with input from program faculty, will review courses and award transfer credits on a case by case basis

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing is available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning
Financial Information

 

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Books and Computers

Course syllabi and the program book list include recommended books which students are not required to purchase, but may wish to have as important reference materials. A substantial number of the required textbooks for courses are available to students through an online service that the college subscribes to.  A laptop computer is required for all students entering the Doctor of Pharmacy program.   At least one copy of all required textbooks will be available for use within the Portland Campus library.

Other Expenses

Students are responsible for expenses involved with travel, parking, living expenses and meals at clinical sites.

Housing

For information about on-campus and off-campus housing visit the Housing and Residence Life web pages.

Student Health Care

UNE has Student Health Care Centers on both the Biddeford Campus and the Portland Campus. For more information visit the Student Health Care website.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid Office website.

Please call: 1-800-477-4UNE or 207-221-4500 for further information. Applications are available online from PharmCAS (Pharmacy College Application Service)  www.pharmcas.org.

Doctor of Pharmacy

College of Pharmacy

Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions

Mission

The University is committed to ensuring the success of all online students. The mission of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies reads, "CGPS educates and supports future leaders in industry and service via programs designed to catalyze meaningful career development."

Program Description

The Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions (SPHP) program is for students who have completed a baccalaureate degree and wish to enter a health professions program, but lack the necessary prerequisite courses. Most students enrolled in these courses will be working professionals. Students may enroll in SPHP courses at any time and from anywhere in the world.  The courses are designed to be completed in 16 weeks, but they are self-paced, so students may complete the courses at an accelerated pace in order to meet their personal academic needs.

All of the courses are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Many health professions programs accept these courses, but we encourage you to check with specific schools to verify that the courses are transferrable before you apply and/or register.

For more information on the courses offered within the SPHP program, including prerequisites, registration information, and a description of laboratory components, please call 855-325-0894 or e-mail prehealth@une.edu.

Course Options
Courses Credits
MEDT 1000 - Medical Terminology 3
MATH 1005 - Statistics  4
PHYS 1010 - Physics I 4
PHYS 1011 - Physics II 4
CHEM 1010 - Medical General Chemistry I/Lecture 3
CHEM 1010L - Medical General Chemistry I/Lab 1
CHEM 1011 - Medical General Chemistry II/Lecture 3
CHEM 1011L - Medical General Chemistry II/Lab 1
CHEM 1020 - Medical Organic Chemistry I/Lecture 3
CHEM 1020L - Medical Organic Chemistry I/Lab 1
CHEM 1021 - Medical Organic Chemistry II/Lecture 3
CHEM 1021L - Medical Organic Chemistry II/Lab 1
BIOL 1010 - Medical Biology I w/Lab 4
BIOL 1011 - Medical Biology II w/Lab 4
CHEM 1005 - Medical Biochemistry 4
PHSL 1010 - Medical Physiology 4
BIOL 1020 - Microbiology for Health Professions/Lecture 3
BIOL 1020L- Microbiology for Health Professions Lecture & Lab 4
ANAT 1005 - Medical Anatomy for the Health Professions 4

BIOL 1030 - Pathophysiology for Health Professions

4
BIOL 1040 - Genetics 4
NTRN 1010 - Principles of Human Nutrition 3
Academic Policy

Course Length:

 1. Courses in the SPHP program are equivalent to one-semester courses, designed to be completed in 16 weeks.

2. Enrollment in the course begins the day your section opens, which is listed in the Academic Calendar found on the SPHP Webpage.

Upon completion of a course, the course instructor submits a grade for each student.   The instructor will notify students once their final grade has been calculated.

Technology requirements may differ by course. Please email prehealth@une.edu regarding technology requirements for a specific course.

Students take proctored exams online using Proctor U.  For instructions on taking online exams, please visit ProctorU.

Withdrawal from the Course and Refunds

To withdraw from a course, please use go to http://www.une.edu/registrar/registration/registration-forms and complete the withdrawal form under "Science Prerequisite Course Forms."  All correspondence with the UNE Registrar's office must be from your UNE email address. Please complete all sections of the withdrawal form, including your PRN, the CRN, course subject and number (Example: ANAT 1005). This action will result in a W grade for the course.  For withdrawal deadlines, please refer to the academic calendar.

Refund POLICY

To learn about the refund policy, please refer to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies' Student Handbook

Admissions

Students may enter the program at any time, as long as they meet the prerequisites for the individual courses.  They may take as many courses as needed to meet the prerequisite requirements for the health professions program to which they are applying, but they are encouraged to limit enrollment to a maximum of two courses simultaneously.  For students wishing to take more than two courses at a time, please email an Enrollment Counselor at prehealth@une.edu or call 855-325-0894. 

Financial Information

We do not accept any type of financial aid or payment plan at this time, with the exception of military assistance.  Students are expected to make payment in full at the time of checkout. 

Call 855-325-0894 or E-mail prehealth@une.edu.
 

Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions

College of Graduate and Professional Studies

Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions

Student Enrollment Status

Student Enrollment Status

The University of New England classifies student credit load status for the purposes of financial aid loan deferments.  The following table applies credit hour enrollment to full time, 3/4 time, and half time status.

PROGRAM

CLASSIFICATION

CREDITS       

Graduate/ First Professional / Doctoral Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0 or more

3.0 - 5.9

College of Osteopathic Medicine

Full Time Only

Full Time only

College of Pharmacy

Full Time

3/4 Time

Half Time

10.0 or more

7.0 -9.9

6.0 or less