Graduate Catalog

Graduate Catalog uneadmin Sat, 11/21/2020 - 09:20

Financial Information for Graduate Programs

Financial Information for Graduate Programs uneadmin Sat, 11/21/2020 - 09:20

Graduate Tuition and Fee Rates (2021–2022 fees are subject to change)

Athletic Training (Master of Science)

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)

$240
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $940
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $50

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Educational Leadership

Application Fee (non-refundable) $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $60
Technology Fee (per semester) $85
Registration Fee (non-matriculated students per semester) $30
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $600

Doctorate in Education

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $60
Technology Fee (per semester) $85
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $950

Health Informatics (Master of Science or Graduate Certificate)

Application Fee (non-refundable) $40

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)

$60
Technology Fee (per semester) $85
Registration Fee (non-matriculated students per semester) $30
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $750

Master of Science: Applied Nutrition

Application Fee  (non-refundable) $40

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable)

$60
Technology Fee (per semester) $85
Registration Fee (non-matriculated students per semester) $30
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $750
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $50

Master of Science: Biological Sciences and Marine Sciences

Application Fee  (non-refundable) $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $360
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (academic year) $36,350

Professional Science Masters: Ocean Food Systems

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $240
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (academic year) $49,780

Master of Science in Education, Online Instruction

Application Fee (non-refundable) $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $60
Technology Fee (per semester) $85
Registration Fee (non-matriculated students per semester) $30
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour)

$600

Nurse Anesthesia (Master of Science)

Application Fee (non-refundable) $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $240
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $1,540
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable) $430
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $60

Occupational Therapy (Master of Science)

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $240
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (academic year) $38,710
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable) $145
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $50

Physician Assistant (Master of Science)

General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $240
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (academic year) $46,530
Program Fee (semester, non-refundable) $1,300
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $65

Physical Therapy (Doctor of Physical Therapy)

General Services Fee Yr. 1 (semester, non-refundable) $360
General Services Fee Yrs. 2-3 (semester, non-refundable) $240
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (Fall and Spring combined) $36,130
Tuition (Summer) $9,340
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable) $50

Public Health (Master of Public Health or Graduate Certificate)

Application Fee (non-refundable) $40
General Services Fee (semester, non-refundable) $60
Technology Fee (per semester) $85
Registration Fee (non-matriculated students per semester) $30
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $750

Social Work (Master of Social Work)

Application Fee (on-campus, non-refundable) $40
General Services Fee (on-campus, semester, non-refundable) $360

General Services Fee (online, semester, non-refundable)

$60
Technology Fee (online, per semester) $85
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90
Tuition (per credit hour) $980
Malpractice Insurance Fee (annual, non-refundable)  $50

Teacher Certification Program (TCP)

Application Fee (non-refundable)

$40

General Services Fee (one time, non-refundable)

$150
Parking Permit Fee (Resident) $300
Parking Permit Fee (Commuter) $90

Tuition (per credit hour)

$710

Explanation of Fees

Student Malpractice Insurance

A group insurance policy is purchased and provided by the University of New England for those students involved in clinical training rotations in the amount of $1,000,000/$3,000,000.

General Services Fee

This mandatory fee is billed to graduate students and provides the following services.

  1. Graduation activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  2. Student Senate (Government) activities including support for clubs, programs, cultural events, etc.
  3. Orientation activities.
  4. Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  5. Finley Center gymnasium.
  6. Access to Biddeford Campus facilities, including: Harold Alfond Forum, Campus Center, Library, Bookstore.
  7. Athletic events including intramural programs and all intercollegiate home games.
  8. Transcripts available at no charge.

Health Insurance

Graduate students are required to enroll in UNE's Student Medical Insurance Plan unless proof of comparable insurance can be demonstrated. Please refer to the health insurance brochure for additional information.

Parking Fee

Students, Faculty and Staff wishing to park a vehicle on campus must purchase a parking permit from www.thepermitstore.com. Enter your destination as University of New England.  Permit prices vary. Failure to register a vehicle will result in a fine and having your vehicle towed from campus.

Payment Options

Students may pay the college charges as they fall due each semester or in accordance with UNE's Monthly Payment Plan offered through Tuitionpay. They may also arrange to pay the total due by using a mixture of these payment arrangements.

The payment dates in the UNE sponsored payment plans cannot be deferred for the convenience of students using student loans, or other tuition payment programs. Both long and short-term financial arrangements should be made far enough in advance to assure payment on the required dates. Special problems or emergency situations can be discussed with the Student Financial Services Center at any time.

Option I: Payment by Semester

Approximately six weeks prior to the start of a semester, bills will be sent for the tuition, room and board, and fees. Payment of this bill is due by the start of the semester. The payment due is the total of all the semester charges less any previous payments or financial aid credits.

Option II: Monthly Payment Plans

The Ten-Pay Payment Plan spreads the full year charges over ten months beginning June 1st. This plan is offered through Tuitionpay and is designed to relieve the pressure of “lump sum” payments by spreading the cost over 10 months. There is an application fee. There are no interest charges.

In addition to these options for payment, UNE accepts MasterCard, VISA, and Discover.

Applicants are urged to apply by May 15th. Applications made after the start of the program (June 1st) must be accompanied by an initial payment sufficient to become current with the regular 10-month payment schedule. Applications for the 10-month plan will not be accepted after September 15th.

Late Payment Charge

The balance due each semester will be considered overdue if not paid by the specified date, and any unpaid balance will be subject to a late charge of 12% per annum or 1% per month. Students with unpaid bills will not be able to register for courses or be placed on the official school roster nor can they attend classes until they have received clearance from the Student Financial Services Center.  Students with overdue accounts are not eligible for academic credit, transcripts, or degrees.

Course Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy

Course changes for matriculated students are allowed during the add/drop period during the fall and spring semesters.  After the add/drop period, no refunds are made for course withdrawals.

University Withdrawal

Matriculated students who intend to withdraw from the University must complete official forms available from the program director, Student Affairs Office, or Registration Services on either campus. Documentation must be signed by the appropriate academic dean. Student responsibilities include: a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in this catalog; b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; c) return of any University keys to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

For purposes of computing refunds, the date of withdrawal recorded by the academic dean's office upon receipt of the withdrawal notice from the student shall be considered official and will be used to compute refunds, if any, due to the student.

Tuition refunds for matriculated students leaving the University during a semester will be made as follows: 

  • Fall\Spring\Summer Refunds 
  • During first two weeks - 80%
  • During third week - 60%
  • During fourth week - 40%
  • More than four weeks - No refunds

Short-Term and Online (except Md. and Wisc.) Courses (3-10 weeks) 

  • Before second class - 100% 
  • During first week - 40%
  • During second week - 20%
  • More than two weeks - No refunds 

Loan/Grant/Scholarship Adjustments

Adjustments to scholarships, grants, and loan programs will be made in accordance with respective program regulations and University policy before a refund to the student is calculated. In cases where a refund may be due and the student has received funds through the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, it is our policy to refund those funds directly to the bank which made the loan. Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, dismissal, or suspension.

Other Fees

After registration there shall be no refund of fees.

Refunds for Maryland Residents

MARYLAND

University of New England's Refund Policy follows the Federal Return of Title IV Aid Refund Policy for Maryland residents. If a student withdraws from UNE prior to the 60% point in the semester (based on calendar days from the first day of the semester through the last scheduled day of the semester), eligible charges due or paid will be refunded on a pro rata basis within 40 days of termination date. Some fees are non-refundable, and therefore, not pro-rated. Fees not refunded are: General Service (one-time fee), Application (one-time fee), and Technology (charged each semester fee). Financial aid awarded (if any) will be returned to the federal, state, and University of New England programs on a pro rata basis. Outside scholarship or non-federal loan assistance will not be returned unless specifically requested by the provider.  After the 60 percent point in the semester, financial aid will not be reduced for any withdrawal, nor will any refund be granted. This policy applies to all university withdrawals whether student initiated or administrative withdrawals.  Students should note that withdrawal may or may not result in an actual refund of money to the student. Circumstances may occur in which the student still owes money to the University even after appropriate withdrawal credit.

MARYLAND STUDENTS - PROPORTION OF TOTAL COURSE, PROGRAM OR TERM COMPLETED AS OF WITHDRAWAL OR TERMINATION DATE

TUITION REFUND

Less than 10%

90%

10% up to but not including 20%

80%

20% up to but not including 30%

60%

30% up to but not including 40%

40%

40% up to but not including 60%

20%

More than 60%

No Refund

Contact Student Financial Services with specific questions >

Important Notes

  1. Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  2. The Board of Trustees, however, reserves the right to make changes in tuition and fees at any time.
  3. For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies. People's United Bank, which is our preferred bank, provides a full-service ATM machine located in the Campus Center and in the Alfond Forum on the Biddeford Campus, and in the breezeway between Proctor and Hersey Halls on the Portland College Campus.  For those students who have People's United Bank checking accounts, ATM transactions are free of charge. Checks may also be cashed daily ($75 maximum) at the Student Accounts Office on the Biddeford Campus. 
  4. The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. The sign-up form is available on the Web. 
  5. The University will not be responsible for the loss of property on or off campus although it strives to safeguard students' property on campus.
  6. Students are expected to pay for textbooks at the beginning of the semester. Books, supplies, and other items available at the University Bookstore may be paid for with cash, check, Master Card, VISA, and Discover.
  7. A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester.

Student Enrollment Status

Student Enrollment Status uneadmin Sat, 11/21/2020 - 09:20

The University of New England classifies student credit load status for the purposes of financial aid loan deferments.  The following table applies credit hour enrollment to full time, 3/4 time, and half time status.

Program

Classification

Credits       

Graduate/ First Professional / Doctoral Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0 or more

3.0 - 5.9

Graduate Level Certification Programs

Full Time

Half Time

6.0

3.0

EDD & GMAR/GBIO (Thesis Course Only) Full Time 1.0 or more

Master of Science Nurse Anesthesia

Full Time Only

Full Time Only

Academic Policy and Regulations

Academic Policy and Regulations uneadmin Sat, 11/21/2020 - 09:20

Petition to Graduate and Receipt of Diploma

In the last year of enrollment, students who anticipate completion of all degree requirements must submit an online petition to graduate. Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and are required to earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate (students in the Physician Assistant Master of Science program must earn a minimum GPA of 2.0). The Petition to Graduate form is available via the "Apply to Graduate" link in U-Online. The completed form sets into motion all final processing towards verification of the degree completion, correct spelling of name on the diploma, correct mailing address, and indication of plans to participate in the commencement ceremony.

If a mailing address should change after submission of the form, the student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's office of a new address. It is the goal of the office to verify/post-degree completions and mail out diplomas within six to eight weeks of a student's completion of studies. Commencement is held at the end of each spring semester (usually May) and students who successfully complete all degree requirements per academic policy are considered to be in the "Class of...[that particular year]." Student names must be approved, on recommendation of the faculty, by the Board of Trustees prior to being authorized a degree and diploma from the University of New England. Under some circumstances, verification of degree completion may be possible for students who complete all of their degree requirements prior to the end of the semester. Requests of degree completion letters should be made to the Office of the University Registrar.

 Guidelines for submission of the petition to graduate form are as follows:

If Graduation is anticipated by the end of Submit the Petition to Graduate by
Summer Semester June 30
Fall Semester September 30
Spring Semester January 30

The degree awarded date will correspond to the term where the last course requirement was completed and graded. The exception is where one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided).  In the case of late completion of course requirements (e.g due to an "Incomplete" grade), the degree will be awarded in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources. Further information regarding graduation procedures can be obtained through the Office of the University Registrar or by clicking the following link: http://www.une.edu/registrar/graduation.

Federal Definition of the Credit Hour 

Federal regulation defines a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalence that reasonably approximates not less than 

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester.
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practical, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Registration and Enrollment Confirmation

Students matriculated in any undergraduate program must be pre-approved to register for courses, or change course registration, through their advisor.  First-time students will be registered by the Registrar's office staff and will go through a new student orientation where they receive their course schedule. Returning students can preregister for courses at dates established in the University's Academic Calendar.

Course registration must be confirmed through Registrar's office. This is accomplished only after matriculated students have cleared all other offices on campus, i.e., Student Accounts, Financial Aid, Health Center, Security, or other offices through which arrangements must be made in order to become fully enrolled at the University. All students must confirm their enrollment at the beginning of each semester within certain timelines by methods identified by Registrar's office. Instructions regarding enrollment confirmation are e-mailed to each student.  Course changes are allowed during a designated add/drop period only, as specified on the current academic calendar. Detailed instructions, as well as designated timelines regarding the add/drop process, are e-mailed to each student. Tuition and/or financial aid may be adjusted, depending on number of credit hours enrolled.

Reinstatement

Reinstatement to the University after a Leave of Absence will require written communication from the student's official UNE Email stating they wish to be reinstated as a student for a given term. In some cases, if leave exceeds allotted leave time, the student will need to contact Admissions to complete a re-admission application.  If a re-admission application is required, this will change the student's catalog year and possibly their degree requirements.

Class Attendance

All students are expected to attend all classes for which they have registered. Attendance policies regarding unexcused absences are established and announced by the individual instructor for his/her classes. If a student is absent to the extent that his/her work is adversely affected, the instructor will report the student's absence to the department chair/program director with comments on the status of the student in the course. Ordinarily, for each course, absences per semester should not exceed the number of times that the course meets weekly. Whenever a student is specifically reported in writing by an instructor to the department chair/program director as being excessively absent from class, the instructor, with the approval of the department chair/program director, may drop the student from that course with an appropriate grade. When a student misses class for any religious observances, it is an excused absence. The student should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. Before the absence, the student is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty to arrange to obtain all information contained in each missed class. The student must plan, at the discretion of the faculty member, to take any missed exam either prior to or following the scheduled exam time. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Athletic Competition and Class Attendance

When an athlete misses class for a scheduled varsity intercollegiate competition, it is an excused absence. The student-athlete should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. This policy does not apply to students on clinical rotations. When such absences occur, the student-athlete is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty and making arrangements to obtain all information and/or training contained in each missed class. The athlete must make arrangements to take exams scheduled for a day of absence early or late, at the instructor's preference. All assignments must be handed in on time. Faculty are not required to remediate student-athletes as a result of these absences.

Incomplete Policy

An incomplete (I) grade notation may be given by the instructor to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The I grade notation must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days following the end of an eight-week session. Until changed, the I grade notation defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative *F grade for the course. Some programs have established more restrictive or differing policy regarding incomplete grades. Students should consult the program in which they are enrolled for exceptions to this policy. Once an I grade notation is removed, academic standing will be updated according to  good standing or probationary standards. If one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided due to an "I" grade), then the degree awarded date (if applicable) will be posted in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.  Students receiving Incompletes are not eligible for Dean's List.

Course Withdrawal Policy*

In the fall and spring semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

*A Withdrawal from a course(s) at any point after the Add/Drop period will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse.  A withdrawal that changes a student’s enrollment status could impact repayment of loans/deferment of loans.

Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence for a specified period of time, not to exceed one (1) academic year, may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form available from the respective program/school director, Student Affairs, Registrar's office or online.  A student who is on an approved leave of absence has the status "active/not enrolled" and may not may enroll in courses for credit at another institution. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. A student returning from a leave of absence should contact the Registrar's Office well in advance of returning semester so that status changes are made allowing the student to access courses. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Students with Financial Aid should meet with a Financial Aid representative prior to completing leave of absence paperwork. Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or Registrar (undergraduate) to indicate change of plans.

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available online.  Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

Repeat Course Policy

A student may repeat a course in order to improve his/her grade. However, only the second or last course taken will receive credit on the student's transcript, and only the second or last grade received will calculate into the cumulative GPA.

Course Work at Another Institution

Eligible credit must be earned from a regionally accredited college or university recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). International universities must be recognized according to its country’s regulations. International academic transcripts must be credentialed by World Education Services (WES).  Undergraduate international applicants may also use The Center for Educational Documentation. 

  1.  The posting of transfer credit for approved courses will be completed by the Admissions Office or the University Registrar’s Office upon the receipt of an official transcript. An official transcript is one that corresponds with the credit granting institution’s definition of “official” and is received directly from that institution by the University of New England’s Admissions or University Registrar’s Offices.  When a course description is not sufficient, a syllabus may be requested.
  2. Transfer credit at the graduate and professional level is rarely awarded and is reviewed by the program on a case-by-case basis.  Information related to transfer credit can be found on the individual catalog page related to the program.
  3. A transfer course is identified with the grade of “TR”.  Grade quality points are not awarded or calculated into a University of New England cumulative grade point average. 
  4. All credit hours earned will be assigned for transfer. When a transfer course has fewer credits than an equivalent UNE course, the course may transfer (as equivalent) if outcomes have been met for the UNE course, but only the credit hours earned will be applied.
  5. Grades earned at other institutions as course repeats do not replace those earned at the University of New England. 
  6. Quarter credit hours or units will be converted to semester credits. A quarter credit is divided by 1.5.

Matriculated student who wish to transfer college-level course work taken at other institutions must obtain permission to do so prior to enrolling at another institution. The Application for Transfer Course Work form is located under student forms on the University Registrar’s webpage or through the University Registrar’s Office.

Semester and Term Grade Reports

Semester and term grade reports are issued after examinations have been held at the close of each semester or term and are viewable on U-Online. Semester and term grades reported by faculty members to the Registrar's office are final. Notices of deficiency, if reported, will be viewable at mid-semester on U-Online. 

Student Records and Transcripts

Academic Records

Complete records and related documents are maintained in Registrar's office, Decary Hall for 5 years after separation from the University. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment to the Family Educational and Privacy Act (FERPA), students have the right to review and inspect all official records, files, and data, including all material that is incorporated into each student's cumulative record folder. However, the Department of Health and Human Services has said that clarifying amendments provide that letters of recommendation submitted on the basis of a pledge of confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975 need not be shown to students and that a student may be allowed but not required to waive his/her right of access to letters of recommendation received after that date. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment, post-secondary institutions must provide students not only access to official records directly related to them, but also an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. It is the right of students to file a complaint with the Department of Health and Human Services concerning an alleged failure by an educational agency or institution to comply with section 438 of the Act that guarantees such rights. University students wishing to review their records may do so by providing a written request to Registration Services at least 48 hours in advance of the desired appointment.

Student Conduct Records

Student conduct records and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students in the Student Affairs offices on each campus. Student conduct records/files are maintained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

  1. All student conduct and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of no less than four years after separation from the University. Records may be destroyed at that time. Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time or permanently if specified in the terms of disciplinary sanctions.
  2. Disciplinary records may be voided by the Dean of Students Office with the concurrence of an Appeals Committee for good cause based upon written petition by student(s).
  3. Denials of petitions to void disciplinary records may be appealed to the vice president of academic affairs.

Student Access and Annual Notification

FERPA (see above) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. The student should submit a written request, that identifies the records which they wish to inspect, to Registrar's office. The office will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students should write to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will accompany this notification.
  3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task; or the Veterans Administration for students registered for various GI Bill programs. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failure(s) by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information and Disclosure

The University normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including directory information. Two exceptions to this policy are:

The USA Patriot Act

Section 507 of the USA PATRIOT ACT amends FERPA by permitting educational agencies and institutions to disclose — without the consent or knowledge of the student or parent - personally identifiable information from the student's education records to the Attorney General of the United States or to his designee in response to an ex parte order in connection with the investigation or prosecution of terrorism crimes. In addition, the school is not required to record such disclosures.

The Solomon Amendment

The Solomon Amendment explicitly states that military recruiters must be given equal access to that provided other recruiters.  UNE is therefore obligated to release data included in the list of "student recruiting information," upon request. 

For this purpose, directory information is defined as:

  • Student's Full Name
  • Address
  • Phone Number
  • UNE Email Address
  • Date and place of birth
  • Classification and level
  • Dates of Attendance
  • Enrollment Status
  • Most Previous educational institution attended
  • Participation in sports
  • Height/Weight for members of an athletic team
  • Major
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Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing. Request forms are available in the Office of the University Registrar at either campus. Requests to restrict release of directory information will remain in effect until revoked in writing by the student.

Response Time and End-of-Term Processing

Due to production demands in registration services (both campuses), requests for student records services cannot be processed on demand. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

At the end of each fall and spring semester, Registration Services must process significant volumes of grades, completions, and verifications after all final grades are submitted by instructors. This end-of-term processing is not finished for a minimum of two weeks after the last final exam. For students graduating at the end of spring semester: degree verification, posting, and diploma printing/mailing must be done after end-of-term grades are processed. Diplomas are not normally mailed for a minimum of six-eight weeks after the last final exam. Students are advised to anticipate waiting these periods of time, and should plan ahead when working with employers, graduate schools, agencies, or licensing bureaus when ordering transcripts, grade reports, or degree verifications.

Transcripts

No official transcript will be issued until all financial obligations have been met.

Transcripts are issued only at the written and signed request of the student. The purpose of this policy is to protect the privacy of the individual concerned and to minimize the possibility of the use of another's transcripts for fraudulent purposes. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests. Official transcripts are normally issued directly to other educational institutions or prospective employers designated by the student. Official transcripts issued to the student for purposes of transport to another party can be provided in a sealed envelope but will be considered unofficial if opened by the student. Unsealed transcripts issued directly to students are considered unofficial and are stamped Issued to Student.

Please note: GI Bill® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government Website at http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill.

Applied Nutrition

Category
Department
Degree name
Master of Science Applied Nutrition
College
Sections

Mission

Mission of the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition

The mission of the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition program is to prepare individuals for leadership roles in the field of nutrition, to advance knowledge and expand skills that promote excellence and innovation in all areas of nutrition practice, and to emphasize evidence-based best practices to support the well-being and health outcomes of individuals, families, and communities through education, research, and scholarship.

Mission of the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition, RDN focus area:

The mission of the UNE Master of Science in Applied Nutrition program is to prepare individuals for leadership roles in the field of nutrition, to advance knowledge and expand skills that promote excellence and innovation in all areas of nutrition practice, and to emphasize evidence-based best practices to support the well-being and health outcomes of individuals, families, and communities through education, research, and scholarship.

The Master of Science in Applied Nutrition Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) focus provides a verification statement upon successful completion of program requirements, which prepares graduates for practice as an RDN after passing the national registration exam.

Program Description

Master of Science in Applied Nutrition Program Goals

Graduates of the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition Program will:

  1. Interpret, evaluate, communicate and apply complex nutritional concepts to a wide variety of individuals, communities, and organizations
  2. Use evidence-based knowledge to inform best practices in nutrition professions
  3. Provide leadership and innovation to the nutrition profession, facilitating the growth and application of best practices in the field to our region and globally
  4. Utilize theories of health behavior and the translation of theory into practice as a valuable tool in public health, community, and clinical nutrition settings

Master of Science in Applied Nutrition, RDN Focus Goals

In addition to the above, RDN focus graduates will:

1.be competent practitioners that are equipped to pass the RDN exam, that are ethical and skilled in-patient care, and that are competitively employable in the field.

2. use evidence-based knowledge to inform best practices in nutrition professions and Medical Nutrition Therapy.

ACEND®️ Specific Goals:

Program Completion: At least 80% of program graduates complete program/degree requirements within 3 years (150% of the program length).

Graduate Employment: Of graduates who seek employment, 80 percent are employed in nutrition and dietetics or related fields within 12 months of graduation.

Employer Satisfaction: At least 80% of employers who respond to the “Employer Survey” will select “strongly agree” or “agree” indicating graduates were adequately prepared to be an effective RDN practitioner in their first post-graduate professional position.

Registration Exam:

80% of program graduates take the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists within 12 months of program completion.

The program’s one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.

Program outcomes data measuring success against these objectives is available upon request. Please contact the MSAN Assistant Program Director/Director of RDN Focus for further information.

Objectives in support of the goals of the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition Program

Program Objectives
Graduates of the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition Program will:

  1. Develop and utilize nutrition concepts and best-practices for nutrition and health promotion initiatives
  2. Apply core research principles to measure the nutrition status and environment of individuals and communities
  3. Develop communications and collaboration strategies with representatives from government, non-profit, community, and business entities regarding nutrition initiatives
  4. Interpret and modify explanations of complex nutrition concepts for various audiences
  5. Research, develop and disseminate evidence-based and theory-driven educational materials and work-products at an audience-appropriate level for topics related to nutrition and health promotion

There are degree focus areas that allow the Masters of Science in Applied Nutrition students to concentrate in growing areas of the nutrition industry and to pursue an educational pathway that best addresses their personal and professional needs. The focus area-specific objectives are based on the student’s chosen focus and are listed below.

Degree Focus Area: Obesity and Health Promotion

Graduates completing this focus area will be able to:

  1. Define and explain key concepts related to overweight/obesity to a variety of audiences
  2. Describe the prevalence of and trends in overweight/obesity
  3. Develop materials to combat the impacts of overweight/obesity
  4. Analyze and communicate the medical, psychosocial, and economic costs associated with overweight/obesity to a variety of audiences
  5. Compare overweight/obesity prevention and treatment approaches to evaluate their efficacy at the individual and community levels
  6. Propose and communicate new approaches to combat the incidence of overweight/obesity for a variety of audiences based on analysis of existing policy and regulations

Degree Focus Area: Nutrition and Disease Prevention

Graduates completing this focus area will be able to:

  1. Analyze nutrition research literature to apply it to nutrition practice
  2. Analyze and communicate evidence-based nutrition information to a variety of audiences
  3. Apply theories of health behavior in nutrition practice settings
  4. Analyze and communicate research in nutrition-related disease prevention and progression to a wide variety of audiences
  5. Design and implement nutrition and wellness research to include identifying research hypotheses, analyzing data, interpreting research results, and writing publishable reports

Degree Focus Area: Sustainable Nutrition

Graduates completing this focus area will be able to:

  1. Assess current regional and global agricultural policies and practices in relation to environmental stewardship, human health, and food justice
  2. Analyze nutrition, food systems, and agricultural literature to apply it to nutrition practice, education and advocacy
  3. Evaluate the environmental sustainability of traditional and current diets worldwide and how they can meet nutritional needs while lessening environmental impacts
  4. Analyze and communicate evidence-based nutrition and food systems information to a variety of audiences
  5. Design and implement nutrition and food systems research to include identifying research hypotheses, analyzing data, interpreting research results, and writing publishable reports

Degree Focus Area: Generalist, Applied Nutrition

Students selecting this focus area will develop skills in and an understanding of multiple competency areas of nutrition study and practice, dependent on their individualized course of study. This option allows the student to take the requisite first-year classes, and then diversify their educational plan of study to best meet their personal and professional needs.

Degree Focus Area: Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

  1. At least 80% of graduates who respond to the “Alumni Survey” will select “strongly agree” or “agree” indicating they  were adequately prepared to be an effective RDN practitioner in their first post-graduate professional position.
  2. At least 80% of employers who respond to the “Employer Survey” will select “strongly agree” or “agree” indicating the graduates demonstrated ethical behavior and cultural competency in all areas of nutrition and interprofessional practice in their first post-graduate professional position
  3. At least 80% of graduates who respond to the “Alumni Survey” will select “strongly agree” or “agree” indicating they were able to communicate evidence-based research in nutrition to a wide variety of audiences in their first post-graduate professional position.
  4. At least 80% of employers who respond to the “Employer Survey” will select “strongly agree” or “agree” indicating the graduates were able to communicate evidence-based research in nutrition to a wide variety of audiences in their first post-graduate professional position.

Accreditation

Regional Accreditation

All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Specialized Accreditation

The University of New England Master of Science in Applied Nutrition, RDN focus has been accredited as a program granted candidate status by the Accreditation Council for Education (ACEND) in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, (312) 899-0040 ext. 5400. https://www.eatrightpro.org/ACEND. 

Effective January 1, 2024, the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) will require a minimum of a master’s degree to be eligible to take the credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). In order to be approved for registration examination eligibility with a bachelor’s degree, an individual must meet all eligibility requirements and be submitted into CDR's Registration Eligibility Processing System (REPS) before 12:00 midnight Central Time, December 31, 2023. For more information about this requirement visit CDR's website: https://www.cdrnet.org/graduatedegree.

In addition, CDR requires that individuals complete coursework and supervised practice in program(s) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). Graduates who successfully complete the ACEND-accredited FEM graduate program Master of Science in Applied Nutrition at The University of New England are eligible to apply to take the CDR credentialing exam to become an RDN. In most states, graduates also must obtain licensure or certification to practice.

 

Curricular Requirements

REQUIRED COURSES

APN 600 - Trends and Issues in Nutrition
APN 604 - Nutrition Across the Lifespan
APN 610 - Research Methods
APN 615 - Nutrition and Metabolism
APN 620 - Nutrition Education and Health Behavior Change
APN 625 - Nutrition Practice for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention OR APN 734-Nutrition Leadership, Community Nutrition and Wellness (RDN focus students)

Degree Focus: Nutrition and Disease Prevention

APN 730 - Medical Nutrition Therapy
APN 760 - Micronutrients: Nutrition and Functional Applications
APN 765 - Advanced Practices in Nutrition Therapy 
APN 770 - Nutrition Counseling and Communication
APN 775 - Advanced Nutrition Research
APN 755 - Applied Nutrition Capstone

Degree Focus: Obesity and Health Promotion

APN 730 - Medical Nutrition Therapy 
APN 734 - Nutrition Leadership, Community Nutrition and Wellness 
APN 740 - Nutrition and Nutrition Information in the Media
APN 745 - Overweight and Obesity 
APN 775 - Advanced Nutrition Research
APN 755 - Applied Nutrition Capstone

Degree Focus: Sustainable Nutrition

APN 707 - Dietary Practices and the Environment
APN 712 - Global Food Systems and Sustainable Agriculture Policy
APN 717 - Food Justice and Advocacy 
APN Elective Option (APN 701, APN 734, APN 770, GPH 702, or other approved elective)
APN 775 - Advanced Nutrition Research

APN 755 - Applied Nutrition Capstone

 

Degree Focus: Generalist

Complete 6 Required Courses (APN 601, 605, 610, 615, 620, and 625)
Complete 5 Courses from APN 700 level course offerings
Complete Capstone Course (APN 755)  

Degree Focus: Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Required courses include 12 1-credit lab courses for Supervised Experiential Learning (SEL)

APN 600 - Trends and Issues in Nutrition and 602 - Trends and Issues in Nutrition lab
APN 604 - Nutrition Across the Lifespan and 606 - Nutrition Across the Lifespan lab
APN 610 - Research Methods and 611 - Research Methods lab
APN 615 - Nutrition and Metabolism and 616 - Nutrition and Metabolism lab
APN 620 - Nutrition Education and Health Behavior Change and 621 - Nutrition Education and Health Behavior Change lab
APN 734 - Nutrition Leadership, Community Nutrition and Wellness and 736 - Nutrition Leadership, Community Nutrition and Wellness lab
APN 730 - Medical Nutrition Therapy and 731 - Medical Nutrition Therapy 
APN 760 - Micronutrients: Nutrition and Functional Applications and 761 - Micronutrients: Nutrition and Functional Applications lab
APN 780 - Food and Nutrition Operations Management and APN 781 - Food and Nutrition Operations Management lab
APN 785 - Nutrition Assessment and Application in a Clinical Setting and APN 786 - Nutrition Assessment and Application in a Clinical Setting lab
APN 775 - Advanced Nutrition Research and APN 776 - Advanced Nutrition Research lab
APN 755 - Applied Nutrition Capstone and APN 756 - Applied Nutrition Capstone lab

Academic Policy

Minimum Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Any student who receives a grade of F in two or more courses is dismissed from the program.

Graduation

Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and are required to earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate. All students must file an Application to Graduate with the registrar’s office via U-Online. Please see our Graduation FAQ for complete instructions and the answers to frequently asked questions.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

The last day permissible for matriculating graduate students to add or drop a course without financial penalty is the second day of class.

Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing and will receive a “W” on their transcript indicating withdrawal. Students will receive a partial refund if they withdraw from a course within the first or second week. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course. Students who have not participated in the course by the end of the second week will be administratively withdrawn from the course and will not receive a tuition refund.

Email requests for withdrawals must be submitted from a student’s UNE email to be considered.

Matriculating students who withdraw after completing more than 2/3 of a course will receive a grade of “WF” (withdrawn failing) or “WP” (withdrawn passing), based on the instructor’s assessment of the student’s current standing in the course. A “WF” is calculated as an “F” in the student’s GPA. Upon successful completion of the course, the new grade will be used to calculate the GPA. Students will be dismissed from their program after two failing grades (including a “WF”).

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities.

Leave of Absence (Academic Stop-Out)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop-outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned.

However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning).  

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the student support specialist and student financial services to indicate a change of plans; stop out time can affect financial aid eligibility and repayment.

Medical Leave of Absence

In the event that a leave of absence is taken due to medical reasons, a doctor’s note may be required in order to return to active standing within the program.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the Program Director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and Program Director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e. part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veteran's benefits, etc.

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Program Director. Penalties for students found responsible for violations may depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the degree of premeditation involved, and/or the student’s previous record of violations. Appeal of a decision may be made to the Dean whose decision will be final.  Student appeals will take place through the grievance process outlined in The College of Graduate and Professional Studies Student Handbook.

Student Access Center

The Student Access Center works to ensure that the University promotes respect for individual differences and that no person who meets the academic and technical standards needed for admission and continued enrollment at UNE is denied benefits or subjected to discrimination due to a disability. Toward this end, and in conjunction with federal and state laws, the University provides reasonable accommodations for qualified students.

Experiential Learning

Experiential learning is highly valued by the College of Graduate and Professional Studies. Many courses within the College feature experiential-learning components. However, at this time, no credit will be awarded to students for purely experiential learning experiences undertaken in lieu of coursework.

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the Master of Science in Applied Nutrition program.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus for each course. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to, and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

Transfer courses must:

  • Be classified as graduate level.
  • Have been taken within five years of application.
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better. 
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education. 

Admissions

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

A bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.

Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

Previous coursework in Nutrition and/or Biology, and Statistics is highly recommended.

Computer with internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

Admissions Requirements, RDN Focus

Applications for the MSAN-RDN focus are processed and reviewed upon receipt with rolling admissions. For consideration, applicants are required to have:

Bachelor's degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or equivalent.

See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.

Students graduating from a Bachelor's program soon can apply for conditional acceptance pending receipt of final official transcript.

Undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or above. Applicants with a GPA lower than 3.0 will be considered for admission with statement of rationale for GPA and plans for future success.

Earned B- or better in prerequisite course work 

(comparable courses will be considered for transfer credit pursuant to the transfer credit policy) including:

 OR

Actively working on approval of 400 hours (equivalent to all SEL hours required for the first year of courses) under the guidance of the Assistant Director MSAN/Director RDN Focus

Computer with internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described on the Technical RequirementsMust also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

* If pre-requisite course work or the Verification Statement are older than 5 years, it is strongly recommended that the applicants consider taking the 3 pre-requisite courses.

Application Process

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee
  • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statements
  • Three professional references
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. 
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please see the Master of Science Applied Nutrition Program website.

Policy Exceptions

The Master of Science in Applied Nutrition program and Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Athletic Training

Category
Contact

Wayne R. Lamarre
wlamarre@une.edu

Degree name
Master of Science with a major in Athletic Training
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Athletic Training Program at the University of New England is to provide a comprehensive curriculum designed for individuals who want to enhance the quality of health care for active persons and to advance the profession of athletic training through education and research in the prevention, evaluation, management, and rehabilitation of injuries.

Major Description

This graduate degree program is designed for students who want to work to improve individual and team wellness and health. The curriculum combines the study of anatomy and other health-related sciences with the art of preventing, managing, and rehabilitating athletic and orthopedic injuries. Students are provided with a thorough understanding of the effects of sport and sport-related injuries on the individual performer through a series of interprofessional classroom (didactic) and field (clinical) experiences both on- and off-campus.

Curricular Requirements

First Year

Course Credits
ATC 500 – Fundamentals of Athletic Training 3
ATC 508 – Examination of Athletic & Orthopaedic Injuries 6
ATC 515 – Physical Agents in Athletic Training 3
ATC 520 – Clinical Reasoning in Athletic Training 3
ATC 525 – Athletic Training Clinical Practicum I 5
ATC 530 – Rehabilitative Techniques in Athletic Training 4
ATC 535 – Athletic Performance & Conditioning 3
ATC 540 – General Medical Conditions in Athletic Training 3
ATC 545 – Pharmacology in Athletic Training 3
ATC 550 – Athletic Training Clinical Practicum II 4
Total 37

Second Year

Course Credits
ATC 600 – Administration of Athletic Training Programs 3
ATC 605 – Manual Therapies in Athletic Training 3
ATC 610 – Graduate Seminar in Athletic Training 2
ATC 615 – Diagnostic Techniques in Athletic Training 3
ATC 625 – Psychosocial Interventions in Athletic Training 3
ATC 630 – Athletic Training Clinical Practicum III 6
ATC 640 – Athletic Training Clinical Practicum IV 4
Graduate Capstone 1
Total 25
Minimum required total credits 62

Academic and Technical Standards

Academic Standards

The UNE Master of Science in Athletic Training (MSAT) Program is a graduate program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

  1. Students enrolled in the Professional (graduate) Phase of the MSAT Program must maintain a minimum cumulative semester GPA of 3.0.
  2. Students enrolled in the professional (graduate) phase of the program must maintain a minimum grade of "B" in each required course (or a "P" in each Pass/Fail course). Students may enroll in required courses in the Professional Phase a maximum of two times regardless of the final grade, including "W", "WP" or "WF." Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF) for a detailed description of academic standards.

Technical Standards

The Master of Science in Athletic Training (MSAT) Program at The University of New England is a rigorous and intense program that places specific requirements and demands on the students enrolled in it. An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals engaged in physical activity. The technical standards set forth by the MSAT Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for admitted students to achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer; as well as meet the expectations of the program's accrediting agency CAATE. The following abilities and expectations must be met by all students in the Professional Program. In the event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will be subject to dismissal. All MSAT students must be able to demonstrate competency for patient safety appropriate to the learner’s level of training. Demonstration of fluency of skills and knowledge appropriate to the level of training is a requirement for progression through the curriculum. Most assessments are designed to simulate activities in the clinical training and clinical practice settings and are tied to the learner’s demonstration of competency for patient safety. These assessments may be performed in a timed and structured environment and are designed to evaluate the learner’s ability to demonstrate appropriate fluency of skills and knowledge under specific conditions. 

Compliance with the program's technical standards does not guarantee a student's eligibility for the BOC certification exam.

Candidates for selection to the MSAT Program must demonstrate:

  1. the mental capacity to assimilate, analyze, synthesize, integrate concepts and problem solve to formulate assessment and therapeutic judgments and to be able to distinguish deviations from the norm;
  2. sufficient postural and neuromuscular control, sensory function, and coordination to perform appropriate physical examinations using accepted techniques; and accurately, safely and efficiently use equipment and materials during the assessment and treatment of patients;
  3. the ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients and colleagues, including individuals from different cultural and social backgrounds; this includes, but is not limited to, the ability to establish rapport with patients and communicate judgments and treatment information effectively. Students must be able to understand and speak the English language at a level consistent with competent professional practice;
  4. the ability to record the physical examination results and a treatment plan clearly and accurately;
  5. the capacity to maintain composure and continue to function well during periods of high stress;
  6. the perseverance, diligence and commitment to complete the athletic training program as outlined and sequenced;
  7. flexibility and the ability to adjust to changing situations and uncertainty in clinical situations; and
  8. affective skills and appropriate demeanor and rapport that relate to professional education and quality patient care.

Candidates for selection to the professional (graduate) phase of the MSAT Program will be required to certify with the program director that they have read, understand and meet these technical standards or that they believe that, with certain accommodations, they can meet the standards. Please see the Student Access Center for more information.

Learning Outcomes

Every graduate from the UNE Master of Science in Athletic Training Program will be able to:

  1. Successfully challenge the athletic training entry-level Board of Certification (BOC) examination;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of and clinical proficiency in all five domains of athletic training: 1) injury/illness prevention and wellness promotion, 2) examination, assessment, and diagnosis, 3) immediate and emergency care, 4) therapeutic intervention, and 5) healthcare administration and professional responsibility;  
  3. Model the importance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of high-quality athletic health care; and
  4. Provide evidence-based, clinically-relevant care to athletes and the physically active.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply. 

Admissions

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Application

The University of New England Department of Athletic Training participates in the Athletic Training Centralized Application Service (ATCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

Degree Requirement

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to ATCAS. Please see ATCAS application for additional information and instructions.
GPA Requirement

Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, as calculated by ATCAS (inclusive of all coursework taken with no forgiveness for retakes).

Prerequisite Coursework Requirements
  • General Chemistry I w/lab, 4 semester or 6 quarter credits
  • Anatomy and Physiology I & II w/labs,  8 semester or 12 quarter credits
  • Physics I w/lab, 4 semester or 6 quarter credits
  • Exercise Physiology, 3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits
  • Kinesiology/Biomechanics, 3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits

Other Important Prerequisite Coursework Notes:

  • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C minus” grades are not acceptable).
  • Prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned at the time of application. All courses must be completed with an official transcript submitted to the Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.

All planned or in-progress coursework should be listed on the ATCAS application at the time of application submission; not doing so will result in the applicant not meeting all admissions requirements and therefore will not be eligible for admission review.

Online courses offered through UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites as well as online courses from other regionally accredited U.S. colleges or universities are acceptable with program approval.

Letters of Reference

Two (2) letters of reference* – submitted via ATCAS

  • One (1) academic reference from a professor, research advisor, or academic advisor.
  • One (1) letter from a person of your choice who can speak to your ability to be academically successful and practice professionally. 
    *Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable.
Personal Statement
  • Please refer to the ATCAS application for the specific writing prompt and additional information.
Licenses and Certifications

The following document should be uploaded directly to the ATCAS application:

  • Proof of current certification in Emergency Cardiac Care and Basic First Aid.
Interviews
  • Personal interviews with faculty are required for admission and are granted to qualified applicants by invitation only.
International Applicants

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to ATCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the ATCAS application for test score submission instructions.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Prior to matriculation, accepted and deposited students will be required to complete the following compliance requirements:

  • Completion of physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status. Please refer to UNE’s Student Health Center for detailed information.
  • Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen prior to matriculation, as well as periodically throughout the program (as required by clinical affiliations).
  • Proof of successful completion of yearly OSHA-required bloodborne pathogens safety training will be required prior to the first clinical assignment.
  • All students transferring into the AT Program must meet all admissions requirements and complete the entire graduate phase of the program.
  • All students must have the ability to meet the Academic and Technical Standards of the Athletic Training profession.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies are established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants to the university and its programs
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum and/or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another Athletic Training Program.
  • The program director will review and award transfer credits on a case-by-case basis.

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing placement available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Biological Sciences

Category
Contact

Dr. Kathryn A. Ono
Chair, Graduate Program Committee
Department of Marine Sciences
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, ME 04005
(207)602-2814
kono@une.edu

or

Dr.  Steven Travis
Academic Director, School of Biological Sciences
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, ME 04005
(207) 602-2617
stravis@une.edu

Degree name
Master of Science in Biological Sciences
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Department of Biology at University of New England is to enable students to understand the real-world relevance of the biological sciences, foster scientific literacy and critical thinking skills, and lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society. 

The mission of the Master of Science: Biological Sciences program is to prepare outstanding graduate students for careers or further training in science, technology, and education by providing an advanced knowledge base and a working knowledge of research methods in the biological sciences. 

Program Description

The Master of Science: Biological Sciences program offers post-baccalaureate training to students interested in a wide variety of biological topics. The classroom curriculum features a broad-based exposure to advanced topics in biological subjects that may include physiology, ecology, molecular biology, and microbiology. The program also focuses on the research experience: students will conduct research and prepare a thesis on any of a variety of topics selected in consultation with our faculty.

Program Goals

  • Provide a knowledge base in the biological sciences that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  • Foster participation in the production of biological knowledge through excellence in research.
  • Instill outstanding research skills and a working knowledge of the scientific method by participating in high-quality research.
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through writing and oral presentations.

Curricular Requirements

Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 503 - Research Methods 3
BIO 510 - Graduate Seminar 1
BIO 500 - Level Graduate Topics in Biological Sciences 12+*
Electives - Additional Coursework 6*
BIO 590 - Thesis/Research 12 Minimum
Minimum Total Credits 36
BIO 595 - Thesis Writing/Data Analysis (taken after 36 credits completed) 1
BIO 599 - Masters Thesis 0

*Biological Sciences M.S. students may request to substitute research credits for coursework with approval from their thesis advisor. A formal written request must be submitted to the Graduate Program Committee (GPC), including a justification for the request. If approved by the GPC, students will submit a Course Substitution Form (available on the Registrar's webpage), which requires approval by the School of Biological Sciences Academic Director and by the CAS Dean, to the Registrar in preparation for graduation.

Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain in the MS: Biological Sciences program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0.  A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the graduation requirements.  After two academic years (fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their theses are required to enroll in a minimum of three Thesis credit hours per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/Dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-.  Any student who fails to meet these criteria will be considered for dismissal by the School of Biological Sciences Academic Director and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal

In normal length semesters, a matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average. 

Incomplete Grades

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term may apply for an extension by discussion with the instructor. At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed six weeks following the end date of the course. This agreement must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (such as death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be made in writing, reviewed and signed by the instructor and the student’s advisor.

Learning Outcomes

Program Goals

  1. Provide a knowledge base in the biological sciences that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  2. Foster participation in the production of biological knowledge through high quality research.
  3. Instill outstanding research skills and a working knowledge of the scientific method by participation in high-quality research.
  4. Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate expertise in their thesis research field
  2. Students will increase their proficiency to publication level written and professional oral communication skills
  3. Students will demonstrate mastery of the concepts and principals of the Biological Sciences
  4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of research design and have the ability to carry out a research project

Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another biological science program
  • Transfer credits will be reviewed and awarded on a case by case basis

Advanced standing

  • No advanced standing available

Experiential Learning

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

Admissions Requirements

APPLICATION

The University of New England participates in the Graduate Centralized Application Service (GradCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree in Biology (or other related area) from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please see GradCAS application for additional information and instructions.

GPA REQUIREMENT

  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (inclusive of all coursework taken with no forgiveness for retakes).
  • All applicants must meet minimum GPA requirements to be considered for admission.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

  • Satisfactory completion of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) within 5 years of application.
  • Official GRE score reports should be submitted directly to GradCAS. Please refer to GradCAS application for program GRE code and submission instructions.

RESUME

  • A current resume is required and should be uploaded directly to your GradCAs application.

LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Three (3) letters of reference are required* – submitted via GradCAS

  • Letters should come from a person of your choice who can speak to your academic and/or professional experience.
    *Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information on acceptable tests and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for test score submission instructions.

OTHER IMPORTANT NOTES

  • Prior to or early in the application process, applicants are strongly advised to communicate with UNE faculty with whom they would like to work.
  • Meeting with faculty during the application process does not in any way negate the need to fully complete the application and admissions process.
  • Candidates are reviewed by program faculty and are admitted based on academics and experiences that might be the best fit with the open research opportunities.
  • Applications completed after the posted deadline will be reviewed on a space-available basis.
  • Applicants offered admission will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure a seat in the program.
  • The non-refundable deposit is applied toward fees not covered by the assistantship or grant received upon acceptance.
  • Should the candidate decide not to matriculate in the program, the deposit will be forfeited.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants.
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements.
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, individual candidates.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Continued Enrollment

After two academic years, a student who has completed all coursework except his/her thesis will be required to pay for a minimum of three Thesis credit hours plus mandatory fees each semester to remain in the program. 

Other Expenses

Housing is arranged by and financed at the expense of the student. Currently, there is no on-campus housing available for graduate students.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call (207) 602-2342 or by visiting the Financial Aid website. Information on tuition remission, Research Assistantships, and Teaching Assistantships can be found on the Department of Biology graduate programs website.

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) and Post-Masters Certificate (PMC)

Category
Contact
Degree name
Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) and Post-Masters Certificate (PMC)
College
Sections

Certificate Description

The goals of the Post-Masters Certificate and CAGS programs are to prepare students to:

  • Lead schools, programs, and classrooms in a humanistic, caring manner.
  • Demonstrate professional responsibility and ethical decision-making.
  • Meet the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL):
    • Standard 1. Mission, Vision, and Core Values
    • Standard 2. Ethics and Professional Norms
    • Standard 3. Equity and Cultural Responsiveness
    • Standard 4. Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
    • Standard 5. Community of Care and Support for Students
    • Standard 6. Professional Capacity of School Personnel
    • Standard 7. Professional Community for Teachers and Staff
    • Standard 8. Meaningful Engagement of Families and Community
    • Standard 9. Operations and Management
    • Standard 10. School Improvement

Accreditation

All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Curricular Requirements

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study — Advanced Educational Leadership

For educators interested in pursuing an administrative certification, the University of New England offers a program to equip teachers with the foundational knowledge and curriculum required and approved by the State of Maine.

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in Advanced Educational Leadership is a post-master's degree program of study leading to an educational administrative credential in Maine and has been designed to offer high-quality, cost-effective, and innovative curricula delivered through an online format. This program requires completion of 10 post-master's degree courses (30 credits). Emphasis is on developing the knowledge and skills needed by school administrators and other educators who wish to assume significant leadership roles in their schools, educational institutions, and communities. The program is aligned with the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL).

Core Courses Credits
EDU 701 Educational Leadership and Ethics 3
EDU 702 School Law 3
EDU 703 Educational Change/School Reform 3
EDU 704 Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel 3
EDU 720 Special Education Law 3
EDU 706 School-Community Relations & Communications 3
EDU 707 Instructional Leadership 3
EDU 709 School Finance 3
EDU 715 Organizational Theory & Strategic Planning 3
EDU 791/792 Internship I & II 3
Total 30

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study

The University of New England offers a 30 credit certificate program that allows students to customize their program by choosing electives from different topic areas in education such as curriculum, literacy, educational leadership, and inclusion for teachers looking to advance their education careers. 

30 Credit Certificate in Advanced Graduate Study

Choose any ten (10) of the electives listed below. Students also have the option to add EDU 791/792 Internship I and II to the curriculum. Note: this CAGS is not an approved program for administrative certification in Maine. For UNE's approved administrator preparation program, see CAGS: Advanced Educational Leadership. Please contact your state’s Department of Education for specific certification requirements.

ELectives
  • EDU 701 Educational Leadership
  • EDU 702 School Law
  • EDU 703 Educational Change/ School Reform
  • EDU 704 Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel
  • EDU 706 School-Community Relations and Communications
  • EDU 707 Instructional Leadership
  • EDU 709 School Finance
  • EDU 715 Organizational Theory and Strategic Planning
  • EDU 720 Special Education Law 
  • EDU 721 Using Technology within Inclusion Education
  • EDU 722 Special Education Assessment in Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 723 Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 724 Collaboration in Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 725 Behaviors Considerations/Inclusion
  • EDU 726 Telling Your School's Story through Data Analysis
  • EDU 727 Understanding the Whole Child
  • EDU 740 Supporting Literacy Development for All Learners
  • EDU 741 Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools
  • EDU 742 Study Skills & Content Literacy Instruction for All
  • EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success
  • EDU 744 Meeting Student Literacy Challenges
  • EDU 746 Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership
  • EDU 747 Literacy for English Language Learners
  • EDU 748 Literacy for Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 749 Reading Diagnosis: Clinical Practice I
  • EDU 750 Instruction Intervention: Clinical Practice II
  • EDU 751 The Application Model of Learning – Curriculum Development

Post-Master's degree Certificate — Reading Specialist

For educators with prior Literacy coursework interested in pursuing a Reading Specialist certificate, the University of New England offers a program to equip teachers with foundational knowledge and curriculum. Please contact your state’s Department of Education for specific certification requirements.

Core Courses Credits
EDU 746 Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership 3
EDU 747 Literacy for English Language Learners 3
EDU 748 Literacy for Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 749 Reading Diagnosis: Clinical Practice I 3
EDU 750 Instruction Intervention: Clinical Practice II 3
Total 15

Post-Master's Degree Graduate Certificate

The University of New England offers a 15 credit certificate program that allow students to customize their program by choosing electives from different topic areas in education such as curriculum, literacy, educational leadership, and inclusion for teachers looking to advance their education career. Please contact your state’s Department of Education for specific certification requirements.

Post-Master's Certificate

Choose any five (5) of the electives listed below. Please contact your state’s Department of Education for specific certification requirements

Electives
  • EDU 701 Educational Leadership & Ethics
  • EDU 702 School Law
  • EDU 703 Educational Change/ School Reform
  • EDU 704 Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel
  • EDU 706 School-Community Relations & Communications
  • EDU 707 Instructional Leadership
  • EDU 709 School Finance
  • EDU 715 Organizational Theory and Strategic Planning
  • EDU 720 Special Education Law for the Classroom
  • EDU 721 Using Technology within Inclusion Education
  • EDU 722 Special Education Assessment in Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 723 Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 724 Collaboration in Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 725 Behaviors Considerations/Inclusion
  • EDU 726 Telling Your School's Story through Data Analysis
  • EDU 727 Understanding the Whole Child
  • EDU 740 Supporting Literacy Development for All Learners
  • EDU 741 Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools
  • EDU 742 Study Skills & Content Literacy Instruction for All
  • EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success
  • EDU 744 Meeting Student Literacy Challenges
  • EDU 746 Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership
  • EDU 747 Literacy for English Language Learners
  • EDU 748 Literacy for Inclusion Settings
  • EDU 749 Reading Diagnosis: Clinical Practice I
  • EDU 750 Instruction Intervention: Clinical Practice II

Academic Policy

Course Drop and Withdrawal Policy

The last date to drop a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course. Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal. Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Minimal Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course and must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Students receiving a grade of F in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. Any student who receives a grade of F in two courses is dismissed from the program.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program may occur when the Education Program Director becomes aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Post-Masters Certificate or Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study, a student must:

  • Complete all program requirements.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE (ACADEMIC STOP OUT)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning).

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or by administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old may not be accepted for credit in the program.

Financial Aid

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Learning Outcomes

After completing a CAGS program, students should be able to:

  • Apply research results to leadership decisions
  • Describe the requirements of the PSEL standards
  • Demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills about school administration
  • Exhibit leadership skills in an actual school administrative settings

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study. Transfer credit is not accepted into the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study — Advanced Educational Leadership program.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to, and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

  • Be classified as graduate level.
  • Be taken at a regionally accredited institution
  • Be worth 3 credits.
  • Have been taken within five years of application.
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education.

Transfer credit cannot be accepted into the Post Master's Certificate or Certificate of Advanced Study — Advanced Educational Leadership programs or any other program leading to State of Maine certification.

Admissions

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY (CAGS) AND CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY — ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (CAGS - AEL)

Admission Requirements
  • A master’s degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Graduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  • Employed in an educational setting or ability to regularly access an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.
  • Computer with internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.
Application Process
  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee
  • Current Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statement
  • Supervisor Endorsement
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a master’s degree from a regionally-accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

Procedures and Policies
  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the CAGS program six (6) times a year: Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. If applicable, the TOEFL requirement must be completed and score received by the application deadline.

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please view the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study program website.

Policy Exceptions

\The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study program and the CAGS Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

POST-MASTERS GRADUATE CERTIFICATE (PMC)

Admission Requirements
  • A master’s degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Graduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  • Employed in an educational setting or ability to regularly access an environment in which you can apply course concepts and strategies.
  • Sufficient computer skills to navigate the worldwide web and effectively participate in an on-line program.
  • Own or have regular access to a computer with internet connection and with appropriate hardware and software requirements.
Application Process
  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee
  • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statement
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a master’s degree from a regionally-accredited institution.  All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note:  Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

Procedures and Policies
  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the PMC program six (6) times a year:  Summer A & B, Fall A & B, Spring A & B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Post Masters Certificate program website.

Policy Exceptions

The Post-Master's Degree Graduate Certificate program and the PMC Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Designing Learning Experiences and Teaching Online

Category
Degree name
Graduate Certificate in Designing Learning Experiences and Graduate Certificate in Teaching Online
College
Sections

Certificates Description

Designing Learning Experiences
The 12-credit Graduate Certificate in Designing Learning Experiences is designed to provide students with the instructional design methodologies and skills, informed by learning science, needed to design effective online learning experiences.

Teaching Online
The 12-credit Graduate Certificate in Teaching Online is designed to provide educators with a rigorous and practical introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to design, develop, deliver, and evaluate courses in engaging online formats, and understand the necessary components of the entire online learning ecosystem.

Accreditation

All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Curricular Requirements

Graduate Certificate in Designing learning experiences

This certificate provides students with the instructional design methodologies and skills, informed by learning science, needed to design effective online learning experiences including advanced elements of design.

Certificate Requirements
Required Courses Credits
EDU 631 - Transforming Curriculum for Online Learning 3
EDU 632 - Enhancing Online Student Engagement 3
EDU 633 - Assessment Approaches in Online Courses 3
EDU 635 - Advanced Elements of Learning Experiences 3
Total 12

Graduate Certificate in Teaching Online

The 12-credit Graduate Certificate in Teaching Online is designed to provide educators with a rigorous and practical introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to design, develop, deliver, and evaluate courses in engaging online formats, and understand the necessary components of the entire online learning ecosystem..

Certificate Requirements
Required Courses Credits
EDU 631 - Transforming Curriculum for Online Learning 3
EDU 632 - Enhancing Online Student Engagement 3
EDU 633 - Assessment Approaches in Online Courses 3
EDU 634 - Navigating an Online Learning Ecosystem 3
Total 12

 

Academic Policy

Course Drop and Withdrawal Policy

The last date to drop a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course. Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal. Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Minimal Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course and must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Students receiving a grade of F in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. Any student who receives a grade of F in two courses is dismissed from the program.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program may occur when the Education Program Director becomes aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Master of Science in Education, a student must:

  • Complete all program requirements.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees.

Leave of Absence (Academic Stop Out)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning).

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old may not be accepted for credit in the program.

Learning Outcomes

Graduate Certificate in Designing Learning Experiences

Students will learn to:

  • Recognize and apply best practices in online course design, including designing for equity for all students and applying the principles of universal design for learning. 
  • Design and create effective technology-enabled online learning experiences. 
  • Evaluate and apply multiple strategies supporting virtual assessment. 
  • Determine favorable methods to engage online learners and construct courses that incorporate such methods. 
  • Analyze methods of providing meaningful feedback to online students.  
  • Address authentic online learning challenges by researching and implementing appropriate technologies and methods such as asynchronous video, emerging digital narrative forms, simulations, and gamification. 

Graduate certificate in teaching online

Students will learn to:

  • Recognize and apply best practices in online course design, including designing for equity for all students and applying the principles of universal design for learning. 
  • Design and create effective technology-enabled online learning experiences. 
  • Evaluate and apply multiple strategies supporting virtual assessment.  
  • Determine favorable methods to engage online learners and construct courses that incorporate such methods. 
  • Analyze methods of providing meaningful feedback to online students.  
  • Navigate the online learning ecosystem and develop plans to implement emerging technologies. 

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer one, 3-credit course into the Graduate Certificate in Designing Learning Experiences or Graduate Certificate in Teaching Online.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to, and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

  • Be classified as graduate level.
  • Be taken at a regionally accredited institution.
  • Be worth 3 credits.
  • Have been taken within five years of application.
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Education (Doctor of Education)

Category
Degree name
Doctor of Education
College
Sections

Program Description

This program provides current and aspiring administrative and instructional leaders in diverse settings (e.g., education, health, non-profits, public and private organizations, and agencies, etc.) with the attitudes, knowledge, experience, and skills needed to transform organizations through the effective use of human and technological resources.

This three-year program requiring completion of 13 8-week, 3 credit courses and a 12 credit dissertation representing a total of 51 credits (a maximum of 12 credits can be transferred from a post-Master’s program). The program (including dissertation) will be completed entirely online with no residency requirement.

Program Goals

  • Prepare leaders who are future-focused and capable of fostering innovation and change.
  • Promote a continuing cadre of educators who maintain active connections and collaboration with one another, with schools, communities and professional groups.
  • Establish a higher education program that is technologically sophisticated, educationally effective and academically rigorous.
  • Build a national reputation based upon action research.
  • Provide each candidate with a carefully selected faculty mentoring team contributing actively to the candidate’s progress with their program of study, their research, and their dissertation, beyond what is usually available with a single advisor. 

Curricular Requirements

Core Courses Credits
EDU 801 - Preparation for Transformative Leadership 3
EDU 802 - Qualitative Research Methods 3
EDU 803 - Interpreting Empirical Data 3
EDU 807 - Enacting Transformative Leadership Through Research 3
EDU 808 - Using Theory to Guide Research 3
EDU 809 - Conceptualizing Applied Research 3
EDU 810 - Ethical Leadership 3
EDU 812 - Dissertation Seminar I 3
EDU 813 - Dissertation Seminar II 3
EDU 814 - 817 - Dissertation 12
Electives (12 credits required) Credits
EDU 804 - Technology and Educational Transformation 3
EDU 805 - Managing Change 3
EDU 806 - Policy Analysis 3
EDU 811 - Diagnosing Organizational Dynamics 3

Academic Policy

Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress

Candidates may proceed to subsequent courses in the curriculum with one Low Pass grade. A second Low Pass (or below) course grade may result in termination from the doctoral program. For those needing to report course completion status to employers, a Pass equates to a B or better.

Program Progression

The UNE Doctor of Education program is designed for students to earn their doctorate within a three-year period.  Those individuals who do not complete the program within this timeframe are afforded the opportunity to continue work on their dissertation by enrolling in a series of one-credit continuation courses which provide continued access to faculty and the full resources of the university provided to all enrolled students and doctoral candidates. This enrollment keeps students in active status and on the path to graduation, increasing the likelihood they will complete the Ed.D. program within the mandatory five-year period. 

Timeline for Completion

A student who has not completed the Doctor of Education program within five (5) years will be administratively withdrawn from the program and be required to apply for readmission.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE (ACADEMIC STOP-OUT)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop-outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or been updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning).

Re-admission

Students who have been withdrawn from the program for any reason must reapply if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply. Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old may not be accepted for credit in the program. 

Students who have been administratively withdrawn from the program may petition for re-admission after a full semester has elapsed. The petition letter must provide a justification for re-admission that addresses how past issues have been resolved and will not re-occur. The letter should be sent electronically to the Education Program Director prior to applying for re-admission.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program may occur when the Education Program Director becomes aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course online postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)
  • Academic failure (see “Minimal Grade Standard and Academic Progress”).

Learning Outcomes

  • Participate fully and responsibly in supportive and action-based learning environments of authentic value for colleagues in K-12 education, community college, health, business, and other sectors.
  • Develop and utilize transformative institutional processes to foster, assess the results, and respond to the reported analysis for continued systemic change. 
  • Use technology for research collaboration and dissertation development among colleagues and faculty (e.g., web/videoconferencing).
  • Fully utilize an integrated curriculum that fuses discreet elements of each candidate’s program of study into a coherent whole.
  • Fully utilize online search tools and databases to identify research studies and other relevant resources.
  • Participate in virtual seminars and conferences building a professional learning community.
  • Employ problem and case-based learning strategies extensively in courses and dissertation. 
  • Write and successfully defend a field-based dissertation. 

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to four, 3-credit courses (maximum of twelve credits) into the Doctor of Education program.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to, and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

Transfer courses must:

  • Be classified as graduate, post-Master’s level.
  • Be taken at a regionally accredited institution.
  • Be worth 3 credits.
  • Have been taken within five years of application.
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student's education.

Admissions

Admissions Requirements

  • A Master's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, or its equivalent.
  • Graduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
  • Computer with an internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

Application Process

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee
  • Current Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Application Essay
  • Two (2) letters of recommendation
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a master's degree from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the Doctor of Education program six (6) times a year: Summer A and B, Fall A and B, Spring A and B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Doctor of Education website.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

The Doctor of Education program and the EdD Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Environmental Studies and Environmental Science

Category
Contact

Dr. Noah Perlut (chair)
nperlut@une.edu

Degree name
Master of Science
College
Sections

Mission

The Environmental Studies programs strive to increase awareness and appreciation of human connections with the rest of nature and to stimulate advocacy for sustainable behaviors. The curriculum stresses sound interdisciplinary understanding of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities disciplines in order to explore past, present, and potential ways of living on the earth. We are concerned with environmental issues at local, regional, national, and global levels, and we especially desire to help individuals and communities practice sustainable living by means of our research, teaching, and service. Faculty and students collaborate in active and critical learning through community discourse, personal inquiry, and experiential learning. We intend that our students develop a personal aesthetic awareness of the earth and that they engage in the inquiry, discovery, critical thinking, and debate that characterize the study of environmental issues.

Program Description

This degree requires a total of 36 graduate credits, including a minimum of 12 thesis/research credits (ENV 590), 2 credits of Graduate Seminar in Environmental Studies (ENV 599; 1 in the fouth and 1 in the fifth year), 3 credits of Research Methods (BIO 503) and up to 19 additional course credits (minimum of 12-course credits). Of the 12-19 additional course credits, at minimum of two classes must be offered through the Department of Environmental Studies. A maximum of 12 course credits can double-count towards both the undergraduate and graduate degree requirements.

PROGRAM GOALS

  • Improve the competitiveness of our graduates for jobs and entrance into doctoral programs.
  • Continue to strengthen and diversify research productivity of faculty
  • Attract and retain high achieving students
  • Enhance the intellectual community involving faculty and students in our department

Curricular Requirements

Program Required Courses Credits
ENV 510 - Research/Thesis 19
BIO 503 - Research Methods 3
ENV 5xx - Graduate Seminar I 1
ENV 5XX - Graduate Seminar II 1
ENV Electives 12
Total 36

Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain in the M.S. Biological Sciences program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0.  A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the graduation requirements.  After two academic years (fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their theses are required to enroll in a minimum of three Thesis credit hours per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/Dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-.  Any student who fails to meet these criteria will be considered for dismissal by the Department of Biological Sciences and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Academic Policy

COURSE WITHDRAWAL

In normal length semesters, a matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average. 

INCOMPLETE GRADES

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term may apply for an extension by discussion with the instructor. At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed six weeks following the end date of the course. This agreement must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (such as death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be made in writing, reviewed, and signed by the instructor and the student’s advisor.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate expertise in their thesis research field
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations
  • Students will demonstrate mastery of the concepts and principals of Environmental Studies/Sciences
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of research design and have the ability to carry out a research project

Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another biological science program
  • Transfer credits will be reviewed and awarded on a case by case basis

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

APPLICATION

The University of New England Department of Biology participates in the Graduate Centralized Application Service (GradCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree in Biology (or other related area) from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please see GradCAS application for additional information and instructions.

GPA REQUIREMENT

  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (inclusive of all coursework taken with no forgiveness for retakes).
  • All applicants must meet minimum GPA requirements to be considered for admission.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

  • Satisfactory completion of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) within 5 years of application.
  • Official GRE score reports should be submitted directly to GradCAS. Please refer to GradCAS application for program GRE code and submission instructions.

RESUME

  • A current resume is required and should be uploaded directly to your GradCAs application.

LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Three (3) letters of reference are required* – submitted via GradCAS

  • Letters should come from a person of your choice who can speak to your academic and/or professional experience.

*Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information on acceptable tests and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for test score submission instructions.

OTHER IMPORTANT NOTES

  • Prior to or early in the application process, applicants are strongly advised to communicate with UNE faculty with whom they would like to work.
  • Meeting with faculty during the application process does not in any way negate the need to fully complete the application and admissions process.
  • Candidates are reviewed by program faculty and are admitted based on academics and experiences that might be the best fit with the department’s open research opportunities.
  • Applications completed after the posted deadline will be reviewed on a space-available basis.
  • Applicants offered admission will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure a seat in the program.
  • The non-refundable deposit is applied toward fees not covered by the assistantship or grant received upon acceptance.
  • Should the candidate decide not to matriculate in the program, the deposit will be forfeited.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants.
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements.
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, individual candidates.

Tuition and Fees

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Graduate Certificates in Health Informatics and Healthcare Administration

Category
Degree name
Graduate Certificate in Health Data Analytics, Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management, Graduate Certificate in Health Data Quality, Graduate Certificate in Policy, Law and Compliance and Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management
College
Sections

Certificates Description

The Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management is an 12-credit hour program that provides students with a rigorous and practical introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to help organizations and communities prepare for, and respond to, crisis situations

The Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Data Analytics program is an 12-credit hour program that will provide students who have a background in healthcare or information technology the foundation, skills, and advanced concepts to perform healthcare data analysis. Beyond the foundational and theoretical content provided, these courses provide experiential learning opportunities using software platforms and applications common in today's workplace. Students will graduate from this program with the ability to use SQL, a language used to query data; R, an open-source language which can be used for predictive analytics on large data sets; and Tableau, a data visualization application used to create online charts and dashboards with datasets, to analyze complex healthcare issues.

The Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management is an 12-credit hour program that provides students with a rigorous and practical introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to successfully manage healthcare, and healthcare-related, organizations

The Graduate Certificate in Health Data Quality is an 12-credit hour program that provides students with a rigorous and practical introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to leverage healthcare data for improved patient outcomes

The Graduate Certificate in Health Policy, Law, and Compliance is an 12-credit hour program that provides students with a rigorous and practical introduction to the skills and knowledge needed to guide healthcare, and healthcare-related, organizations through the laws and policies that govern healthcare compliance

Accreditation

The University of New England is Accredited by: New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE)

Curricular Requirements

Emergency Management

Required Courses Credits
HCA 630 - Healthcare Law and Ethics 3
GPH 722 - Introduction to Environmental Health 3
HCA 765 - Communications for Healthcare Leaders 3
HCA 705 - Emergency Management 3
Total 12

Healthcare Data analytics

Required Courses Credits
HIN 620 - Database Design, Standards, Access, Modeling 3
HIN 715 - Information Analysis and Visualization: Turning Data into Insight 3
HIN 770 - Foundations of Healthcare Data Analytics 3
HIN 775 - Advanced Concepts in Healthcare Data Analytics 3
Total 12

Healthcare Management

Required Courses Credits
HCA 601 - Introduction to Health Administration 3
HCA 630 - Healthcare Law and Ethics 3
HCA 720 - Leadership and Strategic Management in Healthcare Settings 3
HCA 765 - Communication for Healthcare Leaders 3
Total 12

Health Data Quality

Required Courses Credits
HIN 605 - Introduction to Health Informatics 3
HCA 610 - Healthcare Quality for Enhanced Value-Based Patient Outcomes 3
HIN 735 - Measuring User Experience 3
HCA 760 - Healthcare Finance and Revenue Cycle Strategy 3
Total 12

Health, Policy, Law, and Compliance

Required Courses Credits
HCA 601 - Introduction to Health Administration 3
HIN 625 - Health Information Legislation, Compliance, Privacy and Security 3
HCA 630 - Healthcare Law and Ethics 3
GPH 702 - Policy: An Interprofessional Approach 3
Total 12

Academic Policy

Minimum Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Students receiving a grade of F in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. Any student who receives a grade of F in two or more courses is dismissed from the program.

Graduation

Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and are required to earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate. All students must file an Application to Graduate with the registrar’s office via U-Online. Please visit the Office of the Registrar website for complete instructions and the answers to frequently asked questions.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

The last day permissible for matriculating graduate students to add or drop a course without financial penalty is the second day of class.

Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing and will receive a “W” on their transcript indicating withdrawal. Students will receive a partial refund if they withdraw from a course within the first or second week. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course. Students who have not participated in the course by the end of the second week will be administratively withdrawn from the course and will not receive a tuition refund.

Email requests for withdrawals must be submitted from a student’s UNE email to be considered.

Matriculating students who withdraw after completing more than 2/3 of a course will receive a grade of “WF” (withdrawn failing) or “WP” (withdrawn passing), based on the instructor’s assessment of the student’s current standing in the course. A “WF” is calculated as an “F” in the student’s GPA. Upon successful completion of the course, the new grade will be used to calculate the GPA. Students will be dismissed from their program after two failing grades (including a “WF”).

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative services.

Leave of Absence (Academic Stop Out)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop-outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning). 

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the student support specialist and student financial services to indicate a change of plans; stop out time can affect financial aid eligibility and repayment.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the Program Director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and Program Director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e. part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veteran's benefits, etc.

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Program Director. Penalties for students found responsible for violations may depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the degree of premeditation involved, and/or the student’s previous record of violations. Appeal of a decision may be made to the Dean whose decision will be final. Student appeals will take place through the grievance process outlined in The College of Graduate and Professional Studies Student Handbook.

Office for Students with Disabilities

The Student Access Center works to ensure that the University promotes respect for individual differences and that no person who meets the academic and technical standards needed for admission and continued enrollment at UNE is denied benefits or subjected to discrimination due to a disability. Toward this end, and in conjunction with federal and state laws, the University provides reasonable accommodations for qualified students.

Experiential Learning

Experiential learning is highly valued by the College of Graduate and Professional Studies. Many courses within the College feature experiential-learning components. However, at this time, no credit will be awarded to students for purely experiential learning experiences undertaken in lieu of coursework.

Learning Outcomes

Emergency Management

  1. Recognize and apply best practices in responding to an emergency.
  2. Evaluate and apply the design, implementation, and evaluation tools used in developing emergency preparedness training exercises.
  3. Develop emergency planning skills by identifying and assessing the components of the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for all hazards and its use by the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

Healthcare Data Analytics

Students who successfully complete the HDAC will be able to:

  1. Build a small relational database containing tables, views, and apply permissions to users using MySQL, an open course relational database program
  2. Build a visualization using Tableau
  3. Import, analyze, and visualize select data using R
  4. Mine structured and unstructured data, build data visualizations, and perform descriptive statistics on the data

Healthcare Management

  1. Apply technology and the healthcare quality framework to meet the goals of the triple aim of improving the patient experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of healthcare.
  2. Demonstrate mastery of leadership skills and tactics required of healthcare managers and executives in the current healthcare environment.
  3. Recognize the rhetorical and stylistic elements necessary for the successful communication of healthcare management strategies, policies, and procedures

Health Data Quality

  1. Evaluate the ways new and developing healthcare technology trends influence worldwide health outcomes, and propose potential technology-based solutions for increasing worldwide health outcomes.
  2. Apply technology and the healthcare quality framework to meet the goals of the triple aim of improving the patient experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of healthcare.
  3. Develop healthcare quality improvement proposals that align with the complex system of legal and regulatory compliance that governs the healthcare system

Health, Policy, Law, and Compliance

  1. Develop healthcare quality improvement proposals that align with the complex system of legal and regulatory compliance that governs the healthcare system.
  2. Analyze significant policies that have shaped the American healthcare system.
  3. Critically evaluate healthcare interests and goals to analyze, formulate, and advocate for
  4. policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Transfer Credit

Emergency Management, Healthcare Management, Health Data Quality and Health, Policy, Law, and Compliance

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to one, 3-credit course (maximum of three credits) into the Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management, Healthcare Management, Health Data Quality and Health, Policy, Law, and Compliance programs.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus for each course. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

Transfer courses must 

  • Be classified as graduate level
  • Have been taken within five years of application
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education

healthcare data analytics

Due to the nature of this four-course graduate certificate, no transfer credit will be accepted for this program offering.

Admissions

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • A bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better.
  • Computer with an internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

Application Process

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee 
  • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statement
  • Three professional references
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. 
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Graduate Health Informatics program website.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

The Graduate Health Informatics program and the Health Informatics Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Health Informatics

Category
Department
Degree name
Master of Science in Health Informatics
College
Sections

Mission

The Master of Science in Health Informatics program prepares future leaders in health informatics to leverage technology tools to improve health and healthcare outcomes through the execution of data-driven management techniques and strategies, to adapt to rapidly-changing landscapes, and to provide leadership and innovation to the health informatics profession.

Program Description

The Graduate Programs in Health Informatics prepares students for a career in health informatics through the interdisciplinary study of the design, development, adoption, and application of technology-based innovations in healthcare services delivery, management, and planning. The courses provide graduate education to individuals with varied backgrounds to learn skills in healthcare, technology, informatics, and leadership. The curriculum is delivered in an online format, with full- and part-time options, and is intentionally flexible and readily applicable to students regardless of where they live.

The Master of Science in Health Informatics is a 36 credit hour curriculum that develops and enhances skills in a variety of professional areas, including healthcare quality, information management, technology, innovation, and leadership. This degree culminates in a practicum, which includes a practical or project experience and capstone paper.

The Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics is an 12-credit hour program that provides students with the core health informatics courses they need to broaden and enhance their professional knowledge. All courses in the Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics are also transferable to the Master of Science in Health Informatics program.

The Graduate Certificate in Health Data Analytics is an 12-credit hour program that provides students who have a background in healthcare/information technology the skills, advanced concepts to perform healthcare data analysis.  Courses provide experiential learning opportunities using software platforms and applications common in today's workplace. Students will graduate from this program with the ability to use SQL, a language used to query data; R, an open-source language which can be used for predictive analytics on large data sets; and Tableau, a data visualization application used to create online charts and dashboards with datasets, to analyze complex healthcare issues. All courses in the Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics are also transferable to the Master of Science in Health Informatics program.

Accreditation

The University of New England is Accredited by: New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE)

Curricular Requirements

Required Courses
HCA 601- Introduction to Health Administration
HCA 605- Introduction to Health Informatics
HCA 610 - Healthcare Quality for Enhanced Value-Based Outcomes
HIN 615 - Advanced Computer Technologies for Health Informaticists
HIN 620 - Database Design, Standards, Access, Modeling
HIN 625 - Health Information Legislation, Compliance, Privacy and Security
HIN 700 - Project Management
HIN 715 - Health Data Analysis, Visualization, and Storytelling
HIN 785 - Health Informatics Capstone
Electives – choose two courses from the following
EDU 760 - Adult Learning Theory
GPH 702 - Public Health Policy
HCA 720 - Leadership and Strategic Management in Health Settings
HIN 730 - Human Factors for System Development
HIN 750 - Applying Consumerization to Health Informatics Strategy
HCA 760 - Healthcare Finance and Revenue Cycle Strategy
HCA 765 - Communication for Healthcare Leaders
HIN 770 - Foundations of Data Analytics
HIN 775 - Advanced Concepts in Data Analytics
Degree Plan for Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics
HCA 601- Introduction to Health Administration
HCA 605- Introduction to Health Informatics
HCA 610- Healthcare Quality for Enhanced Value-Based Outcomes
HIN 615- Advanced Computer Technologies for Health Informaticists

Academic Policy

Minimum Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Students receiving a grade of F in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. Any student who receives a grade of F in two or more courses is dismissed from the program.

Graduation

Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and are required to earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate. All students must file an Application to Graduate with the registrar’s office via U-Online. Please visit the Office of the Registrar website for complete instructions and the answers to frequently asked questions.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

The last day permissible for matriculating graduate students to add or drop a course without financial penalty is the second day of class.

Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing and will receive a “W” on their transcript indicating withdrawal. Students will receive a partial refund if they withdraw from a course within the first or second week. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course. Students who have not participated in the course by the end of the second week will be administratively withdrawn from the course and will not receive a tuition refund.

Email requests for withdrawals must be submitted from a student’s UNE email to be considered.

Matriculating students who withdraw after completing more than 2/3 of a course will receive a grade of “WF” (withdrawn failing) or “WP” (withdrawn passing), based on the instructor’s assessment of the student’s current standing in the course. A “WF” is calculated as an “F” in the student’s GPA. Upon successful completion of the course, the new grade will be used to calculate the GPA. Students will be dismissed from their program after two failing grades (including a “WF”).

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative services.

Leave of Absence (Academic Stop Out)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop-outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning). 

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the student support specialist and student financial services to indicate a change of plans; stop out time can affect financial aid eligibility and repayment.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the Program Director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and Program Director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e. part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veteran's benefits, etc.

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Program Director. Penalties for students found responsible for violations may depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the degree of premeditation involved, and/or the student’s previous record of violations. Appeal of a decision may be made to the Dean whose decision will be final. Student appeals will take place through the grievance process outlined in The College of Graduate and Professional Studies Student Handbook.

Office for Students with Disabilities

The Student Access Center works to ensure that the University promotes respect for individual differences and that no person who meets the academic and technical standards needed for admission and continued enrollment at UNE is denied benefits or subjected to discrimination due to a disability. Toward this end, and in conjunction with federal and state laws, the University provides reasonable accommodations for qualified students.

Experiential Learning

Experiential learning is highly valued by the College of Graduate and Professional Studies. Many courses within the College feature experiential-learning components. However, at this time, no credit will be awarded to students for purely experiential learning experiences undertaken in lieu of coursework.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Graduates will understand the American healthcare system and the effects technology and data have had on it.
  2. Understand the complex system of legal and regulatory compliance that governs the healthcare system.
  3. Apply core concepts of database design to facilitate managing the large amounts of data produced and captured in the healthcare setting.
  4. Understand foundational concepts and theories of leadership and management, especially with respect to data-driven business intelligence.
  5. Apply technology and the healthcare quality framework to meet the goals of the triple aim of improving the patient experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of health care.
  6. Analyze, evaluate, and apply the range of tools needed to implement new technology, including identifying, evaluating, selecting, implementing, and upgrading technological systems.
  7. Evaluate the ways new and developing healthcare technology trends influence worldwide health outcomes, and propose potential technology-based solutions for increasing world-wide health outcomes.
  8. Understand and apply project management tools, concepts, and best practices to oversee the successful completion of complex projects.

Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the Master of Science in Health Informatics program or up to one, 3-credit course (maximum of three credits) into the Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics or Healthcare Data Analytics programs.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus for each course. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

Transfer courses must 

  • Be classified as graduate level
  • Have been taken within five years of application
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education

Admissions

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • A bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better.
  • Computer with an internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

Application Process

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee 
  • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statement
  • Three professional references
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. 
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Graduate Health Informatics program website.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

The Graduate Health Informatics program and the Health Informatics Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Healthcare Administration

Category
Department
Degree name
Master of Healthcare Administration
College
Sections

Mission

The Master of Healthcare Administration program prepares future healthcare leaders to improve health and healthcare outcomes through the execution of data-driven management techniques and strategies, to adapt to rapidly-changing landscapes, and to provide leadership and innovation to the healthcare profession.

Program Description

The Master of Healthcare Administration is comprised of 12 courses (36 graduate credit hours) that prepare graduates with foundational, specialized, and technology skills that align with the core responsibilities found in relevant job postings for healthcare leaders.

These skills include people management, budget management, business strategy, quality assurance/control, project management, business management, communication skills, teamwork/collaboration, planning, research, problem-solving, and the technologies facilitating these skills.

Alignment with the current CGPS portfolio of offerings also provides the coursework for a number of focus areas for the degree, including health data analytics, public health, and grant writing and entrepreneurship.

Students may complete the coursework for the MHA program in 24 months by taking one course during each 8-week term, or on an accelerated schedule by increasing the number of courses taken per term.

Accreditation

The University of New England is accredited by New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Curricular Requirements

Required Courses Credits
HCA 601- Introduction to Health Administration 3
HIN 605 - Introduction to Health Informatics 3
HCA 610 - Healthcare Quality for Enhanced Value-Based Patient Outcomes 3
HCA 630 - Healthcare Law and Ethics 3
HCA 720 - Leadership and Strategic Management in Health Settings 3
HCA 760 - Healthcare Finance and Revenue Cycle Strategy 3
GPH 702 - Policy: An Interprofessional Approach 3
HCA 780 - Healthcare Administration Capstone 3
Total 27

focus area/Elective options

Health Data Analytics Focus Area Courses Credits
HIN 620 - Database Design, Standards, Access, and Modeling 3
HIN 770 - Foundations of Healthcare Data Analytics 3
HIN 775 - Advanced Concepts in Healthcare Data Analytics 3
Public Health Focus Area Courses Credits
GPH 714 - Principles of Public Health 3
GPH 706 - Principles of Public Health Administration 3
GPH 738 - Program Planning and Evaluation 3
Total 9
Total Credits 36

Academic Policy

Minimum Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Students receiving a grade of F in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. Any student who receives a grade of F in two or more courses is dismissed from the program.

Graduation

Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and are required to earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate. All students must file an Application to Graduate with the registrar’s office via U-Online. Please access the following link for complete instructions and the answers to frequently asked questions: www.une.edu/registrar/graduation

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

The last day permissible for matriculating graduate students to add or drop a course without financial penalty is the second day of class.

Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing and will receive a “W” on their transcript indicating withdrawal. Students will receive a partial refund if they withdraw from a course within the first or second week. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course. Students who have not participated in the course by the end of the second week will be administratively withdrawn from the course and will not receive a tuition refund.

Email requests for withdrawals must be submitted from a student’s UNE email to be considered.

Matriculating students who withdraw after completing more than 2/3 of a course will receive a grade of “WF” (withdrawn failing) or “WP” (withdrawn passing), based on the instructor’s assessment of the student’s current standing in the course. A “WF” is calculated as an “F” in the student’s GPA. Upon successful completion of the course, the new grade will be used to calculate the GPA. Students will be dismissed from their program after two failing grades (including a “WF”).

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative services.

Leave of Absence (Academic Stop Out)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop-outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning). 

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the student support specialist and student financial services to indicate a change of plans; stop out time can affect financial aid eligibility and repayment.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the Program Director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and Program Director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e. part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veteran's benefits, etc.

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Program Director. Penalties for students found responsible for violations may depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the degree of premeditation involved, and/or the student’s previous record of violations. Appeal of a decision may be made to the Dean whose decision will be final. Student appeals will take place through the grievance process outlined in The College of Graduate and Professional Studies Student Handbook.

Office for Students with Disabilities

The Student Access Center works to ensure that the University promotes respect for individual differences and that no person who meets the academic and technical standards needed for admission and continued enrollment at UNE is denied benefits or subjected to discrimination due to a disability. Toward this end, and in conjunction with federal and state laws, the University provides reasonable accommodations for qualified students.

Experiential Learning

Experiential learning is highly valued by the College of Graduate and Professional Studies. Many courses within the College feature experiential-learning components. However, at this time, no credit will be awarded to students for purely experiential learning experiences undertaken in lieu of coursework.

Learning Outcomes

Program competencies include:

  1. Healthcare Planning
    • Assess healthcare strategic planning problems to develop comprehensive and practical solutions
    • Evaluate strategies for increasing the reliability of healthcare processes, including using technology
  2. Healthcare Management
    • Demonstrate mastery of leadership skills and tactics required of healthcare managers and executives in the current healthcare environment
    • Evaluate operational and capital budgets for a health care facility, including sources of capital funding and costs, and create budget action plans informed by those analyses
  3. Healthcare Policy
    • Evaluate significant policies that have shaped the American healthcare system
    • Critically evaluate healthcare interests and goals to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice
  4. Healthcare Leadership
    • Demonstrate how to promote quality and a culture of patient safety
    • Demonstrate effective methods for developing and motivating diverse audiences within healthcare settings to improve organizational agility

Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the Master of Healthcare Administration program.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus for each course. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to and will be granted at the discretion of, the program director.

Transfer courses must:

  • Be classified as graduate level
  • Have been taken within five years of application
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education

Admissions

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • A bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.75 or better.
  • Computer with an internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee 
  • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statement
  • Three professional references
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution. See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions. 
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please visit the Master of Healthcare Administration website.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

The Master of Healthcare Administration Program and the Healthcare Administration Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Marine Sciences

Category
Contact

Dr. Kathryn Ono
Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee
Marine Sciences
University of New England
11 Hills Beach Road
Biddeford, ME 04005
(207) 602-2814
kono@une.edu
or
Dr. Barry Costa-Pierce, Chair
Marine Sciences
University of New England
11 Hills Beach Rd.
Biddeford, ME 04005
(207) 602-2440
bcostapierce@une.edu

Degree name
Master of Science in Marine Sciences
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of Marine Programs at University of New England is to enable students to understand the real-world relevance of the marine sciences, foster scientific literacy, and critical thinking skills, and lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society.

The Marine Sciences degree encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, and how it is related to earth systems sciences, as well as to human interactions with the environment. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology to chemistry, geology, and physics. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems, not only in ocean sciences, but in fields as far-ranging as meteorology and space exploration, as well as aquaculture and marine policy.

The mission of the Master of Science in Marine Sciences program is to prepare outstanding graduate students for careers or further training in science, technology, and education by providing an advanced knowledge base and research skills in marine sciences.

Program Description

The Master of Science in Marine Sciences program offers post-baccalaureate training to students interested in continuing their education in the marine sciences. The classroom curriculum provides a strong background in all aspects of the marine sciences. The program focuses on a thesis research experience: students will conduct research and prepare a thesis on any of a variety of topics selected in consultation with our faculty.

Program Goals

  • Provide a knowledge base in the marine sciences that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  • Foster participation in the production of new knowledge through excellence in research.
  • Instill outstanding research skills and a working knowledge of the scientific method by participation in high-quality research.
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations.

Curricular Requirements

Program Required Courses Credits
MAR 503 - Research Methods 3
MAR 530 - Graduate Seminar 1
MAR 512 - Marine Science Center Seminar 1
MAR 566 - Advanced Oceanography I 3
MAR 568 - Advanced Oceanography II 3
Electives - Additional Coursework 9*
MAR 590 - Research and Thesis 12 minimum
Total Credits Required 36
MAR 595 - Thesis Writing/Data Analysis (taken after 36 credits completed) 1
MAR 599 - Masters Thesis 0

*Students may substitute Thesis/Research credits for Electives with the approval of their advisor

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete all required courses with a minimum graduate GPA of 3.0 and successfully pursue, complete, and defend publicly an approved research thesis.

Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain in the M.S. in Marine Sciences program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0. A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the graduation requirements. After two academic years (fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their theses are required to enroll in a thesis continuation credit per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/Dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-. Marine Programs and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences will consider for dismissal any student who fails to meet these criteria.

Academic Policy

Course Withdrawal

In normal length semesters, a matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

Incomplete Grades

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term may apply for an extension by discussion with the instructor. At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed six weeks following the end date of the course. This agreement must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (such as death in the family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be made in writing, reviewed and signed by the instructor and the student’s advisor.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate expertise in their thesis research field
  2. Students will increase their proficiency to publication level written and professional oral communication skills
  3. Students will demonstrate mastery of the concepts and principles of the Marine Sciences
  4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of research design and have the ability to carry out a research project

Transfer Credit

TRANSFER CREDIT

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another Marine Science program
  • Transfer credits will be reviewed and awarded on a case by case basis

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
 

APPLICATION

The University of New England School of Marine Programs participates in the Graduate Centralized Application Service (GradCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please see GradCAS application for additional information and instructions.

GPA REQUIREMENT

  • Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is required.
  • Minimum science/STEM GPA of 3.0 is required.
  • All applicants must meet minimum GPA requirements to be considered for admission.

PREREQUISITE COURSEWORK REQUIREMENTS

  • Marine Science Track
    • Science (all courses should include labs)
      • Biology, 16 credits
      • General Chemistry, 12 credits
      • Physics, 8 credits
    • Other
      • Calculus, 4 credits
  • Oceanography Track
    • Science (all courses should include labs)
      • General Chemistry, 8 credits
      • Physics, 8 credits
    • Other
      • Calculus, 4 credits
      • Complete additional 16 credits in Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or Biology,

Other Important Prerequisite Coursework Notes:

  • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C minus” grades are not acceptable).
  • Prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned at the time of application, although all courses must be completed with an official transcript submitted to the Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.

All planned or in-progress coursework should be listed on the GradCAS application at the time of application submission; not doing so will result in the applicant not meeting all admissions requirements and therefore will not be eligible for admission review.

Online courses offered through UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites as well as online courses from other regionally accredited U.S. colleges or universities are acceptable with program approval.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

  • Satisfactory completion of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) within 5 years of application.
  • Official GRE score reports should be submitted directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the GradCAS application for program GRE code and submission instructions.

PERSONAL STATEMENT

  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for specific writing prompt and additional information.

RESUME

  • A current resume is required and should be uploaded directly to your GradCAS application.

LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Three (3) letters of reference are required* – submitted via GradCAS

  • Letters should come from a person of your choice who can speak to your academic and/or professional experience.
    *Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information on acceptable tests and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for test score submission instructions.

OTHER IMPORTANT NOTES

  • Applicants are strongly encouraged to complete and submit an application well before the application deadline for earliest consideration.
  • Prior to or early in the application process, applicants are strongly advised to communicate with UNE faculty with whom they would like to work.
  • Meeting with faculty during the application process does not in any way negate the need to fully complete the application and admissions process.
  • All completed applications will be reviewed by the program admissions committee after the application deadline, with decisions mailed around mid-March.
  • Applications completed after the posted deadline will be reviewed on a space-available basis.
  • Applicants offered admission will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure a seat in the program.
  • The non-refundable deposit is applied toward fees not covered by the assistantship or grant received upon acceptance.
  • Should the candidate decide not to matriculate in the program, the deposit will be forfeited.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies are established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants to the university and its programs.
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum and/or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements.
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Continued Enrollment

After two academic years, a student who has completed all coursework except his/her thesis will be required to pay for a thesis continuation credit plus mandatory fees each semester to remain in the program.

Other Expenses

Housing is arranged by and financed at the expense of the student. Currently, there is no on-campus housing available for graduate students.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call (207) 602-2342, or visit the Financial Aid website. Information on Research Assistantships and Teaching Assistantships can be found on the School of Marine Programs graduate programs website.

Master of Science in Education

Category
Contact
Degree name
Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.)
College
Sections

Accreditation

All programs at the University of New England are accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Curricular Requirements

The Master of Science in Education

UNE allows students to customize their program by choosing electives from different topic areas in education such as curriculum, literacy, educational leadership, and inclusion for teachers looking to advance their career in education. Contact your state’s Department of Education for specific certification requirements.

Program Requirements Credits
Total core credits 15
Total elective credits (pick any 5 courses) 15
Total program credits 30
Core Courses Credits
EDU 605 Ethical Responsibilities in Today's Education Systems 3
EDU 610 Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 625 Developing a Framework for Diversity and Inclusion 3
EDU 690 Action Research 3
EDU 695 Portfolio 3
Total 15
Elective Courses Credits
EDU 600 Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 615 Motivational Theory and Class Management 3
EDU 631 Transforming Curriculum for Online Learning 3
EDU 632 Enhancing Online Student Engagement 3
EDU 633 Assessment Approaches in Online Courses 3
EDU 634 Navigating an Online Learning Ecosystem 3
EDU 635 Advanced Elements of Learning Experience Design 3
EDU 701 Educational Leadership 3
EDU 702 School Law 3
EDU 703 Educational Change/School Reform 3
EDU 704 Supervision and Evaluation of Instructional Personnel 3
EDU 706 School-Community Relations and Communications 3
EDU 707 Instructional Leadership 3
EDU 709 School Finance 3
EDU 715 Organizational Theory and Strategic Planning 3
EDU 720 Special Education Law for the Classroom 3
EDU 721 Using Technology within Inclusion Education 3
EDU 722 Special Education Assessment in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 723 Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 724 Collaboration in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 725 Behaviors Considerations/Inclusion 3
EDU 726 Telling Your School's Story through Data Analysis  3
EDU 727 Understand the Whole Child 3
EDU 740 Supporting Literacy Development for All Learners 3
EDU 741 Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools 3
EDU 742 Study Skills & Content Literacy Instruction for All 3
EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success 3
EDU 744 Meeting Student Literacy Challenges 3
EDU 746 Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership 3
EDU 747 Literacy for English Language Learners 3
EDU 748 Literacy for Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 760 Adult Learning Theory 3

 

Master of Science in Education — Reading Specialist

For educators interested in pursuing certification, the University of New England offers a program to equip teachers with the foundational knowledge and curriculum required by the State of Maine.

Core Courses Credits
EDU 600 Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 610 Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
Required Electives Credits
EDU 740 Supporting Literacy Development for All Learners 3
EDU 741 Literacy Assessments as Teaching Tools 3
EDU 742 Study Skills and Content Literacy Instruction for All 3
EDU 743 Connecting Reading with Writing for Success 3
EDU 744 Meeting Student Literacy Challenges 3
EDU 746 Professional Learning and Literacy Leadership 3
EDU 747 Literacy for English Language Learners 3
EDU 748 Literacy for Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 749 Reading Diagnosis: Clinical Practice I 3
EDU 750 Instruction Intervention: Clinical Practice II 3
Program Requirements Credits
Total 36

 

Master of Science in Education — Inclusion Education

For educators interested in pursuing certification, the University of New England offers a program to equip teachers with the foundational knowledge and curriculum required by the State of Maine.

Core Courses Credits
EDU 600 Teacher as Leader 3
EDU 690 Action Research 3
Required Electives Credits
EDU 720 Special Education Law for the Classroom 3
EDU 721 Using Technology within Inclusion Education 3
EDU 722 Special Education Assessment in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 723 Teaching and Learning in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 724 Collaboration in Inclusion Settings 3
EDU 725 Behavior Considerations in the Inclusive Setting 3
EDU 726 Telling Your School's Story Through Data Analysis 3
EDU 727 Understanding the Whole Child in the Inclusive Setting 3
Program Requirements Credits
Total 30

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION — TEACHING METHODOLOGY

The Master of Science in Education — Teaching Methodology is available only to UNE students who have successfully completed the Teacher Certification Program (TCP). The Teaching Methodology program is a 30 credit master’s degree encompassing 15 graduate credits from UNE’s College of Arts and Sciences Teacher Certification Program and 15 core credits in the College of Graduate and Professional Studies (CGPS) Graduate Programs in Education.

CAS Program Requirements Credits
EDU 502 Curriculum and Assessment 3
EDU 510 Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 561 Teaching Social Studies, K-8 3
EDU 567 Teaching Science, K-8 3
EDU 573 Teaching Mathematics, K-8 3
EDU 581 Foundations of Literacy Development and Instruction 3
EDU 582 Literacy Research-Based Instructional Methods 3
Total Credits (15 required for MSM, but 21 required for Maine State certification) 21
Secondary or Art Courses Credits
EDU 502 Curriculum and Assessment 3
EDU 510 Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 582 Literacy Research-Based Instructional Methods 3
Select one appropriate methods course from the following 3
EDU 536 Teaching Secondary English 3
EDU 537 Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 538 Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3
EDU 539 Teaching Secondary Math 3
EDU 541 Methods of Art Education  3
Elective - Must choose ONE elective at the Graduate Level 3
Total 15
CGPS Program Requirements Credits
EDU 605 Ethical Responsibilities in Today's Educational Systems 3
EDU 610 Differentiation Theory & Strategies 3
EDU 625 Developing a Framework for Diversity and Inclusion 3
EDU 690 Action Research 3
EDU 695 Portfolio 3
Total 15

Academic Policy

Course Drop and Withdrawal Policy

The last date to drop a course with no record is the first day of course. Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing (e-mail is acceptable) by the end of the fourth week of the course. Students will receive a “W” on their transcripts indicating withdrawal. Beyond the fourth week, at the faculty’s discretion, a “WP” or “WF” may be assigned if extenuating circumstances do not allow the student to complete his/her work. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course.

Minimal Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course and must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Students receiving a grade of F in any course will be immediately placed on academic probation. Any student who receives a grade of F in two courses is dismissed from the program.

Dismissal from the Program

Termination from the Program may occur when the Education Program Director becomes aware of one of the following:

  • Surrender of a teacher license in any jurisdiction for disciplinary reasons.
  • Documented academic dishonesty (Note this also includes course on-line postings and email communications with faculty and staff. Students are advised that their behavior while participating in the Program should exemplify the ethical behavior of a professional educator with respect to all communications.)

Graduation Requirements

To complete the program and receive a Master of Science in Education, a student must:

  • Complete all program requirements.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Pay all tuition and fees.

Leave of Absence (Academic Stop Out)

Students may stop out of their program for up to two semesters. Students need to coordinate stop outs in advance with their assigned student support specialist, and stop out time is considered part of the time allotted to complete the academic program. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time or who exceeds two semesters of stop out will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. Readmitted students are subject to the re-admittance term’s catalog (this may mean that policies and/or program requirements have been changed or updated since previous admission, and should be reviewed for potential impact on degree requirements, time to complete the degree, and degree planning).

Re-admission

Students who have withdrawn from the program, either self-initiated or administrative withdrawal, must reapply to the program if they wish to continue their studies. The application procedures, academic policies, and program requirements that are in effect at the time of readmission will apply.

Students who re-enroll following withdrawal will have their previous coursework evaluated for applicability to the existing academic requirements. Coursework that is more than five years old may not be accepted for credit in the program.

Learning Outcomes

After completing the M.S.Ed. program, students should be able to: 

  1. Apply leadership frameworks that focus on personal values, beliefs, ethics, and leadership styles.
  2. Address the full range of motivation and differentiation issues encountered in today's educational systems.
  3. Promote social justice using principles of diversity and inclusion.
  4. Analyze and conduct research relevant to their teaching or administrative interests.
  5. Document professional development in the program via an electronic portfolio of coursework.
  6. Develop online collaborative relationships with peers. 

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three, 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the Master of Science in Education program.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to, and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

  • Be classified as graduate level.
  • Be taken at a regionally accredited institution.
  • Be worth 3 credits.
  • Have been taken within five years of application.
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education.

Transfer credit cannot be accepted into the Master of Science in Education-Reading Specialist, Master of Science in Education-Inclusion or any other program leading to State of Maine certification.

Admissions

Admission requirements

  • A bachelor's degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
  • Computer with internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described in our Technical Requirements. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the internet as all classes are accessed 100% online. 

Application Process

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee
  • Current Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statement
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a bachelor's degree or above from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note: Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought. The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Students are admitted to the M.S.Ed. program six (6) times a year: Summer A and B, Fall A and B, Spring A and B.
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration. Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited U.S. institution. See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university. UNE accepts several methods to demonstrate English Proficiency, See International Admissions.
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Master of Science in Education website.

exceptions

The Master of Science in Education program and the M.S.Ed. Admissions Committee in collaboration with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Admissions reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Nurse Anesthesia

Category
Contact

Office of Graduate Admissions, gradadmissions@une.edu or 1-800-477-4863 for more program information or details about the application process.

For additional curriculum and program information, contact the School of Nurse Anesthesia at (207) 221-4516.

Degree name
Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia (M.S.N.A.)
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the School of Nurse Anesthesia is to provide an academic environment that allows students to master the intellectual and technical skills necessary to become competent in the safe conduct of anesthesia. This is accomplished by providing a select group of experienced, graduate-level critical care nurses with the highest level of didactic, simulation lab, and clinical site experiences. UNE's graduate nurse anesthetists develop life-long scholarship, critical thinking skills, technical skills, and professionalism needed to become compassionate, patient-centered Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA's) in solo practice or within a collaborative anesthesia environment.

Program Description

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs), as Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, have been providing anesthesia care in the United States of America for over 150 years. Currently, there are approximately 55,000 CRNAs in the country with more than 2,800 students graduating per year.

CRNA's are anesthesia specialists who safely administer approximately 49 million anesthetics to patients in the United States each year. As advanced practice nurses, they can serve in a variety of capacities in daily practice, such as a clinician, educator, administrator, manager, and researcher.  CRNAs work in the administrative positions of hospitals, academic institutions, and other health care facilities. 

  • CRNA's administer anesthesia to patients across the lifespan for all types of surgical cases, using all anesthetic techniques and practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered, from university-based medical centers to free-standing surgical facilities and offices.
  • CRNA's are the primary anesthesia providers in almost 100% of rural hospitals in the United States, affording access to anesthesia care where it would otherwise not be available. CRNAs also provide anesthesia in inner cities as well as urban areas including teaching institutions.
  • CRNAs are qualified and permitted by state law or regulations to practice in every state in the nation. They provide anesthesia in collaboration with surgeons, anesthesiologists, podiatrists, dentists, and other healthcare professionals.

The School of Nurse Anesthesia at the University of New England has been involved in nurse anesthesia education since 1970, serving as an academic affiliate for hospital-based certificate nurse anesthesia programs. In 1988, we initiated a program leading to the Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia. In 1993, the UNE MSNA program became the sole authority of the education of nurse anesthesia students when the last hospital-based program in Maine closed.

Two-Phase Program

The University of New England's program is a 27 month two-phase program. 

Phase I is conducted on our historic Westbrook College of Health Professions Campus, situated in the picturesque coastal city of Portland. The first two semesters of study consist of didactic instruction in basic sciences and anesthesia taught by our CRNA and science faculty. During the eight-month didactic curriculum  instruction using state-of-the-art task trainers and simulation labs is utilized to prepare students for the clinical experience.  In the summer of 2017, the Simulation Lab moved to a multi-million dollar, high fidelity center in Innovation Hall on the Portland campus, increasing the quality and number of simulation experiences provided.

Phase II of the curriculum entails clinical training based at our hospital affiliates for a period of 19 months. Didactic instruction continues during the clinical phase through hybrid and on-campus courses in advanced principles of anesthesia, research, and business and leadership in anesthesia practice. Anesthesia crisis resource management is taught in both lecture and simulation modalities.  The School has contractual relationships with over 38 hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, and offices located in New England and throughout the country, which offer our students a varied and diverse clinical education experience. Our students are trained in collaborative anesthesia environments as well as in non-medically directed, CRNA-only sites. Students gain experience in all facets and types of anesthesia management, including ultrasound guided regional anesthesia, pain management, invasive monitoring, and pre and post-op patient assessment.

With successful completion of the 27-month program, students are awarded a Master of Science degree in Nurse Anesthesia (MSNA). The graduate is then qualified to take the National Certifying Examination. Upon successful completion of the exam, the graduate becomes a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist qualified to practice in all 50 states. To date, 100 percent of our students have passed the certifying examination in their first-year post-graduation and 100 percent have successfully obtained employment.

Transition Plan to the Entry-Level Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program: The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA) requires that all students matriculating into a nurse anesthesia educational program on January 1, 2022, or thereafter, be enrolled in a program approved by the COA to award a practice doctoral degree. The University of New England Nurse Anesthesia program plans to submit its application to the COA for approval to award the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree in February of 2021. Pending approval by the COA, the program plans to enroll its first doctoral cohort of students in September of 2022. Further information regarding this transition may be obtained by contacting the Program Director, Cheryl L. Nimmo, DNP, MSHSA, CRNA at (207) 221-4519, or at cnimmo@une.edu.

Accreditation

The School of Nurse Anesthesia is accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs, a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. The School of Nurse Anesthesia is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs through the fall of 2021. The program received the maximum 10-year accreditation length in June 2011. We are scheduled for reaccreditation in the fall of 2021. 

View the department performance data sheet (PDF)

Curricular Requirements

For the first 8 months (two semesters), students attend classes full time on UNE's Portland campus or online as necessary.  The majority of the basic science and anesthesia didactic courses are offered during this period. The remaining 19 months of the program are clinically-based, with an emphasis on advanced coursework, clinical training, simulation lab experiences, and completion of a senior research project. All students are required to complete the entire curriculum with a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Summer (May–August) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 504 - Advanced Pharmacology I 45 3
ANE 507 - Basic Principles of Anesthesia I 60 4
ANE 631 - Professional Aspects  45 3
ANE 603 - Advanced Physiology I 45 3
ANE 609 - Research Methods for the Health Professional 45 3
ANE 632 - Advanced Pathophysiology I 45 3
Subtotal 285 19
Fall (August–December) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 512 - Airway Management and Regional Techniques 60 4
ANE 602 - Basic Principles of Anesthesia II 60 4
ANE 604 - Advanced Physiology II 45 3
ANE 606 - Advanced Pharmacology II 45 3
ANE 629 - Advanced Physical Assessment Across the Lifespan 45 3
ANE 633 - Advanced Pathophysiology II 45 3
Subtotal 300 20
Spring (January–May) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 623 - Advanced Principles of Anesthesia I 45 3
ANE 650 - Clinical Practicum I 15 1
Subtotal 60 4
Summer (May–August) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 624 - Advanced Principles of Anesthesia II 45 3
ANE 652 - Clinical Practicum II 15 1
Subtotal 60 4
Fall (August–December) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 654 - Clinical Practicum III 15 1
ANE 628 - Research Practicum I 15 1
Subtotal 30 2
Spring (January–May) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 656 - Clinical Practicum IV 15 1
ANE 630 - Research Practicum II 15 1
ANE 619 - Business and Leadership in Anesthesia  15 1
Subtotal 45 3
Summer (May–August) Course Requirements Hours Credits
ANE 658 - Clinical Practicum V 15 1
ANE 627- Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management  15 1
Subtotal  30 2
Program Total 765 54

Clinical Training

Upon completion of the didactic portion of the program, the students move on to the 19-month clinical portion of the curriculum. The primary focus is clinical anesthesia experiential education. The clinical experience obtained encompasses all areas for the student to achieve clinical competency in anesthesia. This is accomplished through affiliations at various clinical sites. The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs has set minimum standards for clinical experience that each student must achieve prior to graduation from the program to qualify for the National Certifying Examination. Each student is required to administer a specific number of anesthetics including all techniques, agents, and patients across the lifespan. Students complete more than the required minimum case numbers and clinical hours. All of the surgical specialties are included, including hands-on training in regional anesthesia techniques with ultrasound. Specialty experiences (i.e. neurosurgery, open-heart surgery, obstetrics) when not available at primary hospital affiliation sites, will be obtained from rotations at other medical facilities.

All types of anesthesia techniques and the latest agents are available for student learning. Students are able to obtain experience in general anesthetics, intravenous agents, invasive line placement, and regional anesthesia including spinal, epidural, and peripheral nerve blocks including the use of ultrasound. Students also rotate to CRNA-only rural sites for experience in autonomous practice settings.

Clinical Affiliates

Please refer to the clinical education website for a list of clinical sites currently utilized by the School of Nurse Anesthesia.

Graduation Requirements

The following criteria must be met to qualify for graduation:

  1. Satisfactory completion of all didactic and clinical courses with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Satisfactory completion of clinical experience as required by the School of Nurse Anesthesia and the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs.
  3. Satisfactory completion and fulfillment of stated UNE School of Nurse Anesthesia Student Learning Outcomes.
  4. Completion of twenty-seven actual months in the program, exclusive of probationary time.
  5. All evaluations must be completed and signed, including University and Program evaluations.
  6. All clinical records must be completed and submitted to the Anesthesia School Administrative staff.
  7. Successful completion of the capstone project.
  8. All fees must be paid in full.
  9. All library books must be returned.
  10. A current RN license and ACLS, PALS, BLS Certifications must be on file.
  11. Successful completion of the Self-Evaluation Exam (SEE) from the NBCRNA. Students are required to obtain a SEE score of 425 or higher or three attempts before they can complete the program. The program will pay for the first attempt and the student is responsible for subsequent SEE payments until the minimum score is obtained. This may delay graduation from the program. Students who do not attain the required SEE score will take a series of comprehensive exams prior to graduation. 

Academic and Technical Standards

WCHP Academic Policy

The Department of Nurse Anesthesia, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality Nurse Anesthesia education program that complies with the evaluative criteria of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA). The program provides learning experiences and didactic knowledge to enable graduates to take the National Certifying Exam and become providers of high quality anesthesia.  Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF) for a detailed description of academic standards.

Academic Policy

PROGRAM COMPLETION TIMELINE

Students are expected to complete 27 actual months in the program.  

RULES OF CONDUCT WHILE ON AFFILIATION AT CLINICAL SITES

Success in the Nurse Anesthesia profession requires certain behavioral attributes including but not limited to personal commitment and hardiness, self-awareness, resilience, perseverance, empathy, discipline, honesty, integrity, personal regard for others, the ability to work effectively with others in a team environment, and the ability to address a crisis or emergency situation in a composed manner. Adherence to these attributes requires a high level of maturity and self-control, even in highly stressful situations. During the clinical phase, students must conduct themselves in a highly professional manner consistent with the patient care responsibilities with which they will be entrusted. Failure to adhere to these standards, as noted below, or comply with the Clinical Rotation Policies will result in disciplinary action ranging from a written warning to dismissal from the program (depending upon the violation and the circumstances surrounding the offense).

  1. Creating or contributing to situations that jeopardize patient safety. 
  2. Students are expected to follow all policies in the Student Code of Conduct section of the University of New England Handbook. Unethical behavior such as academic dishonesty, falsifying case logs, or medical records is considered a violation of the Program’s standards of conduct. 
  3. Respect the confidentiality of patients and fellow students. One is not permitted to discuss any patients by name outside the clinical encounter situation. Students should not discuss other students with preceptors. For academic presentations, all identifying data, including name, initials, date of birth, and facility where seen will be omitted.
  4. Unauthorized possession, use, copying, or distribution of hospital records or disclosure of information contained in such records to unauthorized persons.
  5. Use, distribution, or unauthorized possession of intoxicating beverages or drugs on hospital premises or reporting to work under the influence of intoxicants.
  6. Unauthorized absence from the Anesthesia Department during regularly scheduled clinical hours.
  7. Failure or refusal to follow instructions of a duly assigned preceptor including refusal to accept clinical assignment.
  8. Use of vile, intemperate or abusive language, or acting in a disrespectful manner to any employee, supervisor, patient, or visitor.
  9. Any disorderly conduct on hospital premises.
  10. Creating or contributing to unsanitary conditions.
  11. Theft, fraud, or unauthorized use of property belonging to the hospital, patient, or visitor.

CLINICAL PRACTICUM COURSE EXPECTATIONS

To successfully complete each clinical practicum course, students must achieve a grade of A or B. Details regarding clinical practicum expectations will be detailed in the Student Clinical Practicum Handbook and course syllabus. Clinical progression will be monitored during each clinical practicum. If students are not meeting clinical objectives, they will be placed on Probation.

If a student is placed on a 30-day Probationary Status, they will continue with the clinical objectives scheduled for that level. The student will communicate with program faculty and clinical faculty to develop a plan based on their clinical evaluations, clinical faculty feedback and/or program faculty findings. The plan will include strategies for improvement of clinical performance. 

At the end of the 30-day Probationary Status, the student’s performance will be re-evaluated by the clinical and program faculty. If they are successful, they will resume their clinical practicum at the same level their peers are at and return to good standing. Being placed on probationary status will delay the student's graduation date accordingly. If progress continues to be unsatisfactory, the student will receive an 'F' for the course and be dismissed from the program.

Students may be placed on a second 30-day probationary period for additional (unresolved or newly identified) performance issues. The process described above would apply for this as well. Students are granted a maximum of two (2) probationary periods not to exceed 60 days total. If additional (newly identified) performance issues continue to occur after a student has been granted (2) probationary periods, the student would be immediately dismissed.

ESSENTIAL TECHNICAL STANDARDS

Principles
Nurse anesthesia education requires that accumulation of scientific knowledge be accompanied by the simultaneous acquisition of specific skills and professional attitudes and behavior. Nurse Anesthesia faculty have a responsibility to society to matriculate and graduate the best prepared nurse anesthetists, and thus admission to this program has been offered to those who present the highest qualifications. The essential technical standards presented in this document include pre-requisites for matriculation, subsequent promotion from year to year, and ultimately graduation from the University of New England School of Nurse Anesthesia. These standards pertain to all matriculated students. All required courses in the curriculum are necessary in a progressive order to develop essential skills and knowledge required to become a competent nurse anesthetist.

The faculty is committed to fostering relationships with its students that encourage human and professional growth. Its policies and procedures attempt to reflect this commitment to proactive and supportive communication.

It is imperative that all students recognize that the primary responsibility for a successful nurse anesthesia education, both in and outside the classroom, rests with the individual. Students, including students with disabilities, must have the capacity to manage their lives and anticipate their own needs. The School has incomplete influence in helping students achieve these personal adaptations. Situations can arise in which a student’s behavior and attitudes resulting from a disability or other personal circumstances represent a secondary problem which impairs the student’s ability to meet the School’s standards, even after implementation of all reasonable accommodations have been made by the School.

Recommendations

  1. No otherwise qualified individual will be denied admission to the School of Nurse Anesthesia based solely upon a disabling condition.
  2. Candidates with disabilities applying to the School of Nurse Anesthesia will be expected to have achieved the same requirements as their non-disabled peers.
  3. Matriculation into the School of Nurse Anesthesia assumes certain levels of cognitive, emotional, and technical skills. Nurse anesthetist candidates with disabilities will be held to the same fundamental standards as their non-disabled peers. Reasonable accommodations will be provided to assist the candidates in learning, performing, and satisfying the fundamental standards, so long as the candidate provides timely, comprehensive documentation establishing the candidate’s disability status and need for reasonable accommodation.
  4. Reasonable accommodations that facilitate candidate progress will be provided but only to the extent that such accommodation does not significantly interfere with the essential functions of the School of Nurse Anesthesia, fundamentally alter the program, significantly affect the rights of other candidates, or pose a health or safety risk to any individual including patients. 
  5. The School, under the law, is obligated to provide all reasonable accommodations that will eliminate or minimize the barriers disabled candidates may face in the process of successfully completing the requirements for graduation from the University of New England’s School of Nurse Anesthesia.

Abilities and Skills
A candidate for this program must have abilities and skills of five varieties including observational skills; communication skills; fine and gross motor skills; intellectual skills: conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social/emotional attributes.

I. Observational Skills
The candidate must be able to acquire a defined level of required information as presented through demonstration and experiences in the basic sciences and anesthesia courses including, but not limited to, information conveyed through labs and simulated anesthesia exercises. Furthermore, a candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately, both at a distance, and close at hand, acquire information from written documents and visualize information as presented in radiographic images and patient monitors. The candidate must have visual and hearing acuity, including use of depth perception and peripheral vision; hearing normal and faint body sounds (blood pressure and heart sounds) and hearing auditory alarms on monitors and anesthesia delivery systems. Such observation and information acquisition necessitate the functional use of visual, auditory, and somatic sensation while being enhanced by the functional use of other sensory modalities.

In any case where a candidate’s ability to observe or acquire information through these sensory modalities is compromised, the candidate must demonstrate alternative means and/or abilities to acquire and demonstrate the essential information without reliance upon another person’s interpretation of the information. The university will provide appropriate reasonable accommodations to foster the student’s ability to meet these standards, so long as the student registers with UNE Disability Services.
 
II. Communication Skills
The candidate must be able to effectively and efficiently communicate using verbal, written, and reading skills, in a manner that demonstrates sensitivity to patients, their families, and all members of the health care team. A candidate must be able to accurately elicit information, describe a patient’s change in mood, thought, activity, and status. He or she must also demonstrate established communication skills using traditional or alternative reasonable means that do not substantially modify the standard.

III. Fine and Gross Motor Skills
The candidate must be able to, with or without the use of assistive devices, but without reliance on another person, interpret x-ray and other graphic images and digital or analog representations of physiologic phenomenon (such as EKGs).

The ability to participate in basic diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers and procedures (e.g. palpation, auscultation) is required. It is also essential for a candidate to possess the gross motor skills sufficient to provide a full range of safe and effective care to patients. These include the ability to move within confined spaces, reach above shoulders, bend, stoop, squat, stretch, and reach below the waist. Fine motor skills are necessary to perform psychomotor skills such as picking up objects, grasping, pinching with fingers (intubations, manipulating a syringe, starting IVs), twisting and squeezing.

Physical stamina sufficient to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study is required. In addition, physical endurance and strength are requirements in order to tolerate training during an entire shift (including overtime or call), standing for long periods of time, and sustaining repetitive movements (performing CPR, positive pressure ventilation, etc). Candidates must be able to provide hands-on patient care such as lifting, pushing, and pulling excessive weight to position patients, pick up and carry children, ambulate patients and transfer anesthetized patients from stretchers and beds. When transporting patients to patient recovery areas, the candidate is required to move not only the patient's weight but also the heavy bed.

The candidate is required to carry heavy equipment and supplies, sit for long periods of time on stools with and without any back support, twist and turn to visualize monitors and the surgical field, and possess the strength and flexibility to assist in the restraint of combative patients. In addition, the candidate must be able to move quickly to respond to emergencies. At all times the ability to administer care to patients in a safe manner is paramount.
 
IV. Intellectual Skills - Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities
The candidate must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, and synthesize information in a timely fashion. In addition, the candidate must be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structure. Problem-solving, the critical skill demanded of nurse anesthetists, requires all of these intellectual abilities. These problem-solving skills must be able to be performed in a precisely limited time demanded by a given clinical setting. In addition, the candidate must be able to adapt readily to changing environments and deal with unexpected activities.

V. Behavioral and Social/Emotional Attributes
Candidates must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients.

Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. They must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility, and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of patients. They must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize information effectively in a precisely limited time demanded by a given clinical setting, while under stress, and in an environment in which other distractions may be present.

Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, self-reflection, emotional intelligence, interest, and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and educational processes.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this educational program, the student shall demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the faculty, specific competencies expected of graduates. These competencies identify the knowledge and skills necessary for competent entry-level practice of nurse anesthesia. Upon completion of the program, the graduate will:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the perianesthetic management of patients based on theory and research evidence learned in the basic sciences and basic and advanced principles of anesthesia practice during the didactic phase of the program.
  2. Apply theoretical and evidence-based knowledge learned during the didactic phase of the program and demonstrate mastery in the perianesthetic management of the patient in the clinical setting.
  3. Effectively communicate with all health care professionals, patients, and families in the delivery of culturally competent perianesthetic care throughout the anesthesia experience.
  4. Demonstrate vigilance and adherence to patient safety principles throughout the anesthetic experience.
  5. Demonstrate professional responsibility, integrity, and accountability to their peers, interprofessional colleagues, and other health care stakeholders throughout the program and perianesthetic clinical experiences.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits are not awarded.

Advanced standing

No advanced standing placement is available

Experiential Learning

No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

Important Notice

The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA) requires that all students matriculating into a nurse anesthesia educational program on January 1, 2022 or thereafter be enrolled in a program approved by the COA to award a doctoral degree. The University of New England Nurse Anesthesia program is currently in the process of gaining approval from the COA to award the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree with a major in Nurse Anesthesia. Pending approval by the COA, the program plans to enroll its first doctoral cohort of students in Fall 2022. Additional information about this transition may be obtained by contacting the program directly at (207) 221-4519.
 

APPLICATION and ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

Items to submit:

  • Application with application fee
  • Official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended
  • Three (3) letters of recommendation 
  • Resume
  • Proof of current RN licensure
  • Copies of required certifications/score reports: ACLS, PALS
  • Proof of satisfactory completion of Biochemistry Prerequisite*
    *If you are unsure whether or not a specific Biochemistry course will count towards our prerequisite requirement, please submit the UNE Biochemistry Prerequisite Equivalency Form. Your submission will be reviewed and a reply will be sent to you via email within 5-7 business days.

APPLICATION

All University of New England Master of Nurse Anesthesia Program applicants should apply through the UNE Online Graduate Application.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree (or higher) in Nursing OR
Completion of an Associate’s Degree in Nursing and a Bachelor of Science degree in a science-related field of study.

All degrees must have been completed at a U.S. regionally accredited college/university or international equivalent, and all nursing degrees must have been completed at an accredited nursing program, prior to starting the Nurse Anesthesia program.

GPA REQUIREMENT

  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, specifically in the sciences, is highly recommended.
  • Due to the competitive nature of the program, meeting minimum admission requirements does not guarantee an interview or acceptance.

PREREQUISITE COURSEWORK REQUIREMENT

  • Biochemistry (3-4 semester credits)
    • Course must be upper-division (300 level+)
    • Community College courses are not acceptable

Other Important Prerequisite Coursework Notes:

  • Biochemistry must be completed with a grade of “B” or better (“B minus” grade is not acceptable) 
  • Biochemistry course must have been completed no more than five years prior to the application deadline for the UNE Nurse Anesthesia program
  • Course must be successfully completed with an official transcript submitted to the UNE Office of Graduate Admission no later than the application deadline.

UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites offers an online, accelerated Biochemistry course that can be used to fulfill this prerequisite requirement.

LETTERS OF EVALUATION

Three (3) letters of evaluation are required*

  • One letter must be from the immediate acute care nursing supervisor or manager attesting to the total length of time, in years and months that an applicant has worked in the acute care setting as a registered nurse.
  • It is recommended that the remaining two letters come from those that can attest to the clinical and professional skills of the applicant.

*Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable

EXPERIENCE HOURS

Clinical Experience: All applicants are encouraged to shadow a nurse anesthetist for at least 1 day in the operating room prior to application to more fully understand the commitment involved in studying to become a nurse anesthetist.

  • Minimum of at least 18 months (2 or more years is recommended) current experience as a critical care nurse.
  • All experience hours must be completed prior to application submission
  • Acceptable areas: ICU, CCU, CVICU, SICU, MICU, NICU, PICU and Neuro ICU 

LICENSURE and CERTIFICATIONS

  • Proof of current unencumbered RN licensure in your home state at the time of application; licensure in the state where clinical experience occurs is obtained after enrollment.
  • Certifications Required-
    • Current Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Certification
    • Current Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Certification
  • Certifications highly recommended-
    • CCRN and/or other specialty certification (i.e., CEN) highly recommended
      • Submit a copy of the certification
      • Submit score report

PERSONAL STATEMENT

  • Please refer to the online application for a specific writing prompt and additional information.

INTERVIEWS

Interviews are a required part of the application and admission process:

  • Qualified applicants will be contacted and invited to interview during the fall semester, prior to the summer start of the Masters in Nurse Anesthesia program.
  • Interviews are by invitation only.
  • Alternate interviewing modalities (including virtual interviews) may be instituted as necessary to address ongoing public health concerns with COVID-19. The Office of Graduate Admissions will be in touch with any updates, as needed.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • All supporting documents must be submitted directly to the UNE Office of Graduate Admission.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Prior to matriculation, accepted and deposited students will be required to complete the following compliance requirements:

  • Completion of physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status. Please refer to UNE’s Student Health Center for detailed information.
  • Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen prior to matriculation, as well as periodically throughout the program (as required by clinical affiliations).
  • All students must have the ability to meet the Academic and Technical Standards of the Nurse Anesthesia profession.
  • Admissions decisions are non-rolling and made by the program Admissions Committee after all interviews are completed.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog. Miscellaneous fees that students should plan for in the program include but may not be limited to the following (approximate amounts):

Castlebranch/Certified Background $250
Ear mold for precordial stethoscope  $80
Required texts  $1,500
Nurse Anesthesia Review Course -optional, not required  $800-$900
Self-Evaluation Exam (SEE) fee per attempt $250
Drug screening per facility (clinical rotations) $60

RN license per state of rotation- varies by state

Background Check per state (NH, MA) 

from $75 to $275

$25

National Certification Exam fee (per attempt) $1,000

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call (207) 283-0170, ext. 2342 or by visiting the Financial Aid website.

Occupational Therapy

Category
Contact

Kris Winston
kwinston@une.edu

Degree name
Master of Science in Occupational Therapy
College
Sections

Mission

UNE Occupational Therapy (OT) Mission is to develop innovative and collaborative OT practitioners and leaders who respond to the dynamic needs of people and communities to support health and wellness through occupational engagement. 

Vision

Our vision is to lead the profession in meeting society’s occupational needs by fostering excellence in occupational therapy teaching, scholarship, and service.

 

Program Description

Occupational therapy is a health profession whose practitioners work with persons, groups, and populations of all abilities across the lifespan. The goal of occupational therapy intervention is to increase the ability of those we work with to participate in everyday occupations that include activities we need and want to participate in such as, mealtimes, dressing, bathing, leisure, work, education, and social participation. 

Occupational therapy practitioners work in a variety of settings some of which include hospitals, clinics, schools, rehabilitation centers, home care programs, community health centers, psychiatric facilities, and skilled nursing facilities. With experience, practitioners might function in private practice, as a university faculty member, in administration, as a researcher, or as a consultant.

The OT curriculum is designed to facilitate occupation-based, client-centered practice, critical thinking, and clinical reasoning. Courses emphasize life-long learning and professional responsibilities and help students become competent and compassionate practitioners. Workshops, lectures, intervention labs, small group classes, and fieldwork experiences help students apply and integrate practice grounded in theory.

The graduate OT program within the Westbrook College of Health Professions emphasizes inter-professional education among nursing, nurse anesthesia, athletic training, applied exercise science, physical therapy, social work, dental hygiene, physician assistant, pharmacy, public health, nutrition, health wellness and occupational studies, dental, and osteopathic medical students.

Accreditation

The Occupational Therapy Program was first awarded accreditation in January 1985. The OT program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200, North Bethesda, MD, 20852-4929. For members, (301) 652-AOTA, for non-members (301) 652-6611. www.acoteonline.org

Graduates of the program are eligible to take the National Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). NBCOT, Inc. 1 Bank Street, Suite 300 Gaithersburg, MD, 20878 Phone: (301) 990-7979 Email: Info@nbcot.org Website: www.nbcot.org

National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT)

Most states require licensure to practice. (State licensure requires NBCOT Certification Examination results). Eligibility for the National Certification Examination requires:

  • Master's degree, with a major in occupational therapy
  • Successful completion of an accredited occupational therapy curriculum
  • Successful completion of a minimum of 12 weeks of supervised fieldwork (Level II)

Curricular Requirements

Program Required Courses

Summer Credits
OTR 505 - Foundations in OT 3
OTR 520/520L- Clinical Kinesiology & Anatomy 4
OTR 531 Health Conditions and Occupational Therapy 3
OTR 532 Therapeutic Use of Self and Group Process 3
OTR 502- Occupational Analysis 3
Subtotal 16
Fall Credits
OTR 521 - Biopsychosocial Dimensions of Mental Health & Wellness 3
OTR 521L - OT Interventions in Mental Health & Wellness (includes level I fieldwork) 2
OTR 528 Fieldwork Seminar Mental Health 1
OTR 640 Neuro-Occupation 3
OTR 650 Leadership and Advocacy in delivery Systems 3
OTR 628 - Research Methods & Design 3
Subtotal 15
Spring Credits
OTR 621 - Health Care Management & Delivery 3
OTR 611 - Biopsychosocial Dimensions of Children & Youth 3
OTR 611L - OT Interventions w/ Children & Youth (includes level I fieldwork) 2
OTR 606 - Occupational Engagement in Communities and Contexts (taken either Spring or Second Summer) 3
OTR 610 - Integrative Practice w/Children & Youth 3
OTR 619 - Evidence-Based Research Seminar 3
OTR 605 Fieldwork Seminar Pediatrics 1
Subtotal 15–18
Summer Credits
OTR 527 - Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation in Adulthood 4
OTR 527L - OT Interventions in Adulthood 2
OTR 604 Fieldwork Seminar RDP 1
OTR 606 - Occupational Engagement in Communities and Contexts (taken either Spring or Second Summer) 3
OTR 529 Integrative Practice - Adults 2
OTR 630 Essentials for Practice 3
Subtotal 12–15
Fall/Spring Credits
OTR 601 - Fieldwork IIA 6
OTR 602 - Fieldwork IIB 6
Subtotal 12

Fieldwork Experiences

Level I Fieldwork: Students complete Level I Fieldwork experiences as part of instructional courses, reinforcing course concepts. Students are supervised by qualified personnel may include occupational therapists, teachers, social workers, public health nurses, and physical therapists. Level II Fieldwork: Emphasizes the application of knowledge by providing the student with in-depth experience in delivery of occupational therapy service to patients/clients. Students complete two full-time level II fieldwork experiences, each is 12 weeks long.

The expenses incurred for room and board during these internships, and travel to and from the fieldwork sites, are the responsibility of each student. Students may complete fieldwork at any approved location. The requirements for Level II fieldwork include:

  • A minimum of 24 weeks, full time of Level II Fieldwork experience, preferably with at least 12 weeks on a full-time sustained basis;
  • Completion of all fieldwork experience no later than 18 months following completion of the didactic portion of the curriculum;
  • Supervision provided by a licensed occupational therapist with at least one year of experience.

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete all courses prior to graduation and fulfill all curriculum requirements.

Academic and Technical Standards

WCHP Academic Policies

The Department of Occupational Therapy, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality Occupational Therapy education program that complies with the evaluative criteria of the ACOTE (Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education). The program provides learning experiences to enable graduates to achieve the outcomes required for the practice of Occupational Therapy. Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF) for a detailed description of academic standards.

M.S.O.T. Technical Standards

Technical Standards for Occupational Therapy Program

The following abilities and skills are necessary to engage in the Occupational Therapy department at the University of New England: 

  • Cognitive abilities to analyze, synthesize, and integrate information related to anatomy, physiology, human development, psychology, sociology, kinesiology, and occupational studies in order to make clinical judgments for planning and implementing effective occupation-based interventions.
  • Critical thinking and judgment that promotes safety, optimal occupational performance, remediation, and adaptation.
  • Time management and organizational skills to meet demands of classroom and practice environment.
  • Interpersonal skills that include participating in classroom discussion, conducting interviews, observing body language, listening, responding, collaborative goal setting, and developing intentional relationships.
  • Evaluation of the performance of self and others and making adjustments in behavior or promoting behavioral change in others to enhance occupational performance.
  • Communication skills to develop positive client relationships, complete written documentation consistent with OT practice, and participate as a health care team member.
  • Physical abilities to perform physical examinations, such as balance, range of motion, and strength, and to accurately, safely, and efficiently use assessment tools, equipment, and other materials during occupational therapy intervention.
  • Emotional stability to handle the demands of a practice environment. This includes acting in a professional manner, being dependable, meeting commitments, and being forthcoming about one’s own needs.
  • Ability to maintain personal appearance and hygiene conducive to working in clinical and community settings.

Learning Outcomes

Through the transformative power of occupation, UNE OT graduates collaborate with people and communities to navigate a journey toward health and wellness.

Upon completion of the Occupational Therapy program, students will demonstrate the following outcomes:

Leadership and Advocacy

  • Advocate for access to occupations that support health and wellness.
  • Demonstrate everyday leadership that equips others to navigate the journey to health and wellness through the transformative power of occupation.
  • Develop as leaders who model the way to health and wellness through the transformative power of occupation.

Collaboration

  • Effectively demonstrate professionalism to communicate and collaborate in team-based care for client-centered practice.
  • Cultivate relationships to facilitate health and wellness.
  • Demonstrate communication that is flexible and responsive to contextual demands.

Community and Context

Facilitates UNE OT students' recognition that occupations are inextricably connected to and influenced by the communities and contexts in which they are performed

  • Demonstrate the ability to recognize and assess characteristics of community (comprised of individuals, groups, and populations that are complex, multifaceted, and layered with meaning) and context (factors such as culture, physical environment, personal interests, rituals, routines, spirituality, roles) to collaboratively find solutions to occupational challenges and to support occupational engagement and participation.
  • Value the characteristics of community and context as they influence occupation due to the symbiotic, dynamic, and complex relationship with the nature of the occupation.
  • Support occupational engagement and participation by recognizing and assessing the characteristics of communities and contexts.

Creativity

  • Collaborate with individuals, groups, populations, and communities to implement creative solutions to occupational challenges.
  • Integrate creative resources and strategies to shape thinking that will move people and communities toward health and wellness through occupational engagement.
  • Demonstrate the resourcefulness to keep occupation at the center of academic and practice related learning.

Evidence-based Practice and Scholarly Inquiry

  • Integrate all levels of evidence to create, inform, and support occupation-centered practice encompassing (or throughout) the entire OT process.
  • Embrace a culture of scholarly inquiry that addresses gaps in knowledge and promotes best practices and lifelong learning.
  • Demonstrate excellence in written and verbal communication to disseminate new ideas, knowledge, and skills that inform and guide practice.

Meaning

Meaning provides a framework for people to participate and live a fully engaged life

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how participation and engagement in occupation creates a sense of meaning and in turn influences health and wellness.
  • Demonstrate awareness that meaning is a dynamic process that occurs throughout day-to-day occupations across the lifespan.
  • Discern meaning as it relates to each individual, population, group, and community.

Transfer Credit

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another Occupational Therapy program
  • Transfer credits will be reviewed and awarded on a case by case basis

Advanced STANDING

  • No advanced standing available

Experiential Learning

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

Admissions Requirements

APPLICATION

The University of New England Master of Science in Occupational Therapy program participates in the Occupational Therapy Centralized Application Service (OTCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

GPA REQUIREMENT

  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is preferred, as calculated by OTCAS (inclusive of all coursework taken with no forgiveness for retakes).
  • A minimum prerequisite GPA of 3.0 is preferred, as calculated by UNE using the highest grade received for repeated coursework; calculated using the OTCAS universal computation scale for quality points.

PREREQUISITE COURSEWORK REQUIREMENTS

  • Science​​
    • Human Anatomy & Physiology I and II (with labs, 6-8 semester or equivalent quarter credits) or
      • Human Anatomy w/lab, 3-4 semester or 4.5-6 quarter credits, and
      • Physiology w/lab, 3-4 semester or 4.5-6 quarter credits (Animal or Exercise Physiology not acceptable)
    • Neuroscience* (3-4 semester or 4.5-6 quarter credits); lab component not required, but highly recommended​
  • Other (each prerequisite course below should be equivalent to 3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits)
    • Statistics (Bio, Math, Psych)
    • Intro to Psychology
    • Abnormal Psychology
    • Human Development** (lifespan)
    • Social Science*** (Sociology/Anthropology)
    • English Composition
       
    • Courses in Medical Terminology, College Chemistry, College Physics, and Introduction to Occupational Therapy are not required but highly recommended​.

Other Important Prerequisite Coursework Notes:

  • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C minus” grades not acceptable).
  • All science prerequisite coursework must be completed no more than seven (7) years prior to UNE’s OTCAS application deadline.
  • A maximum of 6 Advanced Placement (AP) or equivalent International Baccalaureate (IB) credits may be accepted as a substitute for Introduction to Psychology and English Composition prerequisite courses only.
  • *Neuroscience – the course should include structure and function of the nervous system including both the central and peripheral nervous system, content related to the neural basis for movement and sensory functions (including content on sensory and moto pathways), and general cognitive functioning.
  • ***Social Science – applicants must have 3 credits of social science which might include sociology or anthropology that is focused on the study of society, human interactions/relationships, the structure and function of social institutions or organized groups, and culture.
  • **Human Development – course must cover entire lifespan from birth to death. Applicants wishing to use Developmental Psychology to fulfill this prerequisite must reach out to the program for approval prior to application submission.
  • All prerequisite courses must be completed at a regionally accredited U.S. college or university.
  • Prerequisite coursework may be in-progress or planned at the time of application.
  • Official transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the summer/fall term should be submitted and verified by OTCAS during the Academic Update period.
  • Official transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the spring term should be submitted directly to UNE’s Office of Graduate Admissions.

All planned or in-progress coursework should be listed on the OTCAS application at the time of application submission; not doing so will result in the applicant not meeting all admission requirements and therefore will not be eligible for admission review.

Online courses offered through UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites as well as online courses from other regionally accredited U.S. colleges or universities may be acceptable, with program approval.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

The GRE test is NOT required for admission.

LETTERS OF EVALUATION

Two (2) letters of evaluation are required* – submitted via OTCAS

  • Letters should come from individuals who can speak to the applicant’s academic abilities and/or professional experiences.

*Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable.

OBSERVATION HOURS

  • Volunteer and/or work experience in a health or human service-related setting is recommended but not required due to continuing uncertainty with COVID-19 and evolving safety recommendations.
  • Volunteer hours and/or work experiences can be documented directly within the OTCAS application.

PERSONAL STATEMENT

  • Please refer to the OTCAS application for specific writing prompts and additional information.

INTERVIEWS

  • Interviews are required for admission and are granted by invitation only.
  • Alternate interviewing modalities, including virtual interviews, may be used to address ongoing public health concerns with COVID-19.
  • UNE's Office of Graduate Admissions will be in touch with updates as needed.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be submitted directly to OTCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE-approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the OTCAS application for test score submission instructions.
     

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Prior to matriculation, accepted and deposited students will be required to complete the following compliance requirements:

  • Admitted and deposited students must arrange for the submission of all outstanding documents, including transcripts and baccalaureate degree conferral via an official transcript submitted to the UNE Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.
  • Completion of physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status. Please refer to UNE’s Student Health Center for detailed information.
  • Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen prior to matriculation, as well as periodically throughout the program (as required by clinical affiliations).
  • All students must have the ability to meet Academic and Technical Standards of the Occupational Therapy profession.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants to the university and its programs
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum and/or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Ocean Food Systems

Category
Contact

Dr. Barry Costa-Pierce, Executive Director
UNE North
University of New England
1075 Forest Ave., Portland, ME 04103

(207) 221-4262
bcostapierce@une.edu

Or

Zach Miller-Hope, M.S., Assistant Director for Education
UNE North
University of New England
1075 Forest Ave., Portland, ME 04103

(207) 221-4149
zhope@une.edu
 

Degree name
Professional Science Master
College
Sections

Mission

The mission for UNE North is to forge new strategic local-to-global North Atlantic/Arctic research, education, and industry/business partnerships at the forefront of the region’s innovation economy; to catalyze the full potential of Maine/North Atlantic/Arctic networks to educate and empower sustainability leaders; to create a platform to develop and apply collaborative solutions to the region’s shared economic, environmental, social, and health challenges.

The UNE NORTH Ocean Food Systems (OFS) P.S.M. envisions a future where a diversified, innovative, and sustainable ocean food system is developed across the Maine-North Atlantic-Arctic region with the participation of all stakeholders including communities, producers, engineers, manufacturers, and consumers. Industry-academic partnerships are paramount to actualizing this vision. OFS partners have direct access to project planning, development, and implementation and are vital to setting “up-to-the-minute” relevant foci of study for OFS program cohorts. 

Program Description

The Professional Master’s in Ocean Food Systems: UNE NORTH, through the School of Marine and Environmental Programs, offers post-baccalaureate training to students interested in an in-depth study of how where you will holistically examine ocean foods value chains in fisheries and aquaculture, seafood trade, and interactions with marine governance, law, management, and policy. 

The 12-month program, along with coursework, will include a customized master’s project catered to each individual student. The master’s project will be designed and extensively researched by each student with the guidance of a mixed committee of faculty and industry stakeholders.

Program goals

  • Provide a knowledge base in Ocean Food Systems that is deeper than the typical undergraduate experience.
  • Foster the participation of new knowledge and thoroughly communicate that to the public.
  • Instill outstanding critical thinking skills paired with in-depth scientific knowledge to inform science, business, and/or policy in Ocean Food Systems.
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations.

Curricular Requirements

Required courses Credits
MAR 571 - Ocean Food System in the North Atlantic 8
MAR 504 - Transdisciplinary Research Methods in Ocean Food Systems 3
MAR 514 - Ocean Food Systems Seminar 1
MAR 530 - Graduate Seminar 1
MAR 591 - P.S.M. Project Work in USA/Iceland 22-24
MAR 596 - P.S.M. Project Writing 1
Total credits 36+

Graduation requirements

Students must successfully complete all required courses with a minimum graduate GPA of 3.0 and successfully pursue, complete and defend publicly an approved research thesis.

Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory academic progress

To remain in the P.S.M. in Ocean Food Systems Program: Marine Sciences program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0. A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program completion timeline

Students have a maximum of three years to complete the graduation requirements. After one academic year (summer, fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their projects are required to enroll in a project continuation credit per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-. UNE NORTH, The School of Marine and Environmental Programs, and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences will consider for dismissal any student who fails to meet these criteria.

Academic Policy

Course withdrawal

In normal length semesters, a matriculated student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty (a grade of W is assigned) at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered, subject to determination by the instructor. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

Incomplete grades

A student who believes she/he is unable to complete the work for a given course by the end of the term may apply for an extension by discussion with the instructor. At the time of this meeting, a plan must be agreed upon for completion of the course work, including a date of completion, not to exceed six weeks following the end date of the course. This agreement must be completed by the last day of class for the given course. Any student who does not follow the above guidelines will receive an F for the course. In exceptional circumstances (such as death in family, significant illness, accident), an additional extension may be requested. Any such request must be made in writing, reviewed, and signed by the instructor and the student’s advisor.

Learning Outcomes

  1. To describe and analyze the international to local issues, problems and opportunities, sustainability challenges, and natural and social-ecological foundations of transdisciplinary work in ocean food systems.
  2. To engage in the processes of project formulation, design, team-building, and writing in ocean food systems.
  3. To develop the ability to conduct independent investigations under supervision in order to build leadership skills in ocean food systems.
  4. To formulate, develop, and deliver a project comprising transdisciplinary, social, and natural science and other technical information; collect data and information, and summarize results, findings, and recommendations, both orally and in writing, to international, national, and local audiences.

Transfer Credit

  • No transfer credit granted

Advanced standing

  • No advanced standing placement available

Experiential learning

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

Admissions requirements

APPLICATION

The University of New England P.S.M. in Ocean Food Systems participates in the Graduate Centralized Application Service (GradCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the GradCAS application for additional information and instructions.
GPA REQUIREMENT
  • Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is preferred.
LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Three (3) letters of reference are required* – submitted via GradCAS

  • One (1) academic reference from faculty who can comment on your potential for graduate study in Ocean Food Systems. In rare instances when an academic reference cannot be obtained, applicants may opt to request an exemption from this requirement. Applicants interested in pursuing an exemption should reach out directly to the UNE Office of Graduate Admissions for more information.
  • Two (2) letters from internship or work/faculty advisors.
    *Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable.
PERSONAL STATEMENT
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for specific writing prompts and additional information.
INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE-approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for test score submission instructions.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with COVID-19, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS
  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants.
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements.
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and are made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Continued enrollment

After one academic year, a student who has completed all coursework except their project will be required to pay for a minimum of one project credit hour plus mandatory fees each semester to remain in the program. 

Other expenses

Housing is arranged by and financed at the expense of the student. Currently, there is no on-campus housing available for graduate students.

Financial aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office at the Biddeford Campus. Call (207) 602-2342 or by visiting the Financial Aid website. Information on tuition remission, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships can be found on the UNE NORTH Educational Programs website

Physical Therapy

Category
Contact

University of New England
Office of Graduate Admissions
716 Stevens Avenue
Portland, ME 04103
(207) 221-4225 or 800-477-4863

Degree name
Doctor of Physical Therapy
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Physical Therapy believes that optimal 21st century, person-centered health care is best delivered by well-educated, compassionate leaders who think critically, reason intelligently, collaborate inter-professionally, and who promote health and wellness. In this spirit, the department is dedicated to preparing students for contemporary physical therapy and advances the profession through its steadfast commitment to excellence in academics, clinical education, scholarship, research, and service. 

Core Values

The Department of Physical Therapy values excellence in student-focused teaching and learning, evidence-based practice, service to the community and profession, interprofessional collaboration, scholarship, and clinical practice.

Student-Focused

  • Friendly, collegial atmosphere
  • Low student-to-faculty ratios
  • Supportive and engaged faculty and professional staff

Academic Excellence

  • Expert academic and clinical faculty
  • State-of-the-art equipment and technology
  • Experiential learning, critical thinking, and problem-solving
  • Quality clinical experiences
  • High standards and expectations for student admission and retention
  • Continuous program improvement

Evidence-based Practice

  • Critical appraisal of evidence
  • Integrate evidence, expertise, and patient values
  • Best practice

Community and Diversity

  • Professional and community service
  • Embrace and learn from diversity
  • Non-discriminatory
  • Academic-Community partnership

Professional Conduct

  • Academic IntegrityRespect for all individuals
  • Respect for all individuals

​​Trustworthy and Truthful

  • Confidentiality of patient-therapist relationship
  • Sound judgment
  • Competence and professional development
  • Pro bono service
  • Life-long learning

Collaboration

  • Interprofessional Grand Rounds, seminars and symposia
  • Research and scholarship
  • Teaching and learning

Scholarship

  • Student participation and choice
  • Collaborative, interprofessional, and individual intellectual pursuits

Health and Wellness

  • Whole person wellness
  • Injury and disease prevention
  • Promotion of healthy environments

Program Goals

  1. Core Attributes: Graduate compassionate, collaborative leaders who are critical thinkers and who promote health and wellness.
  2. Academics: Develop academic excellence.
  3. Clinical Practice: Promote faculty and student involvement in physical therapy practice across the continuum of care.
  4. Research and Scholarship: Generate and disseminate new knowledge.
  5. Service: Identify, develop, and promote opportunities for faculty and students to provide service to the institution, community, and profession.
  6. Administration: Aspire to efficient processes and resources to support department operations.

Program Description

The entry-level D.P.T. program is three calendar years (eight semesters) in length and includes a combination of classroom, laboratory, and clinical practicum experiences. The curriculum begins with the foundational sciences, through which the student explores and studies normal human structure and function, and fundamental physical therapy techniques. From this critical underpinning, the student engages in the evidence-based approach to the physical therapy management of impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities related to movement, function, and health across the life span. The curriculum sequence is generally organized according to key body systems (i.e., musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular, integumentary). Coursework includes the study of the functional and psychosocial impacts of health conditions, relevant medical and surgical interventions, and the physical therapy tests, measures, and interventions utilized within the patient/client management model.

The student is also introduced to the physical therapist's role in disease prevention and health promotion, education, consultation, legislation and policy-making, and management and administration. The student engages in scholarly inquiry, either by completing a case report or conducting research under the direction and mentorship of a faculty member. The student may also explore topics beyond those required in the professional curriculum through elective courses or workshops offered by the Department and College.

Students complete three full-time clinical practica, totaling 36 weeks of clinical experience. Hundreds of clinical sites around the United States are available to provide a broad base of experiences in a variety of settings. The sites represent the continuum of health care practice settings including acute care hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, outpatient private practices, ambulatory care centers, skilled nursing facilities, school/preschool programs, and home health care. Full-time clinical practical experiences are integrated in the second and third professional years, enabling students to apply information learned in didactic courses to patients and clients.

Accreditation

The D.P.T. program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). The Department, through its policies and procedures, is committed to assuring compliance with the evaluative criteria established by CAPTE.

Accreditation indicates that the institution and program have been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators. To contact CAPTE:

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
accreditation@apta.org
(703) 684-2782 or (703) 706-3245

Curricular Requirements

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) program is eight semesters in length and includes a combination of classroom course work, laboratory coursework, and three full-time clinical practica. In addition to the 106 required credits, students are invited to take up elective coursework offered by the department and by other graduate programs within the university.

Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 502 - Gross Anatomy 6
BIO 504 - Neuroscience 4
PTH 501 - Foundations of PT Practice 5
PTH 502 - Kinesiology 5
PTH 503 - Normal Development 2
PTH 504 - Integrated Clinical Experience: Musculoskeletal 1
PTH 506 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disability and Illness 1
PTH 507 - Introduction to Clinical Medicine 1
PTH 508 - Pathology and Medical Management – Musculoskeletal System 2
PTH 510 - PT Mgt Dis Musc/Skel System 11
PTH 514 - Scientific Inquiry 1 2
PTH 516 - Pathology and Medical Management - Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems 1
PTH 522 - PT Management of Patients with Disorders of the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems 4
PTH 524 - Clinical Education Seminar 1
PTH 525 - Practice Management I 1
PTH 601 - Clinical Practicum 1 8
PTH 602 - Scientific Inquiry 2 2
PTH 603 - Pathology and Medical Management – Neuromuscular System 3
PTH 604 - PT Management of Children with Special Health Needs 5
PTH 605 - PT Management of Adults with Disorders of the Neuromuscular System 6
PTH 606 - Research Proposal or PTH 608 Case Report 1 or PTH 690 Research Practicum I* 2
PTH 607 - Clinical Practicum 2 8
PTH 610 - Comprehensive Exam I 1
PTH 700 - Practice Management II 2
PTH 701 - Pathology and Medical Management – Integumentary System 1
PTH 703 - PT Management of Patients with Disorders of the Integumentary System 4
PTH 704 - Disease Prevention and Health Promotion 3
PTH 705 - Research Project or PTH 708 Case Report 2 * 2
PTH 706 - Public Policy & Physical Therapy 2
PTH 707 - Clinical Practicum 3 8
PTH 710 - Complex Case Management 1
PTH 711 - Comprehensive Exam 2 1
Total Credits Required 106

*Students complete one of the following course sequences:

  • PTH 608 and PTH 708 or
  • PTH 606 and PTH 705 or
  • PTH 690 and PTH 705

*Please note: Curriculum is subject to change.

Conferring of the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is contingent upon the successful completion of academic and clinical coursework to include a total of 106 academic credits.

Academic and Technical Standards

Academic Standards

The Department of Physical Therapy, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality physical therapist education program that complies with the evaluative criteria of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. The program provides learning experiences to enable graduates to achieve the outcomes required for the practice of physical therapy. Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF) for detailed description of academic standards.

Essential Technical Standards

The essential technical standards are pre-requisites for successful completion of the D.P.T. program at the UNE. Guidelines for reasonable accommodation are discussed. Please read this document carefully to determine whether you possess the abilities and skills reflected in the technical standards below. The standards apply to program activities taking place in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings.

Principles

  1. Physical Therapy is an intellectually, physically, and psychologically demanding profession.
  2. The obligation and mission of the UNE D.P.T. program is to produce effective and competent physical therapists that are best able to serve the needs of society. Therefore, all applicants, regardless of disability, will be held to the same admission standards. Once accepted, all D.P.T. degree candidates will be held to the same technical standards, with reasonable accommodations provided when necessary and appropriate.
  3. Individuals with documented disabilities applying to the UNE D.P.T. program will be expected to have completed the same academic prerequisites as their non-disabled peers. No applicant is required to disclose the details of disability and no otherwise qualified individual will be denied admission to the D.P.T. program based solely upon a disabling condition.
  4. Upon acceptance, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, under the law, is obligated to provide reasonable accommodations to D.P.T. candidates and students with documented disabilities who are registered with the University’s Student Access Center while completing the academic and clinical requirements for graduation from the program.

Reasonable accommodations

  • Are provided to help minimize the impact of the student’s disability, provide equal access to the University’s programs and services while upholding the academic, clinical, and technical standards of the D.P.T. program.
  • Are provided to assist the student in learning, performing and satisfying the fundamental standards, so long as the student provides comprehensive documentation establishing his/her disability status prior to the need for reasonable accommodation
  • Are provided only to the extent that such accommodation does not fundamentally alter the academic and/or technical standards of the Department of Physical Therapy or interfering with the rights of other students
  • Do not exempt D.P.T. candidates from completing certain tasks deemed essential
  • Do not include reliance on peers-when a candidate’s ability to function is compromised (with or without accommodation) the candidate must demonstrate alternative means and/or abilities to acquire essential information and demonstrate essential tasks without reliance upon another person to help perform that essential task.
  • Are determined by the UNE Student Access Center in consultation with D.P.T. faculty.

In addition, D.P.T. faculty are available to work with candidates with disabilities to help identify strategies that might assist them in performing technical standards.

Candidate Declaration of abilities and skills:

  1. Prior to the start of D.P.T. classes, matriculating students must indicate that they possess the abilities reflected in the technical standards described below, either with or without reasonable accommodation.
  2. A D.P.T. candidate with a disability who wishes reasonable accommodation must contact the Student Access Center, Portland Campus, Lower Level, Ginn Hall, Phone: (207) 221-4418, Fax: (207) 523-1919. An offer of admission may be withdrawn or a D.P.T. candidate may be withdrawn from the program if it becomes apparent at any time (1) that he or she cannot complete the technical standards even with accommodations, (2) that the accommodations needed are not reasonable, or (3) that fulfilling the functions would create a significant risk of harm to the health or safety of the student or others.

Technical Standards: Abilities and Skills

Matriculation into the D.P.T. program assumes certain essential cognitive, emotional, and technical skills. Reflected in the standards that follow are those abilities and skills that degree candidates must possess to engage safely and competently in required learning activities. The abilities and skills are described in five domains, including observation skills; communication skills; motor skills (fine and gross); intellectual-conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social/emotional attributes.

I. Observation
Observation requires the functional use of vision, hearing, touch, and the use of common sense. Candidates must have visual perception, which includes depth and acuity. A candidate must be able to observe lectures, laboratory dissection of cadavers, and lecture and laboratory demonstrations. The candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately and obtain an appropriate medical history directly from the patient or guardian. Examples in which these observational skills are required include: observation of skin color; breathing regularity; temperature of skin; muscle tone; facial expressions; palpation of peripheral pulses, bony prominences and ligaments; visual and tactile evaluation for areas of inflammation; and visual and tactile assessment of the presence and degree of swelling. A candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand, noting nonverbal as well as verbal signals. The candidate must have sufficient vision, hearing, and touch to detect patient/client needs in a busy clinical environment. The candidate must be able to read and interpret equipment, patient charts, and diagnostic tests. The candidate must also be able to accurately monitor dials, displays, and equipment used in treatment of patients including exercise equipment and electrical modalities.

II. Communication
Communication includes: speech, language, reading, writing and computer literacy. Students must be able to communicate effectively, sensitively, and convey a sense of compassion and empathy with patients and their families, as well as perceive non-verbal communications, and to deal effectively with cultural and ethnic diversity. Physical therapy education presents exceptional challenges in the volume and breadth of required reading and the necessity to impart information to others. Candidates must be able to communicate quickly, effectively and efficiently in oral and written English with all members of the health care team. Candidates must be able to complete forms according to directions in a complete and timely fashion. The candidate must be able to demonstrate the ability to deliver and receive complex information in one-on-one and group settings, respond to questions from a variety of sources and respond appropriately to verbal and non-verbal communication, as well as explain complex information according to the listener’s needs and abilities, both formally and informally. A candidate must be able to complete paper and/or online forms and documentation according to directions in a timely fashion, accurately elicit information and describe a patient’s change in mood, thought, activity and posture. Candidates must be able to demonstrate sufficient communication skills to effectively train other D.P.T. candidates, patients, family and support personnel.

III. Motor
The candidate must have sufficient strength, endurance, and motor skills to effectuate the coordination of both gross and fine muscular movement, equilibrium, and the integrated use of touch and vision. Sufficient physical stamina is required to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study. The candidate must be able to access and negotiate laboratories, classrooms and workstations, attend clinical internships, and accomplish required tasks in the clinic and academic settings. The candidate must be able to perform emergency procedures such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation; safely lift, transfer and position patients; safely assist and guard patients during gait training; safely and effectively administer exercise and examination procedures that require resistance or facilitation; perform non-surgical wound debridement, and manually adjust exercise equipment and assistive devices. Long periods of sitting, standing, and moving are required in classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences. The candidate must demonstrate sufficient balance, coordination, and ability to accompany and detect loss of balance in patients who are walking; the ability to support and guard patients who lose their balance during walking on level surfaces, as well as on stairs and uneven terrains/ramps; sufficient freedom of movement to be able to participate in all classroom and clinical activities; and the ability to lift and carry heavy objects. Required movements may include pushing, pulling, standing, sitting for long periods of time with and without back support, twisting, kneeling, stooping, and bending. The candidate must be able to use motor skills to accurately assess changes in muscle tone, tissue and skin temperature, joint position, chest sounds and peripheral pulses, joint play, and other examination tests. The candidate must also be able to: effectively apply compression, traction, resistance, and percussion; and demonstrate sufficient fine motor skills to be able to manipulate small objects and write legibly. The candidate must be able to respond to bells and alarms related to emergencies. At all times the ability to administer care to patients in a safe manner is paramount.

IV. Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities
To effectively solve problems, the candidate must be able to: measure, calculate, reason, analyze, comprehend, integrate and synthesize information from the clinical, natural, and social sciences in a timely fashion. For example, the candidate must be able to synthesize knowledge and integrate the relevant aspects of a patient’s history, physical examination, and laboratory data. The candidate must be able to: provide a reasoned explanation for likely therapy, recalling and retaining information in an efficient and timely manner. The ability to incorporate new information from peers, teachers, and medical literature in formulating treatment plans is essential. In addition, the candidate must be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand spatial relationships of structures. The candidate must have the ability to use computers for searching, recording, storing, and retrieving information. The candidate must be able to understand theory, research literature, and principles that apply to physical therapy practice, and analyze and solve complex patient problems. The candidate must be able to utilize knowledge of natural, clinical, and social sciences to develop appropriate interventions in a clinical setting. The ability to use critical analysis to understand theory, research literature, and principles that apply to physical therapy practice and to apply inductive and deductive clinical reasoning to solve complex patient problems is necessary. The candidate must be able to effectively engage in self-assessment of performance, as well as provide objective and constructive assessments of peers and faculty. The candidate must be able to identify significant findings based upon history and physical examination and interpret laboratory and diagnostic imaging data. The candidate must utilize sufficient judgment to ensure safe encounters with peers and patients and to effectively delegate to support personnel.

V. Behavioral and Social/Emotional Attributes
The candidate must be: dependable, punctual, ethical, and reliable; maintain professional demeanor in all situations; recognize stressors and be able to seek assistance as needed. Candidates must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities. They must: exercise good judgment, promptly complete all responsibilities attendant to the care of patients, and develop mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients. The candidate must also demonstrate a commitment to learning by seeking new knowledge and understanding, formulating their own thoughts and ideas, and taking ownership of their educational advancement. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. They must be able to: adapt to changing environments, display flexibility and function in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice. They must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze and synthesize information effectively in the limited time demanded by a given clinical setting, while under stress, and in an environment in which other distractions may be present. The candidate must be able to abide by the APTA Code of Ethics, the Standards of Physical Therapy Practice and the Core Values, which can be found on the American Physical Therapy Association website at www.apta.org. Candidates must also be able to establish professional and empathetic relationships with individuals across the lifespan and from various cultures. Candidates must demonstrate integrity and honesty in the academic and clinical environment, as well as being able to engage in respectful interactions with individuals from various lifestyles, cultures, races, socioeconomic classes and abilities. They must be able to develop and maintain respectful working relationships with peers, faculty, professional colleagues, patients, family members, and the general public and to recognize the psychosocial impact of movement dysfunction and disability on clients and families. The candidate must be able to accept constructive feedback and respond with suitable action.

Specific Examples of Technical Skills (Essential Functions) and Abilities
Specifically, candidates must be able to:

  1. Attend and participate in classes for 30 or more hours per week during each academic semester. Classes consist of a combination of lecture, discussion, laboratory, and clinical activities.
  2. Use auditory, tactile, and visual senses to receive classroom instruction and to evaluate and treat patients.
  3. Read, write, speak, and understand English at a level consistent with successful course completion and development of positive patient-therapist relationships.
  4. Complete readings, assignments, and other activities outside of class hours.
  5. Apply critical thinking processes to their work in the classroom and the clinic.
  6. Exercise sound judgment in class and in the clinic.
  7. Participate in clinical experiences, which typically require students to be present 40 or more hours per week on a schedule that corresponds to the operating hours of the clinic.
  8. Gather decision-making pieces of information during patient assessment activities in class or in the clinical setting without the use of an intermediary (classmate, aide, etc).
  9. Perform treatment activities in class or in the clinical setting by direct performance.
  10. Sit for two to 10 hours at a time, stand for at least one to two hours at a time, and walk or travel for at least two hours at a time
  11. Frequently lift weights less than 10 pounds and occasionally lift weights between 10 and 100 pounds.
  12. Occasionally carry up to 25 pounds while walking up to 50 feet.
  13. Frequently exert 75 pounds of push/pull forces up to 50 feet and occasionally exert 150 pounds of push/pull forces for this distance.
  14. Frequently twist, bend and stoop.
  15. Occasionally squat, crawl, reach above shoulder level, and kneel.
  16. Frequently move from place to place and position to position at a speed that permits safe handling of classmates and patients.
  17. Frequently stand and walk while providing support to a classmate simulating a disability or while supporting a patient with a disability.
  18. Occasionally climb stairs and negotiate uneven terrain.
  19. Frequently use hands repetitively with a simple grasp and frequently with a firm grasp.
  20. Frequently perform tasks requiring manual dexterity skills.
  21. Frequently coordinate activities with gross motor and communication skills.

*Information and design from The Essential Standards and Technical Standards documents from the Graduate Program in Physical Therapy at Central Michigan and Sacramento State, and University of Buffalo’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, as well as the generic abilities developed by the physical therapy program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Academic Policy

Students are expected to abide by the academic policies and procedures and conduct code outlined in the University of New England (UNE) Student Handbook, the Department of Physical Therapy Student Handbook and the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF). Failure to abide by these policies, procedures or codes may result in disciplinary action.

Learning Outcomes

The Department of Physical Therapy, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality physical therapist education program that complies with the 2016 standards of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).

After completing the physical therapy curriculum, students will:

  1. Integrate concepts from the biological, physical, behavioral, and clinical sciences into physical therapy services
  2. Exhibit professional conduct and behaviors that are consistent with the legal and ethical practice of physical therapy
  3. Demonstrate compassion, caring, integrity, and respect for differences, values, and preferences in all interactions with patients/clients, family members, health care providers, students, other consumers, and payers 
  4. Demonstrate culturally sensitive verbal, nonverbal, and written communications that are effective, accurate, and timely
  5. Collect and critically evaluate data and published literature to apply in the delivery of care, practice management, and to examine the theoretical and scientific basis for physical therapy
  6. Screen patients/clients to determine if they are candidates for physical therapy services or if a referral to, or consultation with, another health care professional or agency is warranted
  7. Complete a patient/client examination/reexamination and evaluate and interpret the examination data to determine a physical therapy diagnosis and prognosis
  8. Employ critical thinking, self-reflection, and evidence-based practice to make clinical decisions about physical therapy services 
  9. Collaborate with patients/clients, caregivers, and other health care providers to develop and implement an evidence-based plan of care that coordinates human and financial resources 
  10. Provide services and information related to health promotion, fitness, wellness, health risks, and disease prevention within the scope of physical therapy practice
  11. Advocate for patient/client and profession
  12. Provide consultative services and education to patients/clients, caregivers, health care workers, and the public using culturally sensitive methods that are adapted to the learning needs, content, and context
  13. Employ effective leadership skills in the context of supervising, delegating, and mentoring within the profession

Transfer Credit

  • Transfer credits are rarely awarded to students who transfer from another Physical Therapy program.
  • The program director will review and award transfer credits on a case-by-case basis.

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing placement available.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning.

Admissions

Admissions requirements

UPDATE: ON-SITE INTERVIEWS ARE NO LONGER REQUIRED AS PART OF THE APPLICATION PROCESS. As an alternative to interviews, the UNE DPT program will host a series of virtual Open Houses. Additional information and specific dates will be posted as soon as they are available.

APPLICATION

The University of New England Department of Physical Therapy participates in the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of a Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to PTCAS. Please refer to the PTCAS application for additional information and instructions.

GPA REQUIREMENT

  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, as calculated by PTCAS (inclusive of all coursework taken with no forgiveness for retakes).
  • Minimum math/science prerequisite GPA of 3.0, as calculated by UNE, using the highest final grade (excludes Introduction to Psychology); calculated using the PTCAS universal computation scale for quality points.
  • Last 60 credit GPA, as calculated by PTCAS, will also be considered.
  • All applicants must meet minimum GPA requirements to be considered for admission.

PREREQUISITE COURSEWORK REQUIREMENTS

Course Subject Course Level Credits
Biology General Biology I and II w/labs 8 semester or 12 quarter credits
Chemistry General Chemistry I and II w/labs 8 semester or 12 quarter credits
Anatomy & Physiology I or Human Anatomy Lab required 4 semester or 6 quarter credits
Anatomy & Physiology II or Human Physiology Lab required 4 semester or 6 quarter credits
Physics (algebra or calculus-based is acceptable) General Physics I and II w/labs 8 semester or 12 quarter credits
Psychology General Psychology 3 semester or 4-5 quarter credits
Statistics   3 semester or 4-5 quarter credits

Other Important Prerequisite Coursework Notes:

  • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C minus” grades are not acceptable).
  • All science prerequisites must be completed no more than seven (7) years prior to UNE’s PTCAS application deadline.
  • Science course requirements – Alternative higher level biology and chemistry courses with a lab component may be acceptable (with program approval).
  • Prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned at the time of application, and should be listed on the application. All courses must be completed with an official transcript submitted to the Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.
  • Official transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the summer/fall term should be submitted and verified by PTCAS during the fall Academic Update period.
  • Official transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the spring/summer term should be submitted directly to UNE’s Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.

All planned or in-progress coursework should be listed on the PTCAS application at the time of application submission; not doing so will result in the applicant not meeting all admissions requirements and therefore will not be eligible for admission review.

Online courses offered through UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites as well as online courses from other regionally accredited U.S. colleges or universities are acceptable with program approval.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

  • UPDATE: Due to ongoing uncertainties related to COVID-19, the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) test requirement is waived for the 2021-2022 application cycle.

LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Three (3) letters of reference are required* – submitted via PTCAS

  • One (1) academic reference from a professor, research advisor, or academic advisor.
  • Two (2) letters from individuals of your choice* who can speak to your ability to be academically successful and practice professionally. *Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable.

OBSERVATION HOURS

  • UPDATE: Due to ongoing uncertainties related to COVID-19, the observation hour requirement is waived for the 2021-2022 application cycle.
  • Although observation hours are not required, any completed hours should still be listed in the PTCAS application.

PERSONAL STATEMENT

  • Please refer to the PTCAS application for specific writing prompts and additional information.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to PTCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE-approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the PTCAS application for test score submission instructions.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Prior to matriculation, accepted and deposited students will be required to complete the following compliance requirements:

  • Admitted and deposited students must arrange for the submission of all outstanding documents, including transcripts and baccalaureate degree conferral via an official transcript submitted to the UNE Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.
  • Completion of physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status. Please refer to UNE’s Student Health Center for detailed information.
  • Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen prior to matriculation, as well as periodically throughout the program (as required by clinical affiliations).
  • All students must have the ability to meet the Academic and Technical Standards of the Physical Therapy profession.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with COVID-19, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Other Expenses

Other expenses will include textbooks and lab fees in some courses. Students should also anticipate transportation, housing, and living expenses during clinical practica.

Equipment

All students are required to have access to high-speed internet service and a laptop computer with the capability of utilizing Blackboard or similar on-line education format, and ExamSoft.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Physician Assistant

Category
Contact

Please call 1 (800) 477-4UNE or (207) 221-4225 for further information. Applications are available online from Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA).

Degree name
Master of Science Physician Assistant
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the University of New England Physician Assistant Program is to prepare master's level primary care Physician Assistants to be highly skilled members of interprofessional healthcare teams. The program is committed to developing clinicians who will provide compassionate, competent and evidence-based patient-centered healthcare to people of all backgrounds and cultures throughout their lifespan. The Program places special emphasis on training clinicians who are knowledgeable about the healthcare needs of our aging population and have the skills and passion to provide healthcare to people in underserved rural and urban communities. 

Graduate Professional Competencies

The mission of the Program is accomplished by having graduates who meet the goals of the educational process. Graduates of the Physician Assistant Program will:

  • Understand the basic sciences of anatomy, physiology and Pathophysiology and be able to utilize this knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
  • Understand the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and to apply them in the treatment of patients.
  • Elicit a detailed, accurate history and perform a thorough physical examination.
  • Understand how to order and interpret appropriate diagnostic tests in a cost-efficient manner.
  • Present patient data and document it appropriately in the medical record.
  • Provide quality acute and ongoing patient care by appropriately delineating patient problems and by formulating and implementing patient management plans, including referrals to other healthcare providers and agencies.
  • Perform or assist in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and manage or assist in the management of medical and surgical conditions, particularly in life-threatening situations.
  • Understand the principles of public health and incorporate health promotion and disease prevention into a patient care practice.
  • Use information technology in the provision of quality healthcare and clinical decision-making.
  • Evaluate the medical literature critically and apply this knowledge and the principles of evidence-based medicine to clinical practice.
  • Provide compassionate and competent healthcare to patients of all ages and backgrounds.
  • Understand the medical and social issues that affect the geriatric patient and provide appropriate management of these problems.
  • Counsel patients, their families and their caregivers regarding issues of health, illness and medical care.
  • Understand the historical and contemporary role of the physician assistant in the healthcare system.
  • Participate effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team.
  • Understand the principles of patient-oriented healthcare and to communicate clearly with patients.
  • Identify the special dynamics of providing healthcare to rural or underserved populations.
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior by following the American Academy of Physician Assistants' Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession.

Program Description

The Master of Science — Physician Assistant Program (M.S.P.A.) has been planned to effectively utilize faculty expertise from the University's five colleges. Some faculty hold joint appointments with responsibility for teaching medical and physician assistant students as well as other health profession matriculants. Similarly, physician assistant candidates will receive clinical supervision as part of an integrated team of health providers. It is our expectation that these collaborative strategies toward teaching and learning will ultimately result in high quality, cost-effective health care delivery, particularly in medically underserved regions of New England.

Upon successful completion of the Physician Assistant Program, the University of New England awards the master of science degree. The program operates on a 24-month full-time calendar, beginning in late May of each year with a new incoming class.

What is a PA?

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health professionals licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. Physician Assistants are qualified by graduation from an accredited physician assistant educational program and/or certification by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants. Within the physician/PA relationship, physician assistants exercise autonomy in medical decision-making and provide a broad range of diagnostic and therapeutic services under the general supervision of the physician.

Other

The University of New England's M.S.P.A. program was designed according to the Essentials and Guidelines for an Accredited Educational Program for the Physician Assistant. The University of New England Physician Assistant Program is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).

Curricular Requirements

Note: The curricular requirements below apply to the class entering JUNE 2018 (Class of 2020). 

Phase I of the program of study consists of 60.5 credit hours in pre-clinical didactic course work. The summer, fall, and spring terms include instruction in the fields of biomedical sciences, clinical medicine, public health, pharmacology, clinical assessment, anatomy, physiology, evidence-based medicine, ethics and professionalism, specialty disciplines, surgery, geriatrics, and emergency medicine. Twelve months of clinical rotations will take place upon successful completion of the didactic phase. The program ends with a final week on campus, which provides a forum for the presentation of students' research projects to peers and faculty; offers assistance in preparing the graduating students for certification, and gives physician assistant candidates an opportunity to integrate the didactic and clinical portions of their training in preparation for the Physician Assistant National Certification Exam.

Summer I (June–August,10 weeks) Courses/Program Areas Credits
PAC 555 - Anatomy 5
PAC 503 - Clinical Assessment I 2.5
PAC 559 - Pharmacology I 3
PAC 548 - Principles of Biological Science 3
PAC 509 - Clinical Medicine I 1
PAC 582 - Professional and Ethical Issues for Physician Assistants 1
Semester total 15.5
Fall (September–December, 15 weeks) Courses/Program Areas Credits
PAC 554 - Clinical Assessment II 3
PAC 560 - Pharmacology II 3.5
PAC 519 - Clinical Medicine II 8
PAC 564 - Interprofessional Geriatric Education Practicum I 2
PAC 565 - Integrating Seminar I 3
PAC 543 - Evidence Based Medicine I 1
Semester Total 20.5
Spring (January–May, 20 weeks) Courses/Program Areas Credits
PAC 551 - Introduction to Public Health 1
PAC 556 - Evidence Based Medicine II 0.5
PAC 545 - Specialty Disciplines 7
PAC 585 - Integrating Seminar II 3
PAC 533 - Clinical Assessment III 3
PAC 561 - Pharmacology III 3.5
PAC 546 - Clinical Medicine III 6
PAC 547 - Interprofessional Geriatric Education Practicum II 1
Semester Total 25
Spring II–Summer II (June–June, 12 months) Clinical Rotations Credits
PAC 667 - Inpatient Selective (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 601 - Internal Medicine Outpatient (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 602 - Emergency Medicine (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 603 - Surgery (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 607 - Family Medicine I (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 608 - Family Medicine II (6 Weeks) 6
PAC 612 - Primary Care Selective 6
PAC 613 - Elective 6
PAC 614 - Preparation for Clinical Practice I 1
PAC 615 - Preparation for Clinical Practice II 1
PAC 616 - Preparation for Clinical Practice III 1
PAC 628 - Clinical Therapeutics I 0.5
PAC 629 - Clinical Therapeutics II 0.5
Semester Total 52

Graduation Requirements

Students must complete all program requirements prior to the issuance of their Master of Science degree and the certificate of completion of the program. 

Academic and Technical Standards

WCHP Academic Policies

The Department of Physician Assistant, the Westbrook College of Health Professions, and the University of New England are committed to offering a quality Physician Assistant education program that complies with the evaluative criteria of the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant. The program provides learning experiences to enable graduates to achieve the outcomes required for the practice of Physician Assistant. Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF) for a detailed description of academic standards.

Technical Standards

A student in the Physician Assistant Program must have abilities and skills in five categories: observation, communication, motor, intellectual, and behavioral/social. All students admitted to the program must meet the following abilities and expectations upon matriculation and maintain these standards while enrolled in the PA Program. In the event a student is unable to fulfill these technical standards, with or without reasonable accommodation, the student will be subject to dismissal after admission.

Reasonable accommodation for persons with documented disabilities will be considered on an individual basis. However, a candidate must be able to perform these skills in an independent manner. Accordingly, the program requires each student to meet the following technical standards with or without accommodation:

Observation: Students must have sufficient sensory capacity to observe in the lecture hall, the laboratory, the outpatient setting, and the patient’s bedside. Sensory skills adequate to perform a physical examination are required. The ability to acquire sensory input using vision, hearing, and tactile sensation must be adequate to observe a patient’s condition and to elicit information through procedures regularly required in a physical examination, such as inspection, auscultation, percussion, and palpation.

In any case, where a student’s ability to observe or acquire information through these sensory modalities is compromised, the student must demonstrate alternative means and/or abilities to acquire and demonstrate the essential information without reliance upon another person’s interpretation of the information. It is expected that obtaining and using such alternative means and/or abilities shall be the responsibility of the student. The University will reasonably assist the student where necessary.

Communication: The student must be able to effectively and efficiently communicate in the English language using verbal, written, and reading skills, in a manner that demonstrates sensitivity to fellow students, patients, their families, and all members of the health care team.

  • A student must be able to accurately elicit information, describe a patient’s change in mood, thought, activity, and posture. Students must demonstrate established communication skills using traditional means which may include the use of assistive devices. 
  • The student must be able to communicate complex findings in appropriate terms for patients/caregivers and other members of the health care team.
  • A student must be able to communicate clearly and audibly during interactions with classmates, professors, patients, and members of the health care team. 
  • A student must be able to receive, write legibly, and interpret written and verbal communication in both clinical and academic settings.
  • The student must be able to interpret and record legibly observations in a manner that is efficient and accurate using handwritten and electronic and dictating formats.

Motor: The ability to participate in basic diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers and procedures (e.g. palpation, percussion, auscultation) is required. Students must have sufficient motor function to safely execute movements required to provide care to patients. Students must be able to negotiate patient care environments and must be able to move between settings, such as clinic, classroom building, and hospital. Physical stamina sufficient to complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study in required. Long periods of sitting, standing, or moving are required in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences.

The student must be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general and emergency diagnosis and medical care such as airway management, placement of intravenous catheters, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and suturing of wounds. At all times the ability to administer care to patients in a safe manner is paramount.

Intellectual: Students must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, and synthesize information effectively in a precisely limited time as would be appropriate for the individual’s level of training in a given clinical setting, while under stress, and in an environment in which other distractions may be present. Problem-solving, one of the critical skills demanded on Physician Assistants, requires all of these intellectual abilities. In addition, students should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures.

Students must be able to read and understand medical literature. The student must be able to demonstrate mastery of these skills and the ability to use them together in a timely fashion in medical problem solving and patient care.

The student must be able to, with or without the use of assistive devices, but without reliance on another person, interpret x-ray, and other graphic images and digital or analog representations of physiologic phenomena (such as EKGs).

Behavioral and Social Attributes: Students must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all academic and patient care responsibilities. The development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients and other members of the health care team are essential. Flexibility, compassion, integrity, motivation, interpersonal skills, and the ability to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice are required.

Students must function professionally and effectively in any academic or clinical setting. Students must always demonstrate the psychological and emotional health required for full utilization of their intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, and the prompt completion of all academic and clinical responsibilities.

The student must demonstrate mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with University faculty and professional staff, peers and classmates, patients and other members of the health care team. Flexibility, compassion, integrity, motivation, interpersonal skills, and the ability to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice are all required.

For more information on disabilities and accommodation, please contact the UNE Student Access Center at (207) 602-2815.

Grading

Upon completion of a course of study, the faculty member in charge of that course submits the number of hours taught and a grade for each student to the academic coordinator. The M.S.P.A. program uses a standard letter grading system.

Academic Policy

Course Add/Drop or Withdrawal Policy

Due to the standard curriculum sequence within the M.S.P.A. program, students are not allowed to add or drop courses. Students may not withdraw from an individual M.S.P.A. course, to do so indicates a complete withdrawal from the MSPA Program.

Repeat Course Policy

Courses in the M.S.P.A. program are offered once per year. All courses within the program must be completed with a minimum final grade of at least 74%. Students must successfully complete each course within a given semester to progress to the next semester. The Program Student Development Committee in association with the program director determines whether or not a course or part of it must be repeated. It may be necessary for the student to await the next time the course is offered in the MSPA Program schedule which may make it necessary for the student to apply for a leave of absence and if granted, return to the program when the course is next offered. 

Upon completion of a repeated course, a new listing and assigned grade are placed on the student's transcript. The original course listing and grade remain on the student's transcript. All courses are listed chronologically on the transcript by semester or academic period in which they are enrolled.

Please refer to the Westbrook College of Health Professions Graduate Progression Policy and Procedures (PDF) for further information regarding graduate program progression. 

Learning Outcomes

The mission of the program is accomplished by having graduates who meet the goals of the educational process. Graduates of the Physician Assistant Program will:

  • Understand the basic sciences of anatomy, physiology, and Pathophysiology and be able to utilize this knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases.
  • Understand the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and to apply them in the treatment of patients.
  • Elicit a detailed, accurate history and perform a thorough physical examination.
  • Understand how to order and interpret appropriate diagnostic tests in a cost-efficient manner.
  • Present patient data and document it appropriately in the medical record.
  • Provide quality acute and ongoing patient care by appropriately delineating patient problems and by formulating and implementing patient management plans, including referrals to other healthcare providers and agencies.
  • Perform or assist in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and manage or assist in the management of medical and surgical conditions, particularly in life-threatening situations.
  • Understand the principles of public health and incorporate health promotion and disease prevention into a patient care practice.
  • Use information technology in the provision of quality healthcare and clinical decision-making.
  • Evaluate the medical literature critically and apply this knowledge and the principles of evidence-based medicine to clinical practice.
  • Provide compassionate and competent healthcare to patients of all ages and backgrounds.
  • Understand the medical and social issues that affect the geriatric patient and provide appropriate management of these problems.
  • Counsel patients, their families and their caregivers regarding issues of health, illness and medical care.
  • Understand the historical and contemporary role of the physician assistant in the healthcare system.
  • Participate effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team.
  • Understand the principles of patient-oriented healthcare and to communicate clearly with patients.
  • Identify the special dynamics of providing healthcare to rural or underserved populations.
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior by following the American Academy of Physician Assistants' Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession.

Transfer Credit

  • Transfer credit is not accepted or awarded.

Admissions

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

APPLICATION

The University of New England Master of Science, Physician Assistant program participates in the Centralized Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to CASPA. Please see CASPA application for additional information and instructions.
     

GPA REQUIREMENTS

  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, as calculated by CASPA (inclusive of all coursework taken with no forgiveness for retakes).
  • Minimum Biology, Chemistry, Physics (BCP) GPA of 3.0, as calculated by CASPA.
    - BCP is the standardized GPA calculated by CASPA and includes all completed biology, chemistry, and physics coursework.
  • Last 60 credit GPA, as calculated by CASPA, will also be considered.
  • All applicants must meet minimum GPA requirements to be considered for admission. Due to the highly competitive nature of the program, meeting minimum admission requirements does not guarantee an interview or acceptance.

PREREQUISITE COURSEWORK REQUIREMENTS

  • Science Courses
    • Biology I & II (w/labs; 8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
    • General Chemistry I & II (w/labs; 8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
    • NEW: Microbiology (w/lab; 4 semester or 2.68 quarter credits) 
    • Human Anatomy & Physiology (w/labs; 8 semester or 12 quarter credits)
      • Completed within seven (7) years of matriculation
      • Must include all body systems and encompass a full-year, two-semester sequence or equivalent
      • Combination of courses must consist of both 4 credits of anatomy with lab and 4 credits of physiology with lab OR 8 credits of A&P I & II (both with lab)
      • Animal Physiology/Exercise Physiology will not satisfy the physiology prerequisite
  • Other Courses
    • Psychology/Sociology or related behavioral science (6 semester or 9 quarter credits)
    • English (6 semester or 9 quarter credits)
    • Statistics (3 semester or 4.5 quarter credits)
  • Recommended Courses
    • Biochemistry w/lab**  (highly recommended)
    • Pathophysiology
    • Advanced Physiology
    • Physics

Other Important Prerequisite Coursework Notes:

  • All prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better (“C minus” grades are not acceptable).
  • Prerequisite courses may be in progress or planned at the time of application, although all courses must be completed with official transcripts submitted to CASPA no later than December 31, 2021. All courses must be completed with an official transcript submitted to the Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.
  • Official transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the summer/fall term should be submitted to CASPA for verification during the fall Academic Update period.
  • Official transcripts for coursework and/or degrees completed in the spring term should be submitted directly to UNE’s Office of Graduate Admission prior to the start of the program.

**For the entering class of 2022:
Biochemistry w/lab is highly recommended and preference will be given to applications with this successfully completed course as it is indicative of future success in the rigorous PA program. Other recommended courses include: genetics, immunology, cell biology, advanced physiology, and pathophysiology. Added value will be given to applications with these successfully completed recommended courses.

**For the entering class of 2023:
Biochemistry w/lab will be a required prerequisite course. Added value will be given to applicants that have successfully completed coursework in genetics, immunology, cell biology, advanced physiology, and pathophysiology.

All planned or in-progress coursework should be listed on the CASPA application at the time of application submission; not doing so will result in the applicant not meeting all admissions requirements and therefore will not be eligible for admission review.

Online courses offered through UNE’s Online Science Prerequisites as well as online courses from other regionally accredited U.S. colleges or universities are acceptable with program approval.

LETTERS OF EVALUATION

Three (3) letters of evaluation are required- submitted via CASPA

  • One (1) letter from a clinician (allopathic physician, osteopathic physician, physician assistant, or registered nurse) is required.
  • Two (2) letters from other clinicians, supervisors, or co-workers. Letters should be requested from those who can speak to the applicant’s academic abilities and/or professional experiences.
    Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable.
     

EXPERIENCE HOURS

All experiences should be documented in the CASPA application.

Applicants are required to complete a minimum of 500 hours of direct patient care experience:

  • Hours can be completed through paid employment or volunteer work.
  • Hours completed for academic credit, e.g. internship hours to complete a bachelor’s degree is acceptable.

Shadowing Requirement-10 hours of Physician Assistant (PA) shadowing prior to the application deadline:

  • Shadowing hours must be completed with a licensed PA.
  • Shadowing in more than one practice facility and practice area is recommended in order to gain a clear understanding of the PA role within a medical team.
  • Shadowing can be completed virtually.
  • Shadowing hours do not count toward direct patient care experience hours.
     

PERSONAL STATEMENT

  • Please refer to the CASPA application for a specific writing prompt and additional information.
     

INTERVIEWS

Interviews are a required part of the application and admission process:

  • Qualified applicants will be contacted and invited to interview by the Office of Graduate Admission.
  • Interviews are done by invitation only.
  • Alternate interviewing modalities (including virtual interviews) may be instituted as necessary to address ongoing public health concerns with COVID-19. The Office of Graduate Admissions will be in touch with any updates, as necessary.
     

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be submitted directly to CASPA. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the CASPA application for test score submission instructions.
     

OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Prior to matriculation, accepted and deposited students will be required to complete the following compliance requirements:

  • Completion of physical examination with proof of up-to-date immunization status. Please refer to UNE’s Student Health Center for detailed information.
  • Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen prior to matriculation, as well as periodically throughout the program (as required by clinical affiliations).
  • All students must have a current American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) certification at the time of matriculation. BLS certification status must remain current throughout the duration of the program.
  • Proficiency with computer technology strongly recommended.
  • All students must be able to meet the Academic and Technical Standards of the Physician Assistant profession.

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with the COVID-19 pandemic, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates
  • All academic (coursework and degree) and experience requirements presented in this summary are subject to change per accreditation mandates or clinical affiliation requirements

ADVANCED STANDING

  • No advanced standing available

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Lab Fees

A fee is charged to cover the expenses for specific science courses (e.g., anatomy), certain specific course or program components (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), evaluative testing, including the use of high-fidelity simulators, etc.) and an equipment fee for personal medical equipment.

Clinical Fee

The Clinical Fee is dispersed to clinical sites during the student's clinical year. It is an honorarium paid to the clinical site in appreciation for clinical training. While dispersed to clinical sites during the clinical year, to better equalize charges and award financial aid, a portion of the fee is billed to students during both the didactic and clinical year.

Tuition and fees are refunded per UNE policy. The refund policy can be found in the University Catalog section on Financial Information for Graduate Programs.

Equipment

Students are required to have certain personal medical equipment. This equipment is group purchased (at a significant discount) for each entering Class and the equipment is delivered to students during the first week of the program. Please do not purchase personal medical equipment from sources other than the Program's group purchase.

Books

Students in the didactic phase can plan on spending approximately $1,500 to $2,000 on required textbooks. Course syllabi and the program booklist may also include recommended books which students are not required to purchase but may wish to have as important reference materials. Most of the texts used in the program are available digitally via the UNE Library's Portal and can be accessed without additional expense.

Other Expenses

Students are responsible for expenses involved with travel, parking, living expenses, and meals.

Student Employment

The program discourages students from having outside employment while attending the PA program. If a student feels that it is necessary to work while in the program, it is advisable that the student inform his/her academic advisor.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Public Health

Category
Department
Degree name
Master of Public Health (MPH) and Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH)
College
Sections

Program Description

Overview

The Graduate Programs in Public Health are designed to provide foundational skills desirable for professionals engaging in the practice, education, and research of public health.  The MPH program competencies align with the competencies outlined by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) in 2016.  Required and elective courses in the MPH program help students attain these competencies that are at the center of knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by emerging leaders in public health.

Major Description

The College of Graduate and Professional Studies offers a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree and a Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH). These programs provide a graduate education to individuals currently working in the public health field, allied health professionals, clinicians, and individuals in the beginning stages of a career in public health. The curriculum is delivered in an online format, with full- and part-time options, and is intentionally flexible and readily applicable to students regardless of where they live.

The Master of Public Health is a 46-credit hour curriculum that develops and enhances skills in a variety of professional areas, including epidemiology, social and behavioral health, program development and evaluation, and public health practice and management. Applied Practice Experience (APE) and Integrative Learning Experience (ILE) are required components of the MPH program. 

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health is an 18-credit hour program that provides students with the core public health courses they need to broaden and enhance their professional knowledge. All courses in the Graduate Certificate in Public Health are also transferable to the MPH degree program.

PROGRAM VISION:

Our graduates will build healthier global communities through informed and collaborative public health practice.

Program Mission:

The Graduate Programs in Public Health are globally accessible programs committed to improving the health and well-being of communities through education, research, and service using a scholar-practitioner model.

Program Goals:

Education

  1. Enroll and support qualified and diverse students.
  2. Cultivate a learning environment that values diversity and cultural competence.
  3. Ensure all graduates possess the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for public health practice.
  4. Recruit, retain, and support qualified instructors.

Research

  1. Sustain a scholarly research agenda to advance the field of public health.
  2. Support scientific inquiry among students.
  3. Support a collaborative scholarly environment for students and faculty.

Service

  1. Facilitate student and faculty participation in service activities with a public health focus.
  2. Identify and support workforce development needs. 

PROGRAM VALUES:

At GPPH, we value and encourage:

  • Advocacy
  • Collaboration
  • Cultural competency
  • Diversity
  • Integrity
  • Transparency
  • Service

Accreditation

The Master of Public Health degree program is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH),  The Master of Public Health and the Graduate Certificate in Public Health are accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

Curricular Requirements

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health includes the following required courses (18 credits):

Course Credits
GPH 702 An Interprofessional Approach to Policy and Advocacy 3
GPH 712 Principles of Epidemiology 3
GPH 714 Principles of Public Health 3
GPH 716 Biostatistics 3
GPH 722 Introduction to Environmental Health 3
GPH 726 Social and Behavioral Health 3

The Master of Public Health program includes the following courses (46 credits)

The following required courses (31 credits)
Required Courses Credits
GPH 702 An Interprofessional Approach to Policy and Advocacy 3
GPH 706 Public Health Administration 3
GPH 712 Principles of Epidemiology 3
GPH 714 Principles of Public Health 3
GPH 716 Biostatistics 3
GPH 719 Research Methods 3
GPH 722 Introduction to Environmental Health 3
GPH 726 Social and Behavioral Health 3
GPH 738 Program Planning and Evaluation 3
GPH 743 Applied Practice Experience 3
GPH 744 Integrative Learning Experience  1
Total 31
One of the following advanced electives (3 credits):
Advanced Elective Courses Credits
GPH 751 Advanced Policy Analysis 3
GPH 752 Advanced Research Methods 3
GPH 753 Advanced Program Evaluation 3
Four of the following electives (12 credits):
Electives Credits
GPH 704 Public Health Law and Ethics 3
GPH 713 Infectious Disease Epidemiology 3
GPH 717 Applied Epidemiology 3
GPH 721 Foundations of Maternal and Child Health 3
GPH 724 Occupational Health 3
GPH 725 Public Health Financial Management 3
GPH 732 Community Assessment 3
GPH 733 Health Informatics 3
GPH 734 Obesity Epidemiology 3
GPH 740 Global Health 3

APPLIED PRActice experience (APE) and integrative learning experience (ILE)

APE and ILE Rrequirements Credits
GPH 743: Applied Practice Experience (3 credits) - The Applied Practice Experience (APE) provides students with the opportunity to apply classroom learning in a public health environment and to work with experienced public health professionals. The APE should address five (5) CEPH Foundational Competencies, and demonstrate the application of public health concepts learned throughout the MPH program and to enhance skills such as leadership, communication, and collaboration. 3
GPH 744: Integrative Learning Experience - The Integrative Learning Experience (ILE) is a required one-credit hour course to be taken in the student's final semester in the program. During the ILE, the student will create a high quality written product that synthesizes public health ideas reflecting program competencies. This product is based on an original project that the student will develop and complete during their chosen Advanced Elective, which is to be taken the semster prior to the ILE. 1

Competencies

The Graduate Programs in Public Health adopted programmatic competencies that align with the competencies outlined by the Council of Education for Public Health (CEPH) in 2016. Relevant competencies are listed on each course syllabus.

In addition, the program has the following program competencies:

  1. Synthesize and incorporate scientific evidence into professional writing.
  2. Search databases and critically analyze peer-reviewed literature.
  3. Develop strategies for qualitative and quantitative data management.
  4. Evaluate the use of financial resources and management techniques by public health programs to achieve goals and sustainability.
  5. Evaluate the use of technological applications in health interventions.

Graduation Requirements

To qualify for completion of and receive the Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete 18 credits of specified course work within three consecutive years.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Have no outstanding financial obligations to the University.

To qualify for completion of and receive the Master of Public Health (MPH) students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete 46 credits of specified course work within six consecutive years.
  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  • Have no outstanding financial obligations to the University.

Academic Policy

Minimum Grade Point Average

Matriculated graduate students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or better. Failure to do so will result in academic probation and possible termination from the program. Any student receiving a grade below B- on any individual course has failed that course and will not earn credits. Any student receiving a grade below B- in a required course must re-enroll and repeat the course to achieve a grade of B- or better. Any student who receives a grade of F in two courses is dismissed from the program.

Graduation

Candidates must fulfill all program requirements and earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be eligible to graduate. All students must file an Application to Graduate with the registrar’s office via U-Online. Please access the following link for complete instructions and the answers to frequently asked questions:

www.une.edu/registrar/graduation

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

  • The last day permissible for matriculating graduate students to add a course is the day before the term starts.
  • The last day permissible for matriculating graduate students to drop a course is the second day of class.
  • For refund information, contact Student Financial Services.

Students who withdraw from a course must do so in writing and will receive a “W” on their transcript indicating withdrawal. Students will receive a partial refund if they withdraw from a course within the first or second week. Be aware that no portion of the tuition will be refunded after the second week of the course. 

Email requests for withdrawals must be submitted from a student’s UNE e-mail to be considered.

Matriculating students who withdraw after completing more than 2/3 of a course will receive a grade of “WF” (withdrawn failing) or “WP” (withdrawn passing), based on the instructor’s assessment of the student’s current standing in the course. A “WF” is calculated as an “F” in the student’s GPA. Upon successful completion of the course, the new grade will be used to calculate the GPA. Students will be dismissed from their program after two failing grades (including a “WF”).

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available from Registration Services. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the Program Director or designee, enroll in a course for an audit grade (AU). This must be requested at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor and Program Director or designee. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of an audit grade is not possible. Once enrolled for AU the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record. The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to complete all lectures and discussion boards, but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count toward enrollment status (i.e. part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veteran's benefits, etc.

Academic Integrity Policy

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

1.      Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.

2.      Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.

3.      Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.

4.      Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.

5.      Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Program Director. Penalties for students found responsible for violations may depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the degree of premeditation involved, and/or the student’s previous record of violations. Appeal of a decision may be made to the Dean whose decision will be final.  Student appeals will take place through the grievance process outlined in The College of Graduate and Professional Studies Student Handbook.

Student Access Center

The Student Access Center works to ensure that the University promotes respect for individual differences and that no person who meets the academic and technical standards needed for admission and continued enrollment at UNE is denied benefits or subjected to discrimination due to a disability. Toward this end, and in conjunction with federal and state laws, the University provides reasonable accommodations for qualified students.

Experiential Learning

Experiential learning is highly valued by the College of Graduate and Professional Studies.  Many courses within the College feature experiential-learning components. However, at this time, no credit will be awarded to students for purely experiential learning experiences undertaken in lieu of coursework.

Transfer Credit

Upon acceptance, students may apply to transfer up to three 3-credit courses (maximum of nine credits) into the MPH program or up to two 3-credit courses (maximum of six credits) into the Graduate Certificate in Public Health program.

To request consideration for transfer credit, a student must provide an official transcript and a course syllabus for each course. Transfer credit is awarded at the discretion of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies based on specific program details listed below. Requests for approval of transfer credit should be submitted to, and will be granted at the discretion of, the Program Director.

Transfer courses must

  • Be classified as graduate level
  • Be from a CEPH accredited institution
  • Have been taken within five years of application 
  • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better
  • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education

Individuals who earned a Graduate Certificate in Public Health from the University of New England within the last five years may apply for admission to the MPH program and request that all courses be accepted.  Current GCPH students, who are in good standing, may apply to the MPH program at any time during the certificate program by requesting a "change of major" with their Student Support Specialist.

Admissions

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

  • A bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent. See International Admissions for details regarding evaluation of international degrees for grade and degree equivalency.
  • Undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
  • Computer with Internet connection, including the hardware and software requirements described on the Technical Requirements page. Must also possess sufficient computer skills to navigate the Internet as all classes are accessed 100% online.

Application Process

  • Completed online application: http://go.une.edu/apply
  • Submission of the non-refundable application fee
  • Resume or Curriculum Vitae
  • Goal Statements
  • Two completed Applicant Recommendation Forms
  • Official transcripts reflecting conferral of a bachelor’s degree or above from a regionally accredited institution.  All transcripts are to be submitted from the original institutions.

Note:  Transcripts for any coursework appearing as transfer credit on the transcript of the conferred degree can be waived if the coursework is unrelated to the degree being sought.  The program admissions committee defines all coursework not eligible for waiver.​

PROCEDURES AND POLICIES

  • Applications for admission are accepted through UNE’s online application only. Detailed instructions are included in the online application.
  • Official transcripts, as well as other documents to support the application, must be submitted to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland, ME, 04103
  • Applications received and completed by the respective deadlines will be given full consideration.  Applications submitted and/or completed after the deadline will be reviewed for the next available term.
  • Admissions are rolling and decisions are made by the program admissions committee throughout the cycle.
  • International applicants and applicants with international degrees must have their transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited US institution.  See International Admissions.
  • All applicants to UNE must be able to understand and communicate in English to be admitted to the university.  UNE accepts several methods of English Proficiency, see International Admissions.  
  • If an applicant cannot prove English Proficiency in another way, scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are required and must be submitted as a part of the completed application. 

For additional information on the admissions process and requirements, please access the Graduate Programs in Public Health website

POLICY EXCEPTIONS

The Graduate Programs in Public Health and the GPPH Admissions Committee reserve the right to make exceptions to the admissions criteria and to make changes or exceptions to policies and procedures, on a case by case basis, when it deems such a decision is necessary and appropriate.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include course textbooks. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available upon request from the Financial Aid Office. Call (207) 602-2342 or visit the Financial Aid website.

Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions

Contact

Call 1 (855) 325-0894 or email prehealth@une.edu.

Department
Degree name
Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Science Prerequisites for Health Professions program is to provide rigorous courses that help non-matriculated students develop a strong understanding of the content, oral and written communication skills, and critical and innovative thinking skills that provide the foundation for entry into, and successful completion of, graduate programs, particularly in the health sciences.

Program Description

The Science Prerequisites for the Health Professions (SPHP) program is primarily for students who have completed a baccalaureate degree and wish to enter a graduate program, but lack the necessary prerequisite courses. Many students enrolled in these courses will be working professionals. Students may enroll in SPHP courses at any time and from almost anywhere in the world.  The courses are designed to be completed in 16 weeks, but they are self-paced, so students may complete the courses at an accelerated pace in order to meet their personal academic needs.

All of the courses in the SPHP program are included in UNE's regional accreditation by the New England Commission on Higher Education (NECHE), the highest standard of academic accreditation possible.

Many institutions accept these courses, but we encourage you to check with specific schools to verify that the courses are transferrable before you apply and/or register.

For more information on the courses offered within the SPHP program, including prerequisites, registration information, and a description of laboratory components, please call 1 (855) 325-0894 or email prehealth@une.edu.

Course Options

Courses Credits
MEDT 1000 - Medical Terminology 3
MATH 1005 - Statistics  4
MATH 1030- Intro to Statistics 3
MATH 1010- College Algebra 3
MATH 1011- Pre Calculus 3
MATH 1020- Calculus I 4
MATH 1021- Calculus II 4
PHYS 1010 - Physics I 4
PHYS 1011 - Physics II 4
CHEM 1010 - General Chemistry I/Lecture 3
CHEM 1010L - General Chemistry I/Lab 1
CHEM 1011 - General Chemistry II/Lecture 3
CHEM 1011L - General Chemistry II/Lab 1
CHEM 1020 - Organic Chemistry I/Lecture 3
CHEM 1020L - Organic Chemistry I/Lab 1
CHEM 1021 - Organic Chemistry II/Lecture 3
CHEM 1021L - Organic Chemistry II/Lab 1
CHEM 1000- Survey  of Chemistry 3
BIOL 1010 - Biology I w/Lab 4
BIOL 1011 - Biology II w/Lab 4
CHEM 1005 - Medical Biochemistry 4
PHSL 1010 - Medical Physiology 4
BIOL 1020 - Microbiology Lecture 3
BIOL 1020L - Microbiology Lecture & Lab 4
ANAT 1005 - Anatomy for the Health Professions 4
BIOL 1030 - Pathophysiology 4
BIOL 1040 - Genetics 4
BIOL 1050 - Cell Biology 3
BIOL 1055 - Molecular Biology 3
BIOL 1060 - Immunology 3
BIOL 1070 - Introduction to Pharmacology 3
NTRN 1010 - Principles of Human Nutrition 3
PSYO 1010 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSYO 1020 - Developmental Psychology 3
PSYO 1030 - Abnormal Psychology 3
ENGL 1010 - English Composition I 3
ENGL 1011 - English Composition II 3
HSTL 1010 - Histology  3
COMN 1010 - Public Speaking 3
SOCI 1010 - Intro to Sociology 3
PHIL 1010 - Ethics 3
ANTH 1005 - Cultural Anthropology 3
ECON 1005 - Intro to Microeconomics 3
ECON 1010 - Intro to Macroeconomics 3
EXSP 1010 - Exercise Physiology 3

Academic Policy

Course Length

  1. Courses in the SPHP program are equivalent to one-semester courses, designed to be completed in 16 weeks.
  2. Enrollment in the course begins the day your section opens, which is listed in the Academic Calendar found on the SPHP Webpage.

Upon completion of a course, the course instructor submits a grade for each student. Students can typically request an official transcript within 5-7 days after completing the course.

Technology requirements may differ by course. Please email prehealth@une.edu regarding technology requirements for a specific course.

Students take proctored exams online using Proctor U. This requires the student to allow an online proctor remote access to the student's computer. UNE holds academic integrity in the highest regard, so exams that are not proctored in their entirety are not credited.  For instructions on creating an account and testing your equipment, please visit ProctorU. For detailed information about the mandatory, UNE-approved webcam and whiteboard needed for all proctored exams, please visit the SPHP student success portal.

Withdrawal from the Course and Refunds

To withdraw from a course, please go to the University Registrar website and complete the withdrawal form under "Science Prerequisite Course Forms." All correspondence with the UNE Registrar's office must be from your UNE email address. Please complete all sections of the withdrawal form, including your PRN, the CRN, course subject, and number (Example: ANAT 1005). This action will result in a W grade for the course. For withdrawal deadlines, please refer to the academic calendar. Please direct any questions about this process to the Student Service Advisory Team at prehealth@une.edu.

Refund POLICY

To learn about the refund policy, please refer to the College of Graduate and Professional Studies' Student Handbook

Admissions

Students may enter the program at any time, as long as they meet the prerequisites for the individual courses. They may take as many courses as needed to meet the prerequisite requirements for the health professions program to which they are applying, but they are encouraged to limit enrollment to a maximum of two courses simultaneously. For students wishing to take more than two courses at a time, please email a Student Service Advisor at prehealth@une.edu or call 1 (855) 325-0894. 

Financial Information

We do not accept any type of financial aid or payment plan at this time, with the exception of military assistance. Students are expected to make payment in full at the time of checkout.

Social Work

Category
Contact
On-Campus Option Contact

Shelley Cohen Konrad, Director, scohenkonrad@une.edu

Online Option Contact

Jennifer O’Neil, Program Director, joneil4@une.edu

On Campus

For program and curricula questions, please contact the School of Social Work administrative office at (207) 221-4508. For application and admissions information, please contact the Office of Graduate Admissions at (207) 221-4225 or at gradadmissions@une.edu

A traditional on-campus face-to-face option where students attend classes on the Portland, Maine campus. The on-campus option offers fully face-to-face and hybrid course options. Hybrid course options meet every third week on campus and in the intervening weeks meet online.

The campus-based M.S.W. provides Information Sessions for the Master of Social Work degree program throughout the year. Some take place on campus and include presentations by students and faculty followed by question and answer sessions and the opportunity to meet one-on-one with faculty or staff, while others take place online in the form of chats. Please contact the School of Social Work at (207) 221-4508 for a schedule of events, or learn more at the Social Work Department Website.

Online Master of Social Work: For program and curricula questions, as well as application information, please contact Online Social Work Enrollment at the College of Graduate and Professional Studies at 1 (877) 863-6791 or locally at (207) 221-4143. We can also be reached via email at socialworkonline@une.edu.

The Online Social Work program provides 100% online asynchronous classes in an eight-week format. Virtual information sessions are provided for the Online Master of Social Work throughout the year. Please contact the online program at (207) 221-4143 for a schedule of events or learn more at the Online Social Work website.

Degree name
Master of Social Work
College
Sections

Mission

Vision

The University of New England School of Social Work envisions a world where social workers are at the forefront of advocating with individuals and communities for human dignity and social inclusion by mobilizing efforts to end inequities, exploitation, and violence. 

Mission

The mission of the School of Social Work is to provide transformative and collaborative learning that embraces the values of social inclusion and promotes enhanced quality of life for individuals and communities. 

Values

Our values promote social inclusion1 conceptualized as actions taken to improve quality of life, access to equitable resources, enhancement of human bonds within the context of cultural diversity, and engagement of people, populations, and communities to fully participate in society. Towards this end:

  • We promote culturally informed practice that is respectful of the complexity and diversity of people’s lives and circumstances.
  • We recognize that social exclusion prevents people from full and just participation in their communities as a consequence of inequities, discrimination, and disadvantage arising from adversity in early life and continuing across the life course.
  • We practice social responsibility by raising public awareness of social exclusion, challenging discrimination and acting with and on behalf of groups, populations, and communities.
  • We support person-centered collaborative practices and partnerships that bring together diverse workers and community members to meet the best interests of individuals, families, and groups.

1“The process of improving the ability, opportunity, and dignity of people, disadvantaged on the basis of their identity, to take part in society.” (2013, World Bank Publication)

References:

  1. Inclusion Matters: The Foundation for Shared Prosperity, World Bank, 2013
  2. The Promotion of Social Inclusion, The Charity Commission, England, and Wales, 2001
  3. Dimensions of Social Inclusion and Exclusion In Yukon 2010, Yukon Bureau of Statistics, 2010

Program Description

The School of Social Work prepares people for advanced professional practice and is accredited to offer the Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) degree by the Council on Social Work Education. M.S.W. graduates learn to understand the potential for individual and collective human development when people live with dignity and social justice; to identify people's strengths across diverse populations and how to build upon them; to understand the multiple social, cultural, political and economic factors influencing the design, development, and evaluation of social policies and programs; to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to carry out multiple social work interventions consistent with the School's mission and the profession's ethics; and to develop intervention strategies that empower individuals, families, groups, or communities.

The M.S.W. degree offers graduates the opportunity to play active roles in health and mental health, alcohol and substance abuse, poverty, and public welfare, women's and children's services, domestic violence, homelessness, corrections, applied arts and social justice and other emerging areas of service delivery. The program prepares graduates to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities in an array of settings and with diverse populations. The values and commitments embedded in the School's Mission Statement permeate our work in every area.

Program Goals

Prepare competent master-level professional social workers who at every system level provide leadership to:

  • Promote social inclusion to enable people, populations, and communities to fully participate in society.
  • Create person-centered collaborative and sustainable relationships across diverse communities and practice settings.
  • Develop and apply ethical reflection, critical consciousness and shared decision-making based on social work values and with consideration of the broader contexts of the world in which we live. 

These goals are integrated into the social work curriculum. Through their presence in courses, fieldwork internships, and internal School governance we bring our mission statement to life.

Accreditation

The School of Social Work at the University of New England is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education to offer the master's degree in social work.

Curricular Requirements

Students in the campus-based program option can complete their M.S.W. in 2-years as a traditional full-time student or in 3-4 years as a part-time student. Students who have graduated from an accredited B.S.W. program can apply for Advanced Standing and complete their M.S.W. in just 1 year (full time) or 2 years (part time). Students can take hybrid courses as part of the campus-based program option. Select M.S.W. courses are offered in a hybrid format that blends online learning with classroom experiences within the individual courses. Campus-based hybrid courses meet once every third week and the remainder of the course material is taught online. Hybrid courses are not to be confused with the online M.S.W. option. It is not possible for students to take both online courses via the online program option and campus-based courses via the campus-based program option at the same time. Hybrid courses are offered as part of the campus-based option only.

M.S.W students are required to complete 64 credit hours of graduate course study. Additionally, students are required to complete two separate Field Placements (internships) that consists of four semesters of supervised practice in approved social work settings; each semester includes 280 hours of practice experience (~18-20 hrs/wk).

Advanced Standing students complete 35 credit hours and 1 field placement consisting of 2 semesters. Students coming from programs outside of UNE are required to take SSW 526 as a requirement of the M.S.W. program. Students coming directly from UNE’s B.S.W. program are exempt from taking SSW 526.

Integrated Clinical Practice Specialization (ICPS)

UNE offers one specialization track, the Integrated Clinical Practice Specialization (ICPS), and three certificate options* in Applied Arts and Social Justice, Trauma-Informed Practice, or Training in Diversity and Aging (TRIAD**). Certificates are integrated into the ICPS and completed within the required credit course structure (see individual certificate pages for more detail).

*The Applied Arts and Social Justice and TRIAD Certificates are offered as part of the campus-based program option

**TRIAD certificate comes with a $10,000 stipend

The ICPS curriculum is designed to provide an integrated generalist foundation and advanced skills for integrated clinical social work practice in a variety of settings:

Generalist Year

Generalist social work courses emphasize an integrated social work perspective involving the social context and its impact on social policy, programs, and the social work profession. Courses include Human Behavior and the Social Environment I and II; Social Work Research and Action Research for Social Work Practice; Social Work Policy and Advocacy; Social Work Practice I and II; Social Work Practice with Groups; and Field Integrating Seminars I and II. In addition, students spend 560 hours in a field setting, which permits students another learning mode through placements in social agencies and programs with structured on-site professional supervision.

Specialization Year

Specialization social work courses prepare students for a wide range of advanced practice roles. Students glean clinical skills necessary for advanced social work practice with individuals, families, and groups, while they can also take advanced courses in policy and program development, administration, supervision, political advocacy, community practice, and evaluation.

The Integrated Clinical Practice Specialization (ICPS) is taught within a framework based in social work values of social inclusion, anti-oppression, and contextualizes human experience with consideration to social determinants of health and well-being. The student experience is enriched by a diverse selection of practice-relevant electives and through shared learning with students from other health professions and the humanities. Students learn skills to translate practice knowledge into work in organizations and communities. The ICPS prepares graduates for professional leadership positions within their communities and beyond.

Click here for information about Social Work Online Program Option.

Traditional Student Progression

Generalist Year Credits
SSW/SSWO 501 Human Behavior & the Social Environment I 3
SSW/SSWO 502 Human Behavior & the Social Environment II 3
SSW/SSWO 503 Social Work Research 3
SSW/SSWO 504 Action Research for Social Work Practice 3
SSW/SSWO 505 Social Policy and Advocacy 3
SSW/SSWO 571 Social Work Practice with Groups 3
SSW/SSWO 510 Social Work Practice I 3
SSW/SSWO 511 Social Work Practice II 3
SSW/SSWO 520 Field Practicum I/Seminar 4
SSW/SSWO 522 Field Practicum II/Seminar 4
Generalist Year Total 32
Specialization Year Credits
SSW/SSWO 552 Contemporary Theory of SW Practice: Individuals and Families 3
SSW/SSWO 553 Advanced Social Work Practice with Families 3
SSW/SSWO 597 Advanced Psychosocial Assessment 3
SSW/SSWO 565 Leadership, Administration and Supervision 3
SSW/SSWO 580 Field Practicum III/Seminar 4
SSW/SSWO 582 Field Practicum IV/Seminar 4
SSW/SSWO 585: Substance Use: A Social Work Perspective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Specialization Year Total 32
Traditional Student Progression Program Total Credits 64

 

Advanced Standing Progression (Online and On-Campus)

Generalist Year Credits
Waived with B.S.W. from CSWE accredited program  
Program Requirements Credits
SSW/SSWO 526 Integrating Clinical/Community Practice Frameworks* 3
SSW/SSWO 552 Contemporary Theory of SW Practice: Individuals and Families 3
SSW/SSWO 553 Advanced Social Work Practice with Families 3
SSW/SSWO 597 Advanced Psychosocial Assessment 3
SSW/SSWO 565 Administration and Supervision 3
SSW/SSWO 580 Field Practicum III/Seminar 4
SSW/SSWO 582 Field Practicum IV/Seminar 4
SSW/SSWO 585 Substance Use: A Social Work Perspective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Total Advanced Standing Online and On-campus Program Credits 35

*Campus Advanced Standing students take this course in the middle of August, prior to New Student Orientation and the start of the fall semester.

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete all courses with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 prior to graduation and fulfill all curriculum requirements.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the UNE SSW will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and leadership in the following:

  1. Practice social inclusion to enable people, populations, and communities to fully participate in society, enhance human bonds in the context of cultural diversity and ensure improved quality of life and equitable resource distribution.
  2. Engage in culturally-informed relationship building respectful of the complexity and diversity of contexts and circumstances. 
  3. Utilize theories of human behavior, social systems, and social inclusion when offering interventions with people and their environments. 
  4. Promote ethical reflection, critical consciousness and shared decision-making based on social work values and with consideration of the broader contexts of the world in which we live. 
  5. Balance the roles of helpers, activists, and advocates through collaboration with communities to build healthy and sustainable resources. 
  6. Engage as critical consumers and producers of research and evaluation applied to clinical and community practices. 
  7. Practice person-centered and collaborative community partnerships across diverse settings. 

Transfer Credit

transfer credits
  • Petitions for transfer credits for graduate social work courses to be submitted at the time of acceptance to the School of Social Work
    • Up to nine (9) credits may be transferred for courses completed with a minimum grade of “B” and equivalent to UNE SSW foundation courses
    • P/F courses will not be accepted for transfer credit 
    • No course electives nor courses from programs outside of social work will be considered for transfer credit
    • All courses to have been completed within seven (7) years of anticipated enrollment in the School
  • Applicants petitioning for transfer credits must include the following
  • Professional statement to include reasons for requesting transfer to the University of New England School of Social Work
  • A syllabus for each course being submitted for transfer credit
  • Transfer students required to adhere to the degree-requirement progression plan in effect at the time of your admission (Note: Individualized provisions may, at times, increase the total credit hours required for graduation from the School of Social Work)
  • SSW may require transfer students to enroll in SSW 526 Integrating Clinical\Community Frameworks as part of their progression plan
  • Consideration of transfer credit beyond nine (9) credits and 7-year matriculation may be considered on a case by case basis at the time of admission
EXPERIENTIAL CREDIT
  • Academic credit is not given for life experiences or previous work experience

Admissions

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

Master of Social Work Program (campus-based)

Specific application information for the campus-based Advanced Standing M.S.W. Progam can be found at the bottom of this page.

APPLICATION

The University of New England School of Social Work participates in the Graduate Centralized Application Service (GradCAS). All applicants are required to apply online through this service.

DEGREE REQUIREMENT

Completion of Bachelor’s Degree from a U.S. regionally accredited institution, or international equivalent, prior to matriculation.

  • All applicants are required to submit official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended. Official transcripts should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please see the GradCAS application for additional information and instructions.
  • Applicants who have not yet completed a Bachelor’s degree must submit a current official transcript.
GPA REQUIREMENT
  • Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is preferred. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.0 will have an opportunity to provide additional information and context in the GradCAS application.
LETTERS OF REFERENCE

Two (2) letters of reference are required* – submitted via GradCAS

  • References should come from individuals who can speak to your academic abilities and/or professional experiences.
  • All reference requests are sent electronically via the GradCAS application service.
    *Letters from friends or family members are not acceptable.
PERSONAL STATEMENT
  • All applicants are required to demonstrate graduate-level writing skills.
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for specific writing prompts and additional information.
RESUME
  • A current resume or CV is required and should be uploaded directly to the GradCAS application.
INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

International applicants and those with foreign degrees and coursework are required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

  • Official credential evaluation by World Education Service (WES), confirming degree and grade equivalency to that of a U.S. bachelor’s degree. The completed credential evaluation should be sent directly to GradCAS. Please refer to the International Admissions section of the UNE website for more information on the type of credential evaluation required for admission review.
  • Applicants whose first language is not English must demonstrate written and spoken fluency through the successful completion of a UNE-approved English language proficiency test.
  • Applicants should refer to the English Language Proficiency page on the UNE website for specific information and minimum score requirements.
  • Please refer to the GradCAS application for test score submission instructions.
     

ADVANCED STANDING MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (M.S.W.) PROGRAM

The advanced standing M.S.W. program can be completed through one (1) year of full-time or two (2) years of part-time enrollment.

Applicants are required to meet all the requirements listed above for the traditional M.S.W. track, as well as the following additional requirements/documents:

  • Submission of an official transcript reflecting conferral of a Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) degree from a CSWE accredited B.S.W. program, preferably within the last seven (7) years.
  • Completion of coursework equivalent to UNE’s Foundation courses at the undergraduate level with a “B” or better is strongly preferred.
  • Evidence of field placement with M.S.W. supervision. Please submit copies of field evaluations and verification of completed field hours as part of your application.
  • One (1) reference must come from a faculty member within your previous B.S.W. program who can speak to your academic abilities (this can serve as one of the required recommendations).
  • Applicants who submit a complete application prior to the conferral of a bachelor's degree may be conditionally accepted upon satisfying all requirements listed above.
     

Note: All materials submitted as part of the application become the property of UNE and will not be returned or released to anyone, including the applicant. This policy includes letters of reference, primary and secondary applications, personal statements, transcripts, and other supporting materials.

Due to continuing developments with COVID-19, some application requirements and processes may change during the cycle for the health and safety of the university, its employees, and prospective students/applicants. We appreciate your flexibility and consideration.

POLICY EXCEPTIONS
  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, not individual candidates

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Academic and Technical Standards

Principles

Social work education requires simultaneous acquisition of theory and social work practice skills and is a competency-based education that rests upon a shared and accepted view of the nature of competence in professional practice. Social work competence is the ability to integrate and apply social work knowledge, values, and skills to practice situations in a purposeful, intentional, and professional manner to promote human and community well-being. (Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards, Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), 2015) 

The essential technical standards presented are required for subsequent promotion from year-to-year, and ultimately graduating from the University of New England (UNE) with either a Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) or a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) degree. These standards pertain to all students enrolled in either the online or on-campus M.S.W. program at UNE.   

UNE’s social work faculty is committed to fostering relationships with its students that encourage personal and professional growth. Its policies and procedures attempt to reflect this commitment to proactive and supportive communication. At the same time, it is imperative that all students recognize that the primary responsibility for a successful SSW education, both in and out of the classroom, rests with the student. 

All students, including students with disabilities, must have the capacity to manage their lives and anticipate their own needs. Situations can arise in which a student’s behavior and attitudes resulting from a disability or other personal circumstances present a problem which impairs the student’s ability to meet the standards set forth, even after reasonable accommodations have been considered and, if appropriate, made by the program, all students must still meet the requirements set forth by the program.  

All applicants, regardless of disability, will be held to the same admission standards, and all enrolled students, regardless of disability, will be held to the same academic standards, understanding that all properly submitted requests for reasonable accommodation will be considered. 

Students are expected to maintain these academic and technical standards in all online, on-campus, and UNE-sponsored off-campus activities, including clinical and fieldwork experiences and relevant community service. 

Academic Program Standards

All students must complete all Social Work program requirements and receive a passing grade in all courses and practicums to be eligible for graduation. The graduating M.S.W. student must have a cumulative grade point average of a 3.0 or better. In order to progress in the program, B.S.W. students must have a “C” or better in PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology, SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology, and SSW 200 – Introduction to Social Work. B.S.W. students must also receive a “C” or better in PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology, PSY 250 – Lifespan Development, PUB 300 – Global Health, and all social work courses. B.S.W. students are given two chances to earn a “C” or better in their required coursework.

Technical Standards

Throughout the program, students are expected to maintain the technical standards set forth and demonstrate them online and in face-to-face interactions; this includes in their classroom comportment, written and oral products, and interactions with peers and faculty; in service-learning settings, and in their field practicum and other professional experiences. Student behaviors that fail to demonstrate these standards while in the program will be reviewed and appropriate action (e.g., remediation, counseling, or dismissal) will be taken. Because this expectation is separate from academic achievement, simply maintaining a GPA is not sufficient. 

Ethics

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics outlines explicit standards for professional conduct. All students are required to acquire their own copy of the “Code of Ethics”, and are subsequently responsible for reading, understanding, and following all Ethical Principals and Ethical Standards as outlined.  

Indicators of Concern

  • Violation of NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws or policies

Respect for Diversity and Social Justice

UNE SSW students are expected to 

  • Exhibit a willingness to relate and work nonjudgmentally across difference with others.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of, and sensitivity to: diversity, oppression, and privilege, including a willingness to examine personal beliefs, values and assumptions that perpetuate oppression.
  • Understanding that members of the social work profession must serve all persons in need of assistance, regardless of the person’s age, class, race, gender, religious affiliation, physical or cognitive ability level, sexual orientation, background, or value system.
  • Demonstrate an interest in different cultural perspectives and circumstances and acknowledge diversity.
  • Demonstrate the ability to solicit and identify quality sources of feedback, reflect on, and integrate the feedback, learn from mistakes and failures. And provide meaningful feedback to others (e.g. appropriately discussing and supporting diversity, be responsive to feedback and constructive criticism regarding professional behavior and attitude, and understand the seriousness of academic and disciplinary warnings).  

Indicators of Concern

  • Violation of NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws, or policies.
  • Use of discriminatory language or stereotypes.
  • Inability to recognize the impact of their own personal values and behaviors on their relationship with others.
  • Discriminatory behavior or harassment towards others on the basis of race, gender, age sexual orientation, disability, religion, etc.

Communication

Communication includes speech, language, reading, writing, computer literacy, body language, and other, non-verbal ques. 

UNE SSW students are expected to

  • Ensure that all their communication is timely, respectful*, with speech free from bias, discriminatory language or stereotyping and responsive to the requests of faculty, field instructors, peers, clients, collaterals, potential and current practicum sites, and associated personnel, and to the School, College, and University as a whole.      
  • To read all communications posted by the School of Social Work (SSW) and are responsible for staying abreast of current and ongoing information pertinent to their roles as graduate and professional students.   
  • Advocate for themself in an ethical, direct, respectful, and responsible manner using SSW and agency-specific channels for conflict management.
  • Demonstrate respect for the privacy of their clients; refrain from gathering information about clients from online sources without the client’s consent (i.e. googling client history, accessing client social media); photographing clients; or publishing client information on social media.
  • Follow relevant laws, field education agency policy, NASW Code of Ethics (1.07) pertaining to social media and in use of technology in all aspects of service delivery.
  • Maintain awareness of how personal communications using social media could affect professional relationships with clients, colleagues, and agencies.
  • That their written assignments demonstrate: good spelling, appropriate use of punctuation, clear structure, paragraphing, good organization, follows logical sequence. Consistent use of APA style.

Indicators of Concern

  • Violation of NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws, or policies.
  • Use of discriminatory language or stereotypes.
  • Written work is frequently vague, shows difficulty in expressing ideas clearly and concisely.
  • Student has many errors in the areas of spelling, punctuation, structure, etc. and does not make effort to show improvement.
  • Appears to have plagiarized the work of others.
  • Demonstrating disrespectful behavior to self or others.
  • Communication is not reciprocated in a timely manner.
  • Public use of social media which depicts self or others in ways that may be viewed as unprofessional or disrespectful
    • Respectful communication is partially explained in the NASW’s “Code of Ethics”:  Social Workers treat each person, in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic diversity...(pg. 5) 
    • 2. 2.0.2 Respect a) Social workers should treat colleagues with respect and should represent accurately and fairly the qualifications, views, and obligations of colleagues.  b) Social Workers should avoid unwarranted negative criticism of colleagues in verbal, written, and electronic communications with clients or with other professionals. Unwarranted negative criticism may include demeaning comments that refer to colleagues’ level of competence, or to individuals'’ attributes such as race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical ability. C) Social workers should cooperate with social work colleagues and with colleagues of other professions when such cooperation serves the well-being of clients. (pg. 18) 

Intellectual

UNE SSW students are expected to

  • Effectively solve problems students must be able to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, comprehend, integrate, and synthesize information from the clinical, natural, and social sciences in a timely fashion.
  • Have the ability to use computers for searching, recording, storing, and retrieving information.
  • Specialization year students must have the ability to use critical analysis to understand theory, research, literature, and principles that apply to social work practice and to apply inductive and deductive clinical reasoning to solve complex patient or client problems as necessary. 
  • M.S.W. students must be able to provide a reasoned explanation for likely intervention.
  • Students must be able to recall and retain information in an efficient and timely manner.
  • Students must have the ability to incorporate new information from peers, teachers, and literature in formulating treatment plans is essential. 

Indicators of Concern

  • Limited or no access to computer and/or the internet
  • Inability to reasonably explain interventions used for treatment
  • Limited ability to incorporate feedback and information from peers, teachers and literature from the field.
  • Inability to problem solve without intervention from a faculty or supervisor.

Openness and Willingness to Learn

UNE SSW students are expected to

  • Demonstrate an openness to learning new ideas and perspectives.
  • As required by the demands of professional practice, be flexible and adaptable in new situations and as circumstances change.
  • Assume the stance of learning with humility (e.g. avoid relying solely on current or past professional or personal experiences to inform your decision-making in the field and in the classroom).
  • Demonstrate a willingness to effectively communicate your learning needs.

Indicators of Concern

  • Monopolizes class discussion(s).
  • Constantly complains about class workload to the point that it impedes the class process.
  • Uses classroom tools, such as the discussion board, to make personal complaints or to lobby for personal issues.
  • Creates conflict which impedes learning and/or building effective relationships.
  • Uncooperative or unwilling to participate in class or practicum activities.
  • Consistently late on assignments.
  • Consistently late to practicum site.
  • Does not sign into Blackboard as frequently as expected or is late or leaves class early.
  • Disruptive to the learning environment.
  • Uses derogatory language or makes demeaning remarks.
  • Unable or unwilling to accept feedback.
  • Responds in a defensive manner.
  • Consistently argumentative.
  • Academic misconduct.
  • Takes little initiative in exploring areas of learning growth.

Professional and Behavioral Conduct

Each SSW student enrolled at UNE is expected to 

  • Behave in a responsible, reliable, and dependable manner (e.g. manage time well; be on time for class; be on time for assignments, meetings, and appointments; plan ahead and follow through with commitments; cooperate with person(s) in charge of programs; and take responsibility for absences or missed assignment(s). 
  • Provide notice to faculty and/or person(s) in charge of programs when not able to follow through with commitments including assignments, class attendance and participation, and other responsibilities required by the program.
  • Demonstrate personal integrity, honesty, and self-discipline (e.g. be consistent and truthful, to show appropriate personal control; take on tasks that they can manage; be honest in reports and self-evaluations).  
  • Project a professional image, both online and in-person, in manner, dress, grooming, speech, and interpersonal relationships. 
  • Recognize their personal limitations and biases, whether they are intellectual, physical or emotional, and to strive to overcome them.  
  • Demonstrate the professional and emotional maturity to manage tensions and conflicts which occur among professional, personal, and family responsibilities, seeking professional help if necessary (e.g. acknowledge the conflict with all parties and work to resolve misunderstandings; get needed help from student support, tutors, counselors, learning assistance professionals and other qualified persons; show ability to prioritize appropriately one’s personal, professional, and academic expectations and activities).  
  • Demonstrate the ability to exercise sound judgment and to function under pressure (e.g. request help when needed and to avoid endangering others; respect the difference between a licensed social worker and a social worker in training; remain focused on the task at hand; remember that as an SSW student 
  • they are representing UNE SSW and the social work profession to the greater community at large.) 
  • Demonstrate compassion and respect towards others (e.g. work cooperatively with differences and diversity in personalities and in cultural backgrounds as well as with differences in social and in economic status, and respect the privacy and individual choice of others).  
  • Demonstrate consistent respect for administrators, faculty, staff, students of the University, as well as all personnel associated with current or potential practicum sites, clients, patients, families, and collaterals.  
  • Familiarize themselves with the policies and procedures of field sites for their clinical or fieldwork placements and to act in accordance with those guidelines. Students should refer to the relevant policies of the specific institution and/or consult with clinical field instructors or supervisors.  
  • Be informed of, and follow all Federal and State laws and agency policies regarding confidentiality and mandatory reporting.
  • Demonstrate the ability to solicit and identify quality sources of feedback, reflect on and integrate the feedback, learn from mistakes and failures. 

Indicators of Concerns

  • Violation of NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws or policies
  • Creates conflict which impedes learning and/or building effective relationships. 
  • Uses classroom tools, such as the discussion board, to make personal complaints or to lobby for personal issues.
  • Uncooperative or unwilling to participate in class or practicum activities.
  • Consistently late on assignments.
  • Consistently late to practicum site.
  • Does not sign into Blackboard as frequently as expected or is late or leaves class early.
  • Disruptive to the learning environment.
  • Uses derogatory language or makes demeaning remarks.
  • ·Difficulty in listening (e.g. overly sensitive, externalizes blame, distorts communication).
  • Unable or unwilling to accept feedback.
  • Responds in a defensive manner.
  • Consistently argumentative.
  • Monopolizes class discussion(s).
  • Constantly complains about class workload to the point that it impedes the class process.
  • Unwilling or unable to develop an understanding of people different from oneself.
  • Inability to separate their personal values from professional values and responsibilities.
  • Inability to recognize the impact of their own personal values and behaviors on their relationship with others.
  • Discriminatory behavior or harassment towards others on the basis of race, gender, age sexual orientation, disability, religion, etc.
  • Physical action directed at clients, faculty, staff, colleagues, or fellow students.
  • Academic misconduct.
  • Takes little initiative in exploring areas of learning growth.

Self-Understanding

UNE SSW students are expected to

  • Use self-disclosure appropriately (e.g. student seems to have an insight and self-awareness, and has resolved the issue they are sharing).
  • Appear to be able to handle discussion of uncomfortable topics.
  • Deal appropriately with issues that arouse emotions.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of one’s own personal limits and biases.
  • Understands the effect of one’s own behavior on others.
  • Seeks supervision and feedback from others.
  • Willing to examine, assess, and reconcile (if need be) the relationship between their own personal values and their alignment with the profession's ethics as outlined in NASW’s Code of Ethics.

Indicators of Concern

  • When engaged in self-disclosure, the student appears to be working through unresolved issues and/or avoiding client issues.
  • The student appears to overreact to or resent feedback (e.g. takes it personally).
  • Appears unwilling or unable to control emotional reactions.
  • Verbal or physical threats directed towards clients, faculty, staff, coworkers, or students.
  • Demonstrates impaired judgment, decision-making, or problem-solving skills.
  • Consistent failure to demonstrate the ability to form effective client/social worker relationship.

Reasonable Accommodations

  • Are intended to provide students with disabilities equal access to the University’s programs and services while upholding the academic, clinical, and technical standards of the M.S.W. program.
  • Are provided only to the extent that such accommodation does not fundamentally alter the academic and/or technical standards of the B.S.W. or M.S.W. program or interfere with the rights of other students.
  • Do not exempt B.S.W. or M.S.W. students from completing certain tasks deemed essential.
  • Are considered on a case-by-case basis and determined by the UNE Student Access Center in consultation with SSW faculty through the University’s accommodations application process.

Continued Enrollment Requirements

  • HIPPA: Students must be in compliance with UNE HIPAA requirements to attend practicum.  
  • Background checks: Practicum sites may request background checks. Information obtained in background checks may inhibit students from completing generalist or advanced field practicums and thus may delay or hinder graduation. The university does not pay for these checks. 
  • Drug Screening: Practicum sites may request drug screens. Information obtained in drug screens may inhibit students from completing generalist or advanced field practicums and thus may delay or hinder graduation. The university does not pay for these tests. 
  • Transportation: All students must provide their own transportation to practicum sites and interviews. Students must be willing to travel a reasonable distance for their practicum. 
  • Technology: Students enrolled in the online M.S.W. program are required to comply with the Technology Requirements for Online Programs, as outlined.