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Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences members take part in biomedical science conference

Members of UNE's Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences recently took part in the 2019 North East Regional IDeA Conference
Members of UNE's Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences recently took part in the 2019 North East Regional IDeA Conference

August 27, 2019

Eight members of the Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences recently took part in the 2019 North East Regional IDeA Conference.

The bi-annual conference promotes the development, coordination and sharing of research resources and expertise within a state or geographic area. The goal is to help support basic research and increase our understanding of biological processes in order to lay the foundation for advances in disease diagnosis and treatments.

The conference was attended by scientists from Delaware, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. Attendees are part of the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Institutional Development Award (IDeA) network.

Ben Harrison, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Biomedical Science Department, College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM), gave a seminar titled “Neuron-intrinsic mechanisms of nervous system plasticity.”

Postdoctoral fellow in the Molliver Lab, Diana Goode, Ph.D., gave an oral presentation titled: “A novel mechanism for regulation of mitochondrial function by Epac2 in acute inflammatory hyperalgesia.”

Karen Houseknecht, Ph.D., associate provost of Research and Scholarship, Cara Sullivan, graduate student in the Meng Lab, and Victoria Eaton, manager of the King Lab, presented their posters at the conference as well.

The IDeA Network program builds research capacities in states that historically have had low levels of NIH funding by supporting basic, clinical and translational research; faculty development; and infrastructure improvements.

IDeA regional conferences help promote interprofessional collaborations among universities and institutions.

Groups audience: