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UNE Center for Global Humanities presents “Acknowledging Black Trauma and its National Effects”

UNE Center for Global Humanities presents “Acknowledging Black Trauma and its National Effects”

October 16, 2019

Françoise Hamlin is an associate professor of History and Africana Studies at Brown University
Françoise Hamlin is an associate professor of History and Africana Studies at Brown University, is author of Crossroads at Clarksdale: The Black Freedom Struggle in the Mississippi Delta after World War II

What is black trauma? And how can understanding the damage it does in individual and collective lives help us better understand America’s complex racial inheritance? 

An upcoming lecture at the University of New England Center for Global Humanities will seek to answer these and other questions when scholar Françoise Hamlin presents “Acknowledging Black Trauma and its National Effects.” Scheduled for Monday, October 28 at 6:00 p.m., the lecture will take place at Innovation Hall at the UNE Portland Campus.

Hamlin, who is an associate professor of History and Africana Studies at Brown University, is author of Crossroads at Clarksdale: The Black Freedom Struggle in the Mississippi Delta after World War II, which won the 2012 Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize and 2013 Lillian Smith Book Award. Her current research focuses on young people, trauma, and activism.

In this lecture, Hamlin will use a case study from the mass movement for civil rights to encourage attendees to rethink activism, trauma, and trauma’s legacies in light of today’s racially-charged political climate.

This will be the fifth lecture of the 2019-2020 season at the Center for Global Humanities, where events are always free, open to the public, and streamed live online. For more information, please visit: https://www.une.edu/calendar/2019/acknowledging-black-trauma-and-its-national-effects

About the Center for Global Humanities

The Center for Global Humanities offers lectures by leading scholars to help us better understand the challenges besetting our civilization and outline new solutions for nations and peoples to live together without prejudice. Global in perspective, the Center’s lectures are streamed live on the Internet, allowing our speakers to answer questions from any country. Because the Center believes in the vital necessity of a humanities culture to civic and democratic life, it works closely with the local community to encourage reading, discussion, and debate. The Center was founded in 2009 by UNE scholar Anouar Majid, Ph.D., who serves as its director.

Groups audience: