Undergraduate Catalog

Undergraduate Catalog uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

Admissions

Admissions uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

Candidates for admission to the University of New England may be surprised to discover that we spend as much time and effort helping them to evaluate the University as we do in evaluating their own credentials. We are interested in establishing a good match between the applicant's needs and goals and the University's ability to meet them.

Campus Tours and Information Sessions

Prospective students, their friends, and families have an open invitation to visit the University. The pleasant drive to scenic Maine and the opportunity to meet the University's students and admissions staff results in a day that is both interesting and informative.

Biddeford Campus tours and information sessions may be scheduled by contacting the Admissions Office, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Prospective students are encouraged to visit on a weekday if at all possible. Daily tours are offered during the school year at 9am, 11am, 1pm and 3pm.  During School breaks and Summer, walking tours are at 10am and 2pm.  Saturday tours with information sessions are offered on the Biddeford campus during the months of October, November, December, January, February, March, and April. Please call in advance, (800) 477-4863.  You can also register online.

Admissions Criteria

To determine a first year applicant's qualifications as a candidate for admission to the undergraduate programs of the University of New England, we carefully consider the following criteria:

  • The secondary school transcript.
  • The SAT or ACT scores.
  • Extracurricular involvement.
  • The essay or personal statement.
  • The two recommendations
  • Qualified students with equivalency certificates are also considered for admission.

The University of New England supports the efforts of secondary school officials and governing bodies to have their schools achieve regional accredited status in order to provide reliable assurance of the quality of the educational preparation of applicants for admission.

Nursing Students

Students interested in the following programs should apply online using The Centralized Application Service for Nursing Programs (NursingCAS):

  • Accelerated Second Degree Bachelor (A-BSN) Program
  • Registered Nurse Bachelor Completion (RN to BSN) Program

All other first-year applicants are required to submit the following:

  • A Common Application (www.commonapp.org) or an Online UNE Application (connect.une.edu) with the $40 application fee.
  • Official SAT or ACT results.
  • Official copy of high school transcript, with 1st semester senior grades.

Admissions Deadlines

Fall

Early Action - December 1

We offer an Early Action Application deadline for undergraduate applicants who desire early notification of their admission status.  Applicants wishing to be considered for Early Action admission will need to submit their completed application by December 1.  Students submitting all application materials on or before December 1 will receive notification of their admissions decision prior to December 31.

Regular Decision - February 15

Freshman: Freshman applicants wishing to be considered for Regular admission must submit their completed application by February 15.

Spring

All applicants wishing to be considered for the spring semester must submit their completed application by January 5th.

Reservation Agreement

Once accepted, students are required to submit a $500 deposit that will guarantee their place in the entering class. In order to give accepted students enough time to hear from all colleges to which they have applied and to eliminate any undue pressure that may affect their final decision, the reservation deposit is refundable through May 1st for students entering the fall semester. After this date, the deposit is either credited toward the expense of the first semester's tuition (and room for residential students) or forfeited for those students withdrawing.  

Early Admissions

Qualified applicants who display exceptional ability and maturity are admitted to the University of New England upon successful completion of the third year of their secondary school program. Early admission applicants must have the consent and cooperation of secondary school officials. A personal interview is required.

Physical Examination and Immunization

The University requires all entering students to have a physical examination prior to enrollment. The necessary form, along with an immunization record, will be sent to all entering students following admission and receipt of the reservation fee. The forms must be completed by an approved health care provider and returned to the University Health Center prior to matriculation. Maine State Law requires all students born after 1956, who wish to register and matriculate for seven or more credits, to produce proof of immunization against those diseases listed on the immunization record form. The University of New England requires additional immunizations, over and above state mandates, for health profession students. That information will also be available on the health forms.

Advanced Placement and CLEP

The University of New England participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) administered by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. Both of these examinations provide academic credit for students qualified for advanced standing. The CAS and CHP undergraduate programs may accept courses toward graduation via these two types of examinations in accordance with the tables which follow.

To receive academic credit from the University of New England through the CLEP and advanced placement examinations, the student must be admitted to the University, and must provide UNE with official transcripts from the organization(s).

Advanced Placement Equivalencies

Qualifying scores necessary to receive credit for advanced placement are recommended by the academic departments and are approved by the University Registrar. They are treated as transfer credit in accordance with the following table.

AP Exam Title Minimum Score Course Equivalent Credit Earned
Art History 3 ARH 210 or ARH 211 3
Biology 4 BIO 105 or MAR 105 or BIO 104 and
BIO 106
8
Calculus AB 4 MAT 190 4
Calculus BC 3 MAT 190 4
Calculus BC 4 MAT 190 and MAT 195 8
Chemistry 3 CHE 110 4
Chemistry 4 CHE 110 and CHE 111 8
Chinese Language and Culture 3 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
English Language and Composition 4 ENG 110 4
English Literature and Composition 4 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Environmental Science 3 ENV 104 3
European History 3 HIS 231 - Exploration 3
French Language 3 FRE 100 - Exploration 3
German Language 3 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Government and Politics: Comparative 3 PSC 204 - Exploration 3
Government and Politics: United States 3 PSC 101 - Exploration 3
Human Geography 4 ENV 200  3
Japanese Language and Culture 3 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Latin: Vergil 3 ENG 198 - Exploration 3
Macroeconomics 3 BUEC 203 3
Microeconomics 3 BUEC 204 3
Music Theory 3 MUS 101 3
Physics B 3 PHY 110 4
Physics B 4 PHY 110 and PHY 111 8
Physics C: Mechanics 3 PHY 110 4
Physics C: Mechanics 4 PHY 210 4
Psychology 4 PSY 105 3
Spanish Language 3 SPA 101 - Exploration 3
Statistics 3 MAT 120 3
Studio Art: 2-D Design 4 ART 106 3
Studio Art: 3-D Design 4 ART 113 3
Studio Art: Drawing 3 ART 100 - Exploration 3
United States History 3 HIS 199 - Exploration 3
World History 4

HIS 276 or HIS 278

3

If an advanced placement examination has been taken on a subject not listed in the table above, the student should contact the Registration Services at uneregistrar@une.edu

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) minimum score standard for each examination, and its UNE equivalent course, is individually determined by the Department in which the course is offered.

CLEP - General Exams Minimum Score Course Equivalent Credit Earned
English Composition w/ Essay 50 ENG 110 4
English Composition 50 ENG 110 4
Social Sciences and History 50 Explorations (2) 6
Natural Sciences 50 Clear with Department  
Humanities 50 Explorations (2) 6
Mathematics   No Equivalency  
American Government 50 PSC 199 3
American Literature 50 ENG 200 3
Analyzing and Interpreting of Literature 50 ENG 199 3
Algebra, College 50 SAS 022 (non-degree) 3
PreCalculus 50 MAT 180 3
English Literature 50 ENG 199 3
General Chemistry 50 CHE 110 4
General Chemistry 65 CHE 110 and CHE 111 8
Psychology, Introduction 50 PSY 105 3
Human Growth and Development 50 PSY 220 or PSY 270 3
Principles of Management 50 BUMG 200 3
Accounting, Introduction 50 BUAC 201 3
Business Law, Introduction 50 BUMG 326 3
Principles of Marketing 50 BUMK 200 3
Trigonometry   No Equivalency  
Macroeconomics, Introduction 50 BUEC 203 3
Microeconomics, Introduction 50 BUEC 204 3
Sociology, Introduction 50 SOC 150 3
French: 2 Semesters 50 FRE 100 3
French: 4 Semesters 50 FRE 100 and 101 6
German: 2 Semesters 50 Exploration (1) 3
German: 4 Semesters 50 Explorations (2) 6
Spanish: 2 Semesters 50 SPA 101 3
Spanish: 4 Semesters 50 SPA 101 and 102 6
Calculus 50 MAT 190 4
General Biology 50 BIO 105 or MAR 105 4
Biology 50 BIO 100 4
U.S. History I 50 HIS 201 3
U.S. History II 50 HIS 202 3
Western Civilization I 50 LIL 201 3
Western Civilization II 50 LIL 202 3
Educational Psychology, Introduction   Clear with Department  
Information Systems and Computer Applications 50 CMM 100 3
Freshman College Composition 50 ENG 110

4

If a CLEP examination has been taken on a subject not listed in the table above, the student should contact Registration Services at uneregistrar@une.edu 

DANTES

DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs) provide an opportunity for people to obtain college credit for what they have learned in non-traditional ways. The DSST Program is made available by The Chauncey Group International® and is used by adult education programs, the United States Department of Defense, and two and four-year colleges. Designed originally for the military, DSSTs are available to civilian students and adult learners as well. The DSST program is used by colleges and universities to award college credit to those who demonstrate that they have knowledge comparable to someone who completed the classroom course in the subject.

Recommended credits and minimum scores are based on evaluation by qualified individuals in the American Council on Education (ACE). The symbol B signifies credit to be awarded at the bachelor's level; the symbol BU signifies recommended credit at the upper division (3rd and 4th year) level.

DANTES Exam Title Minimum Score (ACE) Course Equivalent Credit Earned
Fundamentals of College Algebra 3B/47 SAS 021 (non-degree) 3
Principles of Statistics 3B/48 MAT 120 3
Art of the Western World 3B/48 ARH 270 3
Contemporary Western Europe: 1946 - 1990 3B/48 HIS 199 3
Introduction to the Middle east 3B/44 PSC 199 3
Human/Cultural Geography 3B/48 HIS 334 3
Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union 3BU/45 HIS 199 3
History of the Vietnam War 3B/49 HIS 199 3
Civil War and Reconstruction 3BU/47 HIS 199 3
Foundations of Education 3B/46 EDU 105 3
Lifespan Developmental Psychology 3B/46 PSY 220 3
General Anthropology 3B/47 ANT 101 3
Drug and Alcohol Abuse 3BU/49 General Elective 3
Introduction to Law Enforcement 3B/45 General Elective 3
Criminal Justice 3B/49 General Elective 3
Fundamentals of Counseling 3B/45 General Elective 3
Principles of Finance 3BU/46 BUMG 315 3
Principles of Financial Accounting 3B/49 BUAC 201 3
Human Resource Management 3B/48 BUMG 302 3
Organizational Behavior 3B/48 BUMG 301 3
Principles of Supervision 3B/46 BUMG 199 3
Business Law II 3BU/52 BUMG 325 3
Introduction to Computing 3B/47 CMM 100 3
Introduction to Business 3B/46 BUMG 199 3
Money and Banking 3BU/48 BUMG 199 3
Personal Finance 3B/46 BUFI 199 3
Management Information Systems 3BU/46 CMM 100 3
Business Mathematics 3B/48 General Elective 3
Astronomy 3B/48 General Elective 3
Here's to Your Health 3B/48 HSM 199 3
Environment and Humanity:Race to Save the Planet 3B/46 ENV 104 3
Principles of Physical Science I 3B/47 CHE 125 4
Physical Geology 3B/46 ENV 230 3
Technical Writing 3B/46 ENG 199 - Exploration 3
Ethics in America 3B/46 PHI 199 3
Introduction to World Religions 3B/49 REL 200 3
Principles of Public Speaking 3B/47 SPC 100 3
 

Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exams (CAPE)

The Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exam minimum score standard for each examination, and its UNE equivalent course, is individually determined by the Department in which the course is offered.

CAPE Exam Title Accepted  Score Course Equivalent Credit Earned
Accounting Unit I 1 or 2 BUAC 201 3
Biology Unit I 1 or 2 BIO 106 4
Biology Unit II 1 or 2 BIO 105 4
Caribbean Studies 1 or 2 HIS 199 3
Chemistry Unit 1 or 2 CHE 110 4
Chemistry Unit II 1 or 2 CHE 111 4
Communication Studies Unit I 1 or 2 ENG 110 4
Economics Unit I 1 or 2 BUEC 203 3
Economics Unit II 1 or 2 BUEC 204 3
Environmental Science Unit I 1 or 2 ENV 104 3
Environmental Science Unit II 1 or 2 ENV 104 3
French Unit I 1 or 2 FRE 101 3
Geography Unit I 1 or 2 ELE 199 - Elective 3
Information Technology Unit I 1 or 2 CMM 100 3
Information Technology Unit II 1 or 2 CMM 102 3
Law Unit II 1 or 2 BUMG 325 3
Literatures in English Unit I 1 or 2 ENG 199 3
Literatures in English Unit II 1 or 2 ENG 198 3
Management of Business Unit I 1 or 2 BUMG 200 or 302 3
Management of Business Unit II 1 or 2 BUMG 312 3
Pure Mathematics Unit I 1 or 2 MAT 180 and 190 7
Pure Mathematics Unit II 1 or 2 MAT 195 4
Physics Unit I 1 or 2 PHY 110 4
Physics Unit II 1 or 2 PHY 111 4
Psychology Unit I 1 or 2 PSY 105 3
Psychology Unit II 1 or 2 PSY 105 3
Sociology Unit I 1 or 2 SOC 150 3
Sociology Unit II 1 or 2 SOC 170 3

International Baccalaureate (IB) & International Examination

To receive academic credit from the University of New England through the IB examinations, the student must be admitted to the University, and must provide UNE with official IB transcripts.

 

IB COURSE TITLE

LEVEL

MINIMUM SCORE

UNE COURSE EQUIVALENCY

UNE CREDITS

Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature

 

 

 

 

Language A: Literature

HL

5

ENG 199 English Electives

3

Language A: Literature & Language

HL

5

ENG 199 English Electives

3

Group 2: Language Acquisition

 

 

 

 

Language B: French

HL

5

FRE 101 Basic French

3

Language B: Spanish

HL

5

SPA 101 Basic Spanish

3

Group 3: Individuals and Societies

 

 

 

 

Business & Management

HL

5

BUMG 200 Management

OR
Business Elective

3

Economics

HL

5

BUEC 204 Microeconomics OR
Business Elective

3

History

HL

5

HIS 199 Explorations

3

Philosophy

HL

5

PHI 110 Problems of Knowledge

3

Psychology

HL

5

PSY 105 Intro to Psychology

3

Social & Cultural Anthropology

HL

5

ANT 102 Cultural Anthropology

3

Environmental Systems & Societies

SL

5

ENV 104 Intro to Environmental Issues OR
ENV 100 & 101 GLC: Intro to Environmental Issues

3

Global Politics

HL

5

PSC 1XX Political Science Explorations

3

Group 4: Sciences

 

 

 

 

Biology

HL

5

BIO 104 General Biology OR
BIO 105 Biology I & 106 Biology II

4
8

Chemistry

HL

5 or 6

CHE 110 General Chemistry I

4

Chemistry

HL

7

CHE 110 General Chemistry I & CHE 111 General Chemistry II

8

Physics

HL

5 or 6

PHY 110 Physics I

4

Physics

HL

7

PHY 110 Physics I & PHY 111 Physics II

8

Design Technology

HL

5

Business Elective

3

Group 5: Mathematics

 

 

 

 

Further Mathematics

HL

4

MAT 180 Precalculus

3

Further Mathematics

HL

5, 6, 7

MAT 190 Calculus I

4

Mathematics

HL

4

MAT 180 Precalculus

3

Mathematics

HL

5, 6, 7

MAT 190 Calculus I

4

Group 6: The Arts

 

 

 

 

Music

HL

5

MUS 101 Intro to Music OR
MUS 115 Music Appreciation

3

Visual Arts

HL

5

ART 106 Two-Dimensional Design

3

Film

HL

5

ART 199 Topics in Art

3


Note: Credit may be awarded for Advanced Placement examinations, International Baccalaureate HL courses, Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exams, some foreign diploma programs and/or college level courses completed while in high school.  If students choose to take one or more courses at the University of New England which covers substantially the same material as any of these exams or courses the credit from the transferred course or exam will be forfeited.  Students may not receive credit twice for the same material.

International Student Admission

The University of New England (UNE) welcomes applications from students from around the world.

UNE is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and has been approved by the Department of Homeland Security to enroll international students and issue student and/or exchange visitor visa-qualifying documents (I-20/DS-2019). We comply with all regulations of the U.S. Government pertaining to the enrollment and tracking of international students under the SEVIS Program.

At UNE, an international student is someone who is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. (holder of a “Green Card”). Prospective international students must meet the same admissions criteria required of all other applicants.

Note:  Applicants to online programs are not eligible for a student visa.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR:

An international applicant (not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who will require a visa to study in the U.S.)

OR

An applicant with international degrees or coursework (a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who has been educated outside of the U.S. and will not require a visa to study in the U.S.)

  • General admissions criteria for the University and its academic programs can be found by accessing the undergraduate or graduate admissions catalogs or the individual program or major.
  • In addition to the general University admissions criteria, and program specific criteria, international students must also meet the following:

    English Language Proficiency
    • International applicants must be able to understand and communicate in English to gain full admission to the University of New England. If English is not your native language, you will need to submit documentation that indicates your level of English proficiency.
    • UNE accepts several methods of English proficiency including the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), as well as others. Students will meet the minimum standards for English proficiency at UNE by demonstrating one of the following:
TEST SCORE
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) 550 (paper-based)
213 (computer-based)
79 (internet-based)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Overall Band 6.0 or higher
IB (International Baccalaureate) Grade 5 or higher
SAT (Critical Reading and Writing Sections) 500 or higher
GRE (Analytical Writing Section) 4.0 or higher
AP English Language and Composition Exams Score of 4 or higher with college transfer credit received
One year of English composition, taken at a U.S. institution, which counts as transfer credit at UNE (not ESL)    Grade of "C" or higher

 

Additional Methods:

  • Students who have attended a regionally accredited U.S. high school or U.S. Department of Defense school overseas for at least three years, or have received an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university will meet English proficiency requirements.
  • UNE also waives the English proficiency requirement for students who graduated from a regionally accredited school in other English-speaking countries: Anguilla, Antigua/Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Guyana, Canada (except Quebec), Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica/other West Indies, Liberia, Montserrat, New Zealand, South Africa, St. Helena, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caico Isle, United Kingdom, and Virgin Islands, and others.
  • Passing scores on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) with the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) Certification (with submission of photocopy of ECFMG certification to UNE Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions).

VERIFICATION OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Federal law requires that we document how you will finance your education in the U.S., prior to issuing the appropriate student visa application form. In addition to the application for admission to your program of interest, all international applicants must: 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSCRIPTS

  • English Translation of Transcript
  • Official transcripts from ALL schools attended must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions as a part of the application process.
  • All official scholastic records submitted in support of your application must be in English or include English translations.
  • English translations should be literal (word-for-word, not interpretive) translations.
  • For specific procedures and admission criteria for each of our academic programs, please check the program website.
  • Evaluation of Transcripts
  • UNE requires all international applicants and all U.S. students with international degrees or coursework to have international transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution within the U.S. (Any exceptions to this policy will be noted in specific program admissions requirements.)
  • UNE will accept transcript evaluations from World Education Services (WES) only. Evaluations must be for grade and degree equivalency. Please order the WES ICAP service to ensure that copies of your transcripts will be included with the evaluation report.
  • Undergraduate international applicants only may also be permitted to use The Center for Educational Documentation.  Please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for further details.  
  • International medical school graduates only: If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. you must have the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) submit review and verification of the equivalency of your medical degree to that of one earned at a regionally accredited U.S. medical school. The ECFMG review and verification of the student’s International Medical Degree will be accepted as an official evaluation of the degree.
  • Official transcripts from Canadian Medical Schools that are approved by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCMEdo not require external evaluation. There is joint accreditation between LCME and Canada adding 17 more schools to the LCME list. Any school on this LCME list can be considered as offering a valid Doctor of Medicine (MD). 


Please note: official transcripts from ALL schools that the student has attended, U.S. or International, must be submitted to the Office Admissions as a part of the application process. Concerns regarding your ability to provide official transcripts should be directed to your admissions counselor.

Seek Assistance in Your Home Country
For further assistance with securing official documents and information from your country, please contact your local U.S. Embassy/U.S. Consulate/Office of Public Affairs for referral to an overseas educational advising center near you, or consult the list available on the U.S. State Department website.

Transfer Admissions

Students applying for transfer admission are required to forward the completed application form and application fee of $40, and official college transcripts of ALL academic work to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. If the student has less than 30 college credits at the time of application the application must also include their College Board scores and secondary school records.

All undergraduate students accepted to the University will be expected to fulfill both the University and program requirements prior to being awarded a degree from the University of New England. Transfer students will be individually advised by the Undergraduate Admissions Office of all such requirements left outstanding after the evaluation of transfer credit has been completed prior to registration. A transfer student's grade point average (GPA) is based only on grades received at the University of New England.

Transfer students are evaluated on the basis of their collegiate records according to the following guidelines:

  • All students who have earned an associate degree in a program of study from an accredited institution that is parallel or related to the academic offerings at the University of New England are eligible for admission to the University. The student could receive credit for all courses therein, up to a total of 65 credits. However, not all of those credits will necessarily apply towards core or degree requirements.
  • Students who have earned less than an associate degree will be granted transfer credit for those courses completed at an accredited institution that parallel or relate to courses offered by the University with a grade of C- or higher. Some restrictions may apply. Refer to program descriptions for further information.
  • All eligible students with a grade point average of at least 2.5 will be considered for admission to the University; students with a grade point average below 2.5 are considered on an individual basis.
  • Class standing is determined by the University Registrar.
  • Transfer credit is given for courses graded C- or higher. Some restrictions may apply. Refer to program descriptions for further information.
  • Courses previously completed at another accredited college may be transferrable to a UNE degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years to be transferrable. Other options and restrictions may apply.

  • While credits may transfer in based on the criteria above, grades and/or grade points do not transfer into the student's UNE academic record. Grades for accepted transfer courses are identified on the UNE transcript with a "TR" symbol in the grade column, which denotes credit accepted but no GPA calculation value.

Note: Matriculated UNE students who wish to have college-level credits transferred back (for course work taken at institutions away from UNE) must follow policy identified under the Academic Policy section of this catalog.

Portfolio Assessment Credit for Prior Experiential Learning

The University of New England will consider, for credit equivalency, prior experiential learning which a matriculated student might possess, which is considered by the faculty to be college-level learning. It is imperative that the experience relate directly to specific course work in the student's program of study and has occurred within five years of the student's matriculation at UNE. Experience gathered after matriculation at UNE will not be considered under this policy. A maximum of eight credits can be awarded for prior experiential learning, which will be documented from an approved portfolio initiated and prepared by the student. An individual portfolio must be submitted for each course equivalency. Individual departments may designate courses exempt from this policy. There is a $50 processing fee for each portfolio assessment.

Note: Nursing students should contact the Department of Nursing for further information concerning this area of assessment credit.

Portfolio Assessment Application Procedure Outline

The student is responsible for the following procedure of portfolio assessment.

  • Portfolio assessment packets are available from the Registration Services on both the Biddeford and the Portland Campus.
  • A request for credit equivalency, and the subsequent portfolio submission, must occur during your first two semesters at UNE.
  • Secure a faculty sponsor from UNE or within the Greater Portland Alliance of Colleges and Universities. The faculty sponsor will provide guidance in the preparation of the portfolio.
  • Complete the portfolio per the Guidelines for Portfolio Assessment document available in Registration Services.
  • Submit portfolio to the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The dean will notify Student Accounts that the request for experiential learning has been submitted and the student will be billed for a $50.00 non-refundable portfolio assessment fee. The dean will forward the portfolio to the chair of the department in which the course is offered. The chair of the department will select a faculty member to review the portfolio. Faculty selected must have either taught the course for which credit is requested or have proper qualifications to teach the course if/when it is offered at UNE. The faculty reviewer may interview or test the student, or request further information from the student, in order to assess if course objectives have been met. The faculty reviewer will then make a decision and forward it to the chair of the department and the dean for approval or rejection of the credit equivalency request, or may return the portfolio to the student for suggested revision.
  • The decision of the faculty reviewer is final. A reconsideration for the same course equivalency may not be made.
  • If approved, the Registrar records course equivalency as prior experiential learning credits.
  • Course equivalency credit approval for an individual course does not result in a waiver or equivalency credit for any prerequisites of that course. A separate portfolio must be submitted if credit equivalency is requested for the prerequisite.
  • Student is billed by Student Accounts for portfolio assessment, regardless of the decision rendered by the faculty reviewer.

Veterans

Programs of the University of New England have been approved for persons eligible for Veterans Administration Benefits by the Maine State Approving Agency for Veterans' Education Programs. The University encourages active and retired military, National Guard and reservists, as well as veterans, to become matriculated students. For further information concerning veterans admissions and benefits, please contact:

Shawn Plante
Enrollment Specialist  II
716 Stevens Ave.
Portland, ME 04103
Phone: (207) 221-4246
Fax: (207) 221-4898
splante@une.edu

Applicants who are requesting Veterans Administration educational benefits are required to have all previous postsecondary education and training evaluated for transfer credit.
Applicants with military service should send a copy of an Army/ACE Registry Transcript Service (AARTS) or a SMART (Sailor/ Marine Corps American Council on Education Registry Transcript) to Registration Services for credit evaluation.

More information on veterans benefits is available on the Veteran Education Benefits website.

Financial Information for Undergraduate Programs

Financial Information for Undergraduate Programs uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees 

(2017 - 2018 Tuition and Fees subject to change)

Full-Time Fall Spring Total
Tuition $17,620 $17,620 $35,240
Room and Board** $7,180 $7,180 $14,360
General Services Fee* $640 $640 $1,280
Parking permit fee (resident)     $300
parking permit fee (commuter)     $90
Total Full Time $25,440 $25,440 $50,880

* Biddeford Campus only; General Services Fee for Portland Campus is $900 for one year.

** Standard Double Occupancy rate for 1st year student housing. The University offers other options on the Biddeford Campus for upperclassman.

Scope of Tuition: Tuition for full-time undergraduate students covers a course load from twelve to eighteen hours per semester. A course load in excess of eighteen hours requires prior academic approval and will be subject to an overload charge of $1,240 per credit hour.

Part-Time Matriculating: $1,240 per credit hour

Deposits

Admissions Deposit

A $300 deposit is required for all incoming students. The deposit is refundable through May 1st. This deposit is later credited on the fall billing.

Reservation Deposit
A non refundable $100 deposit is required in the spring for all returning full-time matriculating students prior to fall registration scheduled in April. This deposit is later credited on the fall billing.

Room Deposit

A $200 escrow deposit is required for all residential students. This escrow deposit will be held by the University as long as the student is a residential student.

Fees

General Services Fee (Biddeford Campus)

This mandatory fee is billed to undergraduate matriculating full- and part-time day students enrolled in 7 or more credits and provides the following services:

  • Orientation/educational assessment testing program designed to introduce new students to UNE. Includes cost of food, testing, student housing, New Student Convocation, and entertainment.
  • Graduate activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  • Undergraduate Student Government activities including support for clubs, programs, cultural events, etc.
  • Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  • Campus Center featuring a gymnasium, running track, pool, fitness center with racquetball court, snack bar, and bookstore.
  • Harold Alfond Forum featuring an ice rink, multi-surface court, fitness center, grill, and cafe.
  • Access to Portland Campus facilities including: Finley Recreation Center, dining area.
  • Athletic events including intramural programs and all intercollegiate home games.
  • Transcripts are available at no charge. 

General Services Fee (Portland Campus)

Undergraduate - This mandatory fee is billed to undergraduate matriculating full and part time students enrolled in seven or more credits and provides the following services:

  • Orientation/educational assessment testing program designed to introduce new students to UNE. Includes cost of food, testing, student housing, and entertainment.
  • Graduate activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  • Finley Center gymnasium
  • Access to Biddeford Campus facilities including: Harold Alfond Forum, Campus Center, Library, Bookstore.
  • Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  • Transcripts are available at no charge.

Health Insurance

Students are required to enroll in UNE's Student Medical Insurance Plan unless proof of comparable insurance can be demonstrated. Please refer to the Health Insurance Brochure.

Student Malpractice Insurance

Annual mandatory malpractice insurance for the students involved in clinical training rotations.

Applied Exercise Science, annual, 4th year

$90

Athletic Training, annual, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years $75
Dental Hygiene, annual, 3rd and 4th years $255
Nursing, annual, 3rd and 4th years

$65

Travel and Student Teaching Fees

Fees are charged to students who enroll in travel, student teaching, or other designated courses. The fee is listed in the official course schedule published at the time of registration. Please refer to semester course schedules for fee structures.

Late Registration

Students who register after the published deadline will be required to pay a $75 late registration fee.

Parking Fee

Students, Faculty and Staff wishing to park a vehicle on campus must purchase a parking permit from www.thepermitstore.com. Enter your destination as University of New England.  Permit prices vary. Failure to register a vehicle will result in a fine and having your vehicle towed from campus. 

Summer Session

Courses are open to any student on a direct registration basis.  Contact the Registrar's Office for more information and course listings.

College of Arts and Sciences' Courses

  • $340 per undergraduate credit
  • $340 per audited undergraduate course
  • $690 per graduate credit (non-matriculated students and courses not part of a graduate program)
  • Audited graduate course cost is equal to the per credit rate of that program.

Westbrook College of Health Professions' Courses

  • $1,240 per undergraduate credit
  • $340 per audited undergraduate course

Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy

Course changes for matriculated students are allowed during the add/drop period during the fall and spring semesters. After the add/drop period, no refunds are made for course withdrawals.

Tuition Refunds

Refunds for students leaving the institution during a semester will be made as follows:

Fall and Spring Refunds

During first two weeks 80%
During third week 60%
During the fourth week 40%
Over four weeks No refunds

Summer or other Special Sessions Refunds

Before second class 100%
During first week 40%
During second week 20%
Over two weeks No refunds

Please Note: Any undergraduate student who intends to withdraw from the University will be required to go through the withdrawal process. He/she must first see the Dean of their College to obtain the necessary forms. Verbal notice is not sufficient. For purposes of computing refunds, the date of withdrawal recorded by the Dean of their College after receipt of withdrawal forms from the student shall be considered official and that date will be used by Student Financial Services to compute any refunds due to the student.

Room (60 % of Room and Board Rate)

There will be no refund of the room charge for the semester after the room has been occupied. A student obtaining permission to break the Residence Hall/Dining Service Contract by moving off campus for the spring semester will be billed 60 percent of a double room rate for that semester.

Board (40 % of Room and Board Rate)

If a student withdraws during the semester, a refund for board charges will be prorated effective the first of the following month.

Other Fees

After registration, there shall be no refund of lab fees or other annual fees.

Refunds for Maryland Residents

MARYLAND

University of New England's Refund Policy follows the Federal Return of Title IV Aid Refund Policy for Maryland residents. If a student withdraws from UNE prior to the 60% point in the semester (based on calendar days from the first day of the semester through the last scheduled day of the semester), eligible charges due or paid will be refunded on a pro rata basis within 40 days of termination date. Some fees are non-refundable and therefore not pro-rated. Fees not refunded are: General Service (one-time fee), Application (one-time fee), and Technology (charged each semester fee). Financial aid awarded (if any) will be returned to the federal, state, and University of New England programs on a pro rata basis. Outside scholarship or non-federal loan assistance will not be returned unless specifically requested by the provider.  After the 60 percent point in the semester, financial aid will not be reduced for any withdrawal, nor will any refund will be granted. This policy applies to all university withdrawals whether student initiated or administrative withdrawals.  Students should note that withdrawal may or may not result in an actual refund of money to the student. Circumstances may occur in which the student still owes money to the University even after appropriate withdrawal credit.

MARYLAND STUDENTS - PROPORTION OF TOTAL COURSE, PROGRAM, OR TERM COMPLETED AS OF WITHDRAWAL OR TERMINATION DATE

TUITION REFUND

Less than 10%

90%

10% up to but not including 20%

80%

20% up to but not including 30%

60%

30% up to but not including 40%

40%

40% up to but not including 60%

20%

more than 60%

No Refund

CONTACT STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES WITH SPECIFIC QUESTIONS.

 

Adjustments

Adjustments to scholarships, grants, and loan programs will be made in accordance with respective Title IV program regulations and University policy before a refund to the student or parent is calculated. In cases where a refund may be due and the student has received funds through the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, it is our policy to refund those funds directly to the bank which made the loan, consistent with Federal guidelines. Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, dismissal, or suspension.

Leave of Absence Policy

In the event a matriculating undergraduate student desires to apply for a leave of absence, a Leave Form must be submitted to the Dean of Students. The form will include the reason for leaving as well as the expected date of return. Leave of absence adjustment to the student accounts will be given based upon the withdrawal policies.  Failure to return on the agreed upon date will result in a withdrawal. 

A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester. Room, board, and fees will be subject to regular withdrawal policies.

Payment Options

The person or persons responsible for tuition and fee payments (whether it be a student, their parent(s), or guardian(s) may pay the charges as they come due each semester or by using the ten-month installment plan offered through Tuition Pay (see Option II: Monthly Payment Plans). They may also arrange to pay by using a combination of these payment arrangements.

The payment dates in the UNE sponsored payment plans cannot be deferred for the convenience of families using guaranteed student and parent loans or other tuition payment programs. Both long and short term financial arrangements should be made far enough in advance to assure payment on the required dates. Special problems or emergency situations can be discussed with the Student Financial Services Center at any time.

In addition to the following options for payment, UNE accepts MasterCard, Discover, and VISA cards.

Option I:  Payment by Semester

About June 15, a bill will be sent for the tuition, board, room rent, and fees for the fall semester. Payment on this bill is due August 1st. Payments from the family, or any other cash payments, will appear on the bill as credits. Awarded financial aid will appear as a credit or if pending, as a memo to be deducted from the amount owed on the bill. The balance due is the difference between all charges, credits, and memos. The bill for the spring semester will be sent about December 15 and is due on January 10.

Option II:  Monthly Payment Plans

The UNE Installment Plan (IP) spreads the full year charges over ten months beginning June 1st. This program is administered on behalf of UNE by Tuition Pay at 800-635-0120. These plans are designed to relieve the pressure of "lump sum" payments by spreading the cost over 10 months. There is an application fee. There are no interest charges.

Application Deadline

Students and/or their parents are urged to apply by May 15th. Applications made after the start of the program (June 1st) must be accompanied by an initial payment sufficient to become current with the regular 10-month payment schedule. Applications for the 10-month plan will not be accepted after August 15th.

Late Payment Charge

The balance due each semester will be considered overdue if not paid by the specified date, and any unpaid balance will be subject to a late charge of 12% per annum or 1% per month.

Students with unpaid bills will not be able to register for courses, and they will not be allowed to attend classes until they have made satisfactory arrangements with the Student Financial Services Center. Students with overdue accounts are not eligible for academic credit, transcripts, or degrees.

Additional Information

  • Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  • For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies. People's United Bank, which is our preferred bank, provides a full-service ATM machine located in the Campus Center and in the Alfond Forum on the Biddeford Campus, and in the breezeway between Proctor and Hersey Halls on the Portland Campus.  For those students who have People's United Bank checking accounts, ATM transactions are free of charge. Checks may also be cashed daily ($75 maximum) at the Student Accounts Office on the Biddeford Campus.
  • The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. The sign-up form is available on the web at the HR website.
  • The University will not be responsible for the loss of property on or off-campus although it strives to safeguard students' property on campus.
  • Students are expected to pay for books at the beginning of the semester. Books, supplies, and other items available at the University Bookstores may be paid for with cash, check, Master Card, VISA, Discover, and American Express.

Academic Policy and Regulations

Academic Policy and Regulations uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

Graduation Requirements for Undergraduates

The academic requirements outlined in the catalog at the time of a student's matriculation into a program of study are generally normative for graduation. If a student withdraws or is dismissed from the University and subsequently reenters, he/she must observe the catalog requirements in effect at reentry.

Although academic advisors are available to assist students in fulfilling major and graduation requirements, the ultimate responsibility for these matters rests with the student.

All undergraduate students entering the University fall semester 1995, or after, must fulfill the following general requirements:

A minimum of 120 credits for a baccalaureate-level program. For specific credits see program requirements listed under each degree/major. The minimum required credits are normally arrived at by a defined combination of:

  1. Satisfactory completion of the course standards and specific requirements in the student's major program. See specific degree/major requirements in this catalog.
    1. ​University core requirements - to explore important college themes, develop crucial skills, and prepare for lifelong learning.
    2. Program, or professional requirements - to complete curricula established by the academic department responsible for the major area of study.
    3. General elective credit - to encourage additional study in areas of interest and to accumulate credits required for a degree.
  2. Fourth (senior) year in residence.
  3. Submission, by the student, of an online Application for Graduation no later than January 30th prior to intended commencement in May.  Application for August graduation (no ceremony) are due by June 30th and December graduation (no ceremony) are due September 30th.
  4. Satisfaction of all Business Office obligations.
  5. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. Higher grade point requirements may apply in certain programs. Refer to departmental and degree/major requirements.

  Notes:
 
  A fourth-year student who expects to complete degree requirements by the conclusion of the following fall semester with two courses (typically 6-8 credits*) or less of outstanding degree requirements may opt to:

  1. Participate in the May commencement prior to his/her last semester (diploma to be issued after completion of studies); or
  2. Participate in the May commencement following his/her last semester.

* A student might have greater than 6-8 credits if the two courses involve clinical, practicum, or internship study. Learning Assistance Center and developmental mathematics courses do not carry degree credits for fulfillment of graduation requirements.

Petition to Graduate and Receipt of Diploma

In the last year of enrollment, students who anticipate completion of all degree requirements must submit an online petition to graduate. The Petition to Graduate form is available via the "Apply to Graduate" link in UOnline. The completed form sets into motion all final processing towards: verification of the degree completion, correct spelling of name on the diploma, correct mailing address, and indication of plans to participate in the commencement ceremony.

If a mailing address should change after submission of the form, the student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's office of a new address. It is the goal of the office to verify/post degree completions and mail out diplomas within six to eight weeks of a student's completion of studies.

Commencement is held at the end of each spring semester (usually May) and students who successfully complete all degree requirements per academic policy are considered to be in the "Class of...[that particular year]." Student names must be approved, on recommendation of the faculty, by the Board of Trustees prior to being authorized a degree and diploma from the University of New England.

Under some circumstances, verification of degree completion may be possible for students who complete all of their degree requirements prior to the end of the semester. Requests of degree completion letters should be made to the Office of the University Registrar.

 Guidelines for submission of the petition to graduate form are as follows:

If graduation is anticipated by the end of: Submit the petition to graduate by:
Summer Semester June 30th
Fall Semester September 30th
Spring Semester January 30th

The degree awarded date will correspond to the term where the last course requirement was completed and graded.  The exception is where one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided).  In the case of late completion of course requirements (e.g due to an "Incomplete" grade), the degree will be awarded in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.  Further information regarding graduation procedures can be obtained through the Office of the University Registrar.

Residency Requirements

Any course offered for credit by the University of New England is designated as residence or campus credit.  This may include University sponsored off-campus experiences including internships, distance learning, exchange programs, and consortium courses.

Bachelor’s Degree:  For a baccalaureate degree, student must complete at least 30 of the last 45 credits in residence at the University of New England.

Second Bachelor’s Degree:  Students who are pursuing a second bachelor’s degree must complete at least 30 semester hours in residence once the first degree is finished.  If the first degree is from the University of New England, the same requirements apply as the first bachelor’s degree.

A waiver of residency requirements may be obtained by written request from the Office of the University Registrar, University of New England, 11 Hills Beach Road, Biddeford, Maine 04005.  The student’s advisor and the appropriate College Dean’s Office will carefully review each request.  Requestors should receive written notification of the decision within one month of submission.

For more information see:

Frequently Asked Questions About Graduation

Commencement Ceremony

Academic Load

An undergraduate student's normal academic load ranges from 12 to 18 credit hours during the fall and spring semesters. Students must obtain advisor permission to enroll in 19 or 20 academic credits per semester, and must obtain academic dean's permission to enroll in greater then 20 credits. A student must register for a minimum of 12 credits per semester in order to maintain status as a full-time student. A student attempting more than 18 credits during a semester will be subject to an overload charge at the part-time per credit tuition rate.

Semester and Semester Hour Credit

Semester: A calendar 15 weeks of instructional time or its equivalent in effort.


Federal Definition of the Credit Hour 

Federal regulation defines a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutional established equivalence that reasonably approximates not less than 

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester.
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practical, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Registration and Enrollment Confirmation

Students matriculated in any undergraduate program must be pre-approved to register for courses, or change course registration, through their advisor.  First-time students will be registered by the Registrar's office staff and will go through a new student orientation where they receive their course schedule. Returning students can preregister for courses at dates established in the University's Academic Calendar.

Course registration must be confirmed through Registrar's office. This is accomplished only after matriculated students have cleared all other offices on campus, i.e., Student Accounts, Financial Aid, Health Center, Security, or other offices through which arrangements must be made in order to become fully enrolled at the University. All students must confirm their enrollment at the beginning of each semester within certain time lines by methods identified by Registrar's office. Instructions regarding enrollment confirmation are e-mailed to each student. Students who do not confirm their registration within the announced time limits are subject to a $75 late confirmation fee.

Course changes are allowed during a designated add/drop period only, as specified on the current academic calendar. Detailed instructions as well as designated time lines regarding the add/drop process are e-mailed to each student. Tuition and/or financial aid may be adjusted, depending on number of credit hours enrolled.

Reinstatement

Reinstatement to the University after a Leave of Absence will require written communication from the student's official UNE Email stating they wish to be reinstated as a student for a given term.  In some cases, if leave exceeds allotted leave time, the student will need to contact Admissions to complete a re-admission application.  If a re-admission application is required, this will change the student's catalog year and possibly their degree requirements.

Classification

Student-level, or classification, is pertinent to financial aid eligibility, class year, student organizations, information systems, and other post-secondary related institutions or nomenclature. The chart below is intended to clarify student classification:

Minimum Credits Earned Towards UNE Degree:

Year Terminology Credits
First-Year Freshman 1-23
Second-Year Sophomore 24-56
Third-Year Junior 57-89
Fourth-Year Senior 90-120
Fifth-Year Fifth-Year *
*Beyond Baccalaureate Degree    

Class Attendance

All students are expected to attend all classes for which they have registered. Attendance policies regarding unexcused absences are established and announced by the individual instructor for his/her classes. If a student is absent to the extent that his/her work is adversely affected, the instructor will report the student's absence to the department chair/program director with comments on the status of the student in the course. Ordinarily, for each course, absences per semester should not exceed the number of times that the course meets weekly.

Whenever a student is specifically reported in writing by an instructor to the department chair/program director as being excessively absent from class, the instructor, with the approval of the department chair/program director, may drop the student from that course with an appropriate grade.

When a student misses class for any religious observances, it is an excused absence. The student should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. Before the absence, the student is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty to arrange to obtain all information contained in each missed class. The student must plan, at the discretion of the faculty member, to take any missed exam either prior to or following the scheduled exam time. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Athletic Competition and Class Attendance

When an athlete misses class for a scheduled varsity intercollegiate competition, it is an excused absence. The student athlete should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. This policy does not apply to students on clinical rotations.

When such absences occur, the student athlete is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty and making arrangements to obtain all information and/or training contained in each missed class. The athlete must make arrangements to take exams scheduled for a day of absence early or late, at the instructor's preference. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Faculty are not required to remediate student athletes as a result of these absences.

Examinations

Finals week is part of each 16 week semester (15 weeks of courses and 1 week of final exams).  The University expects all undergraduate courses to include appropriate procedures for evaluating student performance unless the department chairperson/program director and the dean of the college have granted an exception. For many undergraduate courses, these procedures will include a final exam, a final paper or project, or some other cumulative activity appropriate to the discipline and to the course.

All final examinations must be given during the one-week period set aside by the University for this purpose, and final examinations must be given at the time specified on the Registrar's Final Examination Schedule.

No final papers, projects or exams may be due during the last week of a course. With rare exceptions, undergraduate courses should have a final exam and/or paper/project that is due during final exams week. All courses are assigned a final examination time and room within the final examination week except the following:

  • Labs
  • Research Courses
  • Internships/Practicums/Clinical/Field Work

Information on the use of the final examination period and its duration should be provided within the course syllabus.  Although the final examination schedule is not published by the Registrar's Office until approximately the 5th week of the semester, instructors should include as much information about the final exam schedule as possible in the syllabus.  This includes its duration and a reminder to students not to plan travel until the exam date and time are announced.  

Whether assessed by a final examination, final paper or culminating project, all undergraduate grades are due by Noon on the Monday following Final Exam Week.

 

Undergraduate Grading System

The following grading system is presently in effect: A, A- (outstanding work), B+, B, B- (excellent work), C-,C ,C-(satisfactory work), D (passing but not satisfactory work), F (failure), P (pass), I (incomplete), W (withdrew without penalty), WP (withdrew passing), WF (withdrew failing), *F (administrative F, assigned to incompletes which haven't been completed within designated time or to non-attending students who are enrolled in courses who have not formally withdrawn), and AU (audit).  NG is assigned when instructors do not assign grades.

Equivalent quality points assigned to grades are as follows:

A 4.00
A- 3.75
B+ 3.50
B 3.00
B- 2.75
C+ 2.50
C 2.00
C- 1.75
D 1.00
F 0.00
  Note: Students may not elect to take a course that satisfies a core requirement on a pass/fail basis.

Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the instructor, enroll in a course for an audit grade ("AU"). This must be done at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of and audit grade is not possible (i.e., once enrolled for "AU" the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record). The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to attend classes regularly but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count towards enrollment status (i.e., part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veterans benefits, etc. Audit courses carry zero credit.

Pass/Fail Policy

Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in a course on a pass/fail basis may do so by notifying the Registrar no later than 15 class days into the given semester on a form provided for this purpose. The decision to take a course pass/fail is final. Note: Students may not elect to take a course that satisfies a core requirement on a pass/fail basis.

Passing represents earned grades of an assigned A through C-. Most elective courses are open to pass/fail enrollment except courses in major fields and English composition and courses satisfying core requirements. Students may register for not more than one course per semester on a pass/fail basis not to exceed eight courses in a degree program. Students in health science programs should consult their departmental requirements for exceptions to the pass/fail policy.

Incomplete Policy

An incomplete (I) grade notation may be given by the instructor to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The I grade notation must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days following the end of an eight-week session. Until changed, the I grade notation defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative *F grade for the course. Some programs have established more restrictive or differing policy regarding incomplete grades. Students should consult the program in which they are enrolled for exceptions to this policy. Once an I grade notation is removed, academic standing will be updated according to good standing or probationary standards. If one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided due to an "I" grade), then the degree awarded date (if applicable) will be posted in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources.  Students receiving Incompletes are not eligible for Dean's List.

Course Withdrawal Policy*

In the fall and spring semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

*A Withdrawal from a course(s) at any point after the Add/Drop period will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse.  A withdrawal which changes a student’s enrollment status could impact re-payment of loans/deferment of loans.

 

Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence for a specified period of time, not to exceed one (1) academic year, may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form available from the respective program/school director, Student Affairs, Registrar's office or online.  A student who is on an approved leave of absence has the status "active/not enrolled" and may not may enroll in courses for credit at another institution. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned; however, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. A student returning from a leave of absence should contact the Registrar's Office well in advance of returning semester so that status changes are made allowing the student to access courses. Policy on leave of absence tuition credit is found in respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Students with Financial Aid should meet with a Financial Aid representative prior to completing leave of absence paperwork.

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or Registrar (undergraduate) to indicate change of plans.

University Withdrawal

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete notification documentation available online.  Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

Repeat Course Policy

A student may repeat a course in order to improve his/her grade. However, only the second or last course taken will receive credit on the student's transcript, and only the second or last grade received will calculate into the cumulative GPA.

Course Work at Another Institution

Matriculated students who wish to transfer college-level course work taken at other institutions must obtain permission to do so prior to enrolling in the course at another institution. The student should work closely with his/her advisor regarding this process. Request for Course Work at Another Institution forms are available from Registration Services. A minimum grade of "C-" must be earned for the course in order for it to be accepted by the University of New England (further restrictions may apply - check with department regarding transfer-back policy). 

Important note regarding transfer credits: while credits may transfer based on these criteria, grades and/or grade points do not transfer into the student's UNE academic record. Grades for accepted transfer courses are identified on the UNE transcript with a "TR" symbol in the grade column, which denotes credit accepted but no GPA calculation value.

Approved Study Abroad

Matriculated students who wish to receive credit for a 3rd Party Study Abroad Program must obtain permission to do so. The form is available at the study abroad website. The student should work closely with his/her advisor and the Global Education Office regarding this process. Approved Request for Study Abroad Coursework forms are required prior to departure.

Study Abroad Transfer Credit

UNE works only with fully accredited study abroad programs.  All courses offered abroad through approved programs are eligible for transfer credit.

With proper planning, study abroad should not interfere with your time to graduate.  It is important to work closely with your academic advisor and a the Global Education Office Study to determine which courses to take abroad, how the courses will transfer to UNE, and how they will fit with your degree progress toward graduation.  Be aware that:

  • Grades earned abroad are listed on the UNE transcript as “TR” and are not computed in the GPA.
  • A grade of C- or better is required for undergraduate credits to transfer.
  • UNE Program and Departmental requirements for specific courses may also apply

Categories of Transfer Courses

While preparing to study abroad, students will complete a Request for Study Abroad Coursework form which will determine transfer credit equivalencies.

Exact Equivalency are designated only when it is clear from the course description that the content of the study abroad course is equivalent to a course offered at UNE.  For example, “POS 201 Environmental Politics” at the University of New Brunswick in Canada transfers as “PSC 204 Intro to Politics & the Environment”.

Same Subject Elective are study abroad courses for which UNE has a comparable subject area, but not an exact course equivalent. For example, “POS 201 Introduction to Policy” at the University of New Brunswick in Canada transfers as “POS 299 Political Science Elective” indicating that the subject area is Political Science, it is a 200-level course at UNE, and the “99” indicates that it is an elective.

General Elective are study abroad courses for which UNE does not offer courses in the specific subject area.  General Elective:  “are study abroad courses for which UNE does not offer courses in the specific subject area are listed as “ELE 299 General Elective”. 

 

Semester and Term Grade Reports

Semester and term grade reports are issued after examinations have been held at the close of each semester or term and are viewable on UOnline. Semester and term grades reported by faculty members to the Registrar's office are final. Notices of deficiency, if reported, will be viewable at mid-semester on UOnline. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal

The student who is attempting six credits or more and whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 1.70 or whose cumulative grade point average is below the minimum acceptable level is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall , spring semester  or summer term to raise his/her cumulative GPA to the minimum acceptable level and will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 1.70 for the semester. Failure to meet both of these criteria will result in automatic dismissal from the University for academic deficiency.

A student on academic probation is ineligible to participate in major extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate athletics, or to serve as officer or director of any student activity.

The minimum cumulative semester-end grade point averages are:

First Year
1.70
Fall of Second Year
1.70
Spring of Second Year
1.80
Fall of Third Year
1.80
Spring of Third Year 1.90
Fall of Fourth Year 1.90
Notes: A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is required for graduation. Higher levels of minimum acceptable semester and/or cumulative GPA may be established by individual departments or academic programs.

Academic Honors

The Dean's List contains the names of full-time matriculating students in good academic standing who have attained a semester grade point average of 3.30 or better. The student must have earned at least 12 credits. A grade of D,F or I automatically prohibits a student from receiving this citation. A student must have a minimum of three courses other than pass/fail in order to be named to the Dean's List with the exception of individual courses offered for 8-15 credits.

Alpha Chi National College Honor Society

Alpha Chi is a national college honor scholarship society, founded in 1922, with membership limited to third- and fourth-year students enrolled in institutions with Alpha Chi chapters. To be eligible for active membership, a student must be in the top 10 percent of the third or fourth year.

Citation of Achievement at Graduation

Citations for identified cumulative grade point accomplishments are noted at graduation, and are posted to the student's academic record.  Effective with the graduating Class of 2011, honors are based on all academic course work completed at UNE.  Undergraduate degrees will be conferred per the following classifications:

Summa Cum Laude on students who have achieved a cumulative grade point (GPA) average between 3.80 - 4.00.
Magna Cum Laude on students who have achieved a cumulative GPA between 3.60 - 3.79.
Cum Laude on students who have achieved a cumulative GPA between 3.30 - 3.59.

Declaration and Change of Major

If Undeclared, before March 15 of the second year, a student is required to make a formal declaration of major using the appropriate form available from Registration Services. Students declaring majors in marine biology, medical biology, and elementary education are asked to declare by the end of the first year.  This declaration must be signed by the advisor and the chair/director of the major department. The declared major must be an existing, approved academic program of study.  See undergraduate catalog (majors) for existing programs of study.

Personal Major (College of Arts and Sciences only)

In exceptional circumstances College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) students may propose a personal major as an alternate to a traditional academic major degree program.  Personal major degree programs must have sponsorship of an academic department within CAS and approval of the CAS Dean’s office.  To receive approval of a personal major degree program an undergraduate student must work collaboratively with college/department faculty and the CAS academic dean to design and describe a proposed comprehensive program that combines core curriculum, departmental requirements, and a course of study reflecting the student's personal scholarly interests.  Approval to begin planning and eventually submit a personal major proposal must be obtained through the CAS Dean’s office. To be eligible for consideration of a personal major, students must be in their second year of study and are required to have a minimum 2.50 overall GPA.  A student pursuing a Personal Major must matriculate, without exception, the equivalent of one full academic year, full time status (30 credit hour minimum) after the approval of his/her degree program.  Additional policies and procedures regarding proposal protocols are available through the CAS Dean’s office.

Academic Minors

The University of New England offers the option for students to petition for a minor program of study. A "minor" is a structured plan of study outside the student's major. A student must have a declared major prior to declaring a minor.  See undergraduate catalog (minors) for available options.  The minimum amount of credits required for a minor is 18 credits. Minors do not appear on UNE diplomas.

Student Advising

Students are assigned a faculty advisor who will serve as the students' primary resource for academic and career guidance planning while at the University. Although academic advisors are available to assist students in fulfilling major and graduation requirements, the ultimate responsibility for these matters rests with the student.

Students are also encouraged to avail themselves of additional services provided by the Counseling and Career Center and the Student Academic Success Center.

Student Records and Transcripts

Academic Records- Complete records and related documents are maintained in Registrar's office, Decary Hall for 5 years after separation from the University. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment to the Family Educational and Privacy Act (FERPA), students have the right to review and inspect all official records, files, and data, including all material that is incorporated into each student's cumulative record folder. However, the Department of Health and Human Services has said that clarifying amendments provide that letters of recommendation submitted on the basis of a pledge of confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975 need not be shown to students, and that a student may be allowed but not required to waive his/her right of access to letters of recommendation received after that date. Under the terms of the Buckley/Pell Amendment, post-secondary institutions must provide students not only access to official records directly related to them, but also an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. It is the right of students to file a complaint with the Department of Health and Human Services concerning an alleged failure by an educational agency or institution to comply with section 438 of the Act that guarantees such rights. University students wishing to review their records may do so by providing a written request to Registration Services at least 48 hours in advance of the desired appointment.

Student Conduct Records - Student conduct records and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students in the Student Affairs offices on each campus. Student conduct records/files are maintained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

  1. All student conduct and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of no less than four years after separation from the University. Records may be destroyed at that time. Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time or permanently if specified in the terms of disciplinary sanctions.
  2. Disciplinary records may be voided by the Dean of Students Office with the concurrence of an Appeals Committee for good cause based upon written petition by student(s).
  3. Denials of petitions to void disciplinary records may be appealed to the vice president of academic affairs.

Student Access and Annual Notification

FERPA (see above) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. The student should submit a written request, that identifies the records which they wish to inspect, to Registrar's office.  The office will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students should write to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will accompany this notification.
  3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task; or the Veterans Administration for students registered for various GI Bill programs. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failure(s) by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information and Disclosure

The University normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including directory information. Two exceptions to this policy are:

THE USA Patriot Act

Section 507 of the USA PATRIOT ACT amends FERPA by permitting educational agencies and institutions to disclose - without the consent or knowledge of the student or parent - personally identifiable information from the student's education records to the Attorney General of the United States or to his designee in response to an ex parte order in connection with the investigation or prosecution of terrorism crimes.  In addition, the school is not required to record such disclosures.

The Solomon Amendment

The Solomon Amendment explicitly states that military recruiters must be given equal access to that provided other recruiters.  UNE is therefore obligated to release data included in the list of "student recruiting information," upon request. 

For this purpose, directory information is defined as:

  • Student's Full Name
  • Address
  • Phone Number
  • UNE Email Address
  • Date and place of birth
  • Classification and level
  • Dates of Attendance
  • Enrollment Status
  • Most Previous educational institution attended
  • Participation in sports
  • Height/Weight for members of an athletic team
  • Major
  • Degree Received
  • Picture

Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing on a per-academic-year basis. Request forms are available in the Office of the University Registrar and Student Affairs Offices at either campus. Requests must be submitted prior to September 30th (if first-time enrollment for academic year is fall semester) or January 30th (if first-time enrollment for academic year is spring semester) to affect a withhold status.

Please remember: active students must renew a request for non-disclosure each year to keep such requests in effect. The University may disclose directory information about former students without meeting notification requirements; however, at the last opportunity as a student (just prior to departure from the University), written requests for non-disclosure will remain in effect until a written request to change non-disclosure status is made by the student.

Response Time and End-of-Term Processing

Due to production demands in registration services (both campuses), requests for student records services cannot be processed on demand. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

At the end of each fall and spring semester, Registration Services must process significant volumes of grades, completions, and verifications after all final grades are submitted by instructors. This end-of-term processing is not finished for a minimum of two weeks after the last final exam.

For students graduating at the end of spring semester: degree verification, posting, and diploma printing/mailing must be done after end-of-term grades are processed. Diplomas are not normally mailed for a minimum of six-eight weeks after the last final exam. Students are advised to anticipate waiting these periods of time, and should plan ahead when working with employers, graduate schools, agencies, or licensing bureaus when ordering transcripts, grade reports, or degree verifications.

Transcripts

No official transcript will be issued until all financial obligations have been met.
Transcripts are issued only at the written and signed request of the student. The purpose of this policy is to protect the privacy of the individual concerned and to minimize the possibility of the use of another's transcripts for fraudulent purposes. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

Official transcripts are normally issued directly to other educational institutions or prospective employers designated by the student. Official transcripts issued to the student for purposes of transport to another party can be provided in a sealed envelope but will be considered unofficial if opened by the student. Unsealed transcripts issued directly to students are considered unofficial and may be stamped Issued to Student.

CAS Core Curriculum

CAS Core Curriculum uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

The College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum (Core) provides an innovative common learning experience for all undergraduates in the college. The Core invites students to explore four college-wide themes from multiple disciplinary perspectives and to develop important intellectual skills. Students focus on a theme each year: Environmental Awareness (first year), Social and Global Awareness (second year), Critical Thinking (third year), and Citizenship (fourth year). Skills of communications, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking are taught throughout the Core. Designed to provide a foundation in the liberal arts, the Core reflects the values of the college and prepares students for living informed, thoughtful, and active lives in a complex and changing society.

First Year Theme

Environmental Awareness is the first-year theme. All entering students enroll in Introduction to Environmental Issues and a four-credit Laboratory Science course. Students discover science as a process and discuss the role of science and technology in society. The laboratory science course also serves to introduce the scientific method as an approach to knowledge, while infusing consideration of issues pertaining to environmental awareness.

As part of the first-year experience, students enroll in one Humanities Exploration course and a subsequent Humanities or Social/Behavioral Sciences Exploration course. These courses are designed to foster student inquiry into engaging academic topics. Each Exploration course introduces the intellectual tools of the discipline in which it is offered, encouraging students to understand the liberal arts as including distinctive ways of understanding. All Exploration courses promote writing as a tool of expression and explicitly teach critical thinking skills.

Second Year Theme

Social and Global Awareness serves as the second year theme. Students come to understand the human experience by means of two specific types of courses: Social and Global Awareness (SGA) and Human Traditions (HT).

In the SGA courses, human experience is explored in cultural, societal, national, and global contexts.  Students use perspectives and methods of the social and behavioral sciences to examine human interaction and growth. Students complete two SGA courses in the second year.

In HT courses, human experience is examined within the traditions of the humanities. Students inquire into the rise and fall of civilizations; study works of art and literature; and, examine the philosophical, religious, and economic ideas that shaped ancient cultures and the modern world. Students complete two HT courses in the second year, with one focused on human prehistory to approximately 1500 and the other focused on human cultures from 1500 to the present day.

Third Year Theme

Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges is the third year theme. This theme is offered through students’ major programs of study and builds upon the knowledge and skills students have developed during their first two years.  This theme and approach enhance students’ ability to deal with the complex problems and issues they confront in their upper-level major courses. Each academic program requires its majors to enroll in a course where students and faculty engage in informed critical and creative thinking about problems confronting their discipline. Grounded in the thinking process as well as on the issues, students research and identify causes of problems, generate and evaluate possible solutions, and decide upon a plan of action.

Fourth Year Theme

Citizenship is the fourth year theme.  This theme focuses on preparing students to make a difference in the world, their communities, and their professions. Students enroll in an interdisciplinary seminar and participate in community service and civic activity. During this seminar, students discuss personal, professional, and public responsibilities as they anticipate and share their concerns for the world they are about to enter. The seminar challenges students to understand the balance between making a living and making a life. Activities provide the opportunity to weave together various threads of the Core and the major.

Additional Core Requirements

In the third and fourth years of study, students select two Advanced Studies courses outside of their major area of study and based upon their interests.  These courses explore methodologies, theories, and/or concepts important in the Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Professions, and/or Humanities.

At some time in their academic career, all students participate in a Creative Arts Experience (CAE) by taking a specifically designated CAE course or by completing an independent project. This requirement emphasizes the value of students’ creative spirits and uncovers gifts that will sustain students throughout their lives.

College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum Goals

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences will prepare for twenty-first-century challenges by acquiring and demonstrating a variety of separate but interrelated concepts and skills. Students will:

  • Acquire Knowledge 
    Students will acquire and demonstrate knowledge of and skills in disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and methodologies in all of the following areas: Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • Develop Skillful Thinking 
    Students will demonstrate their ability to engage in multiple modes of scholarly inquiry including:  Critical thinking, Creative thinking, Decision making and problem solving, and Quantitative reasoning
  • Expand Expressive Capabilities 
    Students will demonstrate proficiency in expressing original thought through different avenues including:  Oral, Written, Graphic, and Symbolic communication and Artistic expression.
  • Demonstrate Understanding of What It Means to Act Responsibly and Ethically 
    Students will show evidence of a greater understanding of their place in the world and their responsibilities by demonstrating these proficiencies at multiple levels, including:  Personal and Interpersonal, Academic, Civic, Environmental.

SUBJECT AREA DETAILS

CREDITS

 

 

First Year Theme: Environmental Awareness

 

ENV 100/101 or ENV 104 - Intro to Environmental Issues (3 cr.)

3

One four-credit Laboratory Science course (4 cr.)

4

One Humanities Exploration course (3 cr.)

3

One Humanities or Social/Behavioral Science Exploration course (3 cr.)

3

ENG 110 - English Composition or equivalent or ENG 122 & SAS 011 & ENG 123 (7 cr.)

4

One Mathematics course (3 or 4 cr.)

3 - 4

   

Second Year Theme: Social and Global Awareness

 

Two Social and Global Awareness courses (6 cr.)

6

Human Traditions I: Prehistory to 1500 (3 cr.)
ARH 276, ENG 276, HIS 276, PHI 276, PSC 276 OR REL 276

6

Human Traditions II: 1500 to Present (3 cr.)

ARH 278, ENG 278, HIS 278, PHI 278, PSC 278 OR REL 278

 

NOTE: Students must take Human Traditions I and Human Traditions II from different disciplines.

 

   

Third Year Theme: Critical Thinking

 

Critical Thinking: Offered as part of major coursework

 

Advanced Studies: Two in total, completed in third and/or fourth year (6 cr. total)

 

Note: Students must take Advanced Studies courses outside of their major area of study.

 

 
Fourth Year Theme: Citizenship  

CIT 400 - Citizenship Seminar (1 cr.) or

1

CIT 420 - Global Citizenship (1 cr.)  

Advanced Studies: Two in total, completed in third and/or fourth year (6 cr. total)

 

   
Once Across the Four Years  

One Creative Arts Experience course (3 cr.)

3

 

 

Total Credits: 42-46

42 - 43

University Core Curriculum Summary and Objectives

The Core Curriculum emphasizes active, collaborative, and experiential learning. It challenges students to transfer knowledge from one academic area to another, appreciate different disciplinary perspectives on the same topic, and integrate what they have learned to construct their own knowledge.  Courses in the Core cultivate effective oral and written communication, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills, and issues of diversity. The curriculum provides an interwoven and reinforced set of experiences in Core courses, in major or professional requirements, in special all-campus events, and in general college life.  The faculty at the University of New England believes that our Core Curriculum is intrinsically valuable and that it helps us to influence our graduates to be better citizens and to be well equipped to contribute to society.  

A more thorough description of the Core is available through the College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Office.

 

Core Counting Rules for Double Majors and Minors

A student whose second major or minor falls outside the area of his or her first/primary major may count any  relevant Core requirement offerings towards both the Core and the major (or minor). An example is a BA in History and a BS in Applied Mathematics.*A student whose second major or minor falls within the same area as his or her primary major may count any relevant Core requirement offering towards both the Core and the major (or minor), with the important exception of Advanced Study courses, which must be completed outside of one’s area of study. An example is a BA in History and a BA in English.**

 

*The Core attributes are Environmental Studies, Math, English Composition, Laboratory Science, Creative Arts Experience, Exploration, Social and Global Awareness, Human Traditions, Citizenship and Advanced Study. All programs of study (majors/minors) fall into one of the following areas: humanities, natural sciences, professional programs, social sciences, interdisciplinary programs, or math.

 

**The intent of this policy is to document a practice already in place that was not previously published.  This should apply to all students, regardless of catalog year.

WCHP Common Curriculum

WCHP Common Curriculum uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

The Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) Common Curriculum is designed to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to engage in liberal arts and science course work while exploring health profession study.  Contemporary education in the health professions is demanding and unique.  The shaping of a competent health professional requires strong traditional liberal arts and sciences foundations, comprehensive disciplinary knowledge and the advancement of interprofessional abilities.  The construction of the WCHP Common Curriculum supports the development of the student in this educational endeavor.

The WCHP Common Curriculum is constructed around three (3) domains of study: Study in the Arts and Sciences, Interprofessional Education and Discipline-specific Study.

Study in the Arts and Sciences: Engagement in the arts and sciences provides an essential underpinning for health profession study and renders a framework for the first two academic years.  This arena serves to develop important intellectual skills, and is characterized by a well-scaffolded sequence of biological course work and study in social-behavioral science.  Quantitative reasoning and critical thinking are examined through mathematics and scientific inquiry.  Written and oral communication abilities are cultivated through English composition and supporting exploratory humanities.  Elements of the College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum are interwoven throughout, providing academic offerings in creative arts, social-global awareness, humanities exploration, and advanced studies/ human traditions course work.  Understanding in the arts and sciences is additionally fostered through other special co-curricular campus events and throughout general collegiate life.  Study in the arts and sciences supports the development of effective communication skills, critical thinking abilities, quantitative reasoning and exploration of issues related to societal and global diversity.

Interprofessional Education:  Contemporary health profession practice demands that graduates be competent not only in disciplinary expertise but also with knowledge and skills in interprofessional collaboration.  This requires health professionals to learn with, from, and about each other in gaining competence in communication, teamwork, understanding of roles and responsibilities, and ethical comportment.  Two required interprofessional education courses (IPE) examine these competencies, providing students with the opportunity to engage in increasingly complex problem solving, work collaboratively in teams, apply interpersonal communication principles, and explore ethical considerations for high quality patient and population care.  Interprofessional course work is delivered in year one through a first year experience (FYE) course, and in year 2 through a course exploring ethical principles and practice.  Application occurs through experiential learning within the major, co-curricular seminars, IPE elective courses, and service learning activities.

Discipline-specific Study:  Engagement in the major is prominent during years three and four of health profession course work.  Study within the major provides the student with experiential learning opportunities integrating foundational cognitive, psychomotor, and affective knowledge gained from study in the arts and sciences and IPE.  Disciplinary education is informed by classroom learning experiences, guided hands-on clinical laboratory, facilitated simulation exercises, and diverse experiences in field work and clinical practice sites.  Study within the major advances critical and creative thinking within the discipline, instills a spirit of inquiry and life-long learning, and upholds the imperative of citizenship within a complex, changing society.  

WCHP Common Curriculum Objectives and Summary

 

  • Employ critical thinking and problem solving skills in the study of the health professions.
  • Examine ethical knowledge, professional standards and values congruent with interprofessional practice.
  • Demonstrate effective communication and interprofessional collaboration abilities.
  • Appraise knowledge of self and personal fit in preparation for interprofessional health practice.

Summary:

The WCHP Common Curriculum is outcomes-oriented and emphasizes active, engaged approaches to learning.  It challenges students to acquire and then integrate knowledge across fields of study in shaping a capable and competent health professional.  The faculty in the Westbrook College of Health Professions uphold the Common Curriculum as an essential component to producing graduates who are highly effective in their disciplinary practice, competent with interprofessional collaboration and informed citizens ready to contribute to a complex, dynamic society.  

Student Academic Success

Student Academic Success uneadmin Thu, 11/03/2016 - 14:05

The Student Academic Success Center (SASC), a unit within the Division of Student Support, provides a comprehensive array of academic support services, including placement evaluation and testing, courses, workshops, tutoring and individual consultations. The goal of the Student Academic Success Center is to assist students in becoming more independent and efficient learners so that they are able to meet the University's academic standards and to attain their personal educational goals.

Placement Testing

Before Orientation, all new undergraduate and transfer students are assessed for competence in mathematics and writing. SAT or ACT scores and a review of each incoming student's previous coursework are considered. In the absence of this information, or if the information is more than 5 years old, students will be required to complete a placement test. Students are strongly encouraged to complete placement prior to Orientation.

Students who do not meet the University's predetermined criteria are placed into an appropriate developmental mathematics course, developmental writing course, or both. SAS courses are subject to the academic policies and procedures set forth by CAS and CHP. SAS courses, however, do not satisfy core curriculum or graduation requirements.

Mathematics

Based on placement testing results, students are assigned one of five levels in Mathematics.

L2: Introduction to Algebra and Problem Solving (SAS 021)
     
L3: Advanced Algebra and Problem Solving (SAS 022), Quantitative Reasoning (MAT 110 or MAT 110G), Statistics (MAT 120), or Applications of Functions (MAT170)
     
L4: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (MAT 130), Statistics for the Life Sciences (MAT 150), or Pre-calculus (MAT 180)
     
L5: Calculus I (MAT 190) or Geometry (MAT 240)
     
L6: Calculus II (MAT 195), Linear Algebra (MAT 220), or Foundations of Mathematics (MAT 230).

The rubric below applies only to SAT Math tests taken prior to March, 2016.  All students with ACT scores may use this rubric to estimate their placement.

Placement Rubric

UL2

SAT <470, ACT 19 or lower

 

 

UL3

SAT 470-540, ACT 20 or 21

or

SAT <470 + HS math higher than Algebra II (‘A’ or ‘B’)

UL4

SAT >=550, ACT 22 or higher

or

SAT 500-540 + HS Calc (‘A’ or’ B’) or Pre-Calc grade(‘A’)

UL5

SAT>=550 + HS Calc with grade A or B

or

 

Petition to Math department

UL6

AP Calculus Exam score of 4 or 5

or

Petition to Math department

Students with RSAT Math scores taken March, 2016 and after will be evaluated using a new rubric currently in development.  RSAT Math scores greater than or equal to 580 will receive a minimum initial placement of UL4.

Students wishing to challenge their initial placement may submit additional evidence such as: Advanced Placement scores, updated or additional transcripts, or Accuplacer® results from another college, or take the placement test at UNE, or complete ALEKS bridge.

Students may complete placement testing by appointment at the Student Academic Success Center or at another testing site that administers the Accuplacer®. Students are strongly encouraged to complete placement prior to Orientation. Students who do not complete required placement testing will be assigned a UL2 placement level.

Writing

Based on the placement process, students are assigned one of three courses in Writing.

  • Stretch English Composition (ENG 122+SAS 011, ENG 123)
  • English Composition with Writing Lab (ENG 110+SAS 011)
  • English Composition (ENG 110)     

The Writing Placement Process considers multiple measures of each student's current skill in writing to determine the most appropriate writing course.  Measuers of writing skill include reported high school GPA, high school English grades, and in some cases, grades in writing-intensive college courses.

Students wishing to challenge their initial placement may submit additional evidence as detailed in the Writing Placement Challenge procedure.  For mor information, contact writingplacement@une.edu .

Tutoring

The Student Academic Success Center offers professional and peer tutoring to support a variety of undergraduate courses. Peer tutors complete a training program certified by the College Reading and Learning Association. Peer and professional writing support services are also available. Tutors' regularly scheduled hours are accessible online at une.tutortrac.com.

Individual Consultation

Learning specialists are available (by appointment) to meet with students seeking assistance with their specific course demands. Consultations regarding learning strategy, note-taking skills, active reading skills, time management skills, test-taking skills, and preparation for professional boards are available.

Animal Behavior

Contact

Dr. Teresa Dzieweczynski

tdzieweczynski@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Animal Behavior
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Psychology offers students a broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on community, social and individual approaches to understanding human behavior.  Students are thus exposed to a combination of theoretical, scientific and practical approaches to solving human problems.  Issues of gender, race, class and culture are emphasized in courses throughout the curriculum.  As a result of required course work and internship experiences, the department graduates students with marketable skills that prepare them for entry-level positions in social services or for graduate study in related areas.  As part of this mission, the Department of Psychology offers three majors: psychology, neuroscience, and animal behavior.

Animal behavior involves the investigation of how an organism relates to its environment - comprised of both physical and social factors - and includes a wide variety of topics, from finding food to achieving dominance, that all influence an organism's ability to survive and reproduce. It is — by its very nature — interdisciplinary, drawing on techniques and concepts from multiple diverse fields such as psychology and neuroscience. Through the use of expertise in psychology (the study of behavior and mental processes) and biology (the study of the living world), we can understand how animals behave, how these behaviors develop and the mechanisms, explanations and consequences of these behaviors. Answers to the mechanisms of behavior include not only how external stimuli in the environment affect behavior but also how the internal hormonal and neural mechanisms mediate behavior. The study of the development of behavior focuses on the way behavior changes over an individual's lifetime as a result of both genes and experience. Investigations of the explanations of behavior examine immediate effects of a particular behavior on an animal, and ultimate effects such as a behavior's value in helping a species survive and reproduce successfully and that behavior's evolution over time.

The mission of animal behavior, as an interdisciplinary science that combines both psychology and biology, is to examine the complicated question of how and why animals behave the way they do through the use of techniques and concepts from multiple fields.  By the time they graduate, animal behavior majors will know how to think like scientists. This will include a mastery of the basic skills that underlie the fields of psychology and biology — from critically observing the world around them to formulating basic hypotheses — as well as an understanding of concepts central to the disciplines and how these concepts interact and interrelate. In order to enable students to attain these goals, they will be actively involved in the scientific process. Through active involvement, students will gain an appreciation of not just animal behavior but psychology and biology as a whole.

One of the things that makes the University of New England a unique institution is its focus on learning by doing. The psychology faculty is wholly supportive of this approach as indicated not only by strong student-faculty relationships but also by requiring an internship experience. The animal behavior major further embraces this philosophy by providing research experiences within and outside the classroom learning environment. Research experience is as critical a component of a well-rounded degree as content mastery and provides students with skills that are beneficial throughout their careers after graduation. Through these hands on experiences, students will discover their talents, hone their skills, achieve their goals and become independent, critical thinkers that understand their role in not just the work force but the community in general.

Major Description

Animal Behavior is an interdisciplinary major with students taking courses in a variety of departments to gain an appreciation of the discipline from multiple perspectives. Animal behavior is the scientific study of not only everything an animal does but why it does it. This major is designed for students who are interested in understanding why animals act the way they do on a proximate and ultimate level. An animal behavior major can lead to employment in national parks, research laboratories, veterinary clinics, animal shelters, aquariums or zoos, or academia. Students who are planning on attending a graduate program in this field should be prepared not only to maintain an appropriately high GPA but also to conduct research in a laboratory on campus or at another institution.

Curricular Requirements

  Credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-46
  Credits
Program Required Courses 50-59
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
BIO 105/105L - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution w/Lab OR MAR 105/105L 4
BIO 106/106L - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular w/Lab OR MAR 106/106L 4
CHE 110/110L - General Chemistry I w/Lab 4
CHE 111/111L - General Chemistry II w/Lab 4
PSY 225 - Psychology Statistics 3
PSY 275 - Introduction to Tech/Animal Behavior 3
PSY 285 - Research Methods 3
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology or BIO 245 General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology & Pathophysiology 4
PSY 335 - Comparative Animal Behavior 3
Organismal Topic* 3
PSY 362 - Animal Cognition 3
PSY 365 - Biological Bases of Behavior 3
PSY 382 - Animal Learning and Behavior 3
PSY 425 - Advanced Methods in Animal Behavior 3
PSY 495 - Animal Behavior Internship/Research 3-12
Animal Behavior Electives - Three electives are required for the animal behavior major if the internship is 3-4 credits. If the internship is 5 or more credits, then only 2 electives are required. Other courses may be applied as electives with the approval of the animal behavior program director or the department chair. 6 or more

BIO 232 - Microbiology 

4

BIO 332 - Vert Neuroanatomy

3

BIO 333 - Evolution

3

BIO 345 - General Prin Anat/Phys/Pathophys

5

BIO 350 - Ecology

4

ENV 250 -Environ Policy Compar Perspect

3

ENV 318 - Advanced Methods in Avian Ecology

4

ENV 356 - Terrestrial Wildlife and Ecology

4

MAR 237 - Marine Animal Rehab

3

MAR 250 - Marine Biology

4

MAR 252 - Nat His Marine Mammals

3

PHY 110/PHY 111 - Physics    

4-8

PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology    

3

PSY 226 - Motivation & Emotion 

3

PSY 245 - Evolutionary Psychology

3

PSY 325 - Psychology of Aging

3

PSY 330 - Psychology of Stress  

3

PSY 370 - Drugs, Society, Behavior

3

PSY 383 - Memory & Cognition

3

PSY 406 - Spec Topics in Animal Behavior

3
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Organismal Topics courses must be 200-level or higher and include a hands on component. These courses include but are not limited to: BIO 222 Finfish/Shellfish Culture Tech; BIO 255 Entomology; BIO 319 Ornithology; BIO 330 Comp Vert Anatomy; ENV 318 Adv Research Methods Avian Ecol; ENV 356 Terrestrial Wildlife Eco/Cons; MAR 320 Invert Zoology; MAR 331 Biology of Fishes; MAR 355 Biology Marine Mammals; MAR 275 Biology Sharks, Skates, Rays; MAR 451 Topics: Galapagos; PSY 406 Spec Topics Animal Behavior. 

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Academic and Technical Standards

A grade point average of 2.25 is necessary to be approved to add a major in Psychology, Animal Behavior, or Neuroscience, and to add a minor in Psychology, Animal Behavior, Neuroscience, Art Therapy, or MHRT/C.   Double majoring or majoring and minoring within the Department of Psychology may be possible for a student.  However, students interested in this option should do so with close consultation of their academic advisor to ensure that a substantial degree of overlap between the two areas does not occur.

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all courses used to fulfill the requirements for the Animal Behavior major.  See Undergraduate Academic Policy also.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their Bachelors Degree Program in Animal Behavior, students will be able to:

1. Exhibit critical and integrative thinking skills

2. Demonstrate ability to communicate scientific information in both oral and written formats

3. Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts in animal behavior

4. Exhibit quantitative research skills (or demonstrate ability to perform all parts of the scientific method)

5. Demonstrate ability to think flexibly and apply knowledge to new problems

Minor

A student with GPA of at least 2.25 and a major at UNE may minor in Animal Behavior with the approval of the Psychology Department Chair.  Declarations must occur prior to the completion of the first semester of the junior year. Major programs of study with significant course overlap with animal behavior minor requirements may be disallowed by the chair.  Students declaring a minor in animal behavior will not be allowed to double-dip credits across the minor and either major or core requirements (unless no other options are provided by the major, minor, or core requirements). A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit with a minimum grade of "C-" in each course is required for the minor in Animal Behavior as follows:

  Credits
Minimum Credits 18
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 335 - Comparative Animal Behavior 3
PSY 365 - Biological Bases of Behavior 3
BIO XXX - One Organismal Topic (see above) 3-4
Animal Behavior Elective (see above) 3-4
PSY 382 - Animal Learning and Behavior 3

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Anthropology

Category
Degree name
Minor in Anthropology
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Department of Society, Culture and Languages is to offer a vigorous and exciting broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics.  The department provides a combination of theoretical, scientific, practical and experiential approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture as well as hands on learning are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for careers in a variety of public and social services and/or for graduate study in related areas.

Minor Description

A minor in Anthropology is the scientific study of the origin, the behavior, and the physical, social, and cultural development of humans. In simple terms, it is the study of humanity. A minor in Anthropology will prepare students to work side by side with civil and industrial engineers, cancer researchers, specialists in public health and medicine, chemists, biologists, and others in the science, technology, and engineering fields as well as pursue careers more directly related to Anthropology.

Curricular Requirements

To complete the Minor in Anthropology students must complete six (6) three (3) credit courses in Anthropology. Four of these six courses must be completed at the University of New England. Two courses (noted below) are required of all minors. The electives may come from a variety of fields depending on the specific course. In all, three of these four electives must be in Anthropology (including Archeology). Students may count courses taken in the Core Curriculum as part of the minor. One course (other than SOC 370) must be at the 300 or 400 level.

Students must take: Credits
ANT 102 - Cultural Anthropology 3
SOC 370 - Applied Field Methods 3
AND choose four (4) electives from the following:  
ARC 190 - Cultures Through Archeology 3
ANT 118 - Applied Anthropology 3
ANT 211 - Medical Anthropology 3
ANT 224 - Forensic Anthropology/Human Rights 3
ANT 230 - Anthropology in Latin American and the Caribbean 3
ANT 231 - Culture and Society in the Middle East 3
ANT 312 - Human Trafficking 3
ANT 425 - Sex/Gender/Sexuality Critical Perspective 3
Courses that could be used as electives with pre-approval:  
ENV 200 - Society, Population and Environment: A Global Perspective 3
HIS 210 - Race & Ethnicity Latin America 3
SOC 210 - Displaced Cultures & Society 3
SOC 265 - Social Issues Problem Global World 3
SOC 290 - British Cultural Studies 3
SOC 331 - Latin American Society and Culture Through Cinema 3
Total Credits 18

Learning Outcomes

These goals and outcomes are for the Minor in Anthropology. Each of these goals and outcomes also meet the goals and outcomes of the Department of Society, Culture and Languages.

  1. Expand the awareness and application of anthropology.
  2. Examine, apply, and critically assess various anthropological research methods.
  3. Examine how cultural and social structures operate.
  4. Examine the diversity of human societies.
  5. Communicate anthropology effectively.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Applied Exercise Science

Category
Contact

Heath R. Pierce, M.Ed., RSCC*D, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, EP-C (Program Director)
hpierce@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Applied Exercise Science
College
Sections

Mission

The Applied Exercise Science (AES) program is a student-centered, innovative, comprehensive program designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for excellence in the fields of exercise science, sport performance, and health & wellness. The curriculum encourages life-long learning through classroom, laboratory, internship, and research experience. Graduates will become highly effective, compassionate allied health care professionals capable of working with varied populations.

Major Description

The AES program is designed to provide graduates with the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to perform pre-participatory screening, fitness testing, exercise prescription, and exercise leadership for healthy, health-compromised populations, and athletic performance enhancement. With a combination of basic science, exercise science and athletic training courses, these students are prepared for career opportunities as an exercise science professional in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, strength and conditioning, sports medicine, corporate fitness, personal training, and health promotion. Internship settings include: colleges and universities, sport/athletic organizations, hospitals/clinics, private/commercial/community health and fitness facilities, municipalities, corporations, and non-profit organizations. The Applied Exercise Science program provides a strong foundation for graduate school preparation for allied health programs.

Curricular Requirements

  Credits
First Year  30-32
IHS 130 - Interprofessional Health Care First Year Experience 3
BIO 105 - Biology I Ecology/Evolution 4
BIO 106 - Biology II Cellular/Molecular 4
ENG 110 - English Composition or ENG 122/123- College Reading & Writing I/II 4-6
EXS 120 - Personal Health and Wellness 3
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Explorations Course 3
   
Second Year  33
BIO 208 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
IHS 220  - Nutrition 3
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
ATC 333 - Gross Anatomy 3
One (1) Social Global Awareness Course 3
EXS 180 - Motor Learning and Performance 3
BIO 209 or BIO 209G - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
ATC 101 - Care and prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
   
Third Year 32
ATC 420 - Research Methods 3
EXS 310 - Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3
EXS 320 - Exercise Physiology w/Lab 3
EXS 330 - Fitness Evaluation and Prescription w/Lab 3
EXS 380 - 12 Lead ECG Interpretation w/Lab 3
EXS 392 - Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription w/Lab 3
EXS 495 - AES Seminar 1
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
PHY 110 - General Physics w/ Lab 4
AES Elective Course 1 of 4** 3
AES Elective Course 2 of 4** 3
   
Fourth Year  27
EXS 340 - Concepts of Strength and Conditioning 3
EXS 432 - Exercise Management for Chronic Disease & Disability 3
EXS 322 Metabolism and Bioenergetics of Sport Nutrition 3
One (1) Advanced Studies Course 3
EXS 499 - Internship* 6
AES Elective Course 3 of 4** 3
AES Elective Course 4 of 4** 3
One (1) Creative Art Course (ART, ARH, MUS prefix) 3
Minimum Required Credits 122-124

“A student in the applied exercise science major may elect to pursue a bachelor’s degree in health sciences.  This degree is only open to matriculated students at the University of New England.  Special permission from the student’s advisor and the Dean of the Westbrook College of Health Professions is required for enrollment in the BS in Health Sciences”.

INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE 

*The senior-level culminating experience may be either EXS 499 taken as a six-credit field experience internship (taken in the summer, fall or spring) or a combination of  (2) EXS 499 three-credit field experience internships totaling six-credits.   Each student is required to complete a minimum of 270 hours (45 hours/credit) under the direct supervision of an approved clinical internship site supervisor. To be eligible to complete the internship the student must: be senior level status with a minimum of 90 earned credits, be in good standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater and compliant with all academic and technical standards.  Failure to achieve these academic standards may delay graduation.   

**AES Electives (12 credits):

1)   Students need to take a minimum of 6 credits with EXS or ATC prefix, but have permission to take all 12 credits in EXS or ATC if they so desire.

2)   If a student does not take all 12 credits in EXS or ATC, any remaining credits can be filled by taking courses in BIO, CHE or PHY.

3)   Elective course substitution is allowed per permission of the Exercise and Sport Performance Department Chair.

Academic and Technical Standards

Students accepted to the Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) at the University of New England are subject to two sets of academic guidelines, one to meet minimum qualifications for ongoing enrollment at the University of New England and the other to meet specific program requirements.

National Strength and Conditioning Association - Education Recognition Program Endorsement

WCHP Common Curriculum Standards – Semesters One Through Four (Freshman and Sophomore Years)

  1. In keeping with the guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows:
     
    Fall of First Year 1.70
    Spring of First Year 1.70
    Fall Of Second Year 1.70
    Spring of Second Year 1.80
  2. Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the Catalog of the University of New England.
  3. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in the following courses: MAT 120, BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 309, EXS 120, EXS 180, ATC 101 and IHS 220. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a “C” will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  4. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C-” in the following courses: CHE 110 and PHY 110. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a “C-” will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.

  5. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a "C" or "C-" in any of the above outlined courses requires the student to repeat the course.

  6. Failure to achieve a minimum of a "C" or "C-" a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  7. A student may enroll in any of the courses listed above a maximum of two times. Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade. Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.

Applied Exercise Science Program Standards – Semesters Four Through Eight (Junior and Senior Years) 
 

Minimum acceptable semester-end GPA 2.5
Minimal grade of a C or better in any EXS or ATC prefix course 2.0
  1. Once in course work within the major (fall of the junior year and beyond), students must maintain a minimum semester-end grade point average GPA of 2.5.   Failure to do so will result in program–level probation and may affect academic progression and delay graduation. 
  2. Students whose semester-end GPA falls below the 2.5 threshold for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the program. 
  3. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in each EXS and ATC prefix course.
  4. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a "C" in each EXS or ATC prefix course requires the student to repeat the course.

  5. Failure to achieve a minimum of a "C" a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  6. A student may only enroll in any EXS or ATC prefix course a maximum of two times.  Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade.  Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Applied Exercise Science Program students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the exercise sciences including: anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology, Kinesiology and biomechanics, ECG interpretation, exercise testing and prescription, motor learning and nutrition.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of and clinical proficiency in the following content areas for both apparently healthy and chronic disease populations: a) pre-participation screening/ health risk appraisal and stratification, b) fitness assessment and evaluation c) the design of individually tailored exercise prescription, d) appropriate exercise techniques.
  3. Recognize the importance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of safe, high quality care within the health care system/exercise science field.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in both oral and written formats.
  5. Recognize the importance of ethically-grounded care for diverse clients, patients and/or athletes.
  6. Successfully challenge entry-level professional certification examinations from the American College of Sports Medicine and/or the National Strength and Conditioning Association.
  7. Participate in activities to promote life-long learning and professional development. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

The following criteria must be met for admission to the AES program:

1. A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including: chemistry (must include laboratory); biology (must include laboratory); mathematics (two mathematics courses - algebra required, geometry preferred); English (three years required - four years preferred).        

2. Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses.        

3. Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) scores must be submitted.        

4. A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding applicant's complete physical exam.

5. Complete the Common Application.

Also see Undergraduate Admissions.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Applied Mathematics

Contact

Michael Arciero (Chair)
marciero@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Applied Mathematics
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Mathematical Sciences is an integral part of the strong liberal arts tradition at the University of New England. We believe a student's education is enriched by studying mathematics, and our courses support the College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum. Our Applied Mathematics major and minor programs provide a solid foundation in contemporary mathematics which prepares students to pursue further study and careers in the mathematical sciences and other quantitative and analytical fields. The Department’s faculty mentor student research and are active in original scholarship. Through consulting and research collaborations, we are a resource for students and faculty across the University.

Major Description

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics provides a well-rounded, liberal arts-based education focused on the application of the mathematical sciences for inquiry and problem solving. The program places emphases on mathematical modeling and statistical methods, and project-based approaches. The curriculum integrates computational and theoretical approaches to enable students to experience both the power and the beauty of mathematics for problem-solving and exploration. This major gives students the quantitative and analytical skills to support careers in the sciences, business, finance, health, government, and many other fields. The program also prepares students for advanced study in the applied mathematical sciences. Students interested in a double major will find Applied Mathematics to be an excellent complement to majors in the natural sciences and other fields, as many fields continue to experience an increasing reliance on mathematics. 

Curricular Requirements

  Credits

CAS Core Requirements (excluding mathematics)

39-42
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 - Calculus I 4
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
MAT 200 - Calculus III 4
MAT 212 - Applied Discrete Mathematics 3
MAT 220 - Applied Linear Algebra 3
MAT 225 - Computer Programming w/ MATLAB 3
MAT 315 - Applied Mathematics w/ Differential Equations 3
MAT 321 - Applied Statistics I 3
MAT 323 - Applied Statistics II 3
MAT 400 - Real Analysis 3

MAT 480 - Mathematics Research Seminar* 

OR

MAT 490 Topics in Mathematics

3
Mathematics and/or Science electives at level 300 or above 6-8

Program Minimum Required Total Credits 

45-47
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120

*Students who are inclined toward and have demonstrated the potential for research will have the option to take MAT 480 Mathematics Research Seminar instead of MAT 490 Topics in Mathematics. 

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Math can complete a double major with Applied Mathematics and Secondary Education OR a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Applied Mathematics.  For more Information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Applied Mathematics major will:

  1. use  mathematical reasoning, modeling, and statistical methods to explore, represent, and communicate about quantitative relationships;
  2. apply quantitative methods to solve problems in a variety of disciplines;
  3. develop proficiency with computer algebra, statistical, and geometric software to investigate mathematical concepts and applications;
  4. prepare mathematical documents for dissemination in written and presentation formats;
  5. gain analytic and technological skills to support careers in mathematics and related areas, and graduate and professional study.

Minors

Students may earn a minor in Applied Mathematics by completing the following:

CREDITS

MAT 120 OR MAT 150 3
MAT 190 3
Four additional mathematics courses including: MAT 195 and/or any MAT course at a 200 level or above 12
TOTAL CREDITS 18

Students wishing to declare an Applied Mathematics minor should complete a course plan in consultation with a Mathematical Sciences faculty member.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred mathematics courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the mathematics courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Applied Social and Cultural Studies

Category
Contact

Dr. Samuel A. McReynolds

smcreynolds@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Applied Social and Cultural Studies
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Department of Society, Culture and Languages is to offer a vigorous and exciting broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics.  The department provides a combination of theoretical, scientific, practical and experiential approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture as well as hands on learning are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for careers in a variety of public and social services and/or for graduate study in related areas.

Major Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Applied Social and Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary degree which allows students to integrate coursework from sociology, anthropology, political science, psychology, communications and other related fields of study. The major core emphasizes social science methods and ways of knowing while introducing students to a variety of social science disciplines. Within the Applied Social and Cultural Studies degree, students will also pursue a concentration in one of the three particular content areas.

In addition to the interdisciplinary approaches to the social sciences, there are two unique elements to this program. First, students complete a 120 hour internship. This helps students to: engage in experiential learning, apply social science to the real world, under take career explorations. Second, upper level students participate in a semester-long applied sociological experience. One option is an internship with a minimum of 360 hours of engagement to be selected from a variety of area schools, agencies and programs. A second option is for a student to study abroad. While studying in a foreign society and culture is important, the primary focus is for students to take courses and engage experientially in a way that helps students develop their areas of interest. There needs to be an integrated social science experience that drives the study abroad learning as well as the opportunity to explore a new society and culture for this to be a successful experience.

Overall, this program will provide students with a strong foundation for understanding today's social issues and problems. The student will also have a wide range of skills and experiences that will enhance their future educational and career opportunities as well as enable them to be a more active and aware citizen.

Curricular Requirements

  CREDITS
CAS CORE REQUIREMENTS 42-46
  CREDITS
ASCL CORE  
Three (3) of the following four (4) courses:  
ANT 102 - Cultural Anthropology 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSC 105 - Introduction to Political Science 3
And:  
SOC 268 - Practice of Social Research 3
SOC 270 - Classical Social Theory OR 3
SOC 280 - Contemporary Social Theory  
SOC 300 - Internship 3
SOC 370 - Applied Field Methods 3
Total ASCL Core Credits 21
Applied Capstone Experience (See Details Below) 9-16
Concentration Credits (See Options Below) 12
Total Credits in Major 84-95
Open Electives (needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

Applied Capstone Experiences:

  1. Internship – students may take between 9 and 16 credits to complete this ACE. Students may select from over 800 sites in the departmental database. This learning opportunity should parallel the student’s concentration and help him/her to gain experience, skills and knowledge of how systems work and how to develop contacts in a given field.
  2. Thesis – students may take between 9 and 16 credits to complete this ACE. The thesis should build on the work the student has done in the ASCS major and his/her chosen concentration. This academic work should prepare them for graduate study in disciplines that have been incorporated into their concentration.
  3. Study Abroad – students will typically take 15-16 credits to complete a study abroad experience. While studying in a foreign society and culture is important, the primary focus is to take courses from the new institution that will help the student to develop his/her areas of interest as it relates to the major. In short, there needs to be an integrated social science experience that drives the study abroad learning as well as the opportunity to explore a new society and culture for this to be a successful experience. All study abroad experiences should first be cleared with the department chair to see if they qualify to meet the requirement for the Capstone.

Applied Concentration

There are three concentrations in the ASCS major. As soon as possible after arriving at UNE students should declare their major. By the end of their second year students should declare their concentration. There are no required courses in any concentration. In each concentration students, in consultation with their advisor, choose four courses from a variety of disciplines that will help them build foundations, skills, and develop expertise in their chosen concentration. These concentrations are:

Health, Medicine and Society          

Sample courses include (but are not limited to):

ANT 211 - Medical Anthropology
SOC 228 - The Sociology of Aging
SOC 275 - The Sociology of Food & Health
SOC 355 - Medical Sociology
PSY 235 - Health Psychology
PSC 325 - Politics and Public Health

Society, Human Services and Community

Sample courses include (but are not limited to):

SOC 215 - Poverty
SOC 320 - Community Organization
SOC 460 - Social Policy and Planning
SOC 480 - The Family
PSY 236 - Mental Health and Society
PSY 370 - Drugs, Society, and Behavior

Law, Crime and Society

Sample courses include (but are not limited to):

ANT 224 - Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights
SOC 170 - Deviance and Crime
SOC 333 - Sociology of Law
SOC 241 - A Just Society?
PSY 252 - Forensic Psychology
PSY 255 or 255G - Social Psychology
CMM 411 - Communication, Law, and Regulation

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

 

Learning Outcomes

  1. Expand the awareness and application of the sociological imagination and how it is applied in the anthropology field.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • describe how sociology and anthropology are distinct from other social sciences;
    • apply the sociological imagination to social phenomena;
    • apply anthropology to social phenomena.
  2. Emphasize the role of sociological and anthropological theory in social perspectives.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • describe the role of theory in building sociological and anthropological knowledge;
    • compare and contrast different theoretical perspectives;
    • apply these theories to social conditions.
  3.  Examine, apply, and critically assess the nature of evidence in sociology and anthropology.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • identify the basic methodological approaches in building sociological and anthropological  knowledge;
    • compare and contrast various research methodologies;
    • design and complete a written research project;
    • critically assess published research.
  4.  Apply and assess a wide range of data analysis.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • recognizes the role of data analysis in building sociological and anthropological knowledge and testing sociological theory;
    • use computer software for statistical analysis;
    • understand appropriate statistical techniques;
    • draw valid conclusions from the data analysis.
  5.  Examine how cultural and social structures operate.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • describe different social institutions and their various influences on the individual.
    • explain how the aforementioned institutions are interrelated;
    • evaluate them using sociological theory;
    • Explain the concept of culture and its influences on human condition.
  6.  Examine the diversity of human societies.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • describe the significance of variation by race, class, gender, religion and age;
    • explain patterns and variations using sociological and anthropological perspectives;
    •  justify policy recommendations to address social inequalities.
  7.  Communicate sociology and anthropology effectively.
    ​Students will be able to:
    • produce well written papers that clearly express sociological and anthropological knowledge;
    • clearly express sociological and anthropological knowledge in verbal presentations;
    • demonstrate critical thinking.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences

Contact

Dr. Jeri Fox
jfox@une.edu
or
Dr. Stine Brown
sbrown@une.edu

Or

The Marine Science Department in the College of Arts and Sciences.

 

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences
College
Sections

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history – at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age – students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems, and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies.  Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty.  Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them.  In addition, the biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience and experiential learning.  The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog.  Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences major provides students the opportunity to develop analytical skills in biology and business, and technical skills in the culture and maintenance of marine and freshwater organisms. Students who successfully complete the program should satisfy employment needs in the fields of marine and freshwater aquaculture and in the educational, maintenance and design needs of local, regional and national aquarium museums and businesses. Students who choose to go into graduate programs in these fields should be prepared to do so after maintaining an appropriate GPA in this program.

Curricular Requirements

  Credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-46

 

Credits

Program Required Courses

65-68

BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (credits included in core requirements)

 

BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular

4

BIO 200 - Human Genetics

OR

BIO 207 Organismal Genetics

4-5

BIO 204 - Parasitology

4

BIO 221 - Principles of Aquaculture

3

BIO 222 - Techniques in Finfish and Shellfish Culture

4

BIO 223 - Health, Nutrition and Feeding of Cultured Organisms

4

BIO 232 - Microbiology

OR

BIO 234 Environmental Microbiology

4

MAR 250 - Marine Biology

4

BIO 323 - Principles of Aquarium Operations and Science

4

MAR 325 - Marine Science Speaker Series

1

BIO 495 - Advanced Biological Internship 6

Topic Area Program Required Courses (to be selected in consultation with advisor):

 

One Cellular and Molecular Topic Area course

3-4

One Ecology/Evolutionary Biology Topic Area course

3-4

Science and Mathematics Required Courses:

 

CHE 110 - Chemistry I

4

CHE 111 - Chemistry II

4

MAT 150 - Statistics for Life Sciences

3

Business Administration Required Courses:

 

BUMG 200 or BUMG 200G - Management

3

BUFI 302 - Personal Finance

3

Open elective courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)

variable

Highly Recommended Elective Credits:

 

CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis

EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design

SPC 100 - Effective Public Speaking

 

Minimum Required Total Credits

120

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biological Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology or Department of Marine Sciences.

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

A.  Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas:

Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life - including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, and reproduction.

  • Organismal Diversity - including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
  • Interrelations of Organisms and their Environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.

B.  Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:

  • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
  • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
  • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).

C.  Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:

  • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
  • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
  • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.

Minor

A biology minor requires 6 biology courses, including the Introductory Biology series. In particular, department of biological sciences majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences Minor Required Courses

BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution 

and
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular

Or

BIO 104 - General Biology and one of the following:
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution

or
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular

And
BIO 221 - Principles of Aquaculture
BIO 222 - Finfish/Shellfish Culture Techniques
BIO 223 - Health/Nutrition/Feeding Cultured Organisms
BIO 323 - Principles of Aquarium Operations Science

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Art

Category
Contact

Stephen Burt

sburt@une.edu

Department
Degree name
Minor in Art
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Arts develops intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills through an active hands-on curriculum. While imparting foundational expressive skills, the program encourages students to expand their conceptual and perceptual capabilities and make connections between their personal experience and art, science, social science, and the environment. 

Curricular Requirements

A student with a major in another department may minor in Art with the permission of the Department of Arts Chair This minor provides an in-depth introduction to studio art in both traditional and contemporary practice. Eighteen credit hours as listed are required

  CREDITS
ART 100 - Drawing I 3
ART 101 - Watercolor 3
ART 104 - Painting OR 3
ART 106 - Two-Dimensional Design  
ART 110 - Ceramics OR 3
ART 113 - 3D Fundamentals  
One Studio Elective 3
One 200 Level Studio Elective 3
Any ARH Art History Course 3
Total Credits 18

Academic and Technical Standards

No course grade below C (2.0) in a content area will be accepted towards degree completion. If a grade below C is attained in a required arts course, that course must be retaken until at least a C is received for degree credit. 

Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes for the Art Minor.

The art minor introduces students to the understanding of materials, processes and their application. Students learn to think both concretely and intuitively through hands on experiences. Instructors provide historical and contemporary models to convey these concepts. Learning through the visual arts allows students to acquire a variety of separate but interrelated concepts and skills:

The following seven categories list the outcomes for students enrolled in the art minor. These categories are listed separately but are interrelated concepts and skills. Correlations to CAS core values/methodologies are listed under each heading in italics.

1. CREATIVE/COMPOSITIONAL METHODS- Graphic and Symbolic Communication-Artistic Expression.

Courses emphasize expressing creativity while learning the fundamentals of composition and design in creating works in the studio. Students will be able to demonstrate clear methods of composition and design.

2. CRAFTSMANSHIP- Directed and Engaged Learning, Artistic Expression

Students will be able to determine and demonstrate standards of craftsmanship.

3. CREATIVE PROCESS-Expand Expressive Capabilities, Experiential Learning.

Students will know and be able to demonstrate concrete methods and processes for research and the creation of work in the studio.

4. PERSONAL VOICE-Expressive Capabilities.

Students will develop work that has a distinct personal voice and utilizes their interests and experiences.

5. CRITICAL THINKING- Develop Skillful Thinking

Students will learn methods to critique and discuss works of art as well as be introduced to skills in writing about art.

6. ART HISTORICAL PLACEMENT- Acquire Knowledge (and Context)

Students will be introduced to historical and contemporary styles and strategies of expression and use some of this knowledge to create works of art.

7. INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY- Connections to the Outside World-both Personal and Interpersonal.

Students will be encouraged to link their study of art with other disciplines and have the opportunity to create work that expresses their personal backgrounds and interests.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Art Education K-12

Category
Contact

Stephen Burt (Chair, Department of Arts)

sburt@une.edu

 

Lane Clarke (Chair, Education Department)

lclarke1@une.edu

Department
Degree name
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Art Education
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Arts is staffed by a community of professional artists with national reputations. The mission of the faculty is to nurture and encourage students' individual growth, development and expression while preparing them to pursue a professional career.  After a firm grounding in the foundations, students are mentored in the development of an original body of work in their preferred medium.

Major Description

The Department of Arts in collaboration with the Department of Education offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in art education. Staffed by professional scholars and artists with national reputations, students learn the theory and practice of education as well as effective educational strategies that prepare them as elementary and secondary teachers. Through in-depth study in the studio, culminating in an exhibition of their personal work developed in the Studio Concentration Seminar students will gain a strong understanding of the artistic process and their own expressive capabilities. Students will leave the program as skilled and confident advocates for the arts with Maine state teaching certification (levels K-12) in the visual arts.

Curricular Requirements

  credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-46
  Credits
Required Art Courses  
ART 100 - Drawing I 3
ART 104 - Painting I 3
ART 106 - Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 113 - Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 200 - Advanced Drawing 3
ARH 210 - Art History Survey I 3
ARH 211 - Art History Survey II 3

ARH 260 - Renaissance and Baroque Art

OR 

ARH 270 - Art in the Modern World

3
ART 395 - Studio Concentration Seminar 3
ART Elective 3
One additional courses in studio arts (ART 200-499) 3
Art Minimum Required Total Credits 36
   
Required Education Courses  
EDU 105 - Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110- 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum & Assessment 3
SPE 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 385 - Diversity and Social Justice 3
EDU 382- Literacy Research-Based Instructional Methods 3
EDU 441 - Methods of Art Education 3
EDU 488 - Secondary or Art Ed Practicum 3
EDU 498 - Secondary Education Internship and Seminar 12
EDU 405- Inclusive Methods and Data Based Decision Making 3
Education Minimum Required Total Credits 39
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)  120

FIELD EXPERIENCE
The faculty in the Department of Education are committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific competency-based focus to meet the Maine standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in teacher preparation will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, the teaching of lessons, conducting of experiments, administration of assessments, etc.). Transportation to and from schools is the responsibility of the student. 

INTERNSHIP
Without specific permission from the Education Department Chair, courses may not be taken during the internship semester, so all required coursework must be completed the semester prior to the internship. Admission to the internship is not guaranteed (see section on “Admission requirements and successful progression in the program”). In addition, the student should have:

  1. Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  2. Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  3. Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  4. Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  5. Understanding of and empathy for working with students.
  6. No serious reservations identified on the Student Assessment of Professional Attributes (SAPA) instrument.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer. Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects both schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the InTASC standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Department of Education, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests. The 15 week student teaching experience must be done in a local Maine Public School that is in an established internship protocol with the University of New England. 

 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR REVIEW BOARD (PERB)

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence with respect to InTASC Standards before the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB). The Board is comprised of professional educators from area schools as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a portfolio reflecting their proficiency in meeting these state standards and present and defend the portfolio in front of the Board. Passing the PERB is a requirement for completion of the certification program and subsequently being recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes for the Art Education Program conform to the InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards and Learning Progressions for Teachers adopted by the State of Maine. These are listed below.

 Additionally the Studio Art component of the program has its own guidelines and specific outcomes.

Teacher Certification Standards as defined by InTASC

Standard One: Learner Development: The teacher understands how students learn and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

Standard Two: Learning Differences: The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that allow each learner to reach his/her full potential.

Standard Three:  Learning Environments: The teacher works with learners to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.

Standard Four:  Content Knowledge: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners

Standard Five:  Innovative Applications of Content: The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical/creative thinking and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard Six:  Assessment: The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to document learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s on-going planning and instruction.

Standard Seven:  Planning for Instruction: The teacher draws upon knowledge of content areas, cross-disciplinary skills, learners, the community, and pedagogy to plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals.

Standard Eight:  Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to access and appropriately apply information.

Standard Nine:  Reflection and Continuous Growth: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students,  families,  and  other  professionals  in  the  learning  community),  and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Standard Ten:  Collaboration: The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Standard   Eleven:   Technology Standards for Teachers - (NETS.T): Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for   Students   (NETS•S)   as   they   design,   implement,   and   assess   learning experiences  to  engage  students  and  improve  learning;  enrich  professional practice;   and   provide   positive   models   for   students,   colleagues,   and   the community. All teachers will meet the following standards and performance indicators.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Candidates for all undergraduate education programs not already possessing a bachelor’s degree must meet the core requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the requirements for their major. Elementary/middle certification requirements for the major rests solely within the Department of Education. Secondary certification students and art education students must meet two sets of major requirements involving their content major as well as the requirements for professional certification. 

Each undergraduate student will be reviewed for admission to advanced standing when s/he has completed approximately 60 credit hours. Advanced standing is earned by achieving minimums of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in professional education courses with no course grade below a C; 3.0 in content area classes for those pursuing secondary or art education certification; and a 2.5 cumulative grade point average across all courses including the core curriculum and electives. Grade point averages will be calculated using only courses taken at UNE (the cumulative grade point average) and using transfer courses if accepted as a part of the professional program (the cumulative professional grade point average). Students who do not meet these grade-point average requirements must improve their grade-point average before continuing in education courses, or change their major to Education Studies. If a grade below C- is attained in a professional education course, that course must be retaken until at least a C- is received before additional education courses can be taken.

At the time of the 60-credit review, students must pass the Praxis I Core Academic Skills for Educators using the state of Maine minimum scores. Undergraduate transfer students who bring in more than 60 transfer credits have up to one semester to pass Praxis I. If Praxis I is not passed at the time of these deadlines, the student must change his/her major to Educational Studies. 

No student will be able to student teach without showing evidence of passing PRAXIS II. All students must show evidence of passing Praxis II before the internship application deadline, which is February 1st for a Fall internship and October 1st for a Spring internship. Students who can not show evidence of passing all sections of PRAXIS II are required to change their major to Educational Studies.

Students may obtain PRAXIS I registration information and Praxis II registration information from the Department of Education office or from the Educational Testing Service website: www.ets.org.

In addition to these achievement requirements, students admitted to UNE's teacher education programs are assessed systematically for the purpose of determining their professionalism and suitability for teaching. Students complete self-assessment SAPA each semester through advising and these are reviewed by faculty. If serious reservations arise, a committee will convene to determine a student’s continuance in the program. Finally, students must pass the Professional Education Review Board (referenced later in this section of the catalog) at which competency in the InTASC teaching standards must be shown.

All certification coursework including the internship should be completed within a five-year timeframe. A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of course work. Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised plan program in order to meet state certification regulations.

COURSE WITHDRAWAL POLICY

In the fall, spring, and summer semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete (I) grade may be given by the instructor to a student, who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The Incomplete grade must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days following the end of an eight-week session. Until changed, the Incomplete grade defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the deadline date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative F grade for the course. Once an Incomplete grade is removed, academic standing will be updated according to dean's list, good standing or probationary standards.

COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS

All coursework, including the internship, should be completed within a five-year timeframe.  A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of course work.  Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five-year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised program plan, in order to meet state certification regulations.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog. 

Art Therapy

Category
Contact

Stephen Burt, Chair, Department of Arts
sburt@une.edu

Dr. Trish Long, Chair, Department of Psychology
plong3@une.edu

Department
Degree name
Minor in Art Therapy
College
Sections

Minor Description

The Department of Psychology and the Department of Arts jointly offer a Minor in Art Therapy. Art Therapy in a burgeoning field that draws from the disciplines of psychology, art, and other creative process to promote healing and overall well-being for individuals with mental and physical disabilities. The minor provides a basic foundation for continued study or for work in community art programs and organizations where art is used as part of the therapeutic process.  The permission of the chair in either the Department of Arts or the Department of Psychology is required.

Curricular Requirements

A student with GPA of at least 2.25 and a major at UNE may minor in Art Therapy with the approval of the Chair of the Department of Psychology or the Department of Arts.  Declarations must occur prior to the completion of the first semester of the junior year. Major programs of study with significant course overlap with art therapy minor requirements may be disallowed by the chair. 

The minor in Art Therapy requires a total of 21 credits (12 from the Psychology Department and 9 from the Department of Arts) with a minimum grade of "C-" in each course. Courses may not be used to fulfill both major and minor requirements. For example, students who must complete PSY 205, Abnormal Psychology, as part of their major may not also use this course to fulfill the Art Therapy requirement.  Those students should instead complete either PSY 295, Listening and Communication Skills, or PSY 310, Children and Stress.

  CREDITS
Psychology Department 12
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 205 - Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 410 - Theories, Research and Practice of Counseling 3
PSY 430 - Introduction to Art Therapy 3
   
Department of Arts 9
ART 100  - Drawing I 3
ART 201 - Painting I 3
One of the following courses:  
ART 110 - Ceramics 3
ART 113 - Sculpture 3
   
In the event that the above courses have been taken to fulfill requirements for the Art Education major or an art minor, students will be required to take 9 credits from the following list:  
ART 102 - Photography 3
ART 103 - Introduction to Image Capture 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 199 - Art Topics Course 3
ART 204 - Painting II 3
ART 214 - Digital Photography 3
ART 230 - Graphic Design 3
Minimum Required Total Credits 21

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Art and Design Media

Category
Contact

Stephen Burt (Chair, Department of Arts)

(207) 602-2193
sburt@une.edu

Deb Dewitt

Administrative Assistant

(207) 602-2193

ddewitt@une.edu

 

Department
Degree name
Bachelor of Arts with a major Art and Design Media
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Arts is staffed by a community of professional artists with national reputations. The mission of the faculty is to nurture and encourage students' individual growth, development and expression while preparing them to pursue a professional career.  After a firm grounding in the foundations, students are mentored in the development of an original body of work in their preferred medium.

Major Description

Major Description

The Department of Arts offers a Bachelor of Arts in Art and Design Media.

The Art and Design Media course of study develops intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills through an active hands-on curriculum taught by professional scholars and artists. While imparting foundational expressive skills in traditional art media, the program encourages students to expand their conceptual and perceptual capabilities and receive training in current technological media that both support the traditional arts and are essential tools in contemporary society.

Developing connections between their personal experience and art, science, social science, and the environment is an important part of the program and is emphasized in a year-long concentration seminar experience (required of all majors) where students choose an area of focus ranging from traditional arts such as painting and ceramics to video production.  Majors will gain a strong understanding of the creative process and their own expressive capabilities culminating in an exhibition of their personal creative work. Whether planning a career in the arts or developing innovative interdisciplinary work in a double major, the Art and Design Media program will build diverse strengths and skills for the 21st century student.

Program Description

The Art and Design Media program stresses students' acquisition of skills that represent appropriate professional practices and a clear understanding of how to evaluate their own work for accuracy, expression and clarity. Among these skills students will develop experience in and knowledge of:

  • Creative and compositional methods across media.
  • The creative process starting from initial sketches and outlines to the finished work. Problem solving is intrinsic to this process.
  • The development of their personal voice through intensive study in the senior capstone year.
  • The link between concept and media.
  • Art history with an emphasis on contemporary practice in Western and Non-Western worlds.
  • Critical thinking and aesthetic assessment both verbal and written.

The program provides students with hands on experience with the tools and latest technologies used in the arts professions in which they will work. They study and learn to:

  • Appreciate, understand and utilize methods of craftsmanship in a variety of media.
  • Develop their knowledge and abilities in graphic and web design, commercially viable skills with broad applicability.
  • Develop working knowledge of the gallery and museum world.

Students are encouraged to link their study of art with other disciplines and have the opportunity to create work that expresses their personal backgrounds and interests. The 36 credits required of an art media major allows them the possibility to double major in English, History, Liberal Studies, Political Science, Math and Psychology.

Students can also take (3 credit) internships in art and/or communications organizations as part of their course of study. Faculty will work with interested students to facilitate this option.

Curricular Requirements

  credits

CAS Core Curriculum

42-46
  Credits
Program Required Courses 30
ART 104 - Painting I 3
ART 118 - Drawing/Design Fundamentals 3
ART 113 - Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 232 - Graphic Design for the Working World 3
ART 200 - Advanced Drawing 3
ART 395 - Studio Concentration Seminar 3
ART 495 - Exhibition Concentration Seminar 3
ARH 222 - Contemporary Currents 3
CMM 302 - Fundamentals of Web Design 3
And one of the following:  
ARH 210 - Art History Survey I or
ARH 211 - Art History Survey II or
ARH 270 - Art in the Modern World
3
ART/CMM Electives
See elective options below
6
   
Electives Options I (choose one)  
ART 101 - Watercolor 3
ART 102 - Photography 3
ART 110 - Ceramics 3
ART 114 - Printmaking 3
ART 199 - Topics Course (any media) 3
   
Electives Options II (choose one)  
ART 214 - Color Digital Photography 3
ART 230 - Graphic Design 3

ART 234 - Animation with Adobe Flash

3
ART 299 - Topics Course (any media) 3
ART 401 - Arts Internship 3
CMM 311 - Digital Video and Audio Production 3
CMM 300 - Photo and Video Documentation 3
CMM 430 - Internship in Communication 3
Program Minimum Required Credits 36
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

No course grade below C (2.0) in a content area will be accepted towards degree completion. If a grade below C is attained in a required arts course, that course must be retaken until at least a C is received for degree credit. 

Suggested Progression for Art and Media Majors

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Learning Outcomes

  1. The program will stress the student’s acquisition of skills that represent appropriate professional practices as well as a clear understanding of how to evaluate their own work for accuracy, expression and clarity. Among these skills students will develop experience in and knowledge of:
    • Creative and compositional methods across media.
    • The creative process starting from initial sketches and outlines to the finished work. Problem solving is intrinsic to this process.
    • The development of their personal voice through intensive study in the senior capstone year. The link between concept and media.
    • Art history with an emphasis on contemporary practice in Western and Non-Western worlds.
    • Critical thinking and aesthetic assessment both verbal and written.
  2. Courses in the creative arts introduce understanding of materials, processes and their application. The program will provide students with hands on experience with the tools and latest technologies used in the arts professions in which they will work.
    • They will study and learn to:
      • Appreciate, understand and utilize methods of craftsmanship in a variety of media.
      • Develop their knowledge and abilities in graphic and web design, commercially viable skills with broad applicability.
      • Develop working knowledge of the gallery and museum world.
  3. Students will be encouraged to link their study of art with other disciplines and have the opportunity to create work that expresses their personal backgrounds and interests. The number of credits required of an art media major will allow them the possibility to double major in English, History, Liberal Studies, Political Science, Math, Psychology, along with the proposed Co-Major in Documentary Studies.
    • Students can also take internships in art and/or communications organizations as part of their course of study. Faculty will work with interested students to facilitate this option.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

 

Biochemistry

Category
Contact

John Stubbs

jstubbs@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Biochemistry
College
Sections

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science, and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. To understand living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, chemistry/secondary education, biochemistry and laboratory science, and minors in chemistry and biophysics, the department fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics.  Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in biochemistry, with its balanced curriculum, assures that each student will achieve a substantial foundation in the other major chemical subdisciplines, including analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical chemistry. This major is a good choice for students who are especially interested in studying the applications of chemistry in biological systems. With appropriate choice of courses, graduates will be prepared for entry into graduate programs in chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and many other fields that rely on chemistry as a fundamental science. Students wishing to enter the job market immediately after completion of their degree program have available to them a wide range of career opportunities in both the public and private sectors. Graduates will be especially well-prepared for entry-level positions in the rapidly growing biotechnology industry.

Curricular Requirements

  credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-46
  Credits
Program Required Courses 58-59
BIO 105 - Biology I (credits included in core requirements)  
BIO 106 - Biology II 4

BIO 200 - Genetics

OR

BIO 207 Organismal Genetics

4-5
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3
CHE 150- University General Chemistry I** 4
CHE 151 - University General Chemistry II** 4
CHE 250  - University Organic Chemistry I** 5
CHE 251  - University Organic Chemistry II** 5
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5

CHE 327 - Applied Physical Chemistry

OR

CHE 371

3
CHE 350 - Biochemistry I: Proteins 5
CHE 351 - Biochemistry II: Metabolism and Bioenergetics 3
CHE 401 - Chemistry Seminar 1
MAT 190 - Calculus I (credits included in core requirements)  
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
PHY 210  - University Physics I** 4
PHY 211  - University Physics II** 4
** The following substitutions may be made with department advisor permission: CHE 110 for CHE 150; CHE 111 for CHE 151; CHE 210 or CHE 210G for CHE 250; CHE 211 or CHE 211G for CHE 251; PHY 110 for PHY 210; and/or PHY 111 for PHY 211.  

Flexible Program Required Courses:  

 
One of the Following:  

CHE 309

OR

CHE 375

OR

CHE 450

2-4
A Minimum of Two of the Following:  

CHE 280 - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

3

CHE 320 - Mechanistic Organic Chemistry

3

CHE 370 - Physical Chemistry I

4

CHE 380 - Inorganic Chemistry

3

CHE 405 - Medicinal Chemistry

3

CHE 410 - Research I

1-4

CHE 411 - Research II

1-4

CHE 420 - Spectro Method Struct Analysis

3

Minimum Flexible Required Credits*

9

Minimum Program Credits 

67-68

Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits)

variable

Minimum Required Total Credits 

120

*No more than 3 credits of which may be CHE 410 and CHE 411.  Consult with your academic advisor for approval of advanced CHE courses not listed below.

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in biochemistry, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to describe and apply advanced biochemical information and concepts.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe and ethical laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate biochemical information in both oral and written forms.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Preferred conditions for entry into the biochemistry major are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry and physics. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Biological Sciences

Contact

Dr. Stine Brown

sbrown@une.edu

or

Dr. Steven Travis

stravis@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Biological Sciences
College
Sections

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history – at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age – students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems, and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies. Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty. Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them. In addition, the biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience and experiential learning. The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog. Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The Biological Sciences major provides a broad background for students interested in biology. The core program is flexible, thereby permitting the student latitude in the area of emphasis. Although students are not required to choose a concentration within the major, two options are available:  Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB); and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB).  A goal of the major is to provide students with the necessary background for entry-level career positions and graduate study.

The department also offers Biological Sciences majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7 - 12) in the area of life science.

Curricular Requirements

  Credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-46
Biological Sciences Core Program Required Courses 20-25
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (credits included in core requirements)  
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4

BIO 200 - Human Genetics

OR

BIO 207 Organismal Genetics

(EEB Concentration requires BIO 207 OR Cellular & Molecular Area Course OR Physiology Area Course)

4-5

BIO 400 or a 400 level or higher BIO capstone course (not satisfied by Internship/Research/Speaker Series)

(MCDB Concentration options include BIO 430 or BIO 450)

(EEB Concentration options include BIO 450 or BIO 460)

3-4
Topic Areas- (to be selected in consultation with advisor) See below*  

Cellular and Molecular area

(Only if no Concentration is chosen)

3-4
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology area 

(Students with an EEB concentration have the option of replacing their EEB area requirement with a second Organismal Biology area course)

3-4
Organismal Biology area 3-4

Biological Sciences Program Required Science and Mathematics Courses

32-33
Chemistry  

CHE 110 - General Chemistry I

4

CHE 111 - General Chemistry II

4

CHE 210 or 210G - Organic Chemistry I

5

CHE 211 or 211G - Organic Chemistry II 

OR

CHE 310 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry

4-5
Mathematics  

MAT 150-Statistics for Life Sciences

3

MAT 190 - Calculus I

4
Physics  

PHY 110 - Physics I and

4

PHY 111 - Physics II

4

Or

 

PHY 210 - University Physics I and

4

PHY 211 - University Physics II

4

Biological Sciences Program Concentration Required Courses 

(See Concentration Tab below for Course List)

6-7
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Topic Area Courses

  Credits

Cellular & Molecular Area

(BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on subject matter and advisor permission.)

 
BIO 203 - Histology 4
BIO 365 - Immunology 3
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3
   

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Area

(BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on subject matter and advisor permission.)

 
BIO 328 - Human Evolution 3
BIO 333 - Evolution 3
MAR 335 - Animal/Behavioral Ecology 4
BIO 350 - Ecology 4
   

Organismal Biology Area

(BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on subject matter and advisor permission.)

 
BIO 204 - Parasitology 4

BIO 232 - Microbiology

OR

BIO 234 - Environmental Microbiology

4
BIO 254 - Medicinal Plant Biology 3
BIO 306 - Virology 3
MAR 310 - Phycology 4
BIO 319 - Ornithology 4
MAR 320 - Invertebrate Zoology 4
BIO 330 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4
MAR 331 - Biology of Fishes 4
MAR 355 - Biology of Marine Mammals 4
MAR 375 - Biology of Sharks, Skates and Rays 4
   
Physiology Area  
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology 3

Additional Guidelines


Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Life Science can complete a double major with Biological Sciences and Secondary Education OR a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Biological Sciences.  For more Information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

 

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology.

 

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

https://www.une.edu/cas/programs/pre-health-graduate-school-preparation-tracks-non-degree

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

A.  Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas:

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life - including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, and reproduction.
  • Organismal Diversity - including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
  • Interrelations of Organisms and their Environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.

B.  Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:

  • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
  • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
  • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).

C.  Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:

  • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
  • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
  • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.

Minor

A biology minor requires 6 biology courses, including the Introductory Biology series.  In particular, Department of Biology majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Minor Required Courses
BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
Or
BIO 104 - General Biology and one of:

BIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution or
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular
 
And
One Organismal Biology Area course
One Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Area course
One Cellular & Molecular Area course
One additional Biology course

Concentrations

Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology (MCDB) Concentration Credits
BIO 370- Cell & Molecular Biology 3
BIO 407- Developmental Biology 3
   
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (EEB) Concentration Credits
BIO 333- Evolution 3
BIO 350- Ecology 4

 

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Biophysics

Category
Contact

John Stubbs

jstubbs@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Biophysics
College
Sections

Minor Description

The biophysics minor builds on the foundations of Physics I and Physics II to create a comprehensive understanding of how the laws of physics apply to organisms, explored from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view.  With its organismal focus, and relationship to modern technology, this minor is well-suited to complement majors in Biology, Medical Biology, and Marine Science, in addition to Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, and Pre-Pharmacy programs of study.    

Curricular Requirements

Biophysics Minor: The biophysics minor requires eighteen hours of coursework

Required Courses

Credits

PHY

210*

University Physics I

4

PHY

211*

University Physics II

4

PHY

220

Medical Physics OR

          

PHY 310

Biophysics: Structure & Motion OR

 
PHY 410

Topics in Physics

4
       

Elective courses**

 

   PHY   208 Energy and Climate Change 3
   PHY    209 Computational Physics 3
   PHY    220 Medical Physics 4
  PHY   305 Revolutions of 20th Century Physics  3

PHY

306

Math Methods of Modern Physics

1

PHY

310

Biophysics: Structure & Motion

3

   PHY    410 Topics in Physics 3-4

*PHY 110/111 accepted with permission

**With permission, either MAR 368 (Advanced Oceanography II: Phy/Che, 3 credits) or CHE 370 (Physical Chemistry I, 4 credits) can be substituted for one elective course.    Students can receive elective credit for either PHY 305 or CHE 370.    

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to describe basic physical, biophysical, and biomechanics concepts
  • Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of physical processes/instrumentation used to investigate biophysical and biomechanical phenomena
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate scientific information in both oral and written forms
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Business Administration

Contact

Tami Gower

tgower@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Department of Business is to provide experienced, skilled and supportive faculty who offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in and face the challenges of an ever-changing world. More specifically, the department strives:

  • to prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in business, not-for-profit organizations and society in general;
  • to develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems;
  • to prepare students to speak and present in front of various audiences in an articulate and compelling manner;
  • to help students achieve their personal and career goals; and
  • to prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level.

Major Description

The Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration is designed to work together with the University's liberal arts core curriculum to achieve the following goals:

  • to facilitate students' acquisition of  basic business knowledge in the functional areas of business including, but not limited to, accounting, business law, economics, finance, management, and marketing;
  • to facilitate students' acquisition of technical skills and competencies in  quantitative techniques;
  • to provide students with the opportunity to focus their business studies by selecting  one of six concentrations: Management, Marketing, Economics, International Business, Social Entrepreneurship or Health Sector Management.
  • to provide experiential opportunities, including at least one credit-bearing internship, to hone students' skills and facilitate their career exploration and professional job search;
  • to facilitate students' ability to integrate their knowledge of the functional areas of business with their technical skills and competencies and their professional experiences and to apply that knowledge and those skills.

Curricular Requirements

 

CREDITS

CAS CORE REQUIREMENTS (INCLUDES MAT 120)

42-46

Program Required Courses

(All Course Numbers ending in 'G' offered in Seville Spain)

45

BUAC 201 or 201G - Financial Accounting

3

BUAC 203 or 203G - Managerial Accounting

3

BUEC 203  or 203G - Macroeconomics

3

BUEC 204 or 204G - Microeconomics

3

BUFI 315 or 315G - Business Finance Concepts &  Skills

3

BUMG 200 or 200G- Management

3

BUMG 302 or 302G - Human Resource Management

3

BUMG 311 - Business and Society Relations

3

BUMG 325 - Legal Environment of Business

3

BUMG 335 or 335G  - International Management

3

BUMG 495A - Internship in Business Administration

3

BUMG 498 - Strategic Management

3

BUMK 200 - Marketing

3

BUMK 312 or 312G - Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management

3

MAT 110 or 110G - Quantitative Reasoning

3

Business Elective Required Courses (Concentration)

15-16

See Concentration Tab Below

 
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

Academic and Technical Standards

  1. Business majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all Business Core required courses, , business concentration courses and business elective courses.
  2. Business minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all four required courses and the two business elective courses.

Accreditation

All degree programs offered by the Department of Business are accredited by The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).  The Business Administration Degree Program in the Department of Business is additionally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Learning Outcomes

Department of Business Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing in application of concepts and theories. 
  2. Demonstrate effective skills in written and oral communications using appropriate technologies.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to integrate the concepts of the core areas of business.
  4. Demonstrate awareness to the importance of the ethical requirements of business activities.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to conduct methodological, secondary research into business issues, which may relate to general business or to a specific business function, which requires familiarity with a range of data, research sources and appropriate methodologies.

Concentration Learning Outcomes

The Management Concentration covers the organizational, operational and sales aspects of management, as well as introduces non-profit management techniques.

Upon completing the concentration in Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an ability to apply general Management know-how in practical business situations.
  2. Develop an understanding of business that reflects the moral responsibility of management to all relevant stakeholders and the natural environment.
  3. Understand the nature and dynamics of social behavior relating to organizational performance in order to develop strategies to become effective in organizations.

The Marketing Concentration focuses on developing strategic and tactical marketing skills, including those used in both digital media and global environments.

Upon completing the concentration in Marketing, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of how marketing initiatives by business and not-for-profit organizations impact society and the economy.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the strategic and tactical use of the primary decision making areas of marketing used by organizations.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of traditional and digital channels of distribution.
  4. Understand the uses of traditional and digital promotional methods.
  5. Understand the strategic importance of global marketing and be able to develop tactics for an organization’s global marketing thrusts.

The Economics Concentration focuses on understanding the impact of the economy on individuals, society and global business development.

Upon completing the concentration in Economics, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of economic thought regarding the incentives.
  2. Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  3. Demonstrate the assumptions and limitations of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  4. Understand the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using the Keynesian model.
  5. Understand the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economy development with reference to theory and empirical data.

The International Business Concentration focuses on understanding the role that cultural differences, globalization and worldwide trends play in the global marketplace.  A semester abroad is required.

Upon completing the concentration in International Business, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate detailed familiarity with the impact of the global economy on US businesses and organizations, utilizing appropriate terminology and concepts.
  2. Demonstrate comprehension of cultural differences in the conduct of business and/or daily life within major global markets during a study abroad experience.
  3. Demonstrate global awareness through an understanding of international business concepts and trends and an ability to internationalize domestically developed business methods and practices.

The Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship Concentration focuses on applying the concepts of sustainability to the creation of a new venture with triple bottom line responsibility and ecological value.

Upon completing the concentration in the Social Entrepreneurship, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding and the application of the concepts of social entrepreneurship and distinguish social entrepreneurship from traditional economic entrepreneurship as well as from sustainable entrepreneurship.
  2. Evaluate and articulate the rewards and risks of undertaking social entrepreneurship by measuring the economic, social and environmental risks and rewards (triple bottom line) of a new venture and measuring and comparing the short-term economic risks and returns of the venture with the long-term expected benefits.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the ecological problems facing local and global communities as well as the ability to recognize business opportunities for entrepreneurs that arise as a result of the trend of identifying and resolving those ecological problems; Undertake this demonstration by applying those skills necessary to investigate and evaluate all the various aspects of the business and policy environment that have an impact on social entrepreneurship decisions, including an evaluation of corporate behavior in the context of environmental and social goals.

The Health Sector Management Concentration focuses on understanding how U.S. healthcare policy and systems impact business in the health sector.

Upon completing the concentration in Health Sector Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to integrate core general management skills with sophisticated understanding of the institutions of the US health care sector.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of US health care economy and markets and those factors that significantly influence decision-making both at the policy level and at the level of the organization.
  3. Utilize the terminology and concepts of health sector systems such as governmental programs, managed care, and information management to recognize and explain the importance of cost, access and quality to providers, payers and vendors.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the legal systems and processes impacting healthcare, including governmental regulation, tort litigation and reform, non-discrimination and privacy legislation and access/equity of care movements in both the federal and state governments.

Minor(s)

Minor in Business Administration

A student pursuing a major other than Business Administration may, with the permission of the Business Department Chair, minor in Business Administration.

  Credits
Required Courses  
BUAC 201 or 201G - Financial Accounting 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMG 200 or 200G - Management 3
BUEC 204 or 204G - Microeconomics 3
Business Electives - 300 and 400 level courses 6
Total Credits  18

Concentrations

Concentration IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

A student in their sophomore year, in the Business Administration major may, with the permission of the Business Department Chair, enroll in one of the following concentrations.    

Management (any 15 credits from the following list of courses)

BUMG 301 - Organizational Behavior 3
BUMG 303 - Management of Non Profit Organizations  3
BUMG 360 - Leadership 3
BUMG 400 - Management Seminar  3
BUMK 405 - Sales Management

 3

BUMG 495B - Internship (with approved Management focus) 3

Marketing (15 credits from the following list of courses as specified)

BUMK 310 - Advertising 3
BUMK 335 or 335G - Global Marketing 3
BUMK 350 - Social Media Marketing Strategy 3
BUMK 400 - Marketing Seminar 3
BUMK 405 - Sales Management 3
BUMK 495B - Internship with approved Marketing focus) 3

Economics (15 credits from the following list of courses as specified)

BUEC 370 - Money, Credit & Banking 3
BUEC 375 - International Trade and Finance  3
BUEC 380 or 380G - Economic Development of the United States OR 3
BUEC 328G - European Union    OR  
BUEC 331G - Global Economy   OR  
BUEC 332G - Economic History   
BUEC 385 - Health Economics 3
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics 3
BUEC 399 - Economic Topics 3
BUMG 495B - Internship (with approved Economics focus) 3
PCS 332 - International Political Economy 3

International Business (15 credits from the following list of courses as specified)

BUMK 335 or 335G - Global Marketing   3
PCS 332 - International Political Economy   OR 3
BUEC 331G - Global Economy (SE)  
CMM 320 - Intercultural Communications  OR 3
SOC 206 - Cross Cultural Communications   
BUEC 375 - International Trade and Finance  OR 3
BUFI 346G - International Finance (SE)  OR  
BUFI 347G - International Financial Accounting  
BUMG 400 - Management Seminar  OR 3
PSC 240 - American Foreign Policy  OR  
PSC 320 - Global Organizations, Politics and Culture  OR  
PSC 409 - Origin of Modern Global Systems  OR  
SOC 255 - Globalization of Technology  OR  
SOC 377 - International Development  
BUMG 495B - Internship (with approved International Business focus) 3

Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship (15 credits from the following list of courses as specified) 

BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics 3
BUMG 410 - Creating Social Enterprises 4
BUMG 313 - Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship  OR 3
ENV 376 - Caribbean Sustainable Development OR  
BIO 421 -Conservation & Ecology of a Caribbean Island  OR  
ENV 348 - Environment, Health and Community Dev in East Africa (OR)  
BUMG 495B - Internship (with approved Social Entrepreneurship focus)  
ENG 317 - Proposal & Grant Writing  AND 3
BUMG  303 - Management of Non Profit Org  3
OR  
BUMG 315 Triple Bottom Line Reporting  AND 3
BUMG 307 Operation Management 3

Health Sector Management (All 9 credits from the following list and 2 other Department-approved courses.

BUEC 380 or 380G - Health Economics 3
BUMG 400 - Management Seminar  3
BUMG 495B - Internship (with approved Health Sector Management focus) 3

Individualized Concentration - 15 credits (with Advisor Approval)

BUEC 365 - Evolution of Economic Theory 3

BUEC 370 - Money Credit and Banking 

3

BUEC 375 - International Trade and Finance 

3

BUEC 380 - Economic Development of the United States

3

BUEC 385 - Health Economics

3

BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics

3

BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics

3

BUFI 302- Personal Finance

3
BUFI 321- Investment Management 3

BUFI 322 - Investments

3
BUMG 120 - Innovation through Technology 3
BUMG 295 - Business Internship 3

BUMG 301 - Organizational Behavior

3
BUMG 303 - Mgmt of Non-Profit Orgs 3
BUMG 309 - Hacking the Maine Food System 3

BUMG 313 - Social Entrepreneurship

3
BUMG 314 - Grant Writing 3
BUMG 315 - Triple Bottom Line Reporting 3

BUMG 328 - Employment Law

3

BUMG 360 - Leadership

3

BUMG 400 - Management Seminar

3

BUMG 410 - Creating Social Enterprises

4

BUMG 495B - Internship in Business Administration

3

BUMK 310 - Advertising

3

BUMK 335 - Global Marketing

3
BUMK 350 - Social Media Marketing Strategy 3

BUMK 405 - Sales Management

3
Courses Below offered in Seville Spain:  
BUEC 328G - European Union 3
BUEC 331G - Global Economy 3
BUEC 380G - Economic History 3
BUFI 346G - International Finance 3
BUFI 347G - International Financial Accounting 3
BUMG 310G - Organizational Theory 3
BUMK 335G - Global Marketing 3

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Chemistry

Contact

John Stubbs

jstubbs@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry
College
Sections

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science, and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. To understand living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, chemistry/secondary education, biochemistry and laboratory science, and minors in chemistry and biophysics, the department fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics. Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry stresses the important fundamental aspects of the discipline, including analytical chemistry, biochemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical chemistry. Classroom work in each of these essential areas is complemented with laboratory exercises designed to illustrate important chemical principles and provide students with hands-on experience in the important classical and instrumental techniques of chemistry. While the chemistry core courses provide both depth and breadth in the basic areas of chemistry, students also have the opportunity to study selected areas of modern chemistry more intensively in advanced elective courses and in undergraduate research. The department's courses stress the integration of theory and experiment, the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills, and the cultivation of oral and written communication skills. The department's faculty members are highly committed to undergraduate education in general and undergraduate research in particular. One of the strengths of the department's programs is the opportunity it provides for students to become involved in undergraduate research in collaboration with a faculty mentor.

The curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training. Students will be well prepared for entry into a variety of laboratory positions or for entry into graduate programs in many areas of science. Chemistry graduates typically are very well prepared for entry into professional programs such as medical, dental, or veterinary schools. The department is well equipped with modern laboratory instrumentation, available to students in laboratory courses and research projects.

Curricular Requirements

  credits

CAS Core Requirements

42-46
  Credits
Program Required Courses  
CHE 150 - University General Chemistry I 4
CHE 151 - University General Chemistry II 4
CHE 250 - University Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 251  - University Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 280/280L - Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 350 - Biochemistry I: Proteins 5
CHE 370 - Physical Chemistry I 4
CHE 371 - Physical Chemistry II 3
CHE 375 - Advanced Laboratory 2
CHE 401 - Seminar 1
CHE 407 - Instrumental Methods of Analysis 5
MAT 190 - Calculus I (credits included in core requirements)  
MAT 195 - Calculus II 4
MAT 200 - Calculus III 4
PHY 210 - University Physics I 4
PHY 211 - University Physics II 4

Additional program courses (Program Electives) 

Minimum one course (3 cr) from the following:

3
CHE 320 - Mechanistic Organic Chemistry (3 cr.)  
CHE 380 - Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)  
CHE 405 - Medicinal Chemistry (3 cr.)  
CHE 410 - Research I (1-4 cr.)  
CHE 420 - Spectroscopic Methods of Structural Analysis (3 cr.)

 

CHE 450 - Advanced Biochemistry Lab (3 cr.)  
 Minimum Program Credits 65
Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) variable
Minimum Required Total Credits  120

Students may substitute the following courses with department advisor permission: CHE 110 for CHE 150; CHE 111 for CHE 151; CHE 210 or CHE 210G for CHE 250; CHE 211 or CHE 211G for CHE 251; PHY 110  for PHY 210; and/or PHY 111 for PHY 211.

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Physical Science can complete a double major with Chemistry and Secondary Education OR a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Chemistry.  For more Information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in chemistry/secondary education, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to describe and apply advanced chemical information and concepts.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate chemical information in both oral and written forms.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.

Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in Chemistry with the permission of the Chemistry and Physics Department Chair.  Twenty-three hours of course work is required for the Minor in Chemistry as specified below. This minor indicates a significant level of accomplishment in the important foundation areas of Chemistry.

  Credits
Minor Required Courses 23
CHE 110 - General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111 - General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210 or CHE 210G  - Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 211 or CHE 211G- Organic Chemistry II 5
CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis 5`

The chemistry course grade point average must be maintained at 2.00 (C) or better.   The following course substitutions may be made with department advisor permission: CHE 150 for CHE 110; CHE 151 for CHE 111; CHE 250 for CHE 210 or CHE 210G; and/or CHE 251 for CHE 211 or CHE 211G.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Admissions

Preferred conditions for entry into the chemistry major are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry and physics. See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Climate Change Studies

Category
Degree name
Minor in Climate Change Studies
College
Sections

Mission

Climate change promises to be one the defining environmental and social problems of our lifetime, and the topic of climate change will grow ever more relevant as we move into the future. The interdisciplinary minor in Climate Change Studies is committed to educating tomorrow’s leaders in the science, impacts, and solutions to climate change.  This interdisciplinary program of study seeks to engage students with an understanding of climate change from diverse perspectives – scientific, political, psychological, economic, and ethical dimensions of the problem and its solutions - and prepare them for a myriad of professions that directly or indirectly relate to understanding, combating, and adapting to climate change.

Minor Description

The interdisciplinary minor in Climate Change Studies engages students in understanding climate change from diverse perspectives, helping them examine scientific, political, psychological, economic, and ethical dimensions of the problem and its solutions. It prepares them for a myriad of professions that directly or indirectly relate to understanding, combating, and adapting to climate change.

Curricular Requirements

A student with a major in the Department of Environmental Studies or another department may minor in Climate Change Studies with the approval of the Environmental Studies Department Chair. To complete this minor, students are expected to successfully complete the following course of study, totaling 18 credits:

Program Required Courses CREDITS
ENV 208 - Climate Change: Causes, Consequences, and Solutions 3
PHY 208 - Energy and Climate Change 3
SOC 227 - Climate Change and Society 3
One Course from each of the following 3 areas: Policy, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences & Humanities  
Policy:  
ENV 250 - Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
MAR 240 - Climate Change and the Sea: Impacts on Oceans and Coasts 3
MAR 316 - Science and Society 3

PSC 306 - Environmental Politics                  

3

PSC 201 - Introduction to International Relations         

3
Natural Sciences:  
ENV 318/318L - Advanced Field Methods in Avian Ecology and Conservation 4
ENV 328 - Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife, and Human Health 3
ENV 398 - Topics in Environmental Studies: Climate Change and Conservation 3
BIO 413 - Global Change Ecology 3
MAR 268/268L - Oceanography II: Physical and Chemical Oceanography 4
MAR 270/270L - Oceanography 4
MAR 460/560 - Global Change (Physical Science Basis) 3
MAR 464 - Polar Biology 3
Social Sciences and Humanities:  
BUEC 390 - Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 - Ecological Economics 3
ENV 321 - Environmental Communication: Expert Practices for Environmental Management 3
ENV 328 - Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife, and Human Health 3
ENV 340 - Environmental Movements and Social Change 3
ENV 344 - Environmental Ethics 3
ENV 357 - Sustaining Water: Social and Global Perspectives 3
PHI 202 - Ethics of Science and Technology 3
PHI 330 - Environmental Philosophy 3
PSC 320 - Global Politics and Culture 3

SOC 210 - Displaced Cultures and Society

3
Internship Opportunities (Optional): Internships may substitute for ONE of the above courses, subject to advisor and internship coordinator approval.  Internship must deal explicitly with some aspect of climate change science, mitigation, or adaptation.  
Internship 3+

* Course Designators vary by major and include but are not limited to ENV 295/495, PSY 300/400, PSC 411, SOC 300/400, SPT 395.

Academic and Technical Standards

Refer to students' major course of studies for academic and technical standards.

Learning Outcomes

After taking this course of study, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the issues and conflicts surrounding climate change from multiple perspectives, including scientific, geographic, political, economic, sociological, psychological, ethical, and cultural perspectives;
  2. Explain and quantify the impacts of climate change on human well-being and the natural world;
  3. Identify options for preventing further climate change (mitigation) and reducing impacts of change on human and natural systems (adaptation);
  4. Analyze and critique policy issues related to global warming;
  5. Apply a practical understanding of climate change impacts, mitigation, and adaptation to their professional work

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

The minor in Climate Change Studies is open to all students in the College of Arts and Sciences. Permission of the students' major advisor and the Climate Change Studies coordinator is required to enroll.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Coaching

Category
Contact

Paul Visich

pvisich@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Coaching
College
Sections

Minor Description

The athletic coaching minor is open to any undergraduate student at the University of New England. The minor is offered through the Westbrook College of Health professions and is directly administered through Department of Exercise and Sports Performance. The minor is interdisciplinary in nature and draws from courses from the Department of Sport and Recreational Management and Education. The minor provides a comprehensive and meaningful academic program for students wishing to pursue coaching at the youth and college level. The minor aims to provide expert knowledge following the eight domains from the National Standards for Sports Coaches: Philosophy and Ethics, Safety and Injury prevention, Physical Conditioning, Growth and Development, Teaching and Communication, Sport Skills and Tactics, Organization and Administration, and Evaluation.

Curricular Requirements

Required Courses (Total of 12 Credits) Credits
EXS 312 - Foundations in Coaching 3
EXS 360 - Coaching Practicum (Prerequisite EXS 312 and successful completion of coaching certification, CPR, and First Aid) 3
EXS 205 - Sports Physiology OR 

EXS 320 - Exercise Physiology (Prerequisite - 4 credit Laboratory Science course)

3
SPT 340 - Athletic and Sport Administration 3
   
Elective Courses, minimum of 2 courses (Total of 6 credits) from the list below:  
ATC 306/PSY 345 - Sport and Exercise Psychology 3
EXS 340 - Strength and Conditioning 3
EXS 180 - Motor Learning and Performance 3
EXS 310 - Biomechanics and Kinesiology 3
SRM 350 - Sport and Recreational Finance Management 3
SRM 360 - Leadership 3
SPT 330 - Sport Governance 3
EDU 202 - Curriculum and Assessment 3
EDU 220 - Exceptionality in the Classroom 3

Students are required to earn a minimum grade of a "C" in all courses with an ATC or EXS prefix. Students are only able to retake a course one time.

Students are required to pass a coaching certification and complete CPR and First Aid prior to taking the Coaching Practicum.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Communications

Contact

Joe Habraken

jhabraken@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Communications
College
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Communications Degree Program is to provide competent, supportive faculty and to offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in an ever-changing world. More specifically, the degree strives:

  • to prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in their chosen professions and society;
  • to develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems;
  • to help students achieve their personal and career goals; and
  • to prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level.

Curricular Requirements

  credits

CAS Core Requirements (includes mat 120)

42-46
  Credits
Program Required Courses 36
CMM 110 - Introduction to Communication 3
CMM 210 - Understanding Mass Media 3
CMM 211 - Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 220 - Organization/Communication 3
CMM 300 - Documentary Video 3
CMM 305 - Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
CMM 311 - Digital Video Production 3
CMM 320 - Intercultural Communications 3
CMM 410 - Writing for the Screen 3
CMM 411 - Communication Law and Regulation 3
CMM 416 - Global Communication 3
One of the Following  3
CMM 420 - Senior Project (3 cr.)  
CMM 430 - Internship (3 cr.)  
Additional Required Courses 12
CMM 122 - Oral Communication 3
CMM 201 - Digital Media Software Tools 3
BUMK 200 - Marketing 3
BUMK 310 - Advertising 3
Open Elective Courses 30
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

Academic and Technical Standards

  1. Communication majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all Communications required courses and all additional required courses.
  2. Communication minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in the two required courses and the four elective courses.

Learning Outcomes

The program goals of the Bachelor of Arts in Communications are strongly focused on providing our students with the oral, written, technical and critical thinking skills that are necessary for them to function effectively in the professional world and their personal lives. Learning outcomes for the degree relate to the teaching of communication skills and practices that extend across different communication contexts.  The learning outcomes listed here are built upon the core competencies that are inherent in each course required for the degree.

  1. Demonstrate oral communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Effectively speak in public settings.
    • Apply advance decision-making processes within groups.
    • Negotiate and collaborate effectively.
  2. Demonstrate written communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Write for specific purposes and situations.
    • Write informatively, persuasively and clearly.
  3. Use current technology related to the communication field effectively and ethically.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Use a range of applications software effectively.
    • Use communication technology effectively and ethically in a professional setting.
    • Understand the limitations of technology.
  4. Competently employ digital media in professional settings as an effective communication tool. Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Have a working knowledge of media story structure.
    • Create media content that communicates effectively using a variety of tools.
    • Contribute to the production of media content by serving in different roles and working effectively in teams.

Minor

The Minor in Communications examines questions about society, business and communication practices with critical attention to the newest media and computer-related technologies. Students will explore communications theory and also learn how to communicate effectively using a full range of media channels including new media technology. Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and evolution of communication and the role of societies and institutions in shaping communications.
  • Articulate and apply the theories and best practices for the use and presentation of images and digital information including audio and video.
  • Apply tools and technologies used in the communications professions.
  Credits
Required Courses  
CMM 110 - Introduction to Communication 3
CMM 210 - Understanding Mass Media 3
   
Elective Courses  
Select two of the following communication theory courses:   
CMM 220 - Organization/Communication 3
CMM 305 - Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
CMM 320 - Intercultural Communication 3
CMM 411 - Communication Law and Regulation 3
CMM 416 - Global Communication 3
   
Select two of the following communication practice courses:  
CMM 201 - Digital Media Software Tools 3
CMM 300 - Documentary Video 3
CMM 311 - Digital Video Production 3
CMM 410 - Writing for the Screen 3
Total Credits 18

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Admissions

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dental Hygiene

Category
Contact

Marji Harmer-Beem, RDH, MS, BS 
mharmerbeenm@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science with a major in Dental Hygiene
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Dental Hygiene endeavors to improve the oral health of individuals and communities by graduating students who place meaningful value on life-long learning, and who have the desire and motivation to achieve beyond their self-imposed limitations.  The faculty strives to stimulate student development of intellectual curiosity and professional expertise through collaborative participation in an academic environment that foster interprofessional education. 

The Department of Dental Hygiene faculty welcomes the opportunity to educate future oral hygienists in both the traditional and newly evolving skills required for entry into the profession.  The faculty also looks forward to developing professional qualities and leadership capabilities in each student by providing opportunities for critical thinking and logical decision-making.

Major Description

This dynamic 4-year program begins with the students becoming fully engaged during their first four semesters in the building of a foundation of knowledge in the sciences and liberal studies, while simultaneously being introduced to interrelated disciplines within the health professions. The students begin their academic experience on the Biddeford campus, which will provide them with the opportunity to enjoy full participation in clubs, seminars, sports and intercollegiate activities.

The last four semesters are delivered on the Portland campus where students are immersed in both the study of dental hygiene theory and professional clinical practice. Dental hygiene students will have the opportunity to engage in interprofessional educational experiences with students and faculty in undergraduate and graduate level health professions programs within the University setting. The dental hygiene baccalaureate program is designed to provide the student with expanded professional opportunities, therefore, skill development in the areas of critical thinking, ethical decision-making and leadership are enhanced.

Curricular Requirements

  Credits
Core Requirements  
BIO 104/104L - General Biology 4
BIO 208/208L - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 209/209L- or 209G/209LG - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3
BIO 242/242L or 242G/242LG - Applied Microbiology 4
CHE 130/130L - Principles of Chemistry 4
DEN 201 - Histology and Embryology 2
ENG 110 - English Composition OR ENG 122 & ENG 123 4-6
IHS 130 -Interprofessional Health Care First Year Experience 3
IHS 210 - Methods of Scholarly Inquiry  3
IHS 220 - Nutrition 3
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
MAT 120 - Statistics 3
PSY 105 - Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 250 - Lifespan Development 3
SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology 3
SPC 100 - Effective Public Speaking 3
One (1) Creative Arts Course (with prefix ARH, ART or MUS) 3
One 276 or 278 Human Traditions Course with the following prefix:
ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC or REL
3
Total Core Requirements 62-64
  Credits
Department Required Courses  
DEN 303 - Dental Hygiene Theory I 2
DEN 304 - Dental Hygiene Theory II 2
DEN 309 - Dental Hygiene Clinic I 4
DEN 311 - Dental Hygiene Clinic II 3
DEN 322 - Radiology 2
DEN 322L - Radiology Lab 1
DEN 325 - Preservation of Tooth Structure 2
DEN 325L - Preservation of Tooth Structure Lab 1
DEN 332 - Community Health I 2
DEN 334 - Community Health II 2
DEN 338 - Medical Emergencies 1
DEN 341 - Oral Anatomy 2
DEN 342 - Head and Neck Anatomy 2
DEN 403 - Dental Hygiene Theory III 1
DEN 404 - Dental Hygiene Theory IV 1
DEN 410 - Dental Hygiene Clinic III 4
DEN 411 - Dental Hygiene Clinic IV 4
DEN 422 - Leadership 2
DEN 425 - Periodontology I 3
DEN 435 - Periodontology II 3
DEN 442 - Pharmacology 2
DEN 445 - Special Care I 2
DEN 446 - Special Care II 2
DEN 452 - Oral Pathology 3
DEN 456 - Pain Management 3
Elective
Total Dental Hygiene Curriculum  59
Total Required for Graduation  121-123

“A student in the dental hygiene major may elect to pursue a bachelor’s degree in health sciences.  This degree is only open to matriculated students at the University of New England.  Special permission from the student’s advisor and the Dean of the Westbrook College of Health Professions is required for enrollment in the BS in Health Sciences”. 

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of "C" is required in all BIO, CHE, MAT and DEN prefix courses, IHS 220 and professional electives.  A "C" or higher must be achieved in all prerequisites for these courses.

See Technical Standards.

Learning Outcomes

The Department of Dental Hygiene offers students the opportunity to:

  1. Competently provide the public with dental hygiene care based on a sound foundation of scientific knowledge and effective decision-making.
  2. Provide individuals and groups with up-to-date dental hygiene care as an essential component of comprehensive, interprofessional health care. 
  3. Explore the complexities of ethical decision-making as it relates to professional situations.
  4. Gain access to dental hygiene licensure in the state of choice by successfully preparing students to complete the national and regional board examinations.
  5. Develop a commitment to life-long learning by continuing with educational plans following graduation.
  6. Demonstrate the knowledge necessary to assess, plan, implement and evaluate community-based oral health programs.
  7. Utilize appropriate communication methods to effectively provide patient care.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents.  Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.  All courses completed must be no older than five years.  Other restrictions apply.  See Undergraduate Admissions also.

Admissions

 Admissions Requirements

  1. A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including: chemistry (must include laboratory); biology (must include laboratory); mathematics (two mathematics courses - algebra required, geometry preferred); English (three years required - four years preferred).       
  2. Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses. College GPA will be considered only if applicant has completed at least 15 semester hours.        
  3. Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) scores must be submitted.        
  4. A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding applicant's complete physical exam.        
  5. Documentation of 20 hours of observation of a dental hygienist is required, prior to enrollment.
  6. Complete the Common Application

See University Undergraduate Admissions also.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dental Hygiene Completion Program

Category
Contact

Marji Harmer-Beem, RDH, MS, BS

mharmerbeem@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene
College
Sections

Mission

The Department of Dental Hygiene endeavors to improve the oral health of individuals and communities by graduating students who place meaningful value on life-long learning, and who have the desire and motivation to achieve beyond their self-imposed limitations.  The faculty strives to stimulate student development of intellectual curiosity and professional expertise through collaborative participation in an academic environment that foster interprofessional education.

The Department of Dental Hygiene faculty welcomes the opportunity to educate future oral hygienists in both the traditional and newly evolving skills required for entry into the profession.  The faculty also looks forward to developing professional qualities and leadership capabilities in each student by providing opportunities for critical thinking and logical decision-making.

Major Description

The University of New England offers a Bachelor of Science completion program for registered dental hygienists already holding an Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene. The Bachelor of Science program advances education in dental hygiene skills and prepares students for a broader range of careers in dental hygiene, community health, administration, research, or teaching.  The Bachelor of Science degree program builds upon the knowledge obtained at the associate degree level with core curriculum courses in the arts and sciences and upper division courses in dental hygiene, management, health care, interprofessional education, and upper division electives.  This program is designed to prepare students to meet the challenges of the changing health care delivery system and to establish a foundation for graduate study.

Curricular Requirements

Dental Hygiene Degree Completion  
Max Transfer 85 credits
General Education 18 credits
MAT 120 - Statistics 3 credits
BIO 309 - Pathophysiology 3 credits
Human Traditions I or II 3 credits
Creative Arts 3 Credits
Social Global Awareness 3 credits
Advanced Humanities 3 credits
Sub Total 103 credits
   
Major Courses  
IHS 310 - Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3 credits
DEN 422 - Leadership 2 credits
DEN 490 - Internship/Experiential Learning 3 credits
DEN 406 - Current Concepts in Dental Hygiene 3 credits
Professional Electives (300 level or higher) 6 credits**
Sub Total 17 credits
   
Total 120 credits

** Additional elective credit will be required if transfer coursework is less than 85 credits.