Graduate Catalog

Graduate Catalog

International Student Admissions

International Student Admissions

The University of New England (UNE) welcomes applications from students from around the world.

UNE is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and has been approved by the Department of Homeland Security to enroll international students and issue student and/or exchange visitor visa-qualifying documents (I-20/DS-2019). We comply with all regulations of the U.S. Government pertaining to the enrollment and tracking of international students under the SEVIS Program.

At UNE, an international student is someone who is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. (holder of a “Green Card”). Prospective international students must meet the same admissions criteria required of all other applicants.

Note:  Applicants to online programs are not eligible for a student visa.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR:

An international applicant (not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who will require a visa to study in the U.S.)

OR

An applicant with international degrees or coursework (a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who has been educated outside of the U.S. and will not require a visa to study in the U.S.)

  • General admissions criteria for the University and its academic programs can be found by accessing the undergraduate or graduate admissions catalogs or the individual program or major.
  • In addition to the general University admissions criteria, and program specific criteria, international students must also meet the following:

    English Language Proficiency
    • International applicants must be able to understand and communicate in English to gain full admission to the University of New England. If English is not your native language, you will need to submit documentation that indicates your level of English proficiency.
    • UNE accepts several methods of English proficiency including the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), as well as others. Students may meet the minimum standards for English proficiency at UNE by demonstrating one of the following:
TEST SCORE
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) 550 (paper-based)
213 (computer-based)
79 (internet-based)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Overall Band 6.0 or higher
IB (International Baccalaureate) Grade 5 or higher
SAT (Critical Reading and Writing Sections) 500 or higher
GRE (Analytical Writing Section) 4.0 or higher
AP English Language and Composition Exams Score of 3 or higher with college transfer credit received
One year of English composition, taken at a U.S. institution, which counts as transfer credit at UNE (not ESL)    Grade of "C" or higher

 

Additional Methods:

  • Students who have attended a regionally accredited U.S. high school or U.S. Department of Defense school overseas for at least three years, or have received an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s degree or doctorate from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university may meet English proficiency requirements.
  • UNE may waive the English proficiency requirement for students who graduated from a regionally accredited school in other English-speaking countries. Please contact the Office of Admissions for more information. 
  • Passing scores on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) with the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) Certification (with submission of photocopy of ECFMG certification to UNE Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions).

VERIFICATION OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Federal law requires that we document how you will finance your education in the U.S., prior to issuing the appropriate student visa application form. In addition to the application for admission to your program of interest, all international applicants must: 

  • Upon acceptance, complete the International Student Supplemental Application Form.
  • Submit a Bank Statement indicating that the applicant has sufficient funds in U.S. dollars to cover the annual cost of attendance for undergraduate or graduate enrollment at UNE. Bank statement must be on letterhead and be officially certified or notarized to be considered acceptable documentation.

INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS

  • English Translation of Transcript
  • Official transcripts from ALL schools attended must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions as a part of the application process.
  • All official scholastic records submitted in support of your application must be in English or include English translations.
  • English translations should be literal (word-for-word, not interpretive) translations.
  • For specific procedures and admission criteria for each of our academic programs, please check the program website.
  • Evaluation of Transcripts
  • UNE requires all international applicants and all U.S. students with international degrees or coursework to have international transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution within the U.S. (Any exceptions to this policy will be noted in specific program admissions requirements.)
  • UNE will accept transcript evaluations from World Education Services (WES) only. Evaluations must be for grade and degree equivalency. Please order the WES ICAP service to ensure that copies of your transcripts will be included with the evaluation report.
  • International medical school graduates only: If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. you must have the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) submit review and verification of the equivalency of your medical degree to that of one earned at a regionally accredited U.S. medical school. The ECFMG review and verification of the student’s International Medical Degree will be accepted as an official evaluation of the degree.
  • Official transcripts from Canadian Medical Schools that are approved by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) do not require external evaluation. There is joint accreditation between LCME and Canada adding 17 more schools to the LCME list. Any school on this LCME list can be considered as offering a valid Doctor of Medicine (MD). 


Please note: official transcripts from ALL schools that the student has attended, U.S. or International, must be submitted to the Office Admissions as a part of the application process. Concerns regarding your ability to provide official transcripts should be directed to your admissions counselor.

Seek Assistance in Your Home Country
For further assistance with securing official documents and information from your country, please contact your local U.S. Embassy/U.S. Consulate/Office of Public Affairs for referral to an overseas educational advising center near you, or consult the list available on the U.S. State Department website.

Financial Information for Grad Programs

Financial Information for Grad Programs

Graduate Tuition and Fee Rates (2013-2014 fees are subject to change)

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $40
Tuition (per credit hour)   $510

Doctorate in Education

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $40
Tuition (per credit hour)   $800

Master of Science:  Biological Sciences & Marine Sciences

Application Fee  (non-refundable)   $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $300
Tuition (Academic year)   $31,130

Master of Science in Education - On-line Instruction

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $40
Tuition (per credit hour)   $510

Medical Education Leadership

Application Fee (semester, M.S. program)
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)
  $25
$40

 

Tuition (per credit hour)   $710

Nurse Anesthesia (Master of Science)

Application Fee (non-refundable)   $40
General Services Fee (semester, nonrefundable)   $200
Tuition (per credit hour)   $1,230
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable)   $100
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $338

Occupational Therapy Master of Science

Application Fee  (non-refundable)   $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $200
Tuition    $33,130
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $114
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable)   $85

Physician Assistant (Master of Science)

  Application Fee  (non-refundable)    $40
  General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $200
  Tuition (Academic year)   $39,820
  Program Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $1,053
  Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, first and second years, non-refundable)   $340

Physical Therapy (Doctor of Physical Therapy)

General Services Fee Yr. 1 (semester, non-refundable)   $300
General Services Fee Yrs. 2-3 (semester, non-refundable)   $200
Tuition (Fall and Spring combined)   $30,930
Tuition (Summer)   $8,000
Malpractice Insurance Fee (non-refundable)   $85

Physical Therapy - (Post Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy)

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $40
Tuition (per credit hour)   $760

Public Health (Master of Public Health or Graduate Certificate)

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)   $40
Tuition (per credit hour)   $635
Registration Fee (nonmatriculated students per semester)   $25

Social Work (Master of Social Work)

Application Fee (on-campus, non-refundable)   $40
General Services Fee (on-campus, semester, non-refundable)   $300

General Services Fee (online, semester, non-refundable)

  $40
Tuition (per credit hour)   $830
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable)    $45
     

Teacher Certification Program (TCP)

   
     
Application Fee (non-refundable)    $100
General Services Fee (one time, non-refundable)   $125
Tuition (per credit hour)   $595

Explanation of Fees

Student Malpractice Insurance

A group insurance policy is purchased and provided by the University of New England for those students involved in clinical training rotations in the amount of $1,000,000/$3,000,000.

General Services Fee

This mandatory fee is billed to graduate students and provides the following services.

  1. Graduation activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  2. Student Senate (Government) activities including support for clubs, programs, cultural events, etc.
  3. Orientation activities.
  4. Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  5. Finley Center gymnasium.
  6. Athletic events including intramural programs and all intercollegiate home games.
  7. Transcripts available at no charge.

Health Insurance

Graduate students are required to enroll in UNE's Student Medical Insurance Plan unless proof of comparable insurance can be demonstrated. Please refer to the health insurance brochure for additional information.

Program Fees

Program Fees Fees are charged to students who enroll in various programs. 

Late Registration Fee

Students who register after the published deadline will be required to pay a $75 late registration fee.

Parking Fee

Students, Faculty and Staff wishing to park a vehicle on campus must purchase a parking permit fromwww.thepermitstore.com  Enter your destination as University of New England.  Permit prices vary.  A  Resident Permit is $300.00 and a Commuter Permit are $90.00.  Failure to register a vehicle will result in a fine and having your vehicle towed from campus.

Payment Options

Students may pay the college charges as they fall due each semester or in accordance with UNE's Monthly Payment Plan offered through Tuitionpay. They may also arrange to pay the total due by using a mixture of these payment arrangements.

The payment dates in the UNE sponsored payment plans cannot be deferred for the convenience of students using student loans, or other tuition payment programs. Both long and short-term financial arrangements should be made far enough in advance to assure payment on the required dates. Special problems or emergency situations can be discussed with the Student Financial Services Center at any time.

Option I: Payment by Semester

Approximately six weeks prior to the start of a semester, bills will be sent for the tuition, room and board, and fees. Payment of this bill is due by the start of the semester. The payment due is the total of all the semester charges less any previous payments or financial aid credits.

Option II: Monthly Payment Plans

The Ten-Pay Payment Plan spreads the full year charges over ten months beginning June 1st. This plan is offered through Tuitionpay and is designed to relieve the pressure of “lump sum” payments by spreading the cost over 10 months. There is an application fee. There are no interest charges.

In addition to these options for payment, UNE accepts Mastercard, VISA, and Discover.

Applicants are urged to apply by May 15th. Applications made after the start of the program (June 1st) must be accompanied by an initial payment sufficient to become current with the regular 10-month payment schedule. Applications for the 10-month plan will not be accepted after September 15th.

Late Payment Charge

The balance due each semester will be considered overdue if not paid by the specified date, and any unpaid balance will be subject to a late charge of 12% per annum or 1% per month. Students with unpaid bills will not be able to register for courses or be placed on the official school roster nor can they attend classes until they have received clearance from the Student Financial Services Center.  Students with overdue accounts are not eligible for academic credit, transcripts, or degrees.

Course Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy

Course changes for matriculated students are allowed during the add/drop period during the fall and spring semesters.  After the add/drop period, no refunds are made for course withdrawals.

University Withdrawal

Matriculated students who intend to withdraw from the University must complete official forms available from the program director, Student Affairs Office or Registration Services on either campus. Documentation must be signed by the appropriate academic dean. Student responsibilities include: a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in this catalog; b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; c) return of any University keys to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

For purposes of computing refunds, the date of withdrawal recorded by the academic dean's office upon receipt of the withdrawal notice from the student, shall be considered official and will be used to compute refunds, if any, due to the student.

Tuition refunds for matriculated students leaving the University during a semester will be made as follows: 
  Fall\Spring\Summer Refunds 
  During first two weeks 80%
  During third week  60%
  During fourth week  40%
  Over four weeks  No refunds
     
  Short-Term and Online (except MD and WI) Courses (3-10 weeks) 

 Before second class 100% 
  During first week  40%
  During second week  20%
  Over two weeks No refunds 

Loan/Grant/Scholarship Adjustments

Adjustments to scholarships, grants and loan programs will be made in accordance with respective program regulations and University policy before a refund to the student is calculated. In cases where a refund may be due and the student has received funds through the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, it is our policy to refund those funds directly to the bank which made the loan. Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, dismissal or suspension.

Other Fees

After registration there shall be no refund of fees.

Important Notes

  1. Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  2. The Board of Trustees, however, reserves the right to make changes in tuition and fees at any time.
  3. For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies. People's United Bank, which is our preferred bank, provides a full-service ATM machine located in the Campus Center and in the Alfond Forum on the Biddeford Campus, and in the breezeway between Proctor and Hersey Halls on the Portland College Campus.  For those students who have People's United Bank checking accounts, ATM transactions are free of charge. Checks may also be cashed daily ($75 maximum) at the Student Accounts Office on the Biddeford Campus. 
  4. The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. The sign-up form is available on the Web. 
  5. The University will not be responsible for the loss of property on or off campus although it strives to safeguard students' property on campus.
  6. Students are expected to pay for textbooks at the beginning of the semester. Books, supplies and other items available at the University Bookstore may be paid for with cash, check, Master Card, VISA, and Discover.
  7. A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester.

Student Enrollment Status

Student Enrollment Status

The University of New England classifies student credit load status for the purposes of financial aid loan deferments.  The following table applies credit hour enrollment to full time, 3/4 time, and half time status.

Program

Classification

Credits       

Undergraduate

Full Time

3/4 Time

Half Time 

Less than Half Time

12.0 or more

9.0 - 11.9

6.0 - 8.9

1.0 - 5.9

Graduate/ First Professional / Doctoral Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0 or more

3.0 - 5.9

Graduate  Level Certification Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0

3.0

EDD & GMAR/GBIO (Thesis Course Only) Full Time 1.0 or more

Master of Science Nurse Anesthesia

Full Time Only

Full Time Only

College of Osteopathic Medicine

Full Time Only

Full Time only

College of Pharmacy

Full Time

Half Time

Less Than Half Time

 

10.0 or more

6.0 -9.9

1.0 - 5.9

 

Advanced Educational Leadership

Certificate Description

Overview

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in Advanced Educational Leadership is a post-master's program of study leading to an educational administrative credential and has been designed to offer high-quality, cost-effective, and innovative curricula delivered through an online, Internet format. This program requires completion of ten post-master's courses (30 credits). Emphasis is on developing the knowledge and skills needed by school administrators and other educators who wish to assume significant leadership roles in their schools, educational institutions, and communities. The program meets the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

·         A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.

·         Have a minimum of three years' teaching experience in an accredited public or private school.

·         Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.

·         Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web.

·          Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection, with the hardware and software requirements described on the CAGS website

Additional prerequisites to participate in the Educational Leadership Program include:

·         A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.

·         The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.

·         The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.

·         Ability to be a positive change agent, maintaining professional ethics and supportive management strategies.

·         Experience in a leadership capacity (i.e. team leader, committee chair, department leader, subject-matter coordinator or other relevant leadership role in an educational setting).

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Applications are reviewed by the Program Admissions Committee using the following criteria for evaluating your personal goal statement and letters of recommendation:
    • Indications of leadership potential
    • Indications of a desire for professional improvement and growth
    • Writing conveys excitement of learning and leading
    • Evidence of compatibility with the distance-learning format
    • Writing is organized, cohesive, and cogent
    • Evidence that the applicant is willing to apply new ideas and techniques
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application
  • Re-admission
    • Students who have withdrawn from the CAGS program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply
    • Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the CAGS program.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the CAGS website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line CAGS programs since the programs have been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Policy exceptions

The Certificate for Advanced Graduate Studies program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

MINIMAL GRADE STANDARD AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Advanced Educational Leadership curriculum consists of nine 3-credit online courses and a 3-credit internship within your local area. Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 30 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Advanced Educational Leadership curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

UNE's CAGS program requirements are: 

  Credits

EDU 701-Educational Leadership

3
EDU 702-School Law 3
EDU 703-Educational Changes/School Reform 3
EDU 704-Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel 3
EDU 705-Leadership, Professional Responsibilities, and Ethics 3
EDU 706-School Community Relations and Communications 3
EDU 707-Instructional Leadership 3
EDU 709-School Finance 3
EDU 715-Organizational Theory and Strategic Planning 3
EDU 791-Internship I 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Advanced Educational Leadership, you must:

  • Complete 30 credits which is composed of eight 3-credit on-line courses, a 3-credit summer seminar at the University of New England campus, and a 3-credit internship within your local area.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees when due.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D. (Chair)

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS), Advanced Educational Leadership

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Biological Sciences

Mission

The mission of the Department of Biology at University of New England is to enable students to understand the real-world relevance of the biological sciences, foster scientific literacy and critical thinking skills, and lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society. 

The mission of the Master of Science:  Biological Sciences program is to prepare outstanding graduate students for careers or further training in science, technology, and education by providing an advanced knowledge base and a working knowledge of research methods in the biological sciences. 

Major Description

The Master of Science: Biological Sciences program offers post-baccalaureate training to students interested in a wide variety of biological topics.  The classroom curriculum features a broad-based  exposure to advanced topics in biological subjects that may include physiology, ecology, molecular biology and microbiology. The program also focuses on the research experience: students will conduct research and prepare a thesis on any of a variety of topics selected in consultation with our faculty.

Program Goals
  • Provide a knowledge base in the biological sciences that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  • Foster participation in the production of biological knowledge through excellence in research.
  • Instill outstanding research skills and a working knowledge of the scientific method by participation in high-quality research.
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through writing and oral presentations.
Admissions

Prerequisite Courses

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS

Quarter hrs

Biology

Labs

16

24

General Chemistry

Labs

12

18

Physics

Labs

8

12

Calculus

 

4

6

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Graduation from a regionally accredited baccalaureate or higher degree program.  (If the Bachelor’s degree is in progress at the time of application, it must be completed prior to enrollment
  • All science prerequisites must include a lab component and must be completed  prior to enrollment into the program, preferably before application
  • All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C-“grades are not acceptable).
  • Minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.0
  • Successfully complete the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) test with competitive score
  • Submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions to complete application file
  • Prior to or during the admissions process, students are advised to communicate with faculty with whom they want to work.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admissions are accepted through the University of New England’s online application.  Detailed instructions are included in the online application portal.
  • Applications must be submitted electronically by the posted deadline. 
  • All completed applications will be reviewed after the application deadline by the program admissions committee.  Applications received after the deadline will be reviewed on a space available basis
  • Decision letters will be mailed and sent as email attachment at the beginning of March each year.
  • Accepted students will be expected to pay a minimal non-refundable deposit to secure the seat for the program by the deadline indicated in the decision letter.  The deposit is non-refundable and will be applied to any fees that are not covered by the assistantship or grant that the student receives upon acceptance. (Deposit is non-refundable and will be forfeited should student decide not to matriculate into the program.)
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions for a list of educational credential evaluators. 
  • International Applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university and not before then.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, (see International Admissions.)
  • If applicable, the TOEFL requirement must be completed and score received by the application deadline.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Biological Sciences website.

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Biological Sciences program and the Biological Sciences Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits at UNE therefore transfer of credit is not accepted.

Advanced Placement

There is no advanced placement.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain in the MS: Biological Sciences program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0.  A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the graduation requirements.  After two academic years (fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their theses are required to enroll in a minimum of three Thesis credit hours per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/Dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-.  Any student who fails to meet these criteria will be considered for dismissal by the  the Department of Biological Sciences and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Curricular Requirements
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 503 - Research Methods 3
BIO 510 - Graduate Seminar 1
BIO 500-Level Graduate Topics in Biological Sciences 12+
BIO 500-Level Additional Electives 6
BIO 590 - Thesis/Research 12 Min
Minimum Total Credits 36
BIO 595 - Thesis Writing/Data Analysis (taken after 36 credits completed) 1
BIO 599 - Masters Thesis 0
Learning Outcomes

Program Goals

  1. Provide a knowledge base in the biological sciences that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  2. Foster participation in the production of biological knowledge through high quality research.
  3. Instill outstanding research skills and a working knowledge of the scientific method by participation in high-quality research.
  4. Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate expertise in their thesis research field
  2. Students will develop their written and oral communication skills
  3. Students will have mastery of the core knowledge and fundamental principals of the Biological Sciences
  4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of research design and have the ability to carry out a research project
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal

In normal length semesters, a matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average. 

Incomplete Grades

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term may apply for an extension by discussion with the instructor. At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed six weeks following the end date of the course. This agreement must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (such as death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be made in writing, reviewed and signed by the instructor and the student’s advisor.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Continued Enrollment

After two academic years, a student who has completed all coursework except his/her thesis will be required to pay for a minimum of three Thesis credit hours plus mandatory fees each semester to remain in the program. 

Other Expenses

Housing is arranged by and financed at the expense of the student.  Currently there is no on-campus housing available for graduate students.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or by visiting the Financial Aid website. Information on tuition remission, Research Assistantships and Teaching Assistantships can be found on the Department of Biology graduate programs website.

Kathryn A. Ono
Chair, Graduate Program Committee
Department of Marine Sciences
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, ME 04005
(207)602- 2814
kono@une.edu

Master of Science (M.S.), Biological Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Biology

Curriculum & Instructional Strategies

Certificate Description

The Curriculum & Instruction Strategies Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study is a 15-credit online program for professional K-12 educators who would like to develop better curriculum, become better leaders, and advance their inclusion teaching methods.

The Curriculum & Instruction Strategies online certificate program begins by addressing leadership and showing teachers how to instill motivation and creativity it their fellow teaching staff. Students will learn current models for curriculum design to insure that materials meet appropriate content and learning goals.

Participants will learn how to address the diverse needs, abilities and experiences of their students. This includes teaching and learning methods for special education students as well as strategy and learning standards. Technology will be examined to determine its effectiveness in reaching special needs students, as well as a wide range of assisting technologies and strategies.

Other topics of study include: study skills, connecting reading and writing, instructional strategy, ESL students, students with disabilities, literacy development, and more.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

·         A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.

·         Have a minimum of three years' teaching experience in an accredited public or private school.

·         Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.

·         Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web.

·          Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection, with the hardware and software requirements described on the CAGS website

Additional prerequisites to participate in the Educational Leadership Program include:

·         A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.

·         The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.

·         The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.

·         Ability to be a positive change agent, maintaining professional ethics and supportive management strategies.

·         Experience in a leadership capacity (i.e. team leader, committee chair, department leader, subject-matter coordinator or other relevant leadership role in an educational setting).

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Applications are reviewed by the Program Admissions Committee using the following criteria for evaluating your personal goal statement and letters of recommendation:
    • Indications of leadership potential
    • Indications of a desire for professional improvement and growth
    • Writing conveys excitement of learning and leading
    • Evidence of compatibility with the distance-learning format
    • Writing is organized, cohesive, and cogent
    • Evidence that the applicant is willing to apply new ideas and techniques
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application
  • Re-admission
    • Students who have withdrawn from the CAGS program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply
    • Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the CAGS program.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the CAGS website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line CAGS programs since the programs have been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Policy exceptions

The Certificate for Advanced Graduate Studies program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

·         FINANCIAL AID

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Curriculum and Instructional Strategies curriculum consists of five 3-credit online courses. Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 15 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Curriculum and Instruction Strategies curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

CAGS Curriculum & Instruction Strategies Program Required Courses Credits
EDU 707 - Instructional Leadership 3
EDU 721 - Using Technology within Inclusion Education 3
EDU 723 - Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 742 - Study Skills and Content Literacy Instruction for All 3
EDU 743 - Connecting Reading with Writing for Success 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings 
Academic Policy

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography. If you are unfamiliar with what constitutes plagiarism, please do an online search to acquaint yourself with all of the components of plagiarism. You may also check the Georgetown University Honor Council for a plagiarism description.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of F' being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the CAGS program and the university.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Curriculum and Instruction Strategies, you must:

  • Complete 15 credits which is composed of five 3-credit on-line courses.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees when due.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dr. William C. Diehl
wdiehl@une.edu

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) Curriculum & Instruction Strategies

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Education (Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership)

Mission

The mission of the Department of Education is to develop - through research, service, and innovative teaching - reflective practitioners and leaders who are competent and caring lifelong learners.

Four guiding principles are used in development and implementation of our courses and programs.  Our courses foster rigorous minds, compassionate hearts, reflective stances and competent demonstration.

Degree Description

The Online Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership, with a focus on Transformative Leadership, admits cohorts on a semi-annual basis.

This program provides current and aspiring administrative and instructional leaders in diverse settings (e.g., education, health, non-profits, NGOs, public and private organizations and agencies, etc.) with the attitudes, knowledge, experience, and skills needed to transform their organizations through the effective use of human and technological resources.

This is a three-year program requiring completion of 13 required 8 week, 3 credit courses and a 12 credit dissertation representing a total of 51 credits (a maximum of 6 credits can be transferred from another post Masters program). The program (including dissertation) will be completed entirely online with no residency requirement.

Admissions

Requirements for the Doctor of Education program include but are not limited to:

  • The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.
  • Regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies. (If you are not currently employed, you must have an organizational setting where you can try out the transformational leadership ideas we will discover and discuss.)
  • The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.
  • Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web and effectively participate in an on-line program.

Academic requirements to include but not limited to:
Completion of a Master of Science or Arts degree from a regionally accredited institution

 

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are submitted through UNE’s online application only.  Cohorts are currently admitted in the Fall and Spring terms.
  • Submission of the following to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME, 04103: 
     
    • A current resume or curricula vita
    • An application essay with a maximum of 1200 words, following APA format demonstrating academic writing, including references to peer reviewed scholarly work, to include but not limited to the following:
      • Why you  value the study and practice of transformational leadership
      • Description of your leadership experiences
      • Lessons learned from your leadership experience, focusing on questions that are worthy of further investigation
      • Academic and professional background that supports your candidacy to pursue this unique program of study
      • Initial thoughts on the line of research and institutional context in which you wish to pursue or apply academic principles and concepts
  • Three (3) letters of recommendation which focus on personal, professional, and academic qualifications for completion of a doctoral level program
  • Official transcripts from ALL colleges and universities attended
  • Completion of a faculty interview, by invitation only, after application file has been reviewed by the department admissions committee
  • Interviews are granted to qualified applicants upon invitation by the EdD Program Admissions Committee only, and are required for admission to the program. (Interviews will be conducted via Skype or telephone.)
  • Applications received by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted after the deadlines will be reviewed on a space available basis only.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee as candidates are interviewed and will continue until the program starts or the class is full.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Doctor of Education website.

advanced standing

No credit will be awarded for advanced standing.

 

transfer credit

  • Up to 6 credits of graduate coursework may be transferred into the EdD program
  • Syllabus must provide clear evidence that the course is comparable to the EdD required course
  • Course may not have been completed as requirement for another degree program
     

experiential learning
No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Policy exceptions

The Doctor of Education program and the EdD Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

If approved, up to 6 credits of graduate coursework may be transferred into the Ed. D.  program. The syllabus of the course must provide clear evidence that the course is comparable to the Ed. D. required course.  Requests for approval of transfer should be submitted to the Doctoral Program Director. 

Grading

The criteria for all courses in the Ed. D. program are straightforward with consistent standards applied throughout the curriculum. In general, these include, but are not limited to:

All assignments are to be completed in a timely manner with appropriate accuracy, detail, thought and reflection fitting of doctoral-level degree candidates. All assignments (done in writing or with other media applications) are graded on the basis of faculty assessment of your ability to accurately apply concepts from readings, organization, and mechanics.

All academic work to be assessed and graded by faculty mentors is based on the following schema:

High Pass (HP):  Work that exceeds all or most of the criteria noted above, and which reflects exceptional command and display of all or most required elements. As a profession, we need to recognize those individuals whose academic work is truly exceptional.  To assure the high level of professionalism inherent in graduate level high education, the grade of "High Pass" is reserved for exceptionally strong academic performance. Only students who demonstrate consistently superior performance will be recognized with the "High Pass" grade.

Pass (P):  Work that meets all requirements and expectations as specified in assignments, and is fully satisfactory in every respect;  Academic work that meets the criteria defined by course rubrics or scoring guides may result in less than an "High Pass" (or its numerical equivalent on assignments).  Students who meet the minimal criteria of a rubric (but no more) are demonstrating a lower level of proficiency compared to those who do work that goes beyond the basic requirements in course assignments, writing, expression of ideas, and integrated information.

Low Pass (LP): Work that does not meet all requirements and expectations, and while satisfactory in certain respects, reflects marginal quality in other key elements.

Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress

Candidates may proceed to subsequent courses in the curriculum with one Low Pass grade or below.  A second Low Pass (or below) course grade may result in termination from the doctoral program. For those needing to report course completion status to employers, a Pass equates to a B or better.

Academic Appeals

The procedure for Academic Appeal is fully described in the UNE CAS Student Handbook located in the Student Life website.

Curricular Requirements
Courses Credits
EDU 801 - Preparation for Transformative Leadership 3
EDU 802 - Qualitative Research Methods 3
EDU 803 - Interpreting Empirical Data 3
EDU 804 - Technology and Educational Transformation 3
EDU 805 - Managing Change 3
EDU 806 - Policy Analysis 3
EDU 807 - Enacting Transformative Leadership 3
EDU 808 - Research Team Project A 3
EDU 809 - Research Team Project B 3
EDU 810 - Ethical Leadership 3
EDU 811 - Diagnosing Organizational Dynamics 3
EDU 812 - Dissertation Seminar 3
EDU 813 - The Politics of Change 3
EDU 814 - 817 - Dissertation 12
Learning Outcomes

Ed. D. Educational Leadership General Program Goals 

  • Prepare leaders who are future-focused and capable of fostering innovation and change
  • Promote a continuing cadre of educators who maintain active connections and collaboration with one another, with schools, communities and professional groups
  • Establish a higher education program that is technologically sophisticated, educationally effective and academically rigorous
  • Build a national reputation based upon transformative action research
  • Provide each candidate with a carefully selected faculty mentoring team contributing actively to the candidate’s progress with their program of study, their research, and their dissertation, beyond what is usually available with a single advisor 

Ed. D. Educational Leadership Learning Outcomes

  • Participate fully and responsibly in supportive and action based learning environments of authentic value for colleagues in K-12 education, community college, health, business,  and other sectors
  • Develop and utilize transformative institutional processes to foster, assess the results, and respond to the reported analysis for continued systemic change.   
  • Use technology for research collaboration and dissertation development among colleagues and faculty (e.g., web/videoconferencing)
  • Fully utilize an integrated curriculum that fuses discreet elements of each candidate’s program of study into a coherent whole
  • Fully utilize online search tools and databases to identify research studies and other relevant resources
  • Participate in virtual seminars and conferences building a professional learning community
  • Employ problem and case-based learning strategies extensively in courses and dissertation 
  • Write and successfully defend a field-based dissertation. 
Academic Policy

Timeline for Completion

A student who has not completed the Doctoral Program within five (5) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission.

Leave of Absence

Students may take one 8 week term leave of absence per academic year (3 terms) but must enroll for the subsequent term to remain on track for program completion. The course must be made up the next time it is offered. Students may take no more than two course-long leaves of absence within the five-year limit in the Doctoral Program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed prior to the beginning of the student's leave.  Any request for a leave of absence must be approved by the Doctoral Program Director.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Doctoral Program Director to indicate a change of plans. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in the respective Financial Information sections of the website.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Program Director and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a professional license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course online postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.  Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than three years old will not be accepted for credit in the program.  Older courses that have been revised or eliminated from the program offerings will not be accepted upon re-admission.

Students who have been administratively withdrawn from the program may petition for re-admission after a full semester has elapsed. The petition letter must provide a justification for re-admission that addresses how past issues have been resolved and will not re-occur. In addition, a letter of recommendation is required from the student's work supervisor that attests to their ability to successfully complete a graduate program. Both letters should be sent electronically to the UNE program director prior to applying for re-admission.

Academic Procedures

Procedure for reporting and review of alleged academic dishonesty in the College of Arts and Sciences.

A course instructor who believes a student has engaged in academic dishonesty shall 

  1. notify the student in writing of the suspicion of academic dishonesty,
  2. report the alleged incident to his or her program director,
  3. provide the program director with a written account of the incident, including all relevant documentation.
  4. program director notifies the department chair and the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) Dean’s Office

The instructor may include a recommendation for the appropriate sanction (the minimum sanction is a failure on the assignment in question).

The department chair shall confer with the CAS Dean's Office to determine if the student is a repeat offender, review the material provided by the instructor, and notify the accused student in writing or e-mail of the charge of academic dishonesty. The student must reply within 5 days of receiving the communication from the chair. The program director will then communicate in writing with the accused student to discuss the charge.

After reviewing the documentation and communicating with the student, the program director and department chair will provide:

  • all relevant documentation,
  • a description of his or her decision on the veracity of the charge and, if necessary,
  • a recommendation of an appropriate sanction to the CAS Dean's Office within 5 days of meeting with the student.

If the student does not reply to the program director’s request to discuss the charge, then the program director will proceed without input from the student within 10 days of receiving the material from the course instructor. 

If the program director and department chair conclude that the student has not committed an act of dishonesty, the department chair must

  • communicate in writing with the course instructor to determine an appropriate course of action,
  • forward the appropriate documentation to the CAS Dean’s Office, and
  • inform the student and course instructor of the program director’s decision.

If the program director and department chair conclude that the student has committed an act of dishonesty, the Associate Dean will review the relevant documentation, the program director’s and department chair’s conclusion, and the recommended sanction. If the Associate Dean disagrees with the conclusion and/or the recommended sanction, the Associate Dean will meet with the department chair to determine an appropriate course of action. The Associate Dean will then notify in writing the department chair, the faculty member, and the student of the Associate Dean’s final decision and the sanction, if appropriate, within 5 days of receiving the material from the department chair.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Michelle Collay
mcollay@une.edu

Doctor of Education with Concentration in Educational Leadership

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Educational Leadership

Certificate Description

The Educational Leadership Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study is a 15-credit online program for professional K-12 educators who are considering school administration. These courses are matched to the national standards set by the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) and provide entry-level knowledge and skills for beginning school administrators.

Teachers will be introduced to the theories and practices of effective leadership centering on the importance of team building, decision making, problem solving and strategic planning. Within these areas, focus is placed on supervision and evaluation of personnel, the legal milieu and analysis skills to interpret potential legal issues within the school, budget development and expenditure, and organizational theory especially as it relates to change. Specific state requirements for entry level into the assistant principal or principal level should be researched to ensure requirements for your locale will be met. Additional courses in Educational Leadership are available for further study.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with faculty, families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

·         A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.

·         Have a minimum of three years' teaching experience in an accredited public or private school.

·         Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.

·         Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web.

·          Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection, with the hardware and software requirements described on the CAGS website

Additional prerequisites to participate in the Educational Leadership Program include:

·         A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.

·         The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.

·         The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.

·         Ability to be a positive change agent, maintaining professional ethics and supportive management strategies.

·         Experience in a leadership capacity (i.e. team leader, committee chair, department leader, subject-matter coordinator or other relevant leadership role in an educational setting).

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Applications are reviewed by the Program Admissions Committee using the following criteria for evaluating your personal goal statement and letters of recommendation:
    • Indications of leadership potential
    • Indications of a desire for professional improvement and growth
    • Writing conveys excitement of learning and leading
    • Evidence of compatibility with the distance-learning format
    • Writing is organized, cohesive, and cogent
    • Evidence that the applicant is willing to apply new ideas and techniques
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application
  • Re-admission
    • Students who have withdrawn from the CAGS program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply
    • Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the CAGS program.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the CAGS website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line CAGS programs since the programs have been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Policy exceptions

The Certificate for Advanced Graduate Studies program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

·         FINANCIAL AID

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

MINIMAL GRADE STANDARD AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership curriculum consists of five 3-credit online courses.  Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 15 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

CAGS Educational Leadership Program Required Courses Credits
EDU 701 - Educational Leadership 3
EDU 702 - School Law 3
EDU 704 - Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel 3
EDU 709 - School Finance 3
EDU 715 - Organizational Theory and Strategic Planning 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership, you must:

  • Complete 15 credits which is composed of five 3-credit online courses.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees when due.
Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) Educational Leadership

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Inclusion Education

Certificate Description

The Inclusion Education Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study is a 15-credit online program for educators, both teachers and administrators, who wish to have more background in special education with respect to inclusion practices and concerns.

This unique concentration explores methods and strategies for teaching all students in inclusion settings with a special course on the range and use of assistive technologies. Furthermore, formal and informal procedures for assessing special needs students will be reviewed with a focus always on utilizing the results to inform and plan instruction. Finally, the ability to apply special education law to your setting and a practicum to integrate all your inclusive education learning concludes this concentration. This does not lead to a special education certification.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

·         A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.

·         Have a minimum of three years' teaching experience in an accredited public or private school.

·         Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.

·         Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web.

·          Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection, with the hardware and software requirements described on the CAGS website

Additional prerequisites to participate in the Educational Leadership Program include:

·         A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.

·         The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.

·         The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.

·         Ability to be a positive change agent, maintaining professional ethics and supportive management strategies.

·         Experience in a leadership capacity (i.e. team leader, committee chair, department leader, subject-matter coordinator or other relevant leadership role in an educational setting).

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Applications are reviewed by the Program Admissions Committee using the following criteria for evaluating your personal goal statement and letters of recommendation:
    • Indications of leadership potential
    • Indications of a desire for professional improvement and growth
    • Writing conveys excitement of learning and leading
    • Evidence of compatibility with the distance-learning format
    • Writing is organized, cohesive, and cogent
    • Evidence that the applicant is willing to apply new ideas and techniques
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application
  • Re-admission
    • Students who have withdrawn from the CAGS program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply
    • Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the CAGS program.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the CAGS website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line CAGS programs since the programs have been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Policy exceptions

The Certificate for Advanced Graduate Studies program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

·         FINANCIAL AID

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

MINIMAL GRADE STANDARD AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Inclusion Education curriculum consists of four 3-credit online courses and a 3-credit internship within your local area. Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 15 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Inclusion Education curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

Inclusion Education Program Required Courses Credits
EDU 720 - Special Education Law for the Classroom 3
EDU 721 - Using Technology within Inclusion Education 3
EDU 722 - Special Education Assessment in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 723 - Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 724 - Collaboration in Inclusion Settings 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership, you must:

  • Complete 15 credits composed of four 3-credit courses and a 3-credit internship within your local area.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition fees when due.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) Inclusion Education

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Leadership, Ethics, and Change

Certificate Description

The Leadership, Ethics & Change Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study is a 15-credit online program for professional educators who are pursuing school administrator positions. The certificate program includes one 15-week internship experience and one 8-week internship experience. Both internships are field-based experiences.

The Leadership, Ethics & Change certificate program focuses on providing a thorough foundation in educational leadership theory, principles, and practices. Participants address the current state of the educational system and progress into educational change, and school reform. The responsibilities and ethics involved with educational leadership are explored. The relationship between school, administrators, and the community is examined. Special focus is paid to the skills needed to instruct, inspire and lead fellow teachers and administrators. Team building, decision-making, and motivational techniques are also discussed. These skills are acquired through coursework and two separate field-based experiences.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with faculty, families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). 

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

·         A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.

·         Have a minimum of three years' teaching experience in an accredited public or private school.

·         Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.

·         Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web.

·          Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection, with the hardware and software requirements described on the CAGS website

Additional prerequisites to participate in the Educational Leadership Program include:

·         A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.

·         The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.

·         The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.

·         Ability to be a positive change agent, maintaining professional ethics and supportive management strategies.

·         Experience in a leadership capacity (i.e. team leader, committee chair, department leader, subject-matter coordinator or other relevant leadership role in an educational setting).

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Applications are reviewed by the Program Admissions Committee using the following criteria for evaluating your personal goal statement and letters of recommendation:
    • Indications of leadership potential
    • Indications of a desire for professional improvement and growth
    • Writing conveys excitement of learning and leading
    • Evidence of compatibility with the distance-learning format
    • Writing is organized, cohesive, and cogent
    • Evidence that the applicant is willing to apply new ideas and techniques
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application
  • Re-admission
    • Students who have withdrawn from the CAGS program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply
    • Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the CAGS program.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the CAGS website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line CAGS programs since the programs have been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Policy exceptions

The Certificate for Advanced Graduate Studies program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

·         FINANCIAL AID

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

MINIMAL GRADE STANDARD AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Leadership, Ethics & Change curriculum consists of four 3-credit online courses and a 3-credit internship within your local area. Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 15 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Leadership, Ethics & Change curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

Leadership, Ethics & Change Program Required Courses Credits
EDU 703 Educational Change/School Reform 3
EDU 705 Leadership, Professional Responsibilities & Ethics 3
EDU 706 School-Community Relations & Communications 3
EDU 707 Instructional Leadership 3
EDU 791 Internship I 3
EDU 792 Internship II (Elective course for students requiring an extended Internship) 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Leadership, Ethics and Change, you must:

  • Complete 15 credits which is composed of three 3-credit on-line courses and two field-based internships which include one 8-week field based internship and one 15-week field-based internship within your local area.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees when due.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D. (Chair)

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) Leadership, Ethics & Change

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Literacy (K-12)

Certificate Description

The Literacy (K-12) Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study is a 15-credit online program for K-12 educators who wish to delve deeper into the importance of reading and writing for all students to be successful.

Current research and theory are translated into practice with each and every class. Teachers will be coached to implement these literacy program strategies and join colleagues online to critique the outcome. Additionally, assessment in literacy will be linked to next steps in connecting data to teaching practice. Literacy interventions that can be used within the content area will be explored. In short, the basic premise of this concentration is that literacy skills are central for all students to succeed. This does not lead to reading specialist certification.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

·         A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.

·         Have a minimum of three years' teaching experience in an accredited public or private school.

·         Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.

·         Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web.

·          Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection, with the hardware and software requirements described on the CAGS website

Additional prerequisites to participate in the Educational Leadership Program include:

·         A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.

·         The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.

·         The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.

·         Ability to be a positive change agent, maintaining professional ethics and supportive management strategies.

·         Experience in a leadership capacity (i.e. team leader, committee chair, department leader, subject-matter coordinator or other relevant leadership role in an educational setting).

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Applications are reviewed by the Program Admissions Committee using the following criteria for evaluating your personal goal statement and letters of recommendation:
    • Indications of leadership potential
    • Indications of a desire for professional improvement and growth
    • Writing conveys excitement of learning and leading
    • Evidence of compatibility with the distance-learning format
    • Writing is organized, cohesive, and cogent
    • Evidence that the applicant is willing to apply new ideas and techniques
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application
  • Re-admission
    • Students who have withdrawn from the CAGS program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply
    • Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the CAGS program.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the CAGS website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line CAGS programs since the programs have been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Policy exceptions

The Certificate for Advanced Graduate Studies program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

·         FINANCIAL AID

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

MINIMAL GRADE STANDARD AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study Literacy (K - 12) curriculum consists of five 3-credit online courses. Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 15 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Literacy (K - 12) curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

Program Required Courses Credits
EDU 740 Supporting Literacy Development 3
EDU 741 Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools 3
EDU 742 Study Skills & Content Literacy Instruction 3
EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success 3
EDU 744 Meeting Student Literacy Challenges 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Literacy (K - 12), you must:

  • Complete 15 credits which is composed of five 3-credit on-line courses.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees when due.
Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

FINANCIAL AID

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) Literacy (K-12)

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Marine Sciences

Mission

The mission of the Department of Marine Sciences at University of New England is to enable students to understand the real-world relevance of the marine sciences, foster scientific literacy and critical thinking skills, and lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society.

The Marine Sciences encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, and how it is related to earth systems science, as well as to human interactions with the environment. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology, to chemistry, geology and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet, and beyond. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems, not only in ocean sciences, but in fields as far ranging as meteorology and space exploration

The mission of the Master of Science:  Marine Sciences program is to prepare outstanding graduate students for careers or further training in science, technology, and education by providing an advanced knowledge base and research skills in marine sciences.

Major Description

The Master of Science:  Marine Sciences program offers post-baccalaureate training to students interested in continuing their education in the marine sciences.  The classroom curriculum provides a strong background in all aspects of the marine sciences. The program also focuses on thesis research experience: students will conduct research and prepare a thesis on any of a variety of topics selected in consultation with our faculty.

Program Goals

  • Provide a knowledge base in the marine sciences that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  • Foster participation in the production of new knowledge through excellence in research.
  • Instill outstanding research skills and a working knowledge of the scientific method by participation in high-quality research.
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations.
Admissions

Prerequisite Courses
 

Marine Science Track

 

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS     

Quarter hrs

 

Biology

Labs

16

24

 

General Chemistry

Labs

12

18

 

Physics

Labs

8

12

 

Calculus

 

4

6

             

 

Oceanography Track

 

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS     

Quarter hrs

General Chemistry

Labs

8

12

Physics

Labs

8

12

Calculus

 

4

6

Additional credits in Mathematics,

Chemistry, Physics, Geology or

Biology

 

 

16

24

           

 

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Graduation from a regionally accredited baccalaureate or higher degree program.  (If the Bachelor’s degree is in progress at the time of application, it must be completed prior to enrollment.)
  • All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C-“grades are not acceptable)
  • All perquisites must be completed prior to enrollment.
  • Minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.0
  • Successfully complete the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) test with competitive scores
  • Submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions to complete application file
  • Prior to or during the admissions process, students are advised to communicate with faculty with whom they want to work.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

·         Applications for admissions are accepted through the University of New England’s online application.  Detailed instructions are included in the online application portal.

·         Applications must be submitted electronically by the posted deadline. 

·         All completed applications will be reviewed after the application deadline by the program admissions committee.  Applications received after the deadline will be reviewed on a space available basis

·         Decision letters will be mailed and sent as email attachment at the beginning of March each year.

·         Accepted students will be expected to pay a minimal non-refundable deposit to secure the seat for the program by the deadline indicated in the decision letter.  The deposit will be applied to any fees that are not covered by the assistantship or grant that the student receives upon acceptance. (Deposit is non-refundable and will be forfeited should student decide not to matriculate into the program.)

·         International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions for a list of educational credential evaluators. 

·         International Applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university and not before then.

·         All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, (see International Admissions.) 

·          If applicable, the TOEFL requirement must be completed and score received by the application deadline.

 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Marine Sciences website  

 

TRANSFER CREDIT

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits at UNE therefore transfer of credit is not accepted..

ADVANCED STANDING

There is no advanced placement.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Biological Sciences program and the Biological Sciences Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

   


QUarter HRS

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits at UNE, therefore, transfer of credit is not accepted.

Advanced Placement

There is no advanced placement.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain in the MS: Marine Sciences program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0.   A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the graduation requirements.  After two academic years (fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their theses are required to enroll in a thesis continuation credit per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/Dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-.  The Department of Marine Sciences and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences will consider for dismissal any student who fails to meet these criteria.

Curricular Requirements
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
MAR 503 - Research Methods 3
MAR 510 - Graduate Seminar 1
MAR 512 - Marine Science Center Seminar 1
MAR 566 - Advanced Oceanography I 3
MAR 568 - Advanced Oceanography II 3
Electives - Additional Coursework 9
MAR 590 - Research and Thesis 12 min
Total Credits Required 36
   
MAR 595 - Thesis Writing/Data Analysis (taken after 36 credits completed) 1
MAR 599 - Masters Thesis 0
Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will demonstrate expertise in their thesis research field
  2. Students will develop their written and oral communication skills
  3. Students will demonstrate mastery of the core knowledge and fundamental principles of the Marine Sciences
  4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of research design and have the ability to carry out a research project
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal

In normal length semesters, a matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

Incomplete Grades

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term may apply for an extension by discussion with the instructor.  At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed six weeks following the end date of the course. This agreement must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (such as death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be made in writing, reviewed and signed by the instructor and the student’s advisor.

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete all required courses with a minimum graduate GPA of 3.0 and successfully pursue, complete and defend publicly an approved research thesis.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Continued Enrollment

After two academic years, a student who has completed all coursework except his/her thesis will be required to pay for a thesis continuation credit plus mandatory fees each semester to remain in the program.

Other Expenses

Housing is arranged by and financed at the expense of the student.  Currently there is no on-campus housing available for graduate students.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342,  or by visiting the Financial Aid website. Information on Research Assistantships  and Teaching Assistantships can be found on the Department of Marine Sciences graduate programs website.

Dr. Kathryn Ono
Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee
Department of Marine Sciences
University of New England
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, ME 04005
(207) 602-2814
kono@une.edu
or
Dr. Barry Costa-Pierce, Chair
Department of Marine Sciences
University of New England
11 Hills Beach Rd.
Biddeford, ME 04005
bcostapierce@une.edu

Master of Science (M.S.), Marine Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Marine Sciences

Master of Science in Education - Career and Technical Education

Major Description

The Master of Science in Education in Career and Technical Education on-line program's 30 credits includes fifteen of which are a core curriculum taken by all master’s degree candidates; and fifteen that concentrate on Career and Technical Education. Courses are ordinarily scheduled in eight (8) week blocks. The core curriculum, involving five 3-credit classes, focuses on areas that are critical for any position that an educator holds.  The Career and Technical Education (CTE) concentration is designed for practicing CTE instructors who wish to enhance their CTE knowledge and skills. The focus of the program is on improving instructional and curricular competencies as well as the development of leadership skills.  Participants will develop the capability to make use of research findings relevant to the CTE classroom. The program provides an opportunity for CTE instructors to establish collaborative relationships with colleagues from across the nation and world.

Accreditation

The MSEd programs are approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

  • A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Minimum of one year teaching experience.
  • Employed as a teacher or ability to access a classroom on a regular basis over an extended period of time.
  • Strong writing skills, the capacity to succeed in a distance education format, and a commitment to educational change and professional development as evidenced by your goal statement submitted at the time of application.

UNE carefully assesses MSED applicants on the basis of evidence provided in all application materials submitted. Therefore, while a personal interview is not required, application materials submitted must be prepared thoroughly and thoughtfully for full consideration. Additional prerequisites to participate in one of the on-line Master of Science in Education programs include but may not be limited to:

  • A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.
  • The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.
  • Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.
  • The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.
  • Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web and effectively participate in an on-line program.
  • Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection and with the hardware and software requirements described on the MSED website. 
  • Motivation to complete all course assignments in a satisfactory and timely manner.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the MSED program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the MSED website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line MSED programs. Full participation in the MSED curriculum is necessary to achieve the desired integration of theory and practice the program provides.

 

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Education program and the MSED Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line MSEd program.  Full participation in the MSEd curriculum is necessary to achieve the desired integration or theory and practice the program provides.

Grading

Minimum Grade Standard and Academic Progress

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 (B or better) with no less than a “C” in any course. Failure to maintain a GPA of 3.0 will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade below a “C” in a course must repeat the course before continuing on in the program.  If a student receives an “F” in any course he/she will be immediately placed on academic probation. This student must register and pass the failed course with grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.  Unsuccessful completion (C- or below) of two courses will result in ineligibility to continue in the program.  If a student feels the grade is in error, the first step in the appeal process is to discuss the outcome with the course instructor.  If the issue is not resolved satisfactorily, the student should follow the grievance policy outlined in the program of study found on the website.

Curricular Requirements

Each online course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks so a student may enroll in 2 courses each semester, one in Term A and one in Term B. EDU 690 - Action Research and Case Study is a 15 week course.

Program Required Courses Credits
Core Courses  
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory and Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research and Case Study (15 weeks) 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
Concentration Courses  
EDU 751 - Application Model of Learning - Curriculum Development 3
EDU 753 - Working with Special Needs Students 3
EDU 755 - Utilizing Literacy Strategies in CTE Learning Environments 3
EDU 757 - Health and Safety Implementation for CTE 3
EDU 759 - Preparing Students for College, Careers and Citizenship 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing the MSE program, students should be able to: 

  1. address the full range of student motivation and differentiation issues encountered in today's school systems
  2. analyze and conduct research relevant to their teaching or administrative interests
  3. document professional development in the program via an electronic portfolio of course work
  4. demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about their chosen concentration area
  5. exhibit leadership in their classroom and/or school system
  6. develop online collaborative relationships with peers 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

 

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

 

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Master of Science in Education (MSED) in Career and Technical Education

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Master of Science in Education - Reading Specialist

Certificate Description

Success in today’s world depends on highly developed literacy skills where students need to be competent in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in order to be college and career ready. As a result of the high stakes of students’ literacy achievement, many school districts have looked to Reading Specialists/ Literacy Coaches to improve the literacy growth and success for all of their K-12 students. This program will prepare you to become certified as a Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach in a K-12 setting. The program will prepare you to take a leadership role in you school and districts to support fellow educators in their goal of improving students’ literacy growth.

The goals of the CAGS program are to prepare students to:

  • Administer schools in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Instill a sense of responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLC) to enable school educators to obtain administrative certification nationwide. The six ISLLC standards state that a school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by:
  1. Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
  2. Advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  3. Ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient and effective learning environment.
  4. Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Acting with integrity and in an ethical manner.
  6. Understanding, responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
Accreditation

The CAGS program is approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is not accepted by the CAGS program, since the program has been developed holistically to meet the six ISLLC standards.

Grading

MINIMAL GRADE STANDARD AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (“B”). Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade of “F” in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. A student receiving an “F” must register and pass the failed course with a grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.

Curricular Requirements

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study Reading Specialist curriculum consists of five 3-credit online courses. Each on-line course is ordinarily scheduled for 8 weeks, so a student has the ability to enroll in two courses each semester, one in term A and one in term B. A minimum of 15 credits must be taken to be awarded the certificate.

The University of New England's Reading Specialist curriculum is designed to apply as broadly as possible to requirements throughout the country, meeting basic ISLLC (Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium) standards. However, it is the responsibility of the candidate to confirm what course content is needed in the state in which certification is sought and to discuss with your advisor if alternative courses need to be accommodated.

Core courses

EDU 600:  Teacher as Leader

EDU 610: Differentiation Theory and Strategies

6 credits

Current Literacy Courses in Concentration

EDU 740: Supporting Development for All Learners

EDU 741: Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools

EDU 742: Content Area Literacy

EDU 743: Connecting Reading and Writing for Success

EDU 744: Meeting Student Literacy Challenges

15 credits-  Concentration courses

Literacy Courses for Specialist Degree

EDU 746: Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership

EDU 749: Reading Diagnosis: Clinical Practice I

EDU 747-: Literacy for English Language Learners

EDU 748: Literacy for Inclusion Settings

EDU 750: Instruction Intervention: Clinical Practice II

** Must have Literacy for Inclusion for Maine certification

15 credits Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach k-12

 

Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to

  • apply research results to leadership decisions
  • describe the requirements of the ISLLC standards
  • demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”).

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

FINANCIAL AID

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Literacy (K - 12), you must:

  • Complete 15 credits which is composed of five 3-credit on-line courses.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees when due.
15 Credit Reading Specialist Certificate

Literacy Courses for Specialist Degree

EDU 746: Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership

EDU 747: Literacy for English Language Learners

EDU 748: Literacy for Inclusion Settings

EDU 749: Reading Diagnosis: Clinical Practice I

EDU 750: Instruction Intervention: Clinical Practice II

15 credits Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach k-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Admission Requirements for the Reading Specialist 15 Credit Certificate:

Pre-requisite requirements will be reviewed to ensure the literacy component has been met.

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

  • A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Minimum of one year teaching experience.
  • Employed as a teacher or ability to access a classroom on a regular basis over an extended period of time.
  • Strong writing skills, the capacity to succeed in a distance education format, and a commitment to educational change and professional development as evidenced by your goal statement submitted at the time of application.

UNE carefully assesses MSED applicants on the basis of evidence provided in all application materials submitted. Therefore, while a personal interview is not required, application materials submitted must be prepared thoroughly and thoughtfully for full consideration. Additional prerequisites to participate in one of the on-line Master of Science in Education programs include but may not be limited to:

  • A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.
  • The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.
  • Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.
  • The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.
  • Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web and effectively participate in an on-line program.
  • Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection and with the hardware and software requirements described on the MSED website. 
  • Motivation to complete all course assignments in a satisfactory and timely manner.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the MSED program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the MSED website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line MSED programs. Full participation in the MSED curriculum is necessary to achieve the desired integration of theory and practice the program provides.

 

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Education program and the MSED Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Master of Science in Education (MSED) in Reading Specialist

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Master of Science in Education - Teaching Methodologies

Degree Description

The Master of Science in Education - Concentration in Teaching Methodology Program is a 30-credit master’s degree encompassing 15 graduate credits that already are offered within the Teacher Certification Program (TCP) and an additional 15 credits that have been designated as core courses delivered on-line.  Please see admission requirements for the guidelines for admittance into the program. 

Program Goals

  • Allow UNE post-baccalaureate teacher certification students to build on their graduate –level teacher certification courses to complete a master’ degree.
  • Offer an innovative curriculum that presents the latest educational theories and the practical skills necessary to maximize performance and competency as professional educators.
  • Enable teachers to complete academic work and degree studies in a time/place flexible manner utilizing primarily an online WebCT format.
  • Establish a learning environment for teachers to become more reflective about their practice, and translate new insights into meaningful change.
Admissions

Requirements for admission  

  • A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Minimum of one year teaching experience.
  • Employed as a teacher or ability to access a classroom on a regular basis over an extended period of time.
  • Strong writing skills, the capacity to succeed in a distance education format, and a commitment to educational change and professional development as evidenced by your goal statement submitted at the time of application.

UNE carefully assesses MSED applicants on the basis of evidence provided in all application materials submitted. Therefore, while a personal interview is not required, application materials submitted must be prepared thoroughly and thoughtfully for full consideration. Additional prerequisites to participate in one of the on-line Master of Science in Education programs include but may not be limited to:

  • A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.
  • The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.
  • Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.
  • The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.
  • Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web and effectively participate in an on-line program.
  • Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection and with the hardware and software requirements described on the MSED website. 
  • Motivation to complete all course assignments in a satisfactory and timely manner.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the MSED program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the MSED website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line MSED programs. Full participation in the MSED curriculum is necessary to achieve the desired integration of theory and practice the program provides.

 

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Education program and the MSED Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Only UNE TCP credits will transfer.

Grading

Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B or better) with no less than a “C” in any course. Failure to maintain a GPA of 3.0 will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade below a “C” in a course must repeat the course before continuing in the program.  If a student receives an “F” in any course he/she will be immediately placed on academic probation. This student must register and pass the failed course with grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.  Unsuccessful completion (C- or below) of two courses will result in ineligibility to continue in the program.

If a student feels the grade is in error, the first step in the appeal process is to discuss the outcome with the course instructor.  If the issue is not resolved satisfactorily, the student should follow the grievance policy outlined in the program of study found on the website.

Curricular Requirements

Courses 

This master's degree program is designed as a two-step program for candidates entering as non-certified teachers. 
 
First, the student will elect the elementary certification, the secondary certification program, or the art certification program and will complete the total credits that are needed to become licensed as a teacher (potentially 27 credits of coursework and 15 credits of internship for elementary certification students; 18 credits of coursework and 15 credits of internship for secondary certification and art education students). 
 
The concentration courses for the master's degree in teaching methodology will be comprised of 15 credits of these initial teacher certification courses within UNE's Teacher Certification Program. 
 
The remaining 15 credits are designed to be taken generally after the student has attained a teaching position, and entails the student enrolling in three to six credits of coursework per semester (fall, spring, summer).

Elementary Education

  Credits
COMMON CORE 15 credits (each course is 3 credits)   
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader  
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory and Strategies   
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory/Classroom Management  
EDU 690 – Action Research/Case Study Research Classroom  
EDU 695 – Portfolio  
   
CONCENTRATION (from Elementary Certification Courses below) 15 credits
(a limit of 5 courses for a total of 15 credits applied to the master degree)
 
EDU 502 - Curriculum Theory and Design   
EDU 510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom  
EDU 581 - Reading/Language/Lit: Early  
EDU 582 - Reading/Language/Lit: Adolescent  
EDU 530 - Educational Assessment & Evaluation  
EDU 549 - Education Psychology & Classroom Management  
EDU 561 - Teaching Social Studies: K - 8  
EDU 567 - Teaching Science: K - 8  
EDU 573 - Teaching Mathematics: K - 8  
   
Distribution:  
COMMON CORE 15
CONCENTRATION   15
DEGREE TOTAL 30

Secondary Art Certification

  Credits
COMMON CORE  15 credits (each course is 3 credits each)   
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory and Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory/Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research/Case Study Research Classroom 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
   
CONCENTRATION (a limit of 5 courses for a total of 15 credits applied to the master degree)  
EDU 502 - Curriculum Theory and Design 3
EDU 510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom  3
EDU 530 - Educational Assessment & Evaluation 3
EDU 533 - American Education 3
EDU 549 - Education Psychology & Classroom Management 3
Select One:  
   EDU 536 - Teaching Secondary English or  3
   EDU 537 - Teaching Secondary Science 3
   EDU 538 - Teaching Secondary Social Studies or  3
  EDU 539 - Teaching Secondary Math or  3
  EDU 541 - Methods of Art Education 3
   
Distribution:   
COMMON CORE  15
CONCENTRATION 15
DEGREE TOTAL 30

Course Titles and Suggested Sequence—Elementary Education

The first two years will be dedicated to the student attaining his/her initial teaching license. Only 15 of these credits (internship credit can not be used) will apply toward the master degree.

  Credits
Sample Sequence  
Year 1  
Fall Semester   
EDU 502 - Curriculum Theory and Design (required for K-8 certification) 3
EDU 581 - Reading/Language/Lit: Early 3
Enter Course  
Spring Semester   
EDU 582 - Reading/Language/Lit: Adolescent 3
EDU 561 - Teaching Social Studies: K - 8 (required for K-8 certification) 3
EDU 549 - Educational Psychology & Classrm Management (required for K-8 certification) 3
   
Summer Semester   
EDU 510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom (required for K-8 certification) 3
EDU 530 - Educational Assessment & Evaluation (required for K-8 certification) 3
   
Year 2  
Fall Semester   
EDU 567 - Teaching Science: K - 8 (required for K-8 certification) 3
EDU 573 - Teaching Mathematics: K - 8 (required for K-8 certification) 3
   
Spring Semester   
EDU 490 - Internship (not to be used toward the master degree)  15
Important note: At this juncture, the student would become a certified teacher in the state of Maine. Fifteen credits from the above coursework, outside of the internship, will be able to be used toward the 30-credit master’s of science in education with a concentration in teaching methodology. The remaining courses would be completed while teaching within their classroom. 
   
Summer Semester   
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader (Core Course) 3
   
Year 3   
Fall Semester   
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory and Strategies (Core Course)  3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory & Classroom Management (Core Course) 3
   
Spring Semester   
EDU 690 - Action Res. & Case Study Res. for the Classroom (Core Course) 3
   
Summer Semester    
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
   
Total 30

Course Titles and Suggested Sequence—Secondary in English, History, Mathematics, Life Sciences or Physical Sciences (7-12) or Art Education (K-12)

The first two years will be dedicated to the student attaining his/her initial teaching license. Fifteen of these credits will apply toward the master degree.

  Credits
Sample Sequence  
Year 1  
Fall Semester   
EDU 502 - Curriculum Theory and Design (required for 7-12/K-12 certification) 3
EDU 533 - American Education (required for 7-12/K-12 certification) 3
   
Spring Semester   
Choose the appropriate Secondary Methods Course (required for 7-12/K-12 art certification) 3
EDU 549 - Educational Psychology & Classrm Man (required for 7-12/K-12 certification) 3
   
Summer Semester   
EDU 510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom (required for 7-12/K-12 certification) 3
EDU 530 - Educational Assessment & Evaluation (required for 7-12/K-12 certification) 3
   
Year 2  
Fall Semester  
EDU 492 or 493 - Internship (not to be used toward a master  degree) 15
Important note: At this juncture, the student would become a certified teacher in the state of Maine. Fifteen (15) credits from the above coursework, outside of the internship, will be able to be used toward the 30-credit Master of Science in education with a concentration in teaching methodology. The remaining courses should be completed while teaching within their classroom. 
   
Year 3   
Fall Semester   
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory and Strategies (Core Course) 3
   
Spring Semester   
EDU 615 - Motivational theory & Classroom Management (Core Course) 3
EDU 690 - Action Research and Case Study Research for the Classroom (Core Course) 3
   
Summer Semester   
EDU 695Portfolio 3
   
Total 30

Nature of Field Experience 

Within each course in the concentration, there is an expectation of a minimum of 10-12 hours of fieldwork per class to meet the State of Maine's requirement of "early and on-going" clinical experiences in public school classrooms. The core courses are based in the classroom of the certified teacher.  

Learning Outcomes

After completing the MSE program, students should be able to: 

  1. address the full range of student motivation and differentiation issues encountered in today's school systems
  2. analyze and conduct research relevant to their teaching or administrative interests
  3. document professional development in the program via an electronic portfolio of course work
  4. demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about their chosen concentration area
  5. exhibit leadership in their classroom and/or school system
  6. develop online collaborative relationships with peers 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.).
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”).

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

 

Master of Science in Education

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Master of Science in Education

Concentrations
  • MSEd with a concentration in Career & Technical Education
    The Career & Technical Education (CTE) concentration is designed for practicing CTE instructors who wish to enhance their CTE knowledge and skills. The focus of the program is on improving instructional and curricular competencies as well as the development of leadership skills.  Participants will develop the capability to make use of research findings relevant to the CTE classroom. The program provides an opportunity for CTE instructors to establish collaborative relationships with colleagues from across the nation and world.
  • MSEd with a concentration in Curriculum & Instruction Strategies
    Curriculum & Instruction Strategies is for K-12 educators who wish to focus on strengthening their classroom in those challenging areas of literacy and inclusion with a course on instructional leadership examining how one can impact curriculum beyond the single classroom. Includes methods and strategies for teaching all students in inclusion settings with a special course on the range and use of assistive technologies.  Study skills and literacy interventions that can be used within the content area will be explored.
  • MSEd with a concentration in Educational Leadership
    The Educational Leadership concentration is designed for K-12 educators who are considering school administration.  These courses are matched to the national standards set by the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) and provide entry-level knowledge and skills for beginning school administrators.  Teachers will be introduced to the theories and practices of effective leadership centering on the importance of team building, decision making, problem solving and strategic planning.  Within these areas, focus is placed on supervision and evaluation of personnel, the legal milieu and analysis skills to interpret potential legal issues within the school, budget development and expenditure, and organization theory especially as it relates to change.  Specific state requirements for entry level into the assistant principal or principal level should be consulted to ensure requirements for your locale will be met.  Additional courses in Educational Leadership are available for further study.
  • MSEd with a concentration in Inclusion Education
    The Inclusion Education concentration is designed for those regular educators, both teachers and administrators, who wish to have more background in special education with respect to inclusion practices and concerns.  This unique concentration explores methods and strategies for teaching all students in inclusion settings with a special course on the range and use of assistive technologies.  Furthermore, formal and informal procedures for assessing special needs students will be reviewed with a focus always on utilizing the results to inform and plan instruction.
  • MSEd with a concentration in Literacy (K-12)
    The Literacy concentration is designed for those K-12 educators who wish to delve deeper into the importance of reading and writing for all students to be successful.  Current research and theory are translated into practice with each and every class.  Teachers will be coached to implement these strategies and join colleagues on-line to critique the outcome.  Additionally, assessment in literacy will be linked to next steps in connecting data to teaching practice.  Study skills and literacy interventions that can be used within the content area will be explored.  In short, the basic premise of this concentration is that literacy skills are central for all students to succeed, so how do we transform what the research indicates to inform practice.
  • MSEd with a concentration as a Reading Specialist (K-12)
    Success in today’s world depends on highly developed literacy skills where students need to be competent in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in order to be college and career ready. As a result of the high stakes of students’ literacy achievement, many school districts have looked to Reading Specialists/ Literacy Coaches to improve the literacy growth and success for all of their K-12 students. This program will prepare you to become certified as a Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach in a K-12 setting.

Accreditation

The MSEd programs are approved by the Maine State Board of Education. All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

Admissions

Requirements for admission  

  • A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Minimum of one year teaching experience.
  • Employed as a teacher or ability to access a classroom on a regular basis over an extended period of time.
  • Strong writing skills, the capacity to succeed in a distance education format, and a commitment to educational change and professional development as evidenced by your goal statement submitted at the time of application.

UNE carefully assesses MSED applicants on the basis of evidence provided in all application materials submitted. Therefore, while a personal interview is not required, application materials submitted must be prepared thoroughly and thoughtfully for full consideration. Additional prerequisites to participate in one of the on-line Master of Science in Education programs include but may not be limited to:

  • A sincere interest in continuing professional development as an educational leader.
  • The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.
  • Current employment in an educational setting where you have regular access to an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.
  • The ability to pursue challenging online graduate study.
  • Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web and effectively participate in an on-line program.
  • Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection and with the hardware and software requirements described on the MSED website. 
  • Motivation to complete all course assignments in a satisfactory and timely manner.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts for all colleges and universities attended, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the MSED program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the MSED website

advanced standing/transfer credit/experiential credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status, or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line MSED programs. Full participation in the MSED curriculum is necessary to achieve the desired integration of theory and practice the program provides.

 

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Education program and the MSED Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

No transfer credit, advanced standing status or credit for experiential learning is accepted into the on-line MSEd programs. Full participation in the MSEd curriculum is necessary to achieve the desired integration of theory and practice the program provides.

Grading

Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 (B or better) with no less than a “C” in any course. Failure to maintain a GPA of 3.0 will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade below a “C” in a course must repeat the course before continuing on in the program.  If a student receives an “F” in any course he/she will be immediately placed on academic probation. This student must register and pass the failed course with grade of “C” or better before registering for any additional credits.  Unsuccessful completion (C- or below) of two courses will result in ineligibility to continue in the program.

If a student feels the grade is in error, the first step in the appeal process is to discuss the outcome with the course instructor.  If the issue is not resolved satisfactorily, the student should follow the grievance policy outlined in the program of study found on the website.

Curricular Requirements

Each online course ordinarily is scheduled for 8 weeks so a student has the ability to enroll in 2 courses each semester, one in Term A and one in Term B. Action Reasearch and Case Study are 15 weeks long.

Program Required Courses Credits
MSEd – Career & Technical Education
Core Courses
 
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory & Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research & Case Study (15 weeks) 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
Concentration Courses  
EDU 751 The Application Model of Learning – Curriculum Development 3
EDU 753 Working with Special Needs Students 3
EDU 755 Utilizing Literacy Strategies in CTE Learning Environments 3
EDU 757 Health and Safety Implementation for CTE 3
EDU 759 Preparing Students for College, Careers, & Citizenship 3
   
MSEd - Curriculum and Instruction Strategies
Core Courses
 
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory & Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research & Case Study (15 weeks) 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio  3
Concentration Courses  
EDU 707 Instructional Leadership 3
EDU 721 Using Technology within Inclusion Education 3
EDU 723 Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 742 Study Skills & Content Literacy Instruction for All 3
EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success 3
   
MSEd - Educational Leadership (Note: EDU 702, 704, 709 and 715 are required for Assistant Principal license in Maine)
Core Courses
 
EDU 600—Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory & Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research & Case Study (15 weeks) 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
Concentration Courses  
EDU 701 – Educational Leadership 3
EDU 702 - School Law 3
EDU 704 - Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel 3
EDU 709 - School Finance  3
EDU 715 - Organizational Theory and Strategic Planning 3
   
MSEd - Inclusion Education
Core Courses
 
EDU 600 - Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory & Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research & Case Study (15 weeks) 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
Concentration Courses  
EDU 720 - Special Education Law for the Classroom 3
EDU 721 - Using Technology within Inclusion Education 3
EDU 722 - Special Education Assessment in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 723 - Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 724 - Collaboration in Inclusion Settings 3
   
MSEd - Literacy (K - 12)
Core Courses
 
EDU 600—Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 - Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 615 - Motivational Theory & Classroom Management 3
EDU 690 - Action Research & Case Study (15 weeks) 3
EDU 695 - Portfolio 3
Concentration Courses  
EDU 740 Supporting Literacy Development for All Learners 3
EDU 741 Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools 3
EDU 742 Study Skills & Content Literacy Instruction for All 3
EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success 3
EDU 744 Meeting Student Literacy Challenges 3
Learning Outcomes

After completing the MSE program, students should be able to: 

  1. address the full range of student motivation and differentiation issues encountered in today's school systems
  2. analyze and conduct research relevant to their teaching or administrative interests
  3. document professional development in the program via an electronic portfolio of course work
  4. demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about their chosen concentration area
  5. exhibit leadership in their classroom and/or school system
  6. develop online collaborative relationships with peers 
Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal Policy

The last date to withdraw from a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course.  Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal.  Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program will occur when the Graduate Coordinator and Chair of the Education Department become aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review instrument.
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”.)

Timeline for Completion/Leave of Absence

A student who has not completed the MSEd Program within three (3) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission. Students are required to take a course every term, otherwise they must request a Leave of Absence, or be withdrawn from the program.  Students may take a slightly reduced course load in any term if necessary. These arrangements are the responsibility of the student and must be communicated in writing to the graduate program coordinator.

Students may “stop out” for one term, if necessary, and take an additional term to complete the program. The required Request for Leave of Absence form must be filed with the MSEd office and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences if this will be occurring.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Dean's Office and  the Education Department to indicate change of plans.

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old will not be accepted for credit in the  program.

Academic Honesty Policy

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate college. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

It is expected that students will accurately and correctly document all academic resources. APA format is the required style for citing sources and establishing a bibliography.

Documented instances of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by UNE administrators. Violation of the academic honesty policy will result in a grade of "F" being issued for the course involved. A student who has violated the academic honesty policy may also be dismissed from the program and the university.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D. (Chair)

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Master of Science in Education (MSEd) with a choice of five concentrations

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Medical Education Leadership

Mission

The mission of the Medical Education Leadership Program is three-fold:

  • Teaching:  To prepare medical and health professionals to grow as educators and leaders in  academic settings.
  • Research: To contribute to the knowledge base of the field of medical education and leadership by refining existing knowledge or developing new knowledge.
  • Service: To provide technical assistance and professional service to academic sites within Maine and New England.

Program Goals

These programs reflect a vision of the medical education leader as a master teacher and executive leader. The student learning outcomes are adapted from the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards in educational leadership.

A medical education leader promotes the success of all learners by:

  •  Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the health care community
  • Advocating, nurturing, and sustaining an institutional culture and an instructional program conducive to student learning and faculty professional growth.
  • Ensuring the management of the organization and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
  • Collaborating with physicians and health care community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.
  • Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.
  • Understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.
  • Conducting, promoting and mentoring medical education research and scholarship as the profession moves toward evidence-based education.
Major Description

The Graduate Programs in Medical Education Leadership (MMEL) are a joint project between the College of Osteopathic Medicine at the University of New England and the Office of Medical Education at Maine Medical Center. The purpose of these programs is to prepare individuals to assume or enhance educational leadership roles in a variety of medical and health care training programs. The programs are designed to provide advanced education in the areas of curriculum and instruction, leadership and administration, and educational research and evaluation with opportunities for application to each individual’s unique professional environment.

Accreditation

The University of New England is accredited through the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. The UNE Board of Trustees approved the Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership and graduate certificates on June 1, 2007. The Maine State Board of Education unanimously approved MMEL on May 14, 2008.

Admissions

ACADEMIC PREREQUISITES    

To be considered for admission, you must have

  • Completed a Bachelor’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited college or university related to the health professions or the equivalent for faculty in academic medicine
  • For applicants who do not have a graduate degree, the Bachelor’s degree must have been completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.0
  • Official transcripts from  ALL colleges and universities attended must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions

Technology Requirements

  • Access to the Internet and a computer with audio capability
  • Students must have key computer competencies and the willingness to learn new software applications
    • Create, edit, and save new documents in MS OFFICE programs – WORD, EXCEL, & POWER POINT
    • Create a table in a WORD document
    • Use ‘track changes/review functions
    • Change parameters such as page numbers, paper orientation, margins, proportions, etc.
    • Manage files, folders, and databases on a personal computer
    • Attach/detach documents to/from email messages.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are submitted through UNE’s online application.
  • Students may start the MMEL program in any semester.  Due dates for applications indicate the date when a completed electronic application and all supporting documentation should be received in the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions. Applications are not considered complete until all documentation materials have been received.
  • Applications are reviewed as they are received.  Admissions are on a rolling basis with decisions being made by the program Admissions Committee as files are completed.  Applications received after the due date for one term will be reviewed on a space available basis or for admissions into the next available term. Applicants are encouraged to complete the application early.
  • Official decision letters are sent to candidates from the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions once a decision is made by the program Admissions Committee.
  • Applications are reviewed as they are completed and decisions are made on a rolling basis. 
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. Foreign medical graduates who are US citizens or permanent US residents may submit a copy of the ECFMG certificate as verification of equivalency of medical degree. See International Admissions
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Medical Education Leadership website.

Policy exceptions

The Master of Science in Medical Educational Leadership program and the MMEL Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance to the master'sprogram, students may request to transfer up to two 3-credit graduate level courses (maximum of 6 credits) into the MMEL program.  The courses must meet the following criteria:

  • Graduate-level courses taken after the receipt of any other degree
  • Completed within the five (5) years before application to MMEL program
  • Completed at a regionally accredited college or university
  • Completed with a grade of ”B” or higher
  • Equivalent to courses required in the MMEL program or used as an elective

To request consideration for transfer credit, students must provide official transcripts, course syllabus and outline, along with a succinct statement justifying the course equivalency of the course (or courses) for which they are requesting transfer credit. Materials will be reviewed by the MEL Director. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the faculty and the Admissions Committee.

Transfer Credit for Harvard Macy Institute Program

UNE’s Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership (MMEL) Program, in accordance with an agreement between the University and Harvard Macy Institute, will accept the following institutes as transfer credit into the MMEL program:

  • “Leading Innovations in Health Care and Education” (3 elective credits)
  • “A Systems Approach to Assessment in Health Science Education” (3 elective credits)
  • “Program for Educators in Health Professions” (6 elective credits)

To request the transfer of credit the applicant will submit a copy of the institute certificate of CME credits and the applicant’s project materials to the MEL Director for review, to assure that student learning and achievement are comparable in breadth, depth, and quality to the results of university provided courses.

Transfer Credit for Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM)

UNE’s Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership (MMEL) Program, in accordance with an agreement between the University and STFM, will accept the following institutes as transfer credit into the MMEL program:

  • The Medical Student Educators Development Institute (MSEDI) (3 credits)
  • The STFM Emerging Leaders program (3 credits)

To request the transfer of credit, the applicant will submit a copy of the institute certificate of CME credits and the applicant’s project materials to the MMEL Director for review, to assure that student learning and achievement are comparable in breadth, depth, and quality to the results of university provided courses.

Transfer Credit for Center for Medical Simulation institutes

UNE’s Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership (MMEL) Program, in accordance with an agreement between the University and the Centre for Medical Simulation, will accept the following institutes as transfer credit into the MMEL program:

  • Comprehensive Instructor Workshop for Simulation Educators (3 credits)
  • Host-Site Simulation as a Teaching Tool (3 credits)
  • Graduate program for Simulation Educators (3 credits)

The CMS Executive Director or the Director of the Institute for Medical Simulation (IMS) should be asked to write a letter of recommendation for the participant to be used in the application process to MMEL.  In order to receive transfer credits for institutes, applicants to MMEL must submit a copy of the Institute certificate. Applicants will write a description of the impact of the course on their work in simulation education and send to the MEL Director for review to assure that student learning and achievement are at least comparable in breadth, depth, and quality to the results of university-provided courses.

TRANSFER CREDIT FOR AMERICAN COLLEGE OF EMERGENCY PHYSICIANS (ACEP)

UNE’s Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership (MMEL) Program, in accordance with an agreement between the University and the ACEP  will accept the TEACHING FELLOWSHIP as three elective/transfer credit into the MMEL program.

The ACEP Executive Director or the Director of the Teaching Fellowship should be asked to write a letter of recommendation for the participant to be used in the application process to MMEL.  In order to receive transfer credits for institutes, applicants to MMEL must submit a copy of the Fellowship certificate and the applicant’s project materials to the MEL Director for review, to assure that student learning and achievement are comparable in breadth, depth, and quality to the results of university provided courses.

ADVANCED STANDING

Individuals who have completed one of our graduate certificates (Program Development in Academic Medicine or Leadership Development in Academic Medicine) may apply to the Master's in Medical Education Leadership within five years of completing a single course or within five years of completing the graduate certificate in academic medicine.  All certificate courses will count towards the Master's degree. 

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

The program reflects a vision of the medical education leader as a master teacher and executive leader.  The student outcomes are adapted from the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards in educational leadership.

A medical education leader promotes the success of all learners by:

  • Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the health care community.
  • Advocating, nurturing, and sustaining an institutional culture and an instructional program conducive to student learning and faculty professional growth.
  • Ensuring the management of the organization and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
  • Collaborating with physicians and health care community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.
  • Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.
  • Understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.
  • Conducting, promoting and mentoring medical education research and scholarship as the profession moves toward evidence-based education.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students must maintain a cumulative grade-point-average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade below B- (80 pts) in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation in the Medical Education Leadership Program. A student receiving a grade below B- (80 pts) has the option to re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- (80 pts) or better. Any student who fails two or more classes is dismissed from the program.

Program Completion TimelineS

Students must complete the Master’s in Medical Education Leadership within five consecutive years of admission to the program, unless the Dean has approved a specified leave of absence.  Students must complete a certificate within two consecutive years of admission to the certificate program, unless a specified leave of absence has been granted by the Dean.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old may not be accepted for credit in the MMEL programs.

Grading

Faculty establish their individual grading criteria and grading scale in courses which they teach. Traditionally, UNE’s Quality Points/Scale assigned to grades are as follows:

A 94 - 100 points Outstanding
A- 90 - 93 points Excellent
B+ 87-89 points Competency achieved to high standard
B 84 - 86 points Competency achieved
B- 80 - 83 points Satisfactory competency
F Below 80 points Failing


Note:  Grades below 80 points are considered marginal and a failing grade.

Incomplete Grades

An incomplete 'I’ grade may be given by the faculty to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The student must request an incomplete from the faculty (by letter or via e-mail) at least one week prior to the end of the term in which the student has registered for the course. The 'I' grade must be changed within the time limit determined by the faculty. Until changed, the ‘I’ grade defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the faculty, results in the assignment of an administrative *F grade for the course. Once an 'I' grade is removed, academic standing will be updated according to good standing or probationary standards. The student will be required to retake and repay for the course in order to receive credit when an administrative *F has been given.

Repeated Courses and Grades

Most courses in the Medical Education Leadership Program are offered at least once per year. If a student fails to meet the minimum required grade (B-), the student is allowed to repeat the course; however, the student must wait until the next time that course is offered in the schedule. The student repeating a course must register for the repeated term and must pay full tuition and fees.

Upon completion of a repeated course, a new listing and assigned grade are placed on the student's transcript. The original course listing and grade remain on the student's transcript. All courses are listed chronologically on the transcript by semester and academic period in which they are enrolled. However, only the second or last course taken will receive credit on the student's transcript, and only the second or last grade received will calculate into the cumulative GPA.

Curricular Requirements

Master of Science: Medical Education Leadership (33 credits)

The Master of Science curriculum totals 33 credits. Courses are offered continuously over each 12-month cycle. Students are required to develop an electronic professional portfolio as evidence of their competence in the seven medical educational leadership standards. Students also submit one exhibit from each course. The portfolio exhibits show growth in written and oral communication skills as well as medical education leadership standards. 

  Credits
MEL 604 Curriculum Design and Program Development  3
MEL 605 Improving Instructional Effectiveness   3
MEL 606 Learner Assessment in Medical Education 3
MEL 610 Leadership Skills in Academic Medicine   3
MEL 611 Professional Development: Developing a Culture of Life-Long Learning  3
MEL 612 Organizational Development: Fostering a Learning Environment 3
MEL 620 Research Methods in Medical Education   3
MEL 651 Applied Project in Academic Medicine I 3
MEL 652 Applied Project in Academic Medicine II 3
MEL Electives* 6
MEL 655 Professional Portfolio

0

Total credits:

33

 

*MEL Elective Options  
MEL 615 Business and Finance in Academic Medicine 3

MEL 639 Independent Study in Medical Education

3-6

MEL 699 Transfer Credit

3-6

Graduate courses from UNE Public Health program 3-6
 

 

 

Certificate: Program Development (12 credits)

This 12-credit program provides students with the core program development concepts in curriculum, instruction, assessment and evaluation. This set of courses is one of the foundations for the UNE Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership.  

  Credits
MEL 604 Curriculum Design and Program Development 3
MEL 605 Improving Instructional Effectiveness   3
MEL 606 Learner Assessment in Medical Education   3
MEL 620 Research Methods in Medical Education 3
Total credits: 12

Certificate: Leadership Development (12 credits) This 12-credit program provides students with the core leadership development concepts in personnel development, organization development, business/finance, and leadership skill training. This set of courses is one of the foundations for the UNE Master of Science in Medical Education Leadership. 

  Credits
MEL 610 Leadership Skills in Academic Medicine 3
MEL 611 Professional Development: Developing a Culture of Lifelong Learning 3
MEL 612 Organizational Development: Fostering the Learning Environment 3
MEL 615 Business and Finance in Academic Medicine 3
Total credits: 12

MEL 604 Curriculum Design and Program Development (3 cr)

Curriculum work is a complex and sophisticated endeavor. Students will come to understand the curriculum and program planning process by working through experiences that will promote the cognitive, personal and social development of curriculum planners. The course challenges curriculum planners to be inquirers and to critically examine the practices of medical and other clinical educational programs. Students  explore questions both in theory and in practice by examining the foundations and principles of curriculum development. Students also consider the institutional context and the collaborative nature of much of curriculum work. The course provides numerous practical ideas for engaging in the work of curriculum development and implementation.

MEL 605 Improving Instructional Effectiveness (3 cr) 

This course introduces key concepts in theories of learning, adult learning principles, and their application to instructional design and improved teaching and learning. Theoretical and practical approaches to organizing learning experiences in a variety of settings [large group, small group, teams, ambulatory, bedside, Operating Room, simulations, and technology] will be examined. Students will be asked to describe the application of these approaches to their own learning environment.

MEL 606 Learner Assessment in Medical Education (3 cr)

Assessing learner outcomes is an essential component of any educational activity and applies to individual sessions as much as to multi-year curricula. Such assessment is critical to making decisions – decisions about improving the curriculum, advancing students, competence attainment, program evaluation and numerous others. This course addresses the procedures and practices that produce high-quality assessment information that can support these decisions. Students closely examine the learning goals of a curriculum and how they can be translated into measureable outcomes. Students also probe the nuances of different types of outcomes and how these differences link to preferred assessment methods. These activities are structured around the development of an Assessment Blueprint that each course participant will design.

MEL 610 Leadership Skills in Medical Education (3 cr)

This course introduces multiple concepts and theories regarding leadership approaches and skills, and student apply such concepts for medical education leaders. The course will focus on differences between leadership vs. management and specific areas necessary for a successful leader [e.g., meeting management, communications, negotiation techniques, marketing]. Students explore their own preferred leadership styles.  As much as possible, students will describe application of this new knowledge and/or skills to their own current situations.

MEL 611 Professional Development: Developing a Culture of Life-long Learning (3 cr)

This interactive course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to human resource issues important to leaders in medical education. The content includes team building, communication styles, conflict resolution, hiring, engaging and retaining staff, development of professional portfolios, and recognition of contributions to educational programs. Participants will bring a human resource case study for analysis at the outset, and throughout the course, they will collaborate with classmates to identify best practice solutions.

MEL 612 Organizational Development: Fostering a Learning Environment (3 cr)

This course introduces multiple concepts and theories regarding organizational development, and students apply these concepts to medical education leadership. The course focuses on differences between types of organizations, smaller components within organizations, meeting management, succession planning, and politics. Students explore their own role within organizations as they foster a learning environment.  As much as possible, students will describe application of this new knowledge and/or skills to their own current situations.

MEL 615 Business and Finance in Academic Medicine

This course provides the essential foundation for understanding the business and financial operations of business entities especially academic medical institutions. The curriculum is designed for medical students, physicians, and other medical professionals. Special emphasis will be placed on the business operations and financial management of academic institutions. A thorough understanding of the concepts will be learned through the assignment of problem sets and cases. Students will be equipped to take an active role and provide leadership in the various aspects of business and financial decision making within any medical organization.

MEL 620 Research Methods in Medical Education (3 cr)

The central focus of the course is the study of the concepts, principles, and methods of research and program evaluation in medical education. The course emphasizes the principles of research and evaluation design, how to access current research in medical education and write a research review, sampling procedures, tools of data collection and data analysis, and the scientific method of problem solving.  The goals of the course are: (1) to strengthen the skills of critical thinking and reasoning that are necessary to become better consumers and producers of research and evaluation in medical education, (2) to strengthen skills necessary to be competent communicators of findings from research and evaluation in medical education, (3) to build capacity for reflective practice and habits of mind as a leader in medical education research and evaluation, and (4) to prepare students for an applied research project.

MEL 651-652 Applied Project in Academic Medicine I & II (6 cr)

Each student will consult with the assigned course advisor to identify an educational issue of professional importance in his or her unit or institution. The applied project provides an opportunity to show the integration of knowledge and skills from multiple core courses and synthesize the formal knowledge into field-based applications. Within the applied project, the learner observes the nature, scope, and function of medical education leadership in the natural setting.  Students can choose to continue with the research plan from Mel 620 or start a new project.

Electives: Must be approved by MEL Director

MMEL espouses a belief in student choice by offering six credits of electives.  The program also allows for two electives (six credits) that may be selected as MEL 615 Business and Finance in Academic Medicine, MEL 639 Independent Study, an approved course selected from the UNE Master’s in Public Health Curriculum,  an academic course transferred from another institution, or an approved external fellowship program or institute.

 

MEL 615 Business and Finance in Academic Medicine

This course provides the essential foundation for understanding the business and financial operations of business entities especially academic medical institutions. The curriculum is designed for medical students, physicians, and other medical professionals. Special emphasis will be placed on the business operations and financial management of academic institutions. A thorough understanding of the concepts will be learned through the assignment of problem sets and cases. Students will be equipped to take an active role and provide leadership in the various aspects of business and financial decision making within any medical organization.

MEL 639 - Independent Study in Medical Education (3-6 cr)

Each student can chose to meet this requirement in part through an independent study, completed with little or no supervision. Independent studies provide students the opportunity to explore their interests deeper and make important decisions about how and where they will direct their time and effort. Each student will consult with the Program Director to design an independent study as elective credits in an area that is not addressed by the core courses of the Master’s degree. The work for an independent study should be comparable to a core course in breadth, depth, and qualityBelow is an outline of the process that students follow to set up an independent study:

  • Discuss with program director the possibility of conducting an independent study.
  • Generate a basic idea: a topic for deeper study or a creative endeavor.
  • Complete and submit the Independent Study Proposal form for review and approval by the Director.
  • The proposal lists the Topic, Learning Outcomes/Performance Indicators, Learning Activities, Learning Resources, Learner Assessments, and Timeline. After approval, the proposal is attached to the UNE Independent Study Registration form.
  • After registration, the student completes the independent study with little to no supervision

MEL 655 – Professional Portfolio (0 cr, no tuition)

During the two-year program, students will fill an electronic portfolio with evidence of growing competency as a medical education leader.  Upon graduation, the student will have a robust electronic document that will focus on medical education leadership, but also be part of a professional record for current and future professional positions.  A portfolio is a record of growth, achievement, and professional attributes.  It illustrates progression to competence over time.  The portfolio itself is the product of, and cannot be separated from, the reflection and assessment processes required to produce it. The Exhibits will demonstrate evidence of competence for each of the seven (7) MMEL outcomes: educational vision, program development/staff development, organizational management, collaboration skills, ethics, educational context, and research capacity.  In addition, a set of exhibits is selected from course projects.  The portfolio will be presented at the end of the program for review.  The Portfolio serves several purposes: a record and display of professional goals, growth, and achievement; a collection of materials that demonstrate competency; an exhibit of work that supports self-marketing upon graduation; a foundation for career-long self-directed professional growth.

Learning Outcomes

Student outcomes are adapted from the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards in educational leadership.

A medical education leader promotes the success of all learners by:

  • Facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the health care community.
  • Advocating, nurturing, and sustaining an institutional culture and an instructional program conducive to student learning and faculty professional growth.
  • Ensuring the management of the organization and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
  • Collaborating with physicians and health care community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.
  • Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.
  • Understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.
  • Conducting, promoting and mentoring medical education research and scholarship as the profession moves toward evidence-based education.
Academic Policy

Audit Policy
A student may, with prior consent of the instructor and the Medical Education Leadership director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and program director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in the course and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e., part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, or veteran's benefits.

Probation/Dismissal

Students must maintain a cumulative grade-point-average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Students receiving a grade below B- (80 pts) in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation in the Medical Education Program. A student receiving a grade below B- (80 pts) has the option to re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- (80 pts) or better. Any student who fails two or more classes is dismissed from the program.  The Program Director may make modifications to the process described above because of extenuating circumstances. 

Course withdrawal

Students may withdraw from a course prior to the course start date by notifying the program office in writing. As all courses officially begin on a Saturday, students must notify the program office  during business hours no later than the Friday prior to the start date. A student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average. Course withdrawals will result in tuition refunds based on the short-term courses refund schedule noted in the Financial Information for Graduate Programs.  Non-matriculated students will forfeit their registration fee. Not logging into a course does not constitute a withdrawal.

Leave of Absence

Students must enroll and successfully complete at least one course per semester.  A leave of absence (LOA) for a specified period of time, not to exceed one (1) academic year, may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form from the respective program/school director, or Registration Services.  Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures.  Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog.  This LOA period is considered part of the five years to complete the MMEL program or two years to complete the certificate.

University/ Program Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete a University Withdrawal form available from Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in respective catalog; and (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.

Academic Dishonesty

The University of New England regards academic integrity as an essential component to the educational process. Charges of academic dishonesty will be handled through the dean of the appropriate College. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:

  • Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  • Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  • Action that destroys or alters the work of another student.
  • Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  • Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Students With Disabilities

Students with disabilities who require accommodations or modifications should communicate their needs to the Director, Office of Students With Disabilities, University of New England, 11 Hills Beach Road, Biddeford, ME 04005. (207) 602-2815. Please allow time for course modifications to occur. Ideally, students should contact the Office on the same date that they register for a course.  Timely accommodations are dependent on early registration with Disability Services.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

For curriculum and program information, contact the Medical Education Leadership Office:
India Broyles, EdD, FNAOME, MMEL Director 
207-602-2694    ibroyles@une.edu     or
Diane Labbe, MMEL Coordinator
207-602-2459   
dlabbe@une.edu

For information about the application process for the Medical Education Leadership programs, please contact the
Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions through email atgradadmissions@une.edu or by phone at 800-477-4863.

Master of Science (M.S.) in Medical Education Leadership

College of Osteopathic Medicine

Medical Education Leadership

Nurse Anesthesia

Mission

The mission of the School of Nurse Anesthesia is to provide an academic environment which allows students to master the intellectual and technical skills necessary to become competent in the safe conduct of anesthesia. This is accomplished by providing a select group of experienced, graduate level nurses with the highest level of didactic, simulation lab, and clinical site experiences. UNE's graduate nurse anesthetists develop life-long scholarship, critical thinking skills and professionalism needed to become compassionate, patient-centered anesthesia providers in solo practice or within anesthesia care teams.

Behavioral Outcomes
Upon completion of this educational program, the student shall demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the faculty, specific competencies expected of graduates.  These competencies identify knowledge and skills necessary for competent entry-level practice of nurse anesthesia.  Upon completion of the program, the graduate will:

  1. Perform an anesthetic-related history and physical exam.
  2. Formulate and discuss a comprehensive anesthetic care plan for a given patient based on the pre-anesthetic assessment and Physical Status Classification I-VI.
  3. Implement and evaluate anesthesia management plans, procedures, and critical decision-making skills  during the anesthetic management of the patient.
  4. Demonstrate proficiency in skills necessary to deliver anesthesia care.
  5. Evaluate the postoperative course of a patient.
  6. Perform resuscitation of the newborn infant, child or adult, if necessary.
  7. Function as a team leader for cardiovascular and/or pulmonary emergencies.
  8. Provide first echelon care and maintenance of all anesthesia equipment.
  9. Critically analyze published data in the field of anesthesia and apply new evidence in technology, pharmacology, and techniques to patient care.
  10. Develop interpersonal behaviors consistent with that of a health care professional.
Degree Description

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA's), as Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, have been providing anesthesia care in the United States of America for over 150 years. Currently, there are approximately 47,000 CRNA's in the country with more than 2,000 students graduating per year.

CRNA's are anesthesia specialists who safely administer approximately 34 million anesthetics to patients in the United States each year. As advanced practice nurses, they can serve in a variety of capacities in daily practice, such as a clinician, educator, administrator, manager and researcher.

  • CRNA's administer anesthesia for all types of surgical cases, using all anesthetic techniques and practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered, from university-based medical centers to free-standing surgical facilities and offices.
  • CRNA's are the primary anesthesia providers in rural hospitals in the United States, affording 1/4th of the population access to anesthesia care.  CRNAs provide a significant amount of the anesthesia in inner cities as well.
  • CRNAs are qualified and permitted by state law or regulations to practice in every state in the nation.

The School of Nurse Anesthesia at the University of New England has been an involved in nurse anesthesia education since 1970, serving as an academic affiliate for hospital-based certificate nurse anesthesia programs. In 1988, we initiated a program leading to the Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia. In 1993, the UNE MSNA program became the sole authority of the education of nurse anesthesia students and the last hospital-based program in Maine closed.

Two-Phase Program

At UNE we offer a 27-month two-phase program.

The first phase is conducted on our historic Westbrook College of Health Professions Campus, situated in the picturesque coastal city of Portland.  The first eight months of study consists primarily of didactic instruction in basic sciences and anesthesia taught by our CRNA and basic science faculty. Included within this 8 month didactic curriculum is instruction using state-of-the-art simulation labs which prepare students for their clinical curriculum.

The second phase of the curriculum entails clinical training based at our hospital affiliates for a period of 19 months.  Didactic instruction continues during the clinical phase through web-based courses in advanced principles of anesthesia, as well as periodic lectures, seminars, and simulation held on campus. The School has contractual relationships with over 32 hospitals located in New England and as far away as Florida, which offer our students a varied and diverse clinical education experience.

With successful completion of the 27 month program, students are awarded a Master of Science degree in Nurse Anesthesia. The graduate is then qualified to take the National Certifying Examination.  Upon successful completion of the exam, the graduate becomes a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist capable of practicing in all 50 states. To date, 100 percent of our students have passed the certifying examination in their first year post-graduation and 100 percent have successfully obtained employment.

In addition to our own integrated M.S.-Nurse Anesthesia Program, the University also serves as the academic center for St. Joseph's School of Anesthesia for Nurses, which is a hospital-based program. Under this arrangement, the University provides only the academic component and awards the academic Master of Science degree in Nurse Anesthesia, while the hospital-based program provides the clinical training leading to the Certificate of Clinical Anesthesia Education, which they award independently. This affiliation will end in September 2015. 

Accreditation

The School of Nurse Anesthesia is accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs, a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Post-secondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. The School of Nurse Anesthesia is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs through the spring of 2021.  The Program received the full 10-year accreditation length in June 2011.

Admissions

PREREQUISITE COURSEs

Biochemistry is required and must be completed no more than five years prior to enrollment into the Nurse Anesthesia program.  Biochemistry must be completed with a grade of "B" or better, and must be completed by the end of December (or fall term) prior to expected enrollment to be eligible for admissions. The Nurse Anesthesia Program will accept the online biochemistry course offered through UNE's online education program, as well as many other courses.

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS

Required

 

 

Biochemistry

Lab/No Lab

3-4

Recommended Science Courses:

   

Anatomy

Lab

4

Physiology

Lab

4

Biology

Lab

4

Chemistry

Lab

4

Microbiology

Lab

4

Organic Chemistry

Lab

4

Pharmacology

No lab

3 – 4

Physics

Lab

4

Grades for the science courses listed above are used to calculate a cumulative science GPA for the Admissions Committee to review the applicant's foundational science base and to evaluate the applicant's aptitude for the sciences.

ACADEMIC / EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Graduation from a regionally accredited baccalaureate or higher degree program in nursing OR graduation from a regionally accredited associate degree program in nursing and completion of a baccalaureate degree in another field 
  • Official transcripts from ALL colleges and universities attended must be submitted as part of a complete application
  • Proof of current licensure as a registered nurse in your own state at the time of application. Upon acceptance into the program, licensure in the state where clinical experience is obtained will be required.
  • A minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.0, especially in the science and professional courses is highly recommended.
  • Applicants are strongly encouraged to "shadow" a nurse anesthetist for at least a day in the operating room prior to application. In addition, to fully grasp the commitment involved in studying to be a nurse anesthetist, it is especially valuable to "shadow" a student registered nurse anesthetist for a day. Neither of these experiences is a requirement for application, but is highly recommended.
  • Minimum of one year of experience as a registered nurse in a critical care area (specifically ICU, CCU, SICU, MICU, PICU and Neuro ICU) prior to application to the program. Note: Emergency Room, Recovery Room or Post-Anesthetic Care Unit (PACU) will be considered on a case by case basis but is generally not sufficient as the sole critical care experience.  
  • Three references/recommendations, submitted as part of the online application; one reference must be from the applicant's immediate acute care nursing supervisor/manager and must attest to the total length of time the applicant has worked in the acute care setting as a registered nurse.
  • Current Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Certification
  • Current Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Certification
  • CCRN, highly recommended

Note:    Before matriculation, accepted applicants will be expected to obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status to meet all health immunization requirements.  Please visit Student Health Care  for details.

As required by clinical training sites, students may be subject to criminal background checks and drug screens prior to matriculation, and periodically throughout the MNA program.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admissions are accepted through the University of New England's online application only.
  • Applications submitted and completed by the posted deadline will be fully considered. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed on a space available basis only.
  • On-campus interviews are granted to qualified applicants upon invitation by the Admissions Committee, and are required for admission to the program. Interviews will begin before the application deadline.
  • Admissions decisions will be made, by the program Admissions Committee. Decision letters will be sent to applicants, from the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution in the US. See International Admissions.
  • International applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Nurse Anesthesia program website.

Policy exceptions

The Nurse Anesthesia program and the MNA Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

There is no transfer credit awarded to students in the Nurse Anesthesia program.

Advanced Placement

There is no advanced placement.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

The School of Nurse Anesthesia is designed to integrate didactic and clinical learning experiences to optimize competency as an anesthesia provider.  Therefore, successful completion of every course is necessary to progress through the Program.

In order to meet the Council on Accreditation guidelines and to maintain our high standards, the School has established the following policy:  Anyone who receives an examination grade below 80%  is encouraged to make an appointment to meet with their academic advisor.  This is done to determine if there are any issues/problems with the student or course work, to provide appropriate counseling to the student, and to promote successful advancement through the program.

Students must successfully pass each clinical practicum course in order to advance to the next level.  Student success will be measured against the clinical objectives designed for each clinical practicum experience.  Grades will take into account clinical performance, clinical preceptor feedback, student self-evaluations and faculty insights.

Program Completion Timeline

Students are expected to complete 27 actual months in the program.

Student Progression

In addition to course grades and clinical or field evaluations, student progression is monitored through three processes: (1) regular instructor evaluation of assignments and performance; (2)  programmatic level review through regularly scheduled Comprehensive Student Reviews; and (3)  Student Development Committee (SDC) reviews as needed.  Comprehensive reviews are the responsibility of the full faculty of each program.  Each program also has an SDC, comprised of a minimum of three faculty members.   Program Directors cannot serve on the SDC, but membership can include faculty from other college programs.  The primary function of the SDC is to conduct reviews of student performance in order to assess whether a student can progress in a program, make a determination of student status, and make recommendations for action when a student has failed to maintain academic and professional standards, whether in class, clinical setting, or community.

A.  EVALUATION OF ASSIGNMENTS AND PERFORMANCE

The most sensitive and detailed assessment of student progress is that which is conducted on an everyday basis through the evaluation of assignments in the classroom and clinical performance. To enhance success, performance concerns should be addressed with the student by the instructor as soon as they arise and not held for mid-term reviews, or end-of term grades.  This may also lead to involvement of the student’s advisor and/or the SDC as determined by the       faculty member. (See II. D. for grade standards, and III. B.3.a.& b. for process)

B.  COMPREHENSIVE STUDENT REVIEW:

            At a pre-determined time or times in each semester, (but no later than mid-semester,) the   faculty of each program will conduct a comprehensive review of student performance.       Students’ standing will be noted as follows:  

            1.  Good Academic Standing: Students who meet the minimum standards and  requirements set by the program and UNE.  Students in good standing may continue to progress without restriction toward graduation.

             2. Probationary Standing:  Students who remain on probation as a result of a prior SDC Review.  Progress or concerns should be noted and discussed as needed at this time. 

3. Marginal Standing: Concerns have been previously noted but were not of sufficient consequence to merit probation. 

            4. New Concern(s) Identified:  Any concerns newly identified by the         Comprehensive Student Review may be referred for advising or to the SDC for        resolution.

a.  Referral for Advising:  When initial or minor concerns are first noted by a faculty member at or prior to the Comprehensive Student Review, , the respective faculty member will notify the student and the student's academic and/or field/clinical advisor(s) as appropriate to review the circumstances in person, and with the student.  The content and action steps determined at any such meeting will be documented and shared with the student in writing within two business days.  

b.  Referral to Student Development Committee:  If a resolution cannot be reached at the level of the advisor, or the concerns are substantial in nature, then the matter is referred to the SDC for a formal review.  Significant concerns may include academic performance (e.g. falling below a 3.0 GPA for semester or cumulative, C- or below in course, or “Fail” in a Pass/Fail course) or professional conduct. (See below.)

C.  STUDENT DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE REVIEW

SDC reviews are intended to support students’ academic progression, and are required in cases where a student is failing to maintain academic standards in the classroom or field placement, is accused of engaging in professionally inappropriate behavior, or is accused of violating academic integrity.  An SDC review can be recommended by any faculty, including the student’s or Program Director(PD), or the faculty as a whole as an outcome of the Comprehensive Student Review.  In the event of an alleged breach of ethical conduct, any aggrieved or responsible party may request that an SDC Review be conducted.  Through the review process, the SDC is responsible for examining the concerns cited, evaluating their merits, determining student status, and recommending a course of action.

1. Responsibilities of the Committee Chair:

The SDC Chair is responsible for notifying all involved parties including the student when a formal SDC Review is required and the rationale for it.  When the rationale includes clinical or fieldwork concerns, every effort will be made to include the relevant parties from the clinical or fieldwork site in the meeting either in person, conference call or videoconference.

2. Responsibilities of the Committee:  

The SDC is responsible for:

a)   gathering all pertinent information relevant to the stated concerns         from all relevant parties, including the identified student, faculty,         advisors, preceptors or field instructors. 

b)         Determination of Student Status:

            i) Probation:  Probationary status allows a student to continue under certain specific criteria as determined by the SDC at a formal  review. Students placed on probation will receive a letter from the PD outlining the conditions of probation and the steps required to return to good standing.  Barring any exceptional circumstances, students who do not return to good standing within the specified                            time frame will be dismissed from the program. 

ii) Return to good standing: Once a student has successfully    completed the criteria specified in the SDC Review to the   satisfaction of the SDC, the Committee will inform the PD who   will send a letter to the student indicating return to good standing.

iii) Dismissal: Students may be dismissed for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to (1) unacceptable academic performance; ( 2) failure to remove probation status; or ( 3) a conduct violation.

c)         Recommending Actions steps:

            The SDC will develop and recommend a plan of action to be taken to  achieve stated outcomes, including the identification of responsible parties and expected dates of actions. This may include helping a student achieve educational objectives (e.g., remediation, use of the learning  assistance center);  employing  alternate pathways to achieve educational objectives (e.g. extending field work hours beyond normal expectations,   retaking a course); or specifying other terms for a student to remain in the  program.  The plan of action also describes the consequences for success(e.g. removal of probationary status) or failure to comply with or achieve the stated goals (e.g., probation, dismissal, or other.) 

d)         Timetable:  The SDC decision re student status and recommended action  steps are made within two (2) business days following the meeting(s) and   communicated to the program director in writing.  The PD reviews the report and seeks clarification if needed.  The PD then communicates the action steps to the student in writing within five (5) business days.

e)Scheduling:  To insure the greatest chance for a successful outcome, educational and conduct concerns should be identified as early as possible, and the SDC Review process initiated promptly.  Except in rare exceptions, this means a minimum of 2 weeks prior to the end of the current semester or term. 

3. Responsibilities of the Student:

The student is responsible for participating in the SDC Review process. This includes providing information as requested and playing an active role in the development of the action steps.

4. Responsibilities of the Program Director:

The PD has a unique role as a member of the faculty while also providing administrative oversight for all program functions.  In the case of SDC Reviews, the PD will review the determination of status by the SDC to ensure that policies have been followed and procedures implemented.  In the case that the PD believes that there are any potential concerns about the process, such as procedural irregularities or additional information that should be considered, the PD will communicate these concerns to the SDC for reconsideration.  The SDCs recommended action steps will be reviewed by the PD for logistical viability (faculty workload, support services, etc.).  The PD will then either approve the plan as is or recommend modifications to the SDC.  Following this step, the SDCs determination of status and recommended action steps will again be forwarded to the PD, who then communicates the outcome to the student. 

5. Responsibilities of the Associate Dean(s):

The Associate Dean(s) serves as a consultant to the SDC and PD re policies and procedures on an as needed basis. 

6. Student Appeals:

A student has the right to appeal to the Dean decisions affecting progression following the process outlined in the UNE Student Handbook

(PLEASE NOTE: There are  expedited review procedures for online programs, please refer to the appropriate program  Student Handbook for details)

C.  ADDITIONAL PROCEDURES

1.  Leave of Absence (LOA).  An LOA can be recommended by the Student Development Committee or be initiated as a student request.  Students who desire to request a leave of absence are encouraged to begin the process with a discussion with their Academic Advisor.  If a decision is made to proceed, a petition is completed by the student, signed by the Advisor, and submitted to the PD, who has final approval.  Leaves of absence can be requested for academic, medical or other personal reasons, and are ordinarily granted for a period not to exceed one year.   The petition form is available at: http://www.une.edu/registrar/upload/leaveabsence.pdf). 

            2. Withdrawal: Students wishing to withdraw for any circumstance must    complete the required University Withdrawal Form . Official withdrawal also        requires approval by the PD.

Appeals, Grievances, and Complaints Other Than Academic Progression

Occasionally, a student may have a grievance regarding another issue.  A student grievance with a faculty member should be addressed first directly with the faculty member.  If a student is not satisfied following this step, the student may request a review by contacting the PD.  The director has the discretion to address the concern directly, or to form a grievance committee.  Questions about procedural options should be directed to the PD.

Grievances or complaints about other aspects of the program may be brought to a faculty member or the PD by an individual student or through student class representatives.  If this does not successfully resolve the concern, a single student or a group of students may bring their complaint or grievance to the College Dean or other relevant administrative unit as per the guidelines in the UNE Student Handbook.

 

Ethical and Behavioral Standards

Failure to adhere to the Student Code of Conduct section of the University of New England Handbook or the Rules of Conduct while on Affiliation at Clinical Sites (see below) may result in a disciplinary sanction. Under these circumstances, the student will go before the SDC.  The SDC may do any or all of the following:

          1. recommend issuing a letter of concern or reprimand
          2. recommend disciplinary probation, which could result in a clinical probation as well 
          3. recommend dismissal from the Program

The SDC may consider any other behaviors in reaching a decision to make a recommendation to the Program Director for adverse actions. This includes actions outside the classroom or in the clinical rotation, which do not reflect well on the Program, profession or individuals.

Rules of Conduct while on Affiliation at Clinical Sites

Success in the Nurse Anesthesia Profession requires certain behavioral attributes including but not limited to personal commitment and hardiness, empathy, discipline, honesty, integrity, personal regard for others, the ability to work effectively with others in a team environment, and the ability to address a crisis or emergency situation in a composed manner.  Adherence to these attributes requires a high level of maturity and self-control, even in highly stressful situations.  During the clinical phase, students must conduct themselves in a highly professional manner consistent with the patient care responsibilities with which they will be entrusted.  Failure to adhere to these standards (noted below) or comply with the Clinical Rotation Policies will result in a disciplinary action ranging from a written warning to discharge from the program (depending upon the violation and the circumstances surrounding the offense).

  1. Creating or contributing to situations that jeopardize patient safety. 
  2. Students are expected to follow all policies in the Student Code of Conduct section of the University of New England Handbook.  Unethical behavior such as academic dishonesty, falsifying logs or medical records is considered a violation of the Program’s standards of conduct. 
  3. Respect the confidentiality of patients and fellow students.  One is not permitted to discuss any patients by name outside the clinical encounter situation.  Students should not discuss other students with preceptors.  For academic presentations, all identifying data , including name, initials, date of birth and facility where seen will be omitted.
  4. Unauthorized possession, use, copying, or distribution of hospital records or disclosure of information contained in such records to unauthorized persons.
  5. Use, distribution, or unauthorized possession of intoxicating beverages or drugs on hospital premises or reporting to work under the influence of intoxicants.
  6. Unauthorized absence from the Anesthesia Department during regularly scheduled clinical hours.
  7. Failure or refusal to follow instructions of a duly assigned preceptor including refusal to accept clinical assignment.
  8. Use of vile, intemperate or abusive language, or acting in a disrespectful manner to any employee, supervisor, patient, or visitor.
  9. Any disorderly conduct on hospital premises.
  10. Creating or contributing to unsanitary conditions.
  11. Theft, fraud, or unauthorized use of property belonging to the hospital, patient, or visitor.

Clinical Practicum Course Expectations

To successfully complete each clinical practicum course, students must achieve a grade of “pass.”    Details regarding clinical practicum expectations will be detailed in the Student Clinical Practicum Handbook and/or course syllabus.  Briefly speaking, clinical progression will be monitored during each clinical practicum.  If students are not meeting clinical objectives, they will be placed on Probation.   
  
If a student is placed on a 30- day Probationary Status, they will continue with the clinical objectives scheduled for that level.  The student will communicate with program faculty and clinical faculty to develop a remediation plan based on their clinical evaluations, clinical faculty feedback and/or program faculty findings.  The plan will include strategies for improvement of clinical performance. 

At the end of the 30-day Probation Status, the student’s performance will be re-evaluated by the program faculty. If they are successful, they will resume their clinical practicum at the same level their peers are at and return to good standing. If progress continues to be unsatisfactory, the student will receive a “fail” for the course and be dismissed from the program.    

Students may be placed on a second 30-day probation period for additional (newly identified) performance issues.  The process described above would apply for this as well.  Students are granted a maximum of two (2) probationary periods not to exceed 60 days total.  If additional (newly identified) performance issues continue to occur after a student has been granted (2) probationary periods, the student would be immediately dismissed.

Essential Technical Standards

Principles:
Nurse anesthesia education requires that accumulation of scientific knowledge be accompanied by the simultaneous acquisition of specific skills and professional attitudes and behavior. Nurse Anesthesia school faculties have a responsibility to society to matriculate and graduate the best prepared nurse anesthetists, and thus admission to this program has been offered to those who present the highest qualifications. The essential technical standards presented in this document are pre-requisite for matriculation, subsequent promotion from year to year, and ultimately graduation from the University of New England School of Nurse Anesthesia. These standards pertain to all matriculated students. All required courses in the curriculum are necessary in order to develop essential skills required to become a competent nurse anesthetist.

The faculty is committed to fostering relationships with its candidates that encourage human and professional growth. Its policies and procedures attempt to reflect this commitment to proactive and supportive communication.

Nonetheless, it is imperative that all candidates recognize that the primary responsibility for a successful nurse anesthesia education, both in and outside the classroom, rests with the individual. Candidates, including candidates with disabilities, must have the capacity to manage their lives and anticipate their own needs. The School has incomplete influence in helping students achieve these personal adaptations. Situations can arise in which a candidate’s behavior and attitudes resulting from a disability or other personal circumstances represent a secondary problem which impairs the candidate’s ability to meet the School’s standards, even after implementation of all reasonable accommodations have been made by the School.

The School’s obligation and mission is to provide an academic environment which allows candidates to master the intellectual and technical skills necessary to become competent in the safe conduct of anesthesia. It does this by providing a select group of experienced, graduate level nurses with the highest level of didactic education, simulation lab and clinical site experiences. Our graduates develop life-long scholarship, critical thinking skills and professionalism needed to become compassionate, patient-centered anesthesia providers in solo practice or within anesthesia care teams. Therefore, all applicants, regardless of disability, will be held to the same admission standards, with reasonable accommodations if needed.

Recommendations:

  1. No otherwise, qualified individual will be denied admission to the School of Nurse Anesthesia based solely upon a disabling condition.
  2. Candidates with disabilities applying to the School of Nurse Anesthesia will be expected to have achieved the same requirements as their non-disabled peers.
  3. Matriculation into the School of Nurse Anesthesia assumes certain levels of cognitive, emotional, and technical skills. Nurse anesthetist candidates with disabilities will be held to the same fundamental standards as their non-disabled peers. Reasonable accommodations will be provided to assist the candidates in learning, performing and satisfying the fundamental standards, so long as the candidate provides timely, comprehensive documentation establishing the candidate’s disability status and need for reasonable accommodation.
  4. Reasonable accommodations that facilitate candidate progress will be provided but only to the extent that such accommodation does not significantly interfere with the essential functions of the School of Nurse Anesthesia, fundamentally alter the program, or significantly affect the rights of other candidates.
  5. The School, under the law, is obligated to provide all reasonable accommodations that will eliminate or minimize the barriers disabled candidates may face in the process of successfully completing the requirements for graduation from the University of New England’s School of Nurse Anesthesia.

Abilities and Skills:
A candidate for this program must have abilities and skills of five varieties including observational skills; communication skills; fine and gross motor skills; intellectual skills: conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social/emotional attributes.

I. Observational Skills
The candidate must be able to acquire a defined level of required information as presented through demonstration and experiences in the basic sciences and anesthesia courses including, but not limited to, information conveyed through gross anatomy labs and simulated anesthesia patient exercises. Furthermore, a candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately, at a distance, and close at hand, acquire information from written documents and visualize information as presented in radiographic images and patient monitors. The candidate must have visual and hearing acuity, including use of depth perception and peripheral vision; hearing normal and faint body sounds (blood pressure and heart sounds) and hearing auditory alarms on monitors and anesthesia delivery systems. Such observation and information acquisition necessitates the functional use of visual, auditory and somatic sensation while being enhanced by the functional use of other sensory modalities.

In any case where a candidate’s ability to observe or acquire information through these sensory modalities is compromised, the candidate must demonstrate alternative means and/or abilities to acquire and demonstrate the essential information without reliance upon another person’s interpretation of the information. The university will provide appropriate reasonable accommodations to foster the student’s ability to meet these standards, so long as the student registers with UNE Disability Services.
 
II. Communication Skills
The candidate must be able to effectively and efficiently communicate using verbal, written, and reading skills, in a manner that demonstrates sensitivity to patients, their families and all members of the health care team.  A candidate must be able to accurately elicit information, describe a patient’s change in mood, thought, activity and status. He or she must also demonstrate established communication skills using traditional or alternative reasonable means that do not substantially modify the standard.

III. Fine and Gross Motor Skills
The candidate must be able to, with or without the use of assistive devices, but without reliance on another person, to interpret x-ray and other graphic images and digital or analog representations of physiologic phenomenon (such as EKGs).

The ability to participate in basic diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers and procedures (e.g. palpation, auscultation) is required. It is also essential for a candidate to possess the gross motor skills sufficient to provide a full range of safe and effective care to patients. These include the ability to move within confined spaces, reach above shoulders, bend, stoop, squat, stretch and to reach below the waist. Fine motor skills are necessary to perform psychomotor skills such as picking up objects, grasping, pinching with fingers (intubations, manipulating a syringe, starting IVs), twisting and squeezing.

Physical stamina sufficient to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study is required. In addition, physical endurance and strength is a requirement in order to tolerate working an entire shift (including overtime or call), standing for long periods of time and sustaining repetitive movements (performing CPR, positive pressure ventilation, etc). Candidates must be able to provide hands-on patient care such as lifting, pushing and pulling excessive weight to position patients, pick up and carry children, ambulate patients and transfer anesthetized patients from stretchers and beds. When transporting patients to patient recovery areas, the candidate is required to move not only the patient's weight but also the heavy bed.
The candidate is required to carry heavy equipment and supplies, sit for long periods of time on stools with and without any back support, twist and turn to visualize monitors and the surgical field and possess the strength and flexibility to assist in the restraint of combative patients. In addition, the candidate must be able to move quickly to respond to emergencies. At all times the ability to administer care to patients in a safe manner is paramount.
 
IV. Intellectual Skills - Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities
The candidate must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize information in a timely fashion. In addition, the candidate must be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structure. Problem-solving, the critical skill demanded of nurse anesthetists, requires all of these intellectual abilities. These problem-solving skills must be able to be performed in a precisely limited time demanded by a given clinical setting. In addition, the candidate must be able to adapt readily to changing environments and deal with unexpected activities.

V. Behavioral and Social/Emotional Attributes
Candidates must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients.
Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. They must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of patients. They must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize information effectively in a precisely limited time demanded by a given clinical setting, while under stress, and in an environment in which other distractions may be present.
Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational processes.

Curricular Requirements

The MSNA curriculum is designed so that students are based on UNE's Portland campus for the first eight months (two semesters) of the program. The majority of the basic science didactic courses are offered during this period. The remaining 19 months of the program are clinically-based, with an emphasis on advanced coursework, clinical training, simulaton lab experiences, and completion of a capstone project. All students are required to complete the entire curriculum with passing grades. 

Course Requirements    
  Hours Credits
Summer (May - August)    
ANE 504 - Advanced Pharmacology I 45 3
ANE 507 - Basic Principles of Anesthesia I 60 4
ANE 601 - Professional Aspects I 30 2
ANE 603 - Advanced Physiology I 45 3
ANE 609 - Research Methods for the Health Professional 45 3
ANE 615 - Advanced Pathophysiology I 30 2
Subtotal  255 17
     
Fall (August-December)     
ANE 512 - Airway Management and Regional Techniques 60 4
ANE 602 - Basic Principles of Anesthesia II 60 4
ANE 604 - Advanced Physiology II 45 3
ANE 606 - Advanced Pharmacology II 45 3
ANE 612 - Advanced Physical Assessment 30 2
ANE 616 - Advanced Pathophysiology II 30 2
ANE 617 - Research Seminar 15 1
Subtotal 285 19
     
Spring  (January-April)     
ANE 623 - Advanced Principles of Anesthesia I 45 3
ANE 650 - Clinical Practicum I 15 1
Subtotal 60 4
     
Summer (April - August)     
ANE 624 - Advanced Principles of Anesthesia II 45 3
ANE 652 - Clinical Practicum II 15 1
Subtotal  60 4
     
Fall (August - December)     
ANE 625 - Advanced Principles of Anesthesia III 45 3
ANE 654 - Clinical Practicum III 15 1
ANE 628 - Research Practicum I 15 1
Subtotal 75 5
     
Spring (January-April)     
ANE 656 - Clinical Practicum IV 15 1
ANE 630 - Research Practicum 15 1
ANE 619 - Business and Leadership in Anesthesia Practice 15 1
Subtotal  45 3
     
Summer (April - August)     
ANE 658 - Clinical Practicum V 15 1
ANE 627 - Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management 15 1
Subtotal  30 2
     
Program Total  810 54

Clinical Training

Upon completion of the didactic portion of the program, the students move on to the 19-month clinical portion of the curriculum. The primary focus is clinical anesthesia training. The clinical experience obtained will be of the width and breadth necessary for the student to achieve clinical competency in anesthesia. This is accomplished through affiliations at various clinical sites.

Each student will participate in a minimum number of cases and techniques. The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs has set minimum standards for clinical experience that each student must achieve prior to graduation from the program in order to qualify for the National Certifying Examination.  All of the surgical specialties are available, including hands-on training in regional anesthesia techniques. Specialty experiences (i.e. neurosurgery, open-heart surgery, high-risk obstetrics) when not available at primary hospital affiliation sites, will be obtained from rotations at other medical facilities.

All types of anesthesia techniques and the latest agents are available for student learning. Students are able to obtain experience in general anesthetics, intravenous agents, invasive line placement, and regional anesthesia including spinal, epidural, and peripheral nerve blocks. Students are required to rotate to CRNA-only sites to gain this valuable experience.

Clinical Affiliates

Please refer to the school website for a list of clinical sites currently utilized by the School of Nurse Anesthesia.

Academic Policy

Grading

All programs in the Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) use the following scale to determine grades:

Percentage Grade
94 - 100 A
90-93 A-
87-89 B+
84 - 86 B
80 - 83 B-
77 - 79 C+
74 - 76 C
70 - 73 C-
67 - 69 D+
64 - 66 D
<64 F

NOTE: Fractional numeric grades are rounded at the discretion of the instructor
NOTE: Standards for Pass/Fail courses are determined by each program

Grade Point Average

Equivalent quality points assigned to grades as follows:

A 4.0
A- 3.75
B+ 3.5
B 3.0
B- 2.75
C+ 2.50
C 2.0
C- 1.75
D 1.0
F 0.0
Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this educational program, the student shall demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the faculty, specific competencies expected of graduates.  These competencies identify knowledge and skills necessary for competent entry-level practice of nurse anesthesia.  Upon completion of the program, the graduate will:

  1. Perform an anesthetic-related history and physical exam.
  2. Formulate and discuss a comprehensive anesthesia care plan for a given patient based on their preoperative assessment and Physical Status Classification I-VI.
  3. Implement and evaluate anesthesia management plans, procedures, critical decision-making skills during the anesthetic management of the patient
  4. Perform and utilize appropriate procedures during the anesthetic management of a patient. 
  5. Evaluate the postoperative course of a patient. 
  6. Perform resuscitation of the newborn infant, child or adult. 
  7. Function as a team leader for cardiovascular and/or pulmonary emergencies. 
  8. Provide first echelon care and maintenance of all anesthesia equipment.
  9. Critically analyze published data in the field of anesthesia and apply new evidence to technology, pharmacology, and techniques to patient care.
  10. Develop interpersonal behaviors consistent with that of a health care professional.  
Graduation Requirements

In order for a student to graduate, the following criteria must be met:

  1. Satisfactory completion of all didactic material.
  2. Satisfactory completion of clinical experience as required by the school and the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs.
  3. Satisfactory completion of stated UNE School of Nurse Anesthesia behavioral objectives.
  4. Completion of twenty-seven actual months in program.
  5. Evaluations must be completed and signed.
  6. All clinical records must be completed and submitted to the Anesthesia School Administrative staff.
  7. Completion of the capstone project.
  8. All fees must be paid in full.
  9. All library books must be returned.
  10. A current RN license and ACLS, PALS, BLS Certifications must be on file.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Equipment  
Ear mold for precordial stethoscope (approximately) $80.00
Books  
Required texts (approximately) $1800.00
Other Expenses  
Certified Background (approximately) $250.00
Malpractice Insurance (annual) - St. Joseph's students exempt $500.00
AANA Associate (student) membership fee $200.00
Nurse Anesthesia Review course (approximately) $775.00
Self-Evaluation Exam (SEE)  $150.00
National Certification Exam fee $725.00

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-283-0170, extension 2342 or by visiting the Financial Aid website.

Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions, gradadmissions@une.edu or 1-800-477-4863 for more program information or details about the application process.

For additional curriculum and program information, contact the Department of Nurse Anesthesia at 207-221-4516.

Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia (MSNA)

Westbrook College of Health Professions

School of Nurse Anesthesia

Occupational Therapy

Mission

The mission of the Occupational Therapy Department is to develop competent, compassionate occupational therapy practitioners and scholars through a dynamic, student-centered, occupation-based educational program.

Vision

Our vision is to lead the profession in the meeting society’s occupational needs by fostering excellence in occupational therapy teaching, scholarship and service.

Degree Description

Occupational therapy is a health profession whose practitioners work with clients of all ages and diagnoses.  The goal of occupational therapy intervention is to increase the ability of the person to participate in everyday activities, including feeding, dressing, bathing, leisure, work, education and social participation. 

Occupational therapy practitioners  work in  hospitals, clinics, schools, rehabilitation centers, home care programs, community health centers, psychiatric facilities, or nursing homes. With experience, the therapist might function in private practice, as a university faculty member, as an administrator, or as a consultant.

The graduate occupational therapy (OT) curriculum is designed to facilitate occupation-based, client-centered practice, critical thinking and clinical reasoning. Courses emphasize life-long learning and professional responsibilities and help students become competent practitioners. Workshops, lectures, intervention labs, small group classes and fieldwork experiences help students apply and integrate practice grounded in theory.
 

The graduate OT program at Westbrook College of Health Professions emphasizes inter-professional education among nursing, nurse anesthesia, athletic training, applied exercise science, physical therapy, social work, dental hygiene, physician assistant, pharmacy, public health, dental, and osteopathic medical students.

 

Accreditation

The Occupational Therapy Program was first awarded accreditation in January 1985. The OT Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20824-3449. [(301) 652-AOTA]. www.acoteonline.org

 

Graduates of the program are eligible to take the National Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR).  NBCOT, Inc. 12 South Summit Avenue, Suite 100 Gaithersburg, Maryland 20877 Phone: 301-990-7979 Email: Info@nbcot.org web: www.nbcot.org


National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT)
Most states require licensure to practice. (State licensure requires NBCOT Certification Examination results). Eligibility for the National Certification Examination requires:

  • Master's degree, with a major in occupational therapy.
  • Successful completion of an accredited occupational therapy curriculum; and
  • Successful completion of a minimum of six months of supervised fieldwork (Level II).
Admissions

PREREQUISITE COURSES

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS

QUARTER HRS

Human Anatomy & Physiology

Labs

8

12

Neuroscience

Lab

4

6

Introduction to Sociology

 

3

4

Introduction to Psychology

 

3

4

Abnormal Psychology

 

3

4

Human Development (Lifespan)

 

3

4

Statistics (taught in Math, Biology or Psychology dept.)

 

3

4

English Composition

 

3

4

  • Anatomy & Physiology and Neuroscience prerequisites must have been completed within seven (7) years of matriculation (taken summer 2008 or more recently).
  • Anatomy and Physiology courses must include all body systems and be a full-year (two semester sequence) or the equivalent. Combination of courses must consist of either 4 credits of anatomy with lab and 4 credits of physiology with lab OR 8 credits of A&P I & II (both with lab). Animal Physiology and Exercise Physiology will not satisfy the physiology prerequisite.
  • All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C-“grades are not acceptable).
  • Prerequisites can be in-progress or planned at the time of application, but must be completed by May, prior to matriculation. Please include any in-progress or planned coursework in your OTCAS application. Upon completion of the in-progress or planned coursework please submit official transcripts to UNE's Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.
  • Courses in medical terminology, college level chemistry or physics, and introduction to occupational therapy are highly recommended

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Successful completion of a Bachelor’s Degree, in any major, from a regionally accredited institution
  • Successful completion of all prerequisite courses (listed above)
  • Have a minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 as calculated by OTCAS
  • Completion of volunteer or work experience in a health or human service related setting is highly recommended.

Note: Before matriculation, accepted applicants will be expected to meet all health immunization requirements; to obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status.  Please visit Student Health Care for details. 

As required by clinical training sites, students may be subject to criminal background checks and drug screens prior to matriculation, and periodically throughout the OT program.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through the Centralized Application Service for Occupational Therapy (OTCAS).
  • Applications must be submitted to OTCAS by the posted deadline.  Students are encouraged to complete and submit applications as early as possible in the cycle. The OTCAS application portal opens in early August.
  • On-campus interviews are granted to qualified applicants by invitation only and are required for admission to the program.  Admissions are rolling and acceptance offers will be made after each interview session and continue until the program starts.
  • When reviewing applicants, the Admissions Committee will consider the full OTCAS applications including student GPAs, related work or volunteer experience, personal statement and letters of reference.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution in the US. See International Applicants
  • Official transcripts for in progress degrees and other in progress or planned prerequisites must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions prior to matriculation. (This includes all degrees/coursework in progress and planned at the time of submission of the OTCAS application.)
  • International applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university and not as a part of the admissions application
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Applicants. If applicable, the TOEFL requirement must be completed and the score received by the application deadline.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the OT Website.

Policy exceptions

The Occupational Therapy program and the OT Admission Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another occupational therapy program. The program director will review and award transfer credits on a case-by-case basis.

Advanced Placement

There is no advanced placement.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Technical Standards for the Profession of Occupational Therapy

The following abilities and skills are necessary to engage in the Occupational Therapy Program at the University of New England:

  • Cognitive abilities to analyze, synthesize, and integrate information related to anatomy, physiology, human development, psychology, sociology, kinesiology, and occupational studies in order to make clinical judgments for planning and implementing effective occupation-based interventions.
  • Critical thinking and judgment that promotes safety, optimal functional performance, remediation and adaptation.
  • Time management and organizational skills to meet demands of classroom and practice environment.
  • Interpersonal skills that include participating in classroom discussion, conducting interviews, observing body language, listening, responding, collaborative goal setting, and developing intentional relationships.
  • Evaluation of performance of self and others and making adjustments in behavior or promoting behavioral change in others to enhance occupational performance.
  • Communication skills to develop positive client relationships, complete written documentation consistent with OT practice, and participate as a health care team member.
  • Physical abilitites to perform physical examinations, such as balance, range of motion, and strength, and to accurately, safely, and efficiently use assessment tools, equipment, and other materials during occupational therapy intervention.
  • Emotional stability to handle the demands of a  practice environment. This includes acting in a professional manner, being dependable, meeting commitments, and being forthcoming about one’s own needs.
  • Ability to maintain personal appearance and hygiene conducive to working in clinical and community settings.

Standards of Professional behavior for MS OT Graduate Students - Key Areas

Communication Skills:

  • Communicate  in class, in groups and in one to one situations.
  • Accepts constructive criticism.
  • Non-verbal behavior reflects an interest in lectures, respect for guests, peers and faculty.
  • Communicate effectively (i.e., verbal, non-verbal, reading, writing and listening) for varied audiences and purposes.

Assumes Responsibility for own Learning:

  • Manage time and resources effectively to obtain maximum possible benefit.
  • Accountable for the outcomes of personal and professional actions
  • Follow through on comittments that encompass the profession within the scope of work, community and social responsibilities
  • Assignments are consistently completed on time.
  • Takes the initiative to make up missed assignments and classes.
  • Demonstrate evidence of honesty and  integrity in doing his/her own work.

Interpersonal Skills:

  • Interact effectively with patients and clients, families, colleagues, other health care professionals, and community members
  • Cooperative and  tactful with peers and instructors.
  • Exhibits self-confidence.

Problem Solving Skills:

  • Recognize and define problems, analyze data, develop and implement solutions, evaluate outcomes
  • Question logically, identify, generate and evaluate elements of logical argument
  • Recognize and differentiate facts, appropriate or faulty inferences and assumptions and distinguish relevant from irrelevant information.
  • Utilize, analyze and critically interpret evidence to develop  a logical argument
  • Solicit and identify quality sources of feedback, reflect on and integrate feedback, provide meaningful feedback to others
  • Adopts behavior based on feedback from faculty/peers.
  • Shows evidence of the ability to manage change and disruptions to a schedule in a professional manner.

commitment to learning:

  • Self direct learning and continually seek and apply new knowledge, behaviors and skills
  • Identify sources of stres san dimplemetn effective coping behaviors in relation to self, patient/clients and their families, members of team and in life balance
  • Demonstrate emotional stability
  • Presents a “professional appearance”.
  • The student interacts professionally with peers, clients, speakers and faculty.
Curricular Requirements
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
Summer

 

 
OTR 505 - Foundations of OT 3
OTR 520/520L - Functional Kinesiology & Anatomy 4
OTR 503 - Biopsychosocial Dimensions of Older Adults 3

OTR 503L - OT Interventions w/ Older Adults (includes level I fieldwork)

2
OTR 522 - Communications, Culture & Group Process 2
  14
Fall  
OTR 513 - Biopsychosocial Dimensions of Mental Health & Wellness 3
OTR 513L - OT Interventions in Mental Health & Wellness 0
OTR 515 - Biopsychosocial Dimensions of Adults 3
OTR 515L - OT Interventions w/ Adults (includes level I fieldwork) 2
OTR 502 - Occupational Analysis 3
OTR 524 - Applied UE Interventions 2
OTR 526 - Integrative Practice w/Adults 3
  16
Spring  
OTR 621 - Health Care Management & Administration 3
OTR 611 - Biopsychosocial Dimensions of Children & Youth 3
OTR 611L - OT Interventions w/ Children & Youth (includes level I fieldwork) 2
OTR 614 - Therapeutic Use of Self & Group Intervention (includes level I fieldwork) 2
OTR 610 - Integrative Practice w/Children & Youth 3
OTR 628 - Research Methods & Design 3
  16
Summer/Fall  
OTR 601 - Fieldwork IIA 6
OTR 602 - Fieldwork IIB 6
  12
Spring  
OTR 619 - Evidence Based Practice Seminar 3
OTR 630 - Essentials for Practice in OT 3
OTR 640 - Neuro-occupation 3
OTR 650 - Leadership/Advocacy within Delivery Systems 3
   
Student must take one (1) of the following: 605, 606, 607, 608,  641, 642, 665 or an approved elective from another department  
OTR 605 - Special Interest Practice Seminar 3
OTR 606 - Cognitive Neurorehabilitation 3
OTR 607 - Hand Therapy 3
OTR 608 - Advanced School Based OT 3
OTR 641 - Advanced Applied Motor Control 3

OTR 642 -Applied Mental Health Practice and Leadership

3

OTR 665 - Inter-Professional Experience with Older Adults

3
Approved elective 3
Total 73

Clinical Experiences
Students complete Level I Fieldwork experiences as part of didactic courses in a variety of community and medical settings. This experience reinforces class concepts. Students are supervised by qualified personnel including occupational therapists, teachers, social workers, public health nurses, and physical therapists.

Level II Fieldwork emphasizes the application of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in delivery of occupational therapy service to patients/clients. Students complete two full time level II fieldwork experiences, each is 3 months long.

The expenses incurred for room and board during these internships, and travel to and from them, are the responsibility of each student. Students may complete fieldwork at any approved location.

The requirements for Level II fieldwork include:

  • A minimum of six months (24 weeks, full time) of Level II Fieldwork experience, preferably with at least three months on a full-time sustained basis;
  • Completion of all fieldwork experience no later than 18 months following completion of academic preparation;
  • Supervision provided by a registered occupational therapist with at least one year of experience.
Learning Outcomes

The OT Department’s goal is to develop competent, compassionate practitioners and scholars. 

Upon completion of the Occupational Therapy curriculum, the student will be able to:

  • Foundations
    • Have acquired, as a prerequisite, a breadth and depth of knowledge in the liberal arts and sciences
    • Have an understanding, awareness, and appreciation of social, global and cultural  issues.
    • Be prepared as a generalist with a broad exposure to models and systems of current and emerging occupational therapy practice.
  • Occupation across the Lifespan
    • Articulate and apply evidence-based occupational therapy for people of all ages.
    • Demonstrate entry-level competence in person-centered and occupation-based practice across the lifespan.
  • Communication and Leadership
    • Commit to uphold the ethical standards, values, and attitudes of the occupational therapy profession.
    • Differentiate roles and responsibilities within occupational therapy.
    • Perform as a competent and compassionate inter-professional practitioner.
    • Demonstrate effective professional communication and leadership skills.
  • Critical Thinking in the OT process
    • Demonstrate effective critical thinking/clinical reasoning/interpersonal reasoning in occupational therapy practice.
    • Advocate for occupational therapy services and for/with the recipients of those services.
  • Scholarship and Research
    • Commit to engage in lifelong learning.
    • Commit to the utilization and promotion of evidence-based practice.
    • Synthesize information from research and knowledge bases to support practice.
    • Participate in professional and/or inter-professional growth and dissemination of research and knowledge.
Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete all courses prior to graduation and fulfill all curriculum requirements.

Jane O'Brien
jobrien@une.edu

Master of Science in Occupational Therapy

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Occupational Therapy

Physical Therapy

Mission

The Department of Physical Therapy believes that optimal 21st century, person-centered health care is best delivered by well-educated, compassionate leaders who think critically, reason intelligently, collaborate inter-professionally, and who promote health and wellness.  In this spirit, the department is dedicated to preparing students for contemporary physical therapy and advances the profession through its steadfast commitment to excellence in academics, clinical education, scholarship, research, and service. 

Core Values

The Department of Physical Therapy values excellence in student-focused teaching and learning, evidence-based practice, service to the community and profession, interprofessional collaboration, scholarship, and clinical practice.

Student-Focused

•  Friendly, collegial atmosphere
•  Low student-to-faculty ratios
•  Supportive faculty and staff

Academic Excellence

•  Expert academic and clinical faculty
•  State-of-the-art equipment and technology
•  Experiential learning, critical thinking and problem solving
•  Quality clinical experiences
•  High standards and expectations of student admission and retention
•  Continuous quality improvement

Evidence-based Practice

•  Critical appraisal of evidence
•  Integrate evidence, expertise and patient values
•  Best practice

Community & Diversity

•  Professional and community service
•  Embrace and learn from diversity
•  Non-discriminatory
•  Academic-Community partnership

Professional Conduct

•  Respect for all individuals
•  Trustworthy and truthful
•  Confidentiality of patient-therapist relationship
•  Sound judgment
•  Competence and professional development
•  Pro bono service
•  Life-long learning

Collaboration

•  Interprofessional Grand Rounds, seminars and symposia
•  Research and scholarship
•  Teaching and learning

Scholarship

•  Student participation and choice
•  Collaborative, interprofessional and individual intellectual pursuits

Health and Wellness

•  Whole person wellness
•  Injury and disease prevention
•  Promotion of healthy environments

Program Goals

The primary educational goal of the program is to prepare the graduate for autonomous practice wherein physical therapists are recognized by consumers and other health care professionals as the practitioners of choice for the diagnosis of, interventions for, and prevention of impairments, functional limitations and disabilities related to movement, function and health. (American Physical Therapy Association Vision Statement 2020) To achieve this goal, the faculty has identified the following six program goals:

  1. Core Attributes: Graduate compassionate, collaborative leaders who are critical thinkers and who promote health and wellness.
  2. Academics: Develop academic excellence.
  3. Clinical Practice: Promote faculty and student involvement in physical therapy practice across the continuum of care.
  4. Research and Scholarship: Generate and disseminate new knowledge.
  5. Service:  Identify, develop and promote opportunities for faculty and students to provide service to the institution, community, and  profession.
  6. Administration: Further develop efficient processes and resources to support the Department's operations.
Degree Description

The entry-level DPT Program is three calendar years (8 semesters) in length and includes a combination of classroom, laboratory, and clinical practicum experiences. The curriculum begins with the foundational sciences, through which the student explores and studies normal human structure and function, and fundamental physical therapy techniques. From this critical underpinning, the student engages in the evidence-based approach to the physical therapy management of impairments, functional limitations and disabilities related to movement, function and health across the life span. The curriculum sequence is generally organized according to key body systems (i.e., musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, integumentary). Coursework includes study of the functional and psychosocial impacts of health conditions, relevant medical and surgical interventions, and the physical therapy tests, measures, and interventions utilized within the patient/client management model.

The student is also introduced to the physical therapist's role in disease prevention and health promotion, education, consultation, legislation and policy-making, and administration. The student engages in scholarly inquiry, either by completing a case report or conducting  research under the direction and mentorship of a faculty member. The student may also explore topics beyond those required in the professional curriculum through elective courses or workshops offered by the Department and College.

Students complete three full-time clinical practica, totaling 36 weeks of clinical experience. More than 300 clinical sites around the United States are available to provide a broad base of experiences in a variety of settings. The sites represent the continuum of health care practice settings including acute care hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, outpatient private practices, ambulatory care centers, skilled nursing facilities, school/ preschool programs, and home health care. Full-time clinical practica experiences are integrated in the second and third professional years, enabling students to apply information learned in didactic courses to patients and clients.

Accreditation

The DPT program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). The Department, through its policies and procedures, is committed to assuring compliance with the evaluative criteria established by CAPTE.

Accreditation indicates that the institution and program have been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators. To contact CAPTE:

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
Email: accreditation@apta.org
Phone: (703)-684-2782 or (703)-706-3245

Admissions

Prerequisite Courses

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS

Quarter hrs

Biology

Lab

4

6

General Chemistry I & II

Labs

8

12

Human Anatomy & Physiology I & II*

Labs

8

12

Physics I & II

Labs

8

12

Statistics

 

3

4

Introduction to Psychology

 

3

4

Psychology Elective

 

3

4

  • All science prerequisites must have been completed within seven (7) years (taken Fall 2008 or more recently) prior to the PTCAS application deadline and be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C-“grades are not acceptable).
  • *Anatomy and Physiology courses must include all body systems and be a full-year (two semester sequence) or the equivalent.  Combination of courses must consist of either 4 credits of anatomy with lab and 4 credits of physiology with lab OR 8 credits of A&P I & II (both with lab). Animal Physiology or Exercise Physiology will not satisfy the physiology prerequisite.
  • All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better; “C-“grades are not acceptable.
  • Prerequisite courses may be in-progress or planned at the time of application, but must be completed by August, prior to matriculation. Please include any in-progress or planned coursework in your PTCAS application

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

  • Distinguished record of excellence and achievement in college as established by cumulative GPA and math/science pre-requisite GPA, extracurricular activities, community involvement, GRE scores, and letters of recommendation
  • Completion of Bachelor’s Degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to matriculation
  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, as calculated by PTCAS.
  • A minimum math/science pre-requisite GPA of 3.0 (excludes the 2 Psychology courses), calculated by UNE.
  • Successful completion of the General Graduate Record Exam (GRE)  Recommended that all section scores be above the 30th percentile.
  • A minimum of 16 hours of observation in PT practice is required. Applicants are evaluated on their knowledge of the breadth and depth of PT practice, therefore, observation in a variety of practice settings and patient populations is recommended.

Note:    Before matriculation, accepted applicants will be expected to obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status to meet all health immunization requirements.  Please visit Student Health Care  for details.

As required by clinical training sites, students may be subject to criminal background checks and drug screens prior to matriculation, and periodically throughout the DPT program.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admissions are accepted through the Central Application Service for Physical Therapy (PTCAS).
  • Applications must be submitted to PTCAS by posted deadline.  Given the normally heavy volume of applications, it is strongly encouraged that completed applications be submitted as early as possible in the cycle.  The PTCAS application portal opens annually in early July.
  • On-campus interviews are granted to qualified applicants by invitation of the Admissions Committee, and are required for admission.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made after each interview session and continue until the program starts. Applications received before the deadline will be given full consideration. Applications submitted after the deadline will be reviewed on a space available basis only.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions for a list of educational credential evaluators. 
  • International Applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university and not before then.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, (see International Admissions.)  If applicable, the TOEFL requirement must be completed and score received by the application deadline.
  • Official transcripts for in-progress degrees and other in-progress or planned prerequisites must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions prior to matriculation. (This includes all degrees/coursework in progress and planned at the time of submission of the PTCAS application)

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the PT Website.

Policy exceptions

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program and the DPT Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Requests for consideration of transfer credit will be handled on a case-by-case basis.

Advanced Standing

Requests for consideration of transfer credit for advanced standing placement will be handled on a case-by-case basis.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Academic Standards

The Department of Physical Therapy, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality physical therapist education program that complies with the evaluative criteria of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. The program provides learning experiences to enable graduates to achieve the outcomes required for the practice of physical therapy.  Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures for detailed description of academic standards.

Essential Technical Standards

The essential technical standards are pre-requisites for successful completion of the DPT program at the UNE. Guidelines for reasonable accommodation are discussed. Please read this document carefully to determine whether you possess the abilities and skills reflected in the technical standards below.

Principles:

  1. Physical Therapy is an intellectually, physically, and psychologically demanding profession.
  2. The obligation and mission of the UNE DPT program is to produce effective and competent physical therapists that are best able to serve the needs of society. Therefore, all applicants, regardless of disability, will be held to the same admission standards. Once accepted, all DPT degree candidates will be held to the same technical standards, with reasonable accommodations provided when necessary and appropriate.
  3. Individuals with documented disabilities applying to the UNE DPT Program will be expected to have completed the same academic prerequisites as their non-disabled peers. No applicant is required to disclose the details of a disability and no otherwise qualified individual will be denied admission to the DPT program based solely upon a disabling condition.
  4. Upon acceptance, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, under the law, is obligated to provide reasonable accommodations to DPT candidates and students with documented disabilities who are registered with the University’s Disability Services while completing the academic and clinical requirements for graduation from the program.

Reasonable accommodations:
Are provided to help minimize the impact of the student’s disability, provide equal access to the University’s programs and services while upholding the academic, clinical, and technical standards of the DPT Program.

Are provided to assist the student in learning, performing and satisfying the fundamental standards, so long as the student provides comprehensive documentation establishing his/her disability status prior to the need for reasonable accommodation

Are provided only to the extent that such accommodation does not result in lowering the technical standards of the Department of Physical Therapy or interfering with the rights of other students

Do not exempt DPT candidates from completing certain tasks deemed essential

Do not include reliance on peers-
When a candidate’s ability to function is compromised (with or without accommodation) the candidate must demonstrate alternative means and/or abilities to acquire essential information and demonstrate essential tasks without reliance upon another person to help perform that essential task.

Are determined by UNE Disability Services in consultation with DPT faculty.

In addition, DPT faculty are available to work with candidates with disabilities to help identify strategies that might assist them in performing technical standards.

Candidate Declaration of abilities and skills:

  1. Prior to the start of DPT classes, matriculating students must indicate that they possess the abilities reflected in the technical standards described below, either with or without reasonable accommodation.
  2. A DPT candidate with a disability who wishes reasonable accommodation must contact the Disability Services, Portland Campus, Lower Level, Ginn Hall, Phone: (207) 221-4418, Fax: (207) 523-1919. An offer of admission may be withdrawn or a DPT candidate may be withdrawn from the program if it becomes apparent at any time that he or she cannot complete the technical standards even with accommodations, that the accommodations needed are not reasonable, or that fulfilling the functions would create a significant risk of harm to the health or safety of the student or others.

Technical Standards: Abilities and Skills

Matriculation into the DPT Program assumes certain essential cognitive, emotional, and technical skills. Reflected in the standards that follow are those abilities and skills that degree candidates must possess to engage safely and competently in required learning activities. The abilities and skills are described in five domains, including observation skills; communication skills; motor skills (fine and gross); intellectual-conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social/emotional attributes.

I. Observation
Observation requires the functional use of vision, hearing, touch, and the use of common sense. Candidates must have visual perception, which includes depth and acuity. A candidate must be able to observe lectures, laboratory dissection of cadavers, and lecture and laboratory demonstrations. The candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately and obtain an appropriate medical history directly from the patient or guardian. Examples in which these observational skills are required include: observation of skin color; breathing regularity; temperature of skin; muscle tone; facial expressions; palpation of peripheral pulses, bony prominences and ligaments; visual and tactile evaluation for areas of inflammation; and visual and tactile assessment of the presence and degree of swelling. A candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand, noting nonverbal as well as verbal signals. The candidate must have sufficient vision, hearing, and touch to detect patient/client needs in a busy clinical environment. The candidate must be able to read and interpret equipment, patient charts, and diagnostic tests. The candidate must also be able to accurately monitor dials, displays, and equipment used in treatment of patients including exercise equipment and electrical modalities.

II. Communication
Communication includes: speech, language, reading, writing and computer literacy. Students must be able to communicate effectively, sensitively, and convey a sense of compassion and empathy with patients and their families, as well as perceive non-verbal communications, and to deal effectively with cultural and ethnic diversity. Physical therapy education presents exceptional challenges in the volume and breadth of required reading and the necessity to impart information to others. Candidates must be able to communicate quickly, effectively and efficiently in oral and written English with all members of the health care team. Candidates must be able to complete forms according to directions in a complete and timely fashion. The candidate must be able to demonstrate the ability to deliver and receive complex information in one-on-one and group settings, respond to questions from a variety of sources and respond appropriately to verbal and non-verbal communication, as well as explain complex information according to the listener’s needs and abilities, both formally and informally. A candidate must be able to complete paper and/or on-line forms and documentation according to directions in a timely fashion, accurately elicit information and describe a patient’s change in mood, thought, activity and posture. Candidates must be able to demonstrate sufficient communication skills to effectively train other DPT candidates, patients, family and support personnel.

III. Motor
The candidate must have sufficient strength, endurance and motor skills to effectuate the coordination of both gross and fine muscular movement, equilibrium, and the integrated use of touch and vision. Sufficient physical stamina is required to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study. The candidate must be able to access and negotiate laboratories, classrooms and workstations, attend clinical internships, and accomplish required tasks in the clinic and academic settings. The candidate must be able to perform emergency procedures such as: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; safely lift, transfer and position patients; safely assist and guard patients during gait training; safely and effectively administer exercise and examination procedures that require resistance or facilitation; perform non-surgical wound debridement, and manually adjust exercise equipment and assistive devices. Long periods of sitting, standing, and moving are required in classroom, laboratory and clinical experiences. The candidate must demonstrate: sufficient balance, coordination and ability to accompany and detect loss of balance in patients who are walking; the ability to support and guard patients who lose their balance during walking on level surfaces, as well as on stairs and uneven terrains/ramps; sufficient freedom of movement to be able to participate in all classroom and clinical activities; and the ability to lift and carry heavy objects. Required movements may include: pushing; pulling; standing; sitting for long periods of time with and without back support; twisting; kneeling; stooping and bending. The candidate must be able to use motor skills to accurately assess changes in: muscle tone, tissue and skin temperature, joint position, chest sounds and peripheral pulses, joint play and other examination tests. The candidate must also be able to: effectively apply compression, traction, resistance, and percussion; and demonstrate sufficient fine motor skills to be able to manipulate small objects and write legibly. The candidate must be able to respond to bells and alarms related to emergencies. At all times the ability to administer care to patients in a safe manner is paramount.

IV. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities
To effectively solve problems, the candidate must be able to: measure, calculate, reason, analyze, comprehend, integrate and synthesize information from the clinical, natural, and social sciences in a timely fashion. For example, the candidate must be able to synthesize knowledge and integrate the relevant aspects of a patient’s history, physical examination, and laboratory data. The candidate must be able to: provide a reasoned explanation for likely therapy, recalling and retaining information in an efficient and timely manner. The ability to incorporate new information from peers, teachers, and the medical literature in formulating treatment plans is essential. In addition, the candidate must be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand spatial relationships of structures. The candidate must have the ability to use computers for searching, recording, storing, and retrieving information. The candidate must be able to understand theory, research literature, and principles that apply to physical therapy practice, and analyze and solve complex patient problems. The candidate must be able to utilize knowledge of natural, clinical, and social sciences to develop appropriate interventions in a clinical setting. The ability to use critical analysis to understand theory, research literature, and principles that apply to physical therapy practice and to apply inductive and deductive clinical reasoning to solve complex patient problems is necessary. The candidate must be able to effectively engage in self-assessment of performance, as well as provide objective and constructive assessments of peers and faculty. The candidate must be able to identify significant findings based upon history and physical examination and interpret laboratory and diagnostic imaging data. The candidate must utilize sufficient judgment to ensure safe encounters with peers and patients and to effectively delegate to support personnel.

V. Behavioral and Social/Emotional Attributes
The candidate must be: dependable, punctual, ethical, and reliable; maintain professional demeanor in all situations; recognize stressors and be able to seek assistance as needed. Candidates must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities. They must: exercise good judgment, promptly complete all responsibilities attendant to the care of patients, and develop mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients. The candidate must also demonstrate a commitment to learning by seeking new knowledge and understanding, formulating their own thoughts and ideas, and taking ownership of their educational advancement. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. They must be able to: adapt to changing environments, display flexibility and function in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice. They must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize information effectively in the limited time demanded by a given clinical setting, while under stress, and in an environment in which other distractions may be present. The candidate must be able to abide by the APTA Code of Ethics, the Standards of Physical Therapy Practice and the Core Values, which can be found on the American Physical Therapy Association website at www.apta.org. Candidates must also be able to establish professional and empathetic relationships with individuals across the lifespan and from various cultures. Candidates must demonstrate integrity and honesty in the academic and clinical environment, as well as being able to engage in respectful interactions with individuals from various lifestyles, cultures, races, socioeconomic classes and abilities. They must be able to develop and maintain respectful working relationships with peers, faculty, professional colleagues, patients, family members and the general public and to recognize the psychosocial impact of movement dysfunction and disability on clients and families. The candidate must be able to accept constructive feedback and respond with suitable action.

Specific Examples of Technical Skills (Essential Functions) and Abilities:
Specifically, candidates must be able to:

  1. Attend and participate in classes for 30 or more hours per week during each academic semester. Classes consist of a combination of lecture, discussion, laboratory, and clinical activities.
  2. Use auditory, tactile, and visual senses to receive classroom instruction and to evaluate and treat patients.
  3. Read, write, speak, and understand English at a level consistent with successful course completion and development of positive patient-therapist relationships.
  4. Complete readings, assignments, and other activities outside of class hours.
  5. Apply critical thinking processes to their work in the classroom and the clinic.
  6. Exercise sound judgment in class and in the clinic.
  7. Participate in clinical experiences, which typically require students to be present 40 or more hours per week on a schedule that corresponds to the operating hours of the clinic.
  8. Gather decision-making pieces of information during patient assessment activities in class or in the clinical setting without the use of an intermediary (classmate, aide, etc).
  9. Perform treatment activities in class or in the clinical setting by direct performance.
  10. Sit for two to 10 hours at a time, stand for at least one to two hours at a time, and walk or travel for at least two hours at a time
  11. Frequently lift weights less than 10 pounds and occasionally lift weights between 10 and 100 pounds.
  12. Occasionally carry up to 25 pounds while walking up to 50 feet.
  13. Frequently exert 75 pounds of push/pull forces up to 50 feet and occasionally exert 150 pounds of push/pull forces for this distance.
  14. Frequently twist, bend and stoop.
  15. Occasionally squat, crawl, reach above shoulder level, and kneel.
  16. Frequently move from place to place and position to position at a speed that permits safe handling of classmates and patients.
  17. Frequently stand and walk while providing support to a classmate simulating a disability or while supporting a patient with a disability.
  18. Occasionally climb stairs and negotiate uneven terrain.
  19. Frequently use hands repetitively with a simple grasp and frequently with a firm grasp.
  20. Frequently perform tasks requiring manual dexterity skills.
  21. Frequently coordinate activities with gross motor and communication skills.

*Information and design from The Essential Standards and Technical Standards documents from the Graduate Program in Physical Therapy at Central Michigan and Sacramento State, and University of Buffalo’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, as well as the generic abilities developed by the physical therapy program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Curricular Requirements

The Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is eight semesters in length and includes a combination of classroom course work, laboratory coursework, and three, full-time clinical practica. In addition to the 103 required credits, students are invited to take up elective coursework offered by the department and by other graduate programs within the university.

  Credits
Program Required Courses  
BIO 502 - Gross Anatomy 6
BIO 504 - Neuroscience 4
PTH 501 - Foundations of PT Practice 5
PTH 502 - Kinesiology 5
PTH 503 - Normal Development 2
PTH 506 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disability and Illness 1
PTH 507 - Introduction to Clinical Medicine 1
PTH 508 - Pathology and Medical Management – Musculoskeletal System 2
PTH 510-  PT Mgt Dis Musc/ Skel System 11
PTH 514 - Scientific Inquiry 1 2
PTH 516 - Pathology and Medical Management - Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems 1
PTH 522 - PT Management of Patients with Disorders of the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems 4
PTH 524 - Clinical Education Seminar 1
PTH 525 - Practice Management 1
PTH 601 - Clinical Practicum 1 8
PTH 602 - Scientific Inquiry 2 2
PTH 603 - Pathology and Medical Management – Neuromuscular System 3
PTH 604 - PT Management of Children with Special Health Needs 5
PTH 605 - PT Management of Adults with Disorders of the Neuromuscular System 6
PTH 606 - Research Proposal or PTH 608 Case Report 1  or PTH 690 Research Practicum I* 2
PTH 607 - Clinical Practicum 2 8
PTH 700 - Administration 2
PTH 701 - Pathology and Medical Management – Integumentary System 1
PTH 703 - PT Management of Patients with Disorders of the Integumentary System 4
PTH 704 - Disease Prevention and Health Promotion 3
PTH 705 - Research Project or PTH 708 Case Report 2 * 2
PTH 706 - Public Policy & Physical Therapy 2
PTH 707 - Clinical Practicum 3 8
PTH 710 - Complex Case Management 1
Total Credits Required 103

*Students complete one of the following course sequences:

PTH 608 and PTH 708 or

PTH 606 and PTH 705 or

PTH 690 and PTH 705

Please note: Curriculum is subject to change.

 
Learning Outcomes

The primary educational outcome of the program is to prepare the graduate for practice wherein physical therapists are recognized by consumers and other health care professionals as the practitioners of choice…for the diagnosis of, interventions for, and prevention of impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities related to movement, function, and health. (American Physical Therapy Association Vision Statement 2020)

The Department of Physical Therapy, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality physical therapist education program that complies with the evaluative criteria of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). The program provides learning experiences to enable graduates to achieve the following outcomes required for the practice of physical therapy set forth by CAPTE, effective, January 2006.

After completing the physical therapy curriculum, students will:

  1. Integrate concepts from the biological, physical, behavioral, and clinical sciences into physical therapy services
  2. Exhibit professional conduct and behaviors that are consistent with the legal and ethical practice of physical therapy
  3. Demonstrate compassion, caring, integrity, and respect for differences, values, and  preferences in all interactions with patients/clients, family members, health care providers, students, other consumers, and payers 
  4. Demonstrate culturally sensitive verbal, nonverbal, and written communications that are effective, accurate, and timely
  5. Collect and critically evaluate data and published literature to apply in the delivery of care, practice management, and to examine the theoretical and scientific basis for physical therapy
  6. Screen patients/clients to determine if they are candidates for physical therapy services or if referral to, or consultation with, another health care professional or agency is warranted
  7. Complete a patient/client examination/reexamination and evaluate and interpret the examination data to determine a physical therapy diagnosis and prognosis
  8. Employ critical thinking, self-reflection, and evidence-based practice to make clinical decisions about physical therapy services 
  9. Collaborate with patients/clients, caregivers, and other health care providers to develop and implement an evidence-based plan of care that coordinates human and financial resources 
  10. Provide services and information related to health promotion, fitness, wellness, health risks, and disease prevention within the scope of physical therapy practice
  11. Advocate for patient/client and profession
  12. Provide consultative services and education to patients/clients, caregivers, health care workers, and the public using culturally sensitive methods that are adapted to the learning needs, content, and context
  13. Employ effective leadership skills in the context of supervising, delegating and mentoring within the profession
Academic Policy

Students are expected to abide by the academic policies and procedures and conduct code outlined in the University of New England (UNE) Student Handbook,the Department of Physical Therapy Student Handbook and the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures. Failure to abide by these policies, procedures or codes may result in disciplinary action.  

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Other Expenses

Other expenses will include textbooks and lab fees in some courses. Students should also anticipate transportation, housing and living expenses during clinical practica.

Equipment

All students are required to have access to high-speed internet service and a laptop computer with the capability of utilizing Blackboard or similar on-line education format.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

Conferring of the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is contingent upon the successful completion of academic and clinical coursework to include a total of 103 academic credits.

University of New England
Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions
716 Stevens Avenue
Portland, ME 04103
207-221-4225 or 800-477-4863

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy, Transitional (tDPT)

Mission

The Department of Physical Therapy believes that optimal 21st century, person-centered health care is best delivered by well-educated, compassionate leaders who think critically, reason intelligently, collaborate inter-professionally, and who promote health and wellness. In this spirit, the department is dedicated to preparing students for contemporary physical therapy and advances the profession through its steadfast commitment to excellence in academics, clinical education, scholarship, research, and service. 

Degree Description

The transitional DPT (tDPT) program culminates in the DPT degree and is “conferred upon completion of a structured transitional educational experience that results in the augmentation of knowledge, skills, and behaviors to a level consistent with the current professional (entry-level) DPT standards. The transitional DPT program enables the US-licensed physical therapist to attain degree parity with therapists who hold the professional DPT by 'filling in' any gaps between their professional baccalaureate or master's degree PT education and the current professional DPT degree education.”*  The tDPT program is a logical extension of curricular offerings from the Department serving the needs of our program graduates as well as graduates from other accredited baccalaureate or master’s degree programs

Program Goals

The tDPT program at the University of New England is designed to:

  • Offer physical therapists with a previously obtained baccalaureate or master’s degree the opportunity to update their knowledge base in areas within the profession that have been augmented over the past 10-15 years as reflected in the current DPT degree curriculum.
  • Support physical therapists who wish to better position themselves as autonomous health care providers by enhancing their current knowledge base in a variety of areas, including evidence-based practice, clinical decision-making, management sciences, prevention and wellness, and health care policy.
  • Provide an interactive and flexible distance education environment to meet the learning needs of today’s busy clinician.

¹Frequently Asked Questions: Doctor of Physical Therapy Program (Transitional)

Accreditation

The University of New England is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Admissions

ACADEMIC PREREQUISITES

All applicants to the Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (tDPT) program must meet the following criteria at the time of application:

  • Have completed a baccalaureate (BPT) or master (MPT) level degree in physical therapy from a Physical Therapy program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy (CAPTE) or equivalent
  • Have a current license to practice, and be employed as a physical therapist in the United States

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are submitted through UNE’s online application 
  • Applications for new students will only be reviewed for fall and spring terms. (Program courses are, however, offered in the summer, fall, and spring terms.) 
  • Admissions are rolling and applications are reviewed as they are received
  • Official transcripts from all previous colleges and universities must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions as documentation of all coursework and degrees completed 
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution and CAPTE accredited Physical Therapy program.  See International Admissions
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the tDPT website.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

The Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy program and the tDPT Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit for up to one course requirement may be granted by demonstration of course equivalency. The criteria for course equivalency include:

  • Successful completion (B or higher grade) of an equivalent graduate level course taken within the past five years prior to enrollment into the tDPT program.
  • Course completed must address the educational outcomes of the tDPT program course.
  • Work or other educational experiences may also be considered in addition to graduate coursework in determining course equivalency.
  • All requests for transfer credit will be reviewed ONLY at the time of matriculation to the program by the Department Admissions Committee.

Advanced Placement

No credit will be awarded for Advanced Placement.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

 

Grading

Students must complete, with a grade of “B” or higher, all academic courses in the tDPT curriculum. Students who earn a grade of “C+” or lower in any of these courses must re-take the course and earn a “B“ or better on the next attempt. If the student does not earn a “B“ or better in re-taking the course, the student will be dismissed from the tDPT program.

Course and instructor evaluations are one of the most important tools that we have for evaluating the quality of your education, and for providing meaningful feedback to course instructors on their teaching. In order to assure that the feedback is both comprehensive and precise, we need to receive it from everyone. Please note that course evaluations are a required element of every course; to receive grades at the end of the semester, students will need to complete the on-line course evaluations. In order to make this as convenient as possible, we will provide a two-week window for completion. If students have any questions regarding this requirement, they may contact the Westbrook College of Health Professions' Dean's Office.

Curricular Requirements

The tDPT program is an on-line educational experience, requiring the successful completion of six courses totaling 18 credit hours. [Note: A minimum of 15 credits must be completed at the University of New England.] Courses may be completed in any sequence with the exception of the Capstone course, which must be taken after successful completion of all other courses.

Curriculum subject areas and credit hours are listed below:

  Credits
PTH 730 - Pharmacology 3
PTH 732 - Management Sciences 3
PTH 734 - Clinical Reasoning and Evidence-Based Practice 3
PTH 736 - Prevention, Health Promotion and Wellness 3
PTH 738 - Legislation and Policy 3
PTH 740 - Capstone in Clinical Practice 3
Academic Policy

The University of New England (UNE) Student Handbook contains policies and procedures, including the University Conduct Code that applies to all students at the University. Students are also expected to abide by the American Physical Therapy Association’s (APTA) Guide for Professional Conduct and the APTA’s Code of Ethics.  You will note that many of the policies described in the UNE Student Handbook are congruent with the APTA’s Guide for Professional Conduct and Code of Ethics.  

Students will be expected to abide by additional course policies established by individual faculty members. Failure to abide by the conduct code described above, course policies or Department policies may result in disciplinary action. 

Registration/Add/Drop

Registration for courses will be on a first-come, first-serve basis until maximum enrollment is met. Students will be able to register for classes only after matriculation into the program.

Completion

The tDPT curriculum must be completed within three years of starting the program.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Equipment

All students are required to have access to high-speed internet service. It is recommended that students have their own computer with the capability of utilizing Blackboard or similar on-line education format.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

Conferring of the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is contingent upon successful completion of the 18 credits of academic coursework in the tDPT curriculum.

University of New England
Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions
716 Stevens Avenue
Portland, ME 04103

207-221-4225 or 800-477-4863

Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (tDPT)

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Department of Physical Therapy

Physician Assistant

Mission

The mission of the University of New England Physician Assistant Program is to prepare masters level primary care Physician Assistants who will practice with physicians and other members of the health care team. The Program is committed to developing practitioners who are educated in all aspects of healthcare including geriatrics, health promotion and disease prevention, and public health practice. Special emphasis is placed on training clinicians who will provide primary healthcare to rural and urban underserved populations.

Graduate Professional Competencies

The mission of the Program is accomplished by having graduates who meet the goals of the educational process.  Graduates of the Physician Assistant Program will:

  • Understand the basic sciences of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology and be able to utilize this knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
  • Understand the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and to apply them in the treatment of patients.
  • Elicit a detailed, accurate history and perform a thorough physical examination.
  • Understand how to order and interpret appropriate diagnostic tests in a cost efficient manner.
  • Present patient data and document it appropriately in the medical record.
  • Provide quality acute and ongoing patient care by appropriately delineating patient problems and by formulating and implementing patient management plans, including referrals to other healthcare providers and agencies.
  • Perform or assist in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and manage or assist in the management of medical and surgical conditions, particularly in life threatening situations.
  • Understand the principles of public health and incorporate health promotion and disease prevention into a patient care practice.
  • Use information technology in the provision of quality healthcare and clinical decision-making.
  • Evaluate the medical literature critically and apply this knowledge and the principles of evidence-based medicine to clinical practice.
  • Provide compassionate and competent healthcare to patients of all ages and backgrounds.
  • Understand the medical and social issues that affect the geriatric patient and provide appropriate management of these problems.
  • Counsel patients, their families and their caregivers regarding issues of health, illness and medical care.
  • Understand the historical and contemporary role of the physician assistant in the healthcare system.
  • Participate effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team.
  • Understand the principles of patient oriented healthcare and to communicate clearly with patients.
  • Identify the special dynamics of providing healthcare to rural or underserved populations.
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior by following the American Academy of Physician Assistants' Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession.
Major Description

The Master of Science - Physician Assistant Program (MSPA) has been planned to effectively utilize faculty expertise from the University's five colleges. Some faculty hold joint appointments with responsibility for teaching medical and physician assistant students as well as other health profession matriculants. Similarly, physician assistant candidates will receive clinical supervision as part of an integrated team of health providers. It is our expectation that these collaborative strategies toward teaching and learning will ultimately result in high quality, cost-effective health care delivery, particularly in medically under- served regions of New England.

Upon successful completion of the Physician Assistant Program, the University of New England awards the master of science degree. The program operates on a twenty-four month full-time calendar, beginning in late May  of each year with a new incoming class.

What is a PA?

The University of New England's Master of Science - Physician Assistant Program was designed according to the Essentials and Guidelines for an Accredited Educational Program for the Physician Assistant. The University of New England Physician Assistant Program is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).

Other

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health professionals licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. Physician Assistants are qualified by graduation from an accredited physician assistant educational program and/or certification by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants. Within the physician/PA relationship, physician assistants exercise autonomy in medical decision-making and provide a broad range of diagnostic and therapeutic services under the general supervision of the physician.

Admissions

 

PREREQUISITE COURSES

COURSES

SPECIFICS

SEMESTER HRS

Quarter hrs

Biology

Labs

8

12

General Chemistry

Labs

8

           12

Human Anatomy & Physiology

Labs

8

           12

Psychology/Sociology or related behavioral science

 

6

            8

English

 

6

            8

 

  • Anatomy & Physiology prerequisite must have been completed within seven (7) years of matriculation (taken summer 2008 or more recently). The courses must include all body systems and be a full-year (two semester sequence) or the equivalent. Combination of courses must consist of either 4 credits of anatomy with lab and 4 credits of physiology with lab OR 8 credits of A&P I & II (both with lab). Animal Physiology will not satisfy the physiology prerequisite.
  • All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C-“grades are not acceptable).
  • Prerequisites may be in-progress or planned at the time of application, but must be completed by December, prior to matriculation. Please include any in-progress or planned coursework in your CASPA application. Upon completion of the in-progress and planned coursework please submit official transcripts to UNE Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.
  • Courses in advanced physiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, statistics, physics, and biochemistry are highly recommended.

ACADEMIC/EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

 (Applicants who meet the minimum requirements for application should understand that the average GPA and number of hours of direct patient care for students accepted into the program are well above the minimum requirements.  Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee an interview or acceptance.)

  • At least 90 undergraduate credits from a regionally accredited institution(s) at time of application, and a Bachelor Degree prior to matriculation (unless in UNE pre-PA accelerated 3/2 track).
  • A minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.0, as calculated by CASPA, is required. (The average for matriculated students has typically been approximately 3.5 for the past few years)
  • A minimum CASPA BCP GPA of 3.0 is required. BCP is the GPA calculated by CASPA for all biology, chemistry, and physics courses completed. (The average for matriculated students has typically been 3.5 for the past few years)
  • A minimum of 250 hours of direct patient care is required. (The average for matriculated students has typically been in the range of 2500 – 3500 hours over the past few years.)
  • To get a clear understanding of the PA role on the medical team, “shadowing” of PAs in more than one practice facility and practice area is highly recommended and will be given consideration upon review of your CASPA application.  Applicants will be required to show evidence of PA shadowing hours in a primary care, inpatient or outpatient settings and must record in the “Health Care Shadowing Experience” section of CASPA. “Shadowing” does not count toward direct patient care hours.
  • Proficiency with computer technology is strongly recommended.
  • Submit official GRE test scores directly to CASPA or the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.  (Test scores must be from within five (5) years of expected enrollment.)

Note:     Before matriculation, accepted applicants will be expected to meet all health immunization requirements; to obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status.  Please visit Student Health Care for details.  Students must also have a current American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) course for the provider and must maintain current BLS throughout the program.

As required by clinical training sites, students may be subject to criminal background checks and drug screens prior to matriculation, and periodically throughout the PA program.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admissions are accepted through the Centralized Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA).
  • Applications must be submitted to CASPA by the posted deadline. Given the normally heavy volume of applications, it is strongly encouraged that completed applications be submitted as early as possible in the cycle. The CASPA application portal opens annually in mid April.
  • On-campus interviews are granted to qualified applicants by invitation only and are required for admission to the program.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made after each interview session and continue until the program starts.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution in the US. See International Applicants for a list of educational credential evaluators. 
  • International applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university, do not submit at time of application.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate (in writing and orally) in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Applicants. If applicable, the TOEFL requirement must be completed and the score received by the application deadline.
  • Official transcripts for in-progress degrees and other in-progress or planned prerequisites must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions prior to matriculation. (This includes all degrees/coursework in progress and planned at the time of submission of the CASPA application.)

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the PA website.

Policy exceptions

The Physician Assistant program and the PA Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another physician assistant program. The program director will award transfer credits on a case-by-case basis.

Advanced Placement

There is no advanced placement.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Program Academic and Technical Standards

Westbrook College of Health Professions Graduate Program Progression Policies

Academic Program Standards

PA students must complete all MSPA Program requirements and receive a passing grade in all courses and clinical rotations to be eligible for graduation.

Technical Standards

All students must be able to meet the following University of New England Physician Assistant Program technical standards to successfully complete the Physician Assistant Program.  A candidate for the Physician Assistant Program must have abilities and skills in five categories: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, and behavioral/social. Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities will be considered on an individual basis, but a candidate must be able to perform in an independent manner. The following skills are required, with or without accommodation:

Observation:  Candidates must have sufficient sensory capacity to observe in the lecture hall, the laboratory, the outpatient setting, and the patient's bedside. Sensory skills adequate to perform a physical examination are required. Functional vision, hearing and tactile sensation must be adequate to observe a patient's condition and to elicit information through procedures regularly required in a physical examination, such as inspection, auscultation and palpation.

Communication:  Candidates must be able to communicate effectively in both academic and health care settings. Candidates must show evidence of effective written and verbal communication skills.

Motor:  The ability to participate in basic diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers and procedures (e.g. palpation, auscultation) is required. Candidates must have sufficient motor function to execute movements required to provide care to patients. Candidates must be able to negotiate patient care environments and must be able to move between settings, such as clinic, classroom building, and hospital.

Physical stamina sufficient to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study is required. Long periods of sitting, standing, or moving are required in classroom laboratory, and clinical experiences.

Intellectual:  Candidates must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize. Problem- solving, one of the critical skills demanded of physician assistants, requires all of these intellectual abilities. In addition, candidates should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures. Candidates must be able to read and understand medical literature. In order to complete the Physician Assistant Program degree, candidates must be able to demonstrate mastery of these skills and the ability to use them together in a timely fashion in medical problem-solving and patient care.

Behavioral and Social Attributes: Candidates must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all academic and patient care responsibilities. The development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients and other members of the health care team is essential. Flexibility, compassion, integrity, motivation, interpersonal skills and the ability to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice are all required.

For more information on disabilities and accommodation, please contact the UNE Office of Students With Disabilities at (207) 602-2815.

Grading

Upon completion of a course of study, the faculty member in charge of that course submits the number of hours taught and a grade for each student to the academic coordinator. The MSPA program uses a standard letter grading system.

Incomplete Policy

An incomplete (I) grade is given to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The I grade must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or thirty days following the end of an eight-week session. The I grade defers computation of credits for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative F grade for the course.

Curricular Requirements

Note: The curricular requirements below apply to the the class entering May 2014 (Class of 2016). 

Phase I of the program of study consists of 56 credit hours in pre-clinical didactic course work. The summer, fall and spring terms include instruction in the fields of biomedical sciences, clinical medicine, public health, pharmacology, clincal assessment, anatomy, physiology, evidence based medicine, ethics and professionalism, specialty disciplines, surgery, geriatrics and emergency medicine.

Twelve months of clinical rotations will take place upon successful completion of the didactic phase. The program ends with a final week on campus, consisting of two credit hours, which provides a forum for the presentation of students' research projects to peers and faculty; offers assistance in preparing the graduating students for certification; and gives physician assistant candidates an opportunity to integrate the didactic and clinical portions of their training in preparation for the Physician Assistant National Certification Exam.
 

Course/Program Area Credits
Summer I
June - August (10 weeks)
 
PAC 501 - Anatomy 3
PAC 503 - Clinical Assessment I 2.5
PAC 557 - Pharmacology I .5
PAC 508 - Principles of Biological Science 4
PAC 509 - Clinical Medicine I 1
PAC 551 - Introduction to Public Health 1
PAC 552 - Evidence Based Medicine I 1
Semester total  13
   
Fall
September - December (15 weeks)
 
PAC 553 - Clinical Assessment II 2
PAC 518 - Pharmacology II 3
PAC 519 - Clinical Medicine II 8
PAC 564 - Interprofessional Geriatric Education Practicum I 2
PAC 565 - Integrating Seminar I 3
PAC 526 - Evidence Based Medicine II 2
Semester Total 20
   
Spring
January - May (20 weeks)
 
PAC 581 - Professional and Ethical Issues for the Physician Assistant 1.5
PAC 556 - Evidence Based Medicine III .5
PAC 566 - Specialty Disciplines 6
PAC 585 - Integrating Seminar II 3
PAC 533 - Clinical Assessment III 3
PAC 587 - Pharmacology III 3
PAC 589 - Clinical Medicine III 4
PAC 584 - Interprofessional Geriatric Education Practicum II 2
Semester Total 23
   
Spring II - Summer II
June - June (12 months)
 
Clinical Rotations  
PAC 600 - Internal Medicine (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 601 - Internal Medicine (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 602 - Emergency Medicine (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 603 - Surgery (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 607 - Family Medicine I (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 608 - Family Medicine II (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 612 - Primary Care Selective 6
PAC 613 - Elective 6
PAC 620 - Preparation for Clinical Practice 3
PAC 630 - Evidence Based Medicine IV 1
Semester Total 52
Learning Outcomes

The mission of the Program is accomplished by having graduates who meet the goals of the educational process.  Graduates of the Physician Assistant Program will:

  • Understand the basic sciences of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology and be able to utilize this knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
  • Understand the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and to apply them in the treatment of patients.
  • Elicit a detailed, accurate history and perform a thorough physical examination.
  • Understand how to order and interpret appropriate diagnostic tests in a cost efficient manner.
  • Present patient data and document it appropriately in the medical record.
  • Provide quality acute and ongoing patient care by appropriately delineating patient problems and by formulating and implementing patient management plans, including referrals to other healthcare providers and agencies.
  • Perform or assist in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and manage or assist in the management of medical and surgical conditions, particularly in life threatening situations.
  • Understand the principles of public health and incorporate health promotion and disease prevention into a patient care practice.
  • Use information technology in the provision of quality healthcare and clinical decision-making.
  • Evaluate the medical literature critically and apply this knowledge and the principles of evidence-based medicine to clinical practice.
  • Provide compassionate and competent healthcare to patients of all ages and backgrounds.
  • Understand the medical and social issues that affect the geriatric patient and provide appropriate management of these problems.
  • Counsel patients, their families and their caregivers regarding issues of health, illness and medical care.
  • Understand the historical and contemporary role of the physician assistant in the healthcare system.
  • Participate effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team.
  • Understand the principles of patient oriented healthcare and to communicate clearly with patients.
  • Identify the special dynamics of providing healthcare to rural or underserved populations.
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior by following the American Academy of Physician Assistants' Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession.
Academic Policy

Course Add/Drop or Withdrawal Policy

Due to the standard curriculum sequence within the MSPA Program, students are not allowed to add or drop courses. Students may not withdraw from an individual  MSPA course; to do so indicates a complete withdrawal from the MSPA Program.

Repeat Course Policy

Courses in the MSPA Program are offered once per year. The Program Student Development Committee in association with the Program Director determines whether or not a course or part of it must be repeated. It may be necessary for the student to await the next time the course is offered in the MSPA Program schedule.  Until the course if offered again the student may have to apply for and be on a leave of absence.  

Upon completion of a repeated course, a new listing and assigned grade are placed on the student's transcript. The original course listing and grade remain on the student's transcript. All courses are listed chronologically on the transcript by semester or academic period in which they are enrolled.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Lab Fees

A fee is charged to cover the expenses for specific science courses (e.g., anatomy), certain specific course or program component (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), evaluative testing, including the use of high-fidelity simulators, etc.) and an equipment fee for personal medical equipment.

Clinical Fee

The Clinical Fee is dispersed to clinical sites during the student's clinical year. It is an honorarium paid to the clinical site in appreciation for clinical training. While dispersed to clinical sites during the clinical year, to better equalize charges and award financial aid, a portion of the fee is billed to students during both the didactic and clinical year.

Tuition and fees are refunded per UNE policy. The refund policy can be found in the  University Catalog section on Financial Information for Graduate Programs.

Equipment

Students are required to have certain personal medical equipment. This equipment is group purchased (at a significant discount) for each entering Class and the equipment is delivered to students during the first week of the program.  Please do not purchase personal medical equipment from sources other than the Program's group purchase.

Books

Students in the didactic phase can plan on spending approximately $1,500 to $2,000 on required textbooks. Course syllabi and the program book list may also include recommended books which students are not required to purchase, but may wish to have as important reference materials.  Most of the texts used in the Program are available digitally via the UNE Library's Portal and can be accessed without additonal expense.

Other Expenses

Students are responsible for expenses involved with travel, parking, living expenses and meals.

Student Employment

The program discourages students from having outside employment while attending the PA Program. If a student feels that it is necessary to work while in the program, it is advisable that the student inform his/her academic advisor.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all program requirements prior to the issuance of their Master of Science degree and the certificate of completion of the program. 

Please call: 1-800-477-4UNE or 207-221-4225 for further information. Applications are available online from Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA) www.caspaonline.org

Master of Science (M.S.) Physician Assistant

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Physician Assistant Program

Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program

Certificate Description

The Teacher Certification Program (TCP) is for individuals who hold a baccalaureate degree and are interested in acquiring elementary/middle or secondary teacher certification. Through course work designed to satisfy department and state requirements, certification in elementary/middle education (K-8), secondary education (7-12 in either life science, physical science, English, history, mathematics), or art education (K-12) can be obtained.  All coursework must be completed at the graduate level (EDU 500 - 600).  After completion of this certification program, a student is eligible to enroll in the Master of Science in Education degree program with a concentration in Teaching Methodology.  This program builds on the Teacher Certification Program and, with the addition of 5 online core courses (15 credits), one may earn a Master of Science in Education degree. 

Prior to admittance into the Teacher Certification Program a student can take courses as a continuing education student. Continuing education (CE) students may enroll in one semester with a limit of two courses (6 credit hours).  One of those courses must be EDU 502 Curriculum Theory and Design.  To enroll in any more courses for subsequent semesters, CE students must be admitted into the TCP.

Accreditation

The Education Certification Programs are approved by the Maine Department of Education and meet documented state standards.  Please note that state requirements can change over time, which can affect curriculum and test requirements for students. Please check with your education advisor to obtain any updates. 

Admissions

The Teacher Certification program is for individuals who hold a baccalaureate degree and are interested in a career in teaching. Certification may be obtained in elementary/middle education (K-8), secondary education (7-12) or art education (K-12). Secondary certification areas are: life science, physical science, social studies/English or mathematics.

After completion of this certification program, a student is eligible to enroll in the Master of Science in Education degree program with a concentration in Teaching Methodology (MSM). The MSM is available only to UNE’s graduate Teacher Certification Students. This program is a 30 credit master’s degree encompassing 15 graduate credits from the Teacher Certification Program (TCP) and an additional 15 credits online that have been designated to satisfy Department and state requirements for certification in areas of elementary education (K-8), secondary education (7-12), or art education (K-12). The remaining 15 credits will be completed following initial teaching certification. These credits are from a totally online graduate program with in depth study in the areas of professional learning communities, differentiation, motivation and action research.

ACADEMIC PREREQUISITES    

  • Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited undergraduate institution
    • Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better for applicants seeking certification, a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the secondary level teaching content area
    • Applicants who do not have the required 3.0 GPA for secondary level teaching may be admitted to the program by passing the PRAXIS II in your subject area (e.g., science, social studies, etc.)
  • Submit official report of passing scores on all sections of the PRAXIS I.
  • Submit official copy of Education Tech III certification from the State of Maine.
  • Satisfy the Maine Department of Education student security clearance.  Documentation of this security clearance must be submitted as a part of the application.  The procedure for meeting security clearance requirements is available from the Maine Department of Education
  • NOTE:  UNE does not accept students for student teaching only, regardless of whether a state transcript analysis shows that all other academic and professional education requirements have been satisfied

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are submitted through the UNE online application.  Submission of the online application will include a personal statement, names and email addresses of three reference letter writers
  • Applications for new students will be accepted for the summer, fall, and spring terms. 
  • Students may enroll in no more than two (2) TCP courses (a maximum of 6 credits) through the Office of Continuing Education before applying to the program.  EDU 502 must be one of the two initial TCP courses.  Students do need to understand that registering for courses as a non-matriculated student will prohibit the student from enrolling in the same semester as a matriculated student.  Also, students are not eligible for financial aid to cover the cost of coursework completed as a non-matriculated students
  • Applicants must submit the following to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions, 716 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME, 04103
    • Official transcripts from ALL colleges and universities attended
    • Official report of PRAXIS I scores (Praxis II report of scores are required for students applying for secondary education certification who do not have a minimum GPA of 3.0.)
    • Official copy of Education Tech III certification
    • Transcript analysis from the State of Maine Department of Education.*
  • Completed applications submitted and completed by the deadline, will be considered by the Admissions Committee.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline for one term will be reviewed on a space available basis; or for admissions into the next available term.
  • International students and students with international degrees must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions. 
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.
  • International applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university, do not submit at time of application.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the TCP Website.

policy exceptions

The Teacher Certification program and the TCP Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Curricular Requirements
Elementary Certification Credits
Program Required Courses 33-43
EDU 502 - Curriculum Theory and Design* 3
EDU 510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom* 3
EDU 545 - Technology for Teaching and Learning 3
EDU 549 - Educational Psych and Classroom Management* 3
EDU 561 - Teaching Social Studies, K-8* 3
EDU 567 - Teaching Science, K-8* 3
EDU 573 - Teaching Mathematics, K-8* 3

EDU 581 - Reading/Language/Literature: Early

3
EDU 582 - Reading/Language/Literature: Adolescent* 3
EDU 530 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation* 3
EDU 1005 - K-8 Internship and Seminar*  15
Total Elementary Certification Credits 
*Indicates that the course requires a field experience.
45
   
Secondary or Art Certification  
EDU 533 - American Education* 3
EDU 502 - Curriculum Theory and Design* 3
EDU 510 - Exceptionality in the Classroom* 3
EDU 549 - Educational Psychology and Classroom Management* 3
EDU 530 - Educational Assessment and Evaluation* 3
Select one appropriate methods course from the following list: 3
EDU 536 - Teaching Secondary English*   
EDU 537 - Teaching Secondary Science*   
EDU 538 - Teaching Secondary Social Studies*   
EDU 539 - Teaching Secondary Math*   
EDU 541 - Methods of Art Education*   
EDU 1010 - Secondary Internship and Seminar * or
EDU 1015 - K-12 Internship and Seminar*
15
EDU 546 - Technology in Secondary Teaching
(Part of internship semester)
1
Total Secondary or Art Certification Credits 
*Indicates that the course requires a field experience.
34

Field Experience

The faculty in the Department of Education is committed to providing students with ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific, competency-based focus to meet the InTASC standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in the TCP will spend time in a field setting during each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., conducting observations, teaching lessons, administering assessments, etc.)  Transportation to and from fieldwork sites is the responsibility of the student. A minimum of 15 hours of field experience per semester is required.

Internship

Courses may not be taken during the internship semester. Therefore, all required coursework must be completed by the end of the semester prior to start of the internship. Note: There is one exception for secondary and art certification students: EDU 546, a 1-credit technology module, is part of the internship semester. Admission to the internship is not guaranteed (see section on “Admission Requirements and Successful Progression in the Program”). In addition, the student should have each of the following:

  1. Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  2. Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  3. Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  4. Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  5. Understanding of and empathy for working with students.
  6. No serious reservations identified on the Professional Performance Student Self-Assessment and Review.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer. Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the InTASC  standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Department of Education, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests. The University, at its discretion, will not place students in internship settings (1) where an intern's children or relatives are enrolled, or (2) where a spouse or relative of an intern is currently employed.

Professional Educator Review Board (PERB)

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence to the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB) with respect to the InTASC standards. This board is comprised of professional educators from area schools, as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a portfolio that attests to their proficiency in meeting the InTASC standards; they must present and defend their portfolio in front of the PERB. Receiving a passing evaluation from the PERB is a requirement for completion of all the certification programs and, subsequently, being recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

Academic Policy

Students in the Teacher Certification Program must maintain a 2.5 grade point average in order to continue in the program.  If a student does not pass an education course with a C or better, they are eligible to retake the course only once.  Grade point averages will be calculated using only courses taken at UNE (the cumulative grade point average) and using accepted transfer courses as meeting professional program requirements but will not be figured into the GPA.

All students must show evidence of passing Praxis II before the internship application deadline, which is February 1st for a Fall internship and October 1st for a Spring internship.

Students may obtain Praxis I registration information and Praxis II registration information from the Department of Education office or from the Educational Testing Service website: www.ets.org.

In addition to these achievement requirements, students admitted to UNE's teacher certification programs are assessed periodically for the purpose of determining their professionalism and suitability for teaching.  Students complete self-assessment questionnaires in each professional education course, and these are reviewed by faculty.  If serious reservations arise in two or more of the assessments, a committee will convene to determine a student's continuance in the program.  Finally, students must pass the Professional Education Review Board (referenced later in this section of the catalog) at which competency in the InTASC standards must be demonstrated.

Course Withdrawal Policy

In the fall, spring, and summer semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

Incomplete Policy

An Incomplete (I) grade may be given by the instructor to a student, who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The Incomplete grade must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days following the end of an eight-week session. Until changed, the Incomplete grade defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the deadline date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative F grade for the course. Once an Incomplete grade is removed, academic standing will be updated according to dean's list, good standing or probationary standards.

Completion Requirements

All coursework, including the internship, should be completed within a five-year timeframe.  A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of course work.  Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five-year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised program plan, in order to meet state certification regulations.

Learning Outcomes

Maine Department of Education Chapter 114

Standard One: Learner Development

The teacher understands how students learn and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

Standard Two: Learning Differences

The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that allow each learner to reach his/her full potential.

Standard Three:  Learning Environments

The teacher works with learners to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.

Standard Four:  Content Knowledge

The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners

Standard Five:  Innovative Applications of Content

The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical/creative thinking and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard Six:  Assessment

The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to document learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s on-going planning and instruction.

Standard Seven:  Planning for Instruction

The teacher draws upon knowledge of content areas, cross-disciplinary skills, learners, the community, and pedagogy to plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals.

Standard Eight:  Instructional Strategies

The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to access and appropriately apply information.

Standard Nine:  Reflection and Continuous Growth

The teacher is a reflective practitioner who uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students,  families,  and  other  professionals  in  the  learning  community),  and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Standard 10:  Collaboration 

The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Standard   11:   Technology Standards for Teachers -  (NETS.T)

Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for   Students   (NETS.S)   as   they   design,   implement,   and   assess   learning experiences  to  engage  students  and  improve  learning;  enrich  professional practice;   and   provide   positive   models   for   students,   colleagues,   and   the community. All teachers will meet the following standards and performance indicators. 

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

FINANCIAL AID

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call 207-602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

  • Individuals who have full acceptance in the Teaching Certification Program can transfer up to, but no more than (6) education credits from other universities.
  • In-service or workshop-type courses that do not carry college credit will not be accepted for transfer equivalency.
  • No courses of any kind will be accepted from other institutions after your acceptance into the program at UNE without a course equivalency granted prior to the course’s being taken.

William C. Diehl, Ph.D.

email: wdiehl@une.edu

Eligible for Teaching Certification by State of Maine

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Education

Public Health

Major Description

Overview

The School of Community and Population Health (SCPH) is dedicated to advancing public health knowledge and practice through education, research, service, practice, training, and workforce development.

SCPH collaborates with other UNE Colleges as well as with local, state, national, and global organizations and universities on chronic disease, health policy, health outcomes research, program evaluation, and community health assessments.

Major Description

The School of Community and Population Health offers a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree and a Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH). These programs provide a graduate education to individuals currently working in the public health field, allied health professionals, clinicians, and individuals in the beginning stages of a career in public health. The curriculum is delivered in an online format, with full- and part-time options, and is intentionally flexible and readily applicable to students regardless of where they live.

The Master of Public Health is a 46-credit hour curriculum that develops and enhances skills in a variety of professional areas, including social and behavioral health, program development and evaluation, and public health practice and management. This degree culminates in a practicum, which includes a public health internship and capstone research project.

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health is an 18-credit hour program that provides students with the core public health courses they need to broaden and enhance their professional knowledge. All courses in the Graduate Certificate in Public Health are also transferable to UNE's MPH degree program.

Program Goals

Education

  1. Recruit and enroll compassionate, motivated, and academically oriented students reflecting diversity in ethnicity, race, age, gender, and experience, and demonstrated passion for improving public health.
  2. Graduate students who are prepared with the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to become successful public health professionals.

Research

  1. Sustain a robust community-oriented research agenda consonant with the program mission and goals.
  2. Train students in research methods by providing practical learning opportunities that allow for meaningful participation in the generation of new knowledge and community relationship building.

Service

  1. Encourage students to perform community service with a public health focus.
  2. Cultivate and promote a culture of active public health service through faculty, staff, and student engagement in the community.

Practice and Workforce Development

  1. Monitor and address public health-related workforce development needs and potential solutions.
  2. Demonstrate ongoing contributions to training and workforce development through the activities of the Area Health Education Center (AHEC), Geriatric Education Center (GEC), Health Literacy Institute, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed), and other public health initiatives.
Accreditation

The Master of Public Health degree program is accredited by the Council of Education for Public Health (CEPH). The Master of Public Health and the Graduate Certificate in Public Health are programs approved by the Maine State Board of Education and accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Admissions

The Master of Public Health (MPH) degree is a 46-credit graduate program of the University of New England’s College of Graduate Studies that provides education in the disciplines associated with public health.


The program is delivered completely online and offers a part-time option. The MPH program is designed to be accessible anywhere there is a computer, and welcomes both adult learners and traditional students.

 

Requirements for admission  

Requirements for the Graduate Program in Public Health include but are not limited to:

  • A sincere interest in continuing professional development in public health science.
  • The potential to improve practice through application of new knowledge and skills.
  • The ability to pursue rigorous online graduate study.
  • Current employment in a setting conducive to applying course concepts and strategies is highly desirable.
     

 Academic prerequisites:

  • Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited undergraduate institution, or international equivalent, with a major that is relevant to the student’s professional goals.
  • Undergraduate cumulative GPA or 3.0 or better.
  • College-level courses in mathematics and science with a minimum grade of a “B” or satisfactory completion of a graduate level course in mathematics or science. In lieu of college-level courses in either, students may submit GRE subject test scores in mathematics or science, or the GRE quantitative ability score.
     

Technology requirements:
 

Courses in the Graduate Programs in Public Health are delivered by Blackboard, an online course management system with an audio component and the following are required to complete the program

  • Access to the internet and to computer audio capability
  • Specific software as described in course syllabi
  • Capacity to succeed in a distance learning format 
     

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are submitted through UNE’s online application. Submission of the online application will include a current curriculum vita or resume, a personal statement describing applicant’s interest in Public Health, a role statement detailing the applicant's current role in public health or what that role will be after attaining the degree, and the names and email addresses of three reference letter writers.
  • Official transcripts from all previous colleges and universities must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions as documentation of all coursework and degrees completed 
  • Applications for new students will be accepted for the summer, fall, and spring terms.
  • Applicants must submit the following to the Office of Online Worldwide Learning, 716 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME, 04103
    • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended
    • GRE scores if applicable
  • Only fully complete applications (with all supporting documentation) submitted by the deadline will be considered by the Admissions Committee.
  • Students not seeking a degree may enroll into individual courses as a non-matriculated student, space permitting and upon approval by the Director of the program. (Non-matriculated students must hold a bachelor's degree and may take up to two courses only.) Students wishing to take more than two courses in the program must apply to UNE and be accepted into the program prior to enrolling in the third course. Students cannot move from non-matriculated status to matriculated status within the same semester.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Public Health website.

Advanced Standing

  • Students who have earned a certificate of graduate study in public health from another institution within the last five (5) years, may apply for admission to the MPH program with advanced standing.  The MPH program will grant advanced standing when a faculty review determines that the courses are equivalent to the UNE certificate courses, and that the student’s transcripts reflect a grade of “B” or better in all core public health courses.
  • UNE graduate certificate-matriculated students, who are in good standing, may apply to the MPH program and request advanced standing at any time during the certificate program. 
  • UNE students who have completed the graduate certificate program may apply for advanced standing in the MPH program within five (5) years of completing the graduate certificate program in Public Health.

Transfer Credit
To request consideration for transfer credit, the student must provide an official transcript, a course syllabus, and complete the transfer credit form. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the Graduate Programs in Public Health.

  • Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) Program: upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to two, 3-credit courses (maximum six semester credits) into the program.
  • Master of Public Health (MPH) Program: upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum nine semester credits) into the program.
  • Transfer courses must:
    • Be classified as graduate level.
    • Have been taken within five years of application.
    • Be from a CEPH accredited institution.
    • Have been completed with a grade of “B” o better.
    • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or a particular course that meets the goal of the student’s public health education.
    • Not have been applied toward any other degree here or elsewhere.

 

Experiential Learning
No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Policy exceptions

The Master of Public Health program and the MPH Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

·         FINANCIAL AID

 

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

To request consideration for transfer credit, the student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the Graduate Programs in Public Health.

Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) Program: Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to two, 3-credit courses (maximum of six credits) into the program.
Master of Public Health (MPH) Program: Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the program.

Transfer courses must:

  • Be classified as graduate level.
  • Have been taken within five years of application.
  • Be from a CEPH accredited institution.
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses, or a particular course that meets the goal of the student’s public health education.
  • Not have been applied toward any other degree here or elsewhere.

Advanced Placement

  • Students who have earned a certificate of graduate study in public health from another institution within the last five years, may apply for admission to the MPH program with advanced standing.  The MPH program will grant advanced standing when a faculty review determines that the courses are equivalent to the UNE certificate courses, and that the student’s transcripts reflect grades of “B” or better in all core public health courses.
  • UNE Graduate Certificate in Public Health students, who are in good standing, may apply to the MPH program and request advanced standing at any time during the certificate program. 
  • UNE students who have completed the Graduate Certificate in Public Health may apply for advanced standing in the MPH program within five years of completing the certificate program.

Experiential Learning

No credit will be awarded to students for experiential learning.

Curricular Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health includes the following required courses (18 credits):

  1. GPH 702 Public Health Policy and Management (3 credits)
  2. GPH 712 Principles of Epidemiology (3 credits)
  3. GPH 714 Principles of Public Health (3 credits)
  4. GPH 716 Biostatistics (3 credits)
  5. GPH 722 Introduction to Environmental Health (3 credits)
  6. GPH 726 Social and Behavioral Health (3 credits)

The Master in Public Health program includes the following courses (46 credits):

The following five core courses (15 credits):

  1. GPH 702 Public Health Policy and Management (3 credits)
  2. GPH 712 Principles of Epidemiology (3 credits)
  3. GPH 716 Biostatistics (3 credits)
  4. GPH 722 Introduction to Environmental Health (3 credits)
  5. GPH 726 Social and Behavioral Health (3 credits)

All students must complete the following required courses (10 credits)

  1. GPH 714 Principles of Public Health (3 credits)
  2. GPH 719 Research Methods (3 credits)
  3. GPH 745 Integrated Public Health Practicum: Practical Experience (2 credits)
  4. GPH 746 Integrated Public Health Practicum: Capstone Project (2 credits)

7 of the following 16 electives (21 credits)

  1. GPH 704 Public Health Law and Ethics (3 credits)
  2. GPH 705 Community-Based Participatory Research (3 credits)
  3. GPH 706 Public Health Administration (3 credits)
  4. GPH 709 Public Health Emergency Preparedness (3 credits)
  5. GPH 713 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3 credits)
  6. GPH 717 Applied Epidemiology (3 credits)
  7. GPH 720 Organizational Theory and Behavior (3 credits)
  8. GPH 724 Occupational Health (3 credits)
  9. GPH 725 Public Health Financial Management (3 credits)
  10. GPH 728 Health Literacy and Plain Language (3 credits)
  11. GPH 730 Health Care Economics (3 credits)
  12. GPH 732 Community Assessment (3 credits)
  13. GPH 734 The Obesity Epidemic: A Public Health Perspective (3 credits)
  14. GPH 735 Health Information Systems (3 credits)
  15. GPH 738 Program Planning and Evaluation (3 credits)
  16. GPH 740 Global Health (3 credits)

Integrated Public Health Practicum

The integrated public health practicum includes a 2-credit practical experience (GPH 745) and a 2-credit capstone project (GPH 746).

GPH 745 Integrated Public Health Practicum: Practical Experience (2 credits)

The practical experience is a required part of the Master of Public Health program and provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom learning in a public health environment and to work with experienced public health professionals. Working with a preceptor, students will develop goals for the practical experience and complete a defined project in a minimum of 120 hours. This will be an opportunity to develop practice-based skills that enhance individual career goals and to demonstrate additional skills such as leadership, communication, and teamwork. This experience is supervised by an approved preceptor and takes place at an approved placement site.

GPH 746 Integrated Public Health Practicum: Capstone Project (2 credits)

This is the synthesis component of the Master of Public Health Program, which allows each student the opportunity to apply the theory, principles, and science of public health. Each student is required to design, execute, and complete a project, and must have successfully completed all Master of Public Health course requirements before registering for this component. The project will complement each student's professional and personal goals. The capstone project provides the opportunity for students to integrate and apply learning from throughout the Master of Public Health curricular experience.

GPH 795 Independent/Directed Study (3 credits)

Students enrolled in the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program may propose independent or directed studies to further special scholarship or research interests. Students should complete all core and required MPH courses prior to the independent/directed study course. The proposed course requires the approval of the faculty sponsor, the Director of the program, and the Dean of the Westbrook College of Health Professions.

Competencies

The Graduate Programs in Public Health adapted the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) competencies. In addition, the program places special emphasis on three public health competencies for all students  that are core to our program.

UNE Master of Public Health Program and Graduate Certificate of Public Health Program Competencies

Learning Outcomes
Academic Policy

Please refer to the School of Community and Population Health Student Handbook for relevant academic policies.

Incomplete Grades

Students are expected to complete all course work by the appointed end date of the course. Under extenuating circumstances, a student may petition the course instructor and program director or designee, in writing, for a temporarily-assigned incomplete (I) grade. The petition must include an expected date of course completion agreed upon by the instructor and student, and may not exceed four weeks following the end of the course. The I grade must be changed within the time limit imposed by the course instructor, but no more than four weeks following the end of the course. The I grade defers computation of credits for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time limit imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative F grade for the course. In exceptional circumstances (death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be reviewed and signed by the program director and academic dean. 

Course Withdrawal

Course drops are allowed until the day after classes begin. As all courses officially begin on a Wednesday, students may drop a course without financial penalty until Thursday after the start date through U-Online.  A student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty for a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the session, as specified in the current academic calendar. If the withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average. Course withdrawals will result in tuition refunds based on the short-term courses refund schedule noted in the Financial Information for Graduate Programs. Non-matriculated students will forfeit their registration fee. Not logging into a course does not constitute a withdrawal.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the instructor and the Graduate Programs in Public Health director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and program director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU, the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e. part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veteran's benefits, etc.

Leave of Absence

Students must enroll and successfully complete at least one course per term. A leave of absence (LOA) for one term or more, not to exceed one academic year, may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate, and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence Form available from the respective program/school director or Registration Services. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. The policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. This LOA period is considered part of the six years allowed to complete the MPH degree or three years allowed to complete the GCPH.
Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or Registrar (undergraduate) to indicate a change of plans.

University/ Program Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from your respective program/school director or Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of the Graduate Programs in Public Health; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions.

Academic Integrity

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the dean of the appropriate college and, if upheld, will result at minimum in a failing grade on the assignment and at maximum in dismissal from the University of New England. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without the permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Students with Disabilities 

Students with disabilities who require accommodations or modifications should communicate their needs to the Director, Office of Students with Disabilities, University of New England, 11 Hills Beach Road, Biddeford, ME 04005. (207) 602-2815. Please allow time for course modifications to occur. Ideally, students should contact the office on the same date that they register for a course. Timely accommodations are dependent on early registration with Disability Services.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Graduation Requirements

To qualify for completion of and receive the Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete 18 credits of specified course work within three consecutive years.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Have been recommended by the GPPH faculty for graduation.
  • Have no outstanding financial obligations to the University.

To qualify for completion of and receive the Master of Public Health (MPH) students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete 46 credits of specified course work within six consecutive years.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Have been recommended by the GPPH faculty for graduation.
  • Have no outstanding financial obligations to the University.

For additional information about the educational opportunities in the School, please contact the Office of Online Worldwide Learning at owladmissions@une.edu or 1-855-325-0895

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Master of Public Health (MPH) and Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH)

Westbrook College of Health Professions

Public Health

Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions

Mission

The University is committed to our distance-learning students. The students who choose to learn through the University's extended campus are an integral part of the University community. Technological links enable students to interact with their faculty, advisors, support service administrators, as well as their student colleagues.

Program Description

The Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions (SPHP) program is for students who have completed a baccalaureate degree and wish to enter a health professions program but lack the necessary prerequisite courses. Most students will be in the workforce and changing careers. They may find it difficult to attend a traditional college for various reasons: some are in the military, some hold jobs with inflexible work hours, and some live in rural areas.  Students may enroll in the SPHP  courses at any time and from anywhere in the world.  The courses are designed to be completed in 16 weeks, but they are self-paced so depending on the circumstances students may complete the courses at an acclerated pace in order to meet their academic needs.

All of the courses are accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA).

Many health professions programs accept these courses but we encourage you to check with the schools to which you are planning to apply to verify that the courses are transferrable before you register.

For more information on the SPHP program, the courses that are offered, including prerequisites, registration information and a description of the laboratory component please call or e-mail Online Worldwide Learning (OWL).

sross6@une.edu
855-325-0894

Admissions

Students may enter the program at any point as long as they meet the prerequisites for the individual courses.  They may take as many courses as they need in order to meet the prerequisite requirements for the health professions program to which they are applying.  For students wishing to take more than one course at a time, please email Sam Ross at sross6@une.edu or call 855-325-0894. All students are required to submit a transcript showing bachelor's degree completion within six weeks of starting their first course.

Technology Requirements

Technology requirements may differ by course offered.  Please refer to COM Online Education or email sross6@une.edu for technology requirements for the class you are interested in taking.

Curricular Requirements
Courses Credits
MEDT 1000 - Medical Terminology 3
MATH 1005 - Statistics for the Health Professions 4
PHYS 1010 - Physics for the Health Professions 4
CHEM 1010 - Medical General Chemistry I/Lecture 3
CHEM 1010L - Medical General Chemistry I/Lab 1
CHEM 1011 - Medical General Chemistry II/Lecture 3
CHEM 1011L - Medical General Chemistry II/Lab 1
CHEM 1020 - Medical Organic Chemistry I/Lecture 3
CHEM 1020L - Medical Organic ChemistryI/Lab 1
CHEM 1021 - Medical Organic Chemistry II/Lecture 3
CHEM 1021L - Medical Organic Chemistry II/Lab 1
BIOL 1010 - Medical Biology I w/Lab 4
BIOL 1011 - Medical Biology II w/Lab 4
CHEM 1005 - Medical Biochemistry 4
PHSL 1010 - Medical Physiology 4
 BIOL 1020 - Microbiology for Health Professions/Lecture 3
BIOL 1020L- Microbiology for Health Professions Lecture & Lab 4
ANAT 1005 - Medical Anatomy for the Health Professions 4

 BIOL 1030 - Pathophysiology for Health Professions
 

4
Exam Procedures

Students can either take their final proctored exam online using Proctor U or at the campus of the University of New England.

Written Proctored Exam

Students may take their exam at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine on the Biddeford Campus. The exam is offered the first Saturday of every month. If the first Saturday of the month is a holiday, the exam will take place on the second Saturday of the month.  Please email COMDistance@une.edu to schedule your exam.

Online Exams

For instructions on taking online exams please visit, ProctorU.

Academic Policy

Course Length and Extensions:

 1. Courses in SPHP program are equivalent to one-semester courses designed to be completed in 16 weeks.

2. Enrollment in the course begins the day your section opens, which is listed in the Academic Calendar found on the SPHP Webpage.

3. Students for whom a grade has not been posted by week 14 will be flagged by the administrative staff.

Upon completion of a course, the course instructor submits a grade for each student.   The instructor will notify students once their final grade has been calculated.

Withdrawal from the Course and Refunds

To withdraw from a course, please e-mail UNERegistrar@une.edu with your intentions to withdraw and include the course subject and number (Example: ANAT 1005). This action will result in a W grade for the course.

Refund POLICY

  • 100% refund prior to the official start of the course.
  • 40% refund within the first week of the official course start date.
  • No refund after the first week of the official course start date.

For further information concerning refunds, please see http://www.une.edu/businessoffice/refunds.cfm.

Financial Information

We do not accept any type of financial aid or payment plan at this time, with the exception of military assistance.  Students are expected to make payment in full at the point of checkout.

Rebecca Rowe
rrowe@une.edu

Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions

Social Work

Mission

The University of New England School of Social Work embraces a vision of sustainable, equitable, diverse communities committed to universal human rights and social and economic justice. From this perspective, health is identified as physical, emotional, social and spiritual well-being.  The mission of the School of Social Work is to educate a diverse cadre of professional social workers who will translate this vision into practice, to produce applied and evidence-based knowledge to push this vision forward, and to  create and sustain interdisciplinary and collaborative partnerships with communities toward this vision. 

We are committed to human dignity, diversity, and self-determination and the struggle against domination, exploitation, and violence in all forms.  Our vision is firmly grounded in human resilience, capacity building, and the potential for individual and collective transformation at all systemic levels and within all organizations.  This includes a professional obligation to combat and dismantle barriers to human dignity and to advocate for resource equity and social justice.  We respect people’s memberships in groups and communities distinguished by class, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, ability, and culture while honoring each person’s individuality. Our program advances growth and change, global and local equity, and relational connection among all people.

As a program within the Westbrook College of Health Professions, the School embraces a comprehensive definition of health as a state of complete physical, emotional, social, and spiritual well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. We believe that health, defined in this way, is a universal right. The majority of human suffering is embedded in inequity in the distribution of resources, with vulnerable populations at greatest risk. Thus, our focus is on changing those structures and relationships that foster the inequities that undermine the promotion of health. The School realizes this goal by teaching empowering theories for practice and developing collaborative relationships based on mutuality and respect, at all levels, from direct practice to societal movements.

Major Description

The School of Social Work prepares people for advanced professional practice and is accredited to offer the Master of Social Work (MSW) degree by the Council on Social Work Education. MSW graduates learn to understand the potential for individual and collective human development when people live with dignity and social justice; to identify people's strengths across diverse populations and how to build upon them; to understand the multiple social, cultural, political and economic factors influencing the design, development and evaluation of social policies and programs; to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to carry out multiple social work interventions consistent with the School's mission and the profession's ethics; and to develop intervention strategies that empower individuals, families, groups, or communities.

The MSW degree offers graduates the opportunity to play active roles in health and mental health, alcohol and substance abuse, poverty and public welfare, women's and children's services, domestic violence, homelessness, and other emerging areas of service delivery. The program prepares graduates to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities in an array of settings and with diverse populations. The values and commitments embedded in the School's Mission Statement permeate our work in every area.

Program Options

The School of Social Work offers several options for those interested in getting their MSW degree: a traditional face-to-face option, a flipped/hybrid option (called FISH_E classes) and an online option.  In the campus-based and flipped/hybrid option, students attend classes at the Portland campus.  Flipped/Hybrid classes meet every third week on campus and in the intervening weeks meet online. The online option is a fully online degree that does not require the student to come to campus.  All options use the same curriculum taught by the School faculty.  In addition to our regular 2 year full-time program and part-time options,we feature an accelerated option that enables students to obtain an MSW degree in as little as 16 months.  This innovative design incorporates a summer semester in the second year and two field placement experiences.

Program Goals

  1. Prepare competent Master-level professional social workers who at every system level:
    • Challenge the inequities of existing social, political, economic and cultural institutions and relationships.
    • Create collaborative, sustainable and health-promoting relationships and communities.
  2. Develop and apply value-based, theory-driven and evidence-guided empowering social work practice.
  3. Provide leadership to advance equitable social structures and practices for human health and well-being.

These goals are carefully specified as learning objectives and permeate our curriculum. Through their presence in courses, fieldwork internships, and internal School governance we bring our Mission Statement to life.

Accreditation

The School of Social Work at the University of New England is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education to offer the master's degree in social work.

Admissions

ACADEMIC PREREQUISITES    

To be considered for admission, you must have

  • Completed a Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university. (If degree is in progress at time of acceptance, degree must be completed prior to matriculation.)
  • Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better is preferred.  (If your GPA is lower, please address this in your personal statement.)
  • Evidence of work or volunteer experience in the human service field with MSW supervision.

Note: Before matriculation, accepted applicants will be expected to meet all health immunization requirements; to obtain a physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status.  Please visit Student Health Care for details. 

As required by clinical training sites, students may be subject to criminal background checks and drug screens prior to matriculation, and periodically throughout the MSW program.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are submitted through UNE’s online application which includes:
    • A personal essay addressing:
      • Your views on social justice, cultural diversity and human dignity with reference to the School of Social Work’s mission statement,
      • Your thoughts about the most pressing issues facing our society; the ways we, as social workers, should respond to these issues; and your personal involvement working on these issues, if applicable.
      • Your assessment of your personal strengths and areas in need of development relative to
    • The names and emails of two (2) education/professional reference letter writers as part of the application. (These should not be friends or family members.)
    • Submission of a current resume.
    • Submission of official transcripts from ALL colleges and universities attended to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions, 716 Stevens Avenue, Portland, ME, 04103.
    • Applications are reviewed as they are completed. Decisions are made on a rolling basis and continue throughout the year until the class is full or the program starts. 
    • Since field planning is an important part of our program, applicants are encouraged to apply early to give us time to help you find a suitable field placement. (Scholarship and grant funds are limited and are awarded on a rolling basis as well.)
    • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. . See International Admissions
    • International applicants must submit the International Student Supplemental Application Form at time of acceptance to the university, do not submit at time of application.
    • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. English Proficiency requirement must be completed at the time of application.

Policy exceptions

The Master of Social Work program and the SSW Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Transfer Credit

transfer credit

  • The University of New England does accept graduate transfer credit from other graduate social work institutions accredited by the Council on Social Work Education
    • Generally, we will accept credit transfers for one full year of graduate social work education.
    • Transfer students must complete a minimum of 32 credit hours at UNE’s School of Social Work to earn a degree from the university. 
    • You must have a minimum grade of “B” in all courses and acceptable field work evaluation.   
    • You must have completed graduate work within seven years of admission to UNE or have substantial practical social work experience.
  • Transfer students with less than one full year of graduate education must meet the following requirements:
    • Requests for transfer of credit must be initiated at the time of application, and no later than beginning of attendance as a degree-seeking student
    • Graduate coursework must be accepted by the SSW as having a direct relevance to the program of study at UNE
    • A maximum of nine credit hours for graduate credits earned in another discipline may be transferred toward elective credit, provided the credits were not taken as part of an earned graduate degree at another institution.
    • Graduate credit earned from a completed graduate program of study in another discipline will not be considered for transfer into the SSW.  Waivers of requirements, without award of credit will be reviewed by faculty for consideration
    • Applicants wishing to apply for transfer of credit must provide the SSW with written petition along with the following documents:
      • Official transcript indicating course was completed with a grade of “B” or better
      • Copy of the course description, syllabi, or bibliographies in which the course and course assignments are described.

ADVANCED STANDING

  • Qualified graduates of BSW programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education may be considered for Advanced Standing under the following conditions:
    • Graduation from a CSWE accredited BSW program within five to seven years of enrollment in the School of Social Work
    • Minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA for the last 60 credit hours of the BSW program.
    • Review by the Admissions Committee
    •  Evidence of work or volunteer experience in the human service field with MSW supervision preferred.
  • Students admitted into advanced standing for the campus-based option are required to enroll in one 3-credit course prior to starting the fall semester (Capstone Project I).

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the School of Social Work website.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Applicants may not receive academic credit for work experience in the field or for life experience.

Curricular Requirements

Students in the campus-based and flipped/hybrid options may choose to complete their degree in as little as 16 months.  Students may also attend for the traditional 2 years, or attend part-time for up to 4 years.  Online students can apply to take the program in 3 or 4 years.   In addition, the School of Social Work offers advanced standing status to qualified graduates of accredited BSW programs (See Advanced Standing). Advanced Standing has both full-time and part-time options for campus-based students and a part-time option for online students.

At no extra cost students may also earn a Certificate in Applied Arts and Social Justice by utilizing their electives and Capstone classes to explore how creative processes can be powerful forces of social and individual change.

All students are required to complete 64 credit hours of graduate study divided between classroom and fieldwork education. Field placements, or internships, consist of four semesters of supervised practice in approved social work settings; each semester includes 280 hours of practice experience. The curriculum is designed to provide an integrated foundation or knowledge base and advanced skills for social work practice within a concentration (individual, family, and group practice or organizational and community social work practice).

Foundation year courses emphasize an integrated social work perspective involving the social context and its impact on social policy, programs, and the social work profession. Courses include Human Behavior and the Social Environment I and II; Social Work Policy and Programs I and II; Social Work Practice I and II; Foundations of Research I and Capstone I; and Field Integrating Seminars I and II. In addition, students spend 560 hours in a field setting, which permits students another learning mode through placements in social agencies and programs with structured on-site professional supervision.

Advanced-year concentrations are offered in clinical practice with individuals, families and groups practice (IFG), and organization and community social work practice (OCP).  The individual, family and group practice (IFG) concentration prepares students with knowledge and skills for advanced practice primarily focused on individuals, families and groups in multiple settings.   The OCP concentration provides students with knowledge and skills in an array of advanced practice roles in the areas of program and policy development, administration, supervision, political advocacy, community practice and evaluation.  Both concentrations prepare graduates for professional leadership positions within their communities.  Both are enriched by a selection of electives.

  Credits
Year One - Foundation   
SSW 501 Human Behavior & the Social Environment I 3
SSW 502 Human Behavior & the Social Environment II 3
SSW 505 Social Welfare Policy and Programs I 3
SSW 506 Social Welfare Policy and Programs II 3
SSW 503 Social Work Research I 3
SSW 504 Social Work Research II (online)
Or
SSW 595 Capstone Project I (Campus-based)

3
SSW 510 Social Work Practice I 3
SSW 511 Social Work Practice II 3
SSW 520 Field Practicum I/Seminar 4
SSW 522 Field Practicum II/Seminar 4
Year One Total 32
   
Year Two - Concentration 3
SSW 552 Contemporary Theory of Social Work Practice for Individuals and Families (IFG)
or SSW 564 Program Dev & Community Practice (OCP)
3
SSW 553 Advanced Social Work Practice with Families (IFG)
or SSW 565 Administration and Supervision (OCP)
3
SSW 597 Advanced Psychosocial Assessment (Required for IFG; elective for OCP) 3
SSW 695 SSW Capstone II (Campus-based)
Or
Elective (Online)

3
SSW 580 Field Practicum III/Seminar 4
SSW 582 Field Practicum IV/Seminar 4
SSW 697 Capstone III (Campus-based)
Or
Elective (Online)
3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Year Two Total 32
Total Program 64
  Credits
Advanced Standing Program On-Campus  
Foundation year waived with BSW from CSWE accredited program  
SSW 552 Contemporary Theory of Social Work Practice for Individuals and Families
or SSW 564 Program Dev & Community Practice
3
SSW 553 Advanced Social Work Practice with Families
or SSW 565 Administration and Supervision
3
SSW 597 Advanced Psychosocial Assessment (Required for IFG; elective for OCP) 3
SSW 595 Capstone I 3
SSW 695 Capstone II 3
SSW 697 Capstone III 3
SSW 580 Field Practicum III/Seminar 4
SSW 582 Field Practicum IV/Seminar 4
SSW Elective 3
SSW Elective 3
SSW Elective 3
Total Advanced Standing On-campus Program (with BSW) 35
  Credits
Advanced Standing Program Online  
Foundation year waived with BSW from CSWE accredited program  
SSW 515 Integrating Micro/Macro Framework 2.5
SSW 525 Introduction to Advanced Practice 2.5
   
SSW 552 Contemporary Theory of SW Practice Indv & Family
Or SSW 564 Program Development & Community Practice
 
3
SSW 553 Advanced Social Work Practice w/ Families
Or SSw 565 Administration and Supervision
3
   
SSW 580 Field Practicum III/Seminar 4
SSW 582 Field Practicum IV/Seminar 4
SSW 597 Advanced Psychosocial Assessment (Required for IFG; elective for OCP) 3
SSW 514 Program Evaluation 3
SSW Elective 3
SSW Elective 3
SSW Elective 3
SSW Elective 3
Total Advanced Standing Online Program (with BSW) 37
Academic Policy

Westbrook College of Health Professions Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures

Grading System

The School of Social Work has a letter grading system (A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C- and F).  Students in the program are expected to maintain a "B" (3.0) average over the course of their study.  Any student who fails two or more classes is dismissed from the program.

Incomplete Policy

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term or semester may apply for an extension by discussing this with the instructor and completing a Request for Incomplete Form (available in the SSW office). At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed four weeks following the end date of the course for on-campus incompletes and seven (7) days for online incompletes. This form must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be reviewed and signed by the School director.

Course Add/Drop or Withdrawal

Course changes (add/drops) are allowed during the first five days of classes for on-campus students and first three days of classes for online students; tuition may be adjusted dependent upon number of hours enrolled. After the first week of classes no refunds are made for course changes.

A matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the course. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

Repeat Course Policy

MSW students may repeat a course in the event of a failing grade if that is the recommendation of the Student Development Committee. However, only the second or last course will receive credit on the student's transcript.

Upon completion of a repeated course, a new listing and assigned grade are placed on the student's transcript. The original course listing and grade remain on the student's transcript and will be counted as one of the two failed classes a student is allowed prior to dismissal from the program. 

All courses are listed chronologically on the transcript by semester or academic period in which the student is enrolled.

Readmission

A student who has officially withdrawn can reapply through the Office of Admissions. Special consideration for students who leave the School in good standing will be given if their application for readmission is received within two years of their departure from the MSW program. Applications for readmission received more than two years from withdrawal will be considered as new applications.

Returning Students

Students who leave the School in good standing prior to completion of the requirements for the MSW degree are given special consideration for readmission. Credit is not given, however, for graduate work completed more than five years prior to the student's readmission.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete all courses prior to graduation and fulfill all curriculum requirements.

Application materials may be obtained from the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions at 1-207-221-4225. 

The School of Social Work in conjunction with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions provides  Information Sessions for the Master of Social Work degree program throughout the year.  Some take place on campus and include presentations by students and faculty followed by question and answer sessions and the opportunity to meet one-on-one with faculty or staff others take place online in the form of chats.  Please contact the School of Social Work at 207-221-4513 for a schedule of events.

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.)

Westbrook College of Health Professions

School of Social Work