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School of Marine Programs faculty and students present at Gulf of Maine 2050 International Symposium

Symposium keynote speaker and award-winning underwater photographer Keith Ellenbogen with Susan Farady and Barry Costa-Pierce
Symposium keynote speaker and award-winning underwater photographer Keith Ellenbogen with Susan Farady and Barry Costa-Pierce

November 20, 2019

Susan Farady presented her research on law and policy issues related to managing fisheries
Susan Farady presented her research on law and policy issues related to managing fisheries
Student Danielle Jolie presented her research poster on the density of shells
Student Danielle Jolie presented her research poster on the density of shells

Susan Farady, J.D., assistant professor of marine affairs, and students joined leaders from across New England and the Maritime Provinces for the Gulf of Maine 2050 International Symposium, an unprecedented event that brought together environmental, economic, social, and institutional perspectives on climate resilience in the Gulf of Maine.

“I identified this event as a great way to engage my students in these important issues,” commented Farady.

The Gulf of Maine is the theme for Farady’s Marine Affairs senior capstone class this semester. Each student’s project is related to climate change in the Gulf of Maine. Projects include the impacts of noise pollution on endangered North Atlantic right whales, managing New England salt marshes in light of climate change, and issues within the Maine lobster industry related to right whales.

At the symposium, Farady presented her research on law and policy issues related to managing fisheries in the Gulf of Maine in response to climate change impacts.

“Professor Farady’s work is bringing new light to fisheries management practices,” stated Charles Tilburg, Ph.D., director of the School of Marine Programs. “The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than 99% of the world’s oceans, so it is imperative that researchers, resource managers, government officials, and others examine the causes and the effects of this warming,” 

Danielle Jolie (Marine Science, ’20) and professional science master's student Zachary Gordon submitted abstracts that were accepted for the symposium.

“Danielle’s and Zachary’s work show that our students are poised to be the next leaders in this important field,” Tilburg commented. “The School of Marine Programs at UNE is taking a leading role in both the direct research into the effects of a warming Gulf of Maine and educating our students for this changing world.” 

The symposium was designed to show how the Gulf of Maine is expected to change over the next 30 years and to build a shared vision for regional resilience and activate new collaborations for action. The event was hosted by Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment, and Huntsman Marine Science Centre.

 

Groups audience: