2023-2024 Academic Catalog

2023-2024 Academic Catalog

The University of New England

The University of New England is an independent, coeducational university with two distinctive campuses in southern Maine. The University is a combination of three institutions — St. Francis College, the New England College of Osteopathic Medicine and Westbrook College, which was founded in 1831 and is our charter institution.

UNE offers more than 40 undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the health sciences, natural sciences, osteopathic medicine, human services, liberal arts, education, business and the healthcare professions.

The Biddeford Campus is distinguished by its beautiful seaside setting in a semi-rural area near Biddeford, Maine. The Portland Campus is a classic New England campus located in suburban Portland, Maine and designated as a national historic district.

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Notice and Responsibilities Regarding this Catalog

This Catalog documents the academic programs, policies, and activities of the University of New England for the 2023–2024 academic year. The information contained herein is accurate as of the date of publication April 28, 2023.

The University of New England reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes of any nature in its programs, calendar, or academic schedule whenever it is deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the rescheduling of classes with or without extending the academic term, canceling of scheduled classes or other academic activities, in any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably practicable under the circumstances.

While each student may work closely with an academic advisor, he or she must retain individual responsibility for meeting requirements in this catalog and for being aware of any changes in provisions or requirements.

Mission Statement

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The University of New England prepares students to thrive in a rapidly-changing world and, in so doing, to improve the health of people, communities, and our planet.

Accreditations, Memberships, and Additional Notes

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2023–2024 University of New England Accreditation Information

Institutional Accreditation

New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE)
Date of Initial Accreditation: 1966
Last Accreditation Review: April 2017
Next Accreditation Review: Spring 2027
Current Status: Accredited

For further information on NECHE, please go to the UNE Accreditation page.

State of Maine Accreditation

Education and Educational Leadership

Maine Department of Education
Last Accreditation Review: Fall 2021
Next Full Accreditation Review: Fall 2025
Current Status: Accredited

Nursing

Maine State Board of Nursing (MSBON)
Last Accreditation Review: March 2015
Next Site Visit: Spring 2026
Current Status: Accredited

Specialized Accreditation

Applied Exercise Science

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)
Initial Accreditation: January 16, 2019
Next Full Accreditation Review: 2024
Current Status: Accredited

Applied Nutrition (dietetics focus of the M.S.)

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND)
Initial Accreditation: June 8, 2020
Next Full Accreditation Review: Fall 2023
Current Status: Accredited as a program with candidacy for accreditation status under the Future Education Model Graduate (FEM-G) accreditation standards

Athletic Training

Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)
Initial Accreditation: October 2003
Last Accreditation Review: 2018-2019
Next Full Accreditation Review: 2028-2029
Current Status: Accredited

Business Administration

Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP)
Initial Accreditation: April 2008
Last Accreditation Review: Fall 2019
Next Full Accreditation Review: 2029
Current Status: Accredited

Dental Hygiene

American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA)
Initial Accreditation: July 27, 1963
Last Accreditation Review: Fall 2016
Next Full Accreditation Review: Fall 2024
Current Status: Accredited

Dental Medicine

American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA)
Initial Accreditation: August 2012
Last Accreditation Review: April 2017
Next Full Accreditation Review: April 2025
Current Status: Accredited

Nurse Anesthesia (M.S.N.A. and D.N.P.)

Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA)
Initial Accreditation: September 1, 1970*
Last Accreditation Review: Fall 2021 (program received ten-year accreditation)
Interim Review: Spring 2026
Next Accreditation Review: Fall 2031
Current Status: Accredited

Nursing

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN)
Initial Accreditation: December 1, 1984*
Last Accreditation Review: February 2018
Next Full Accreditation Review: Spring 2026
Current Status: Accredited

Occupational Therapy

American Occupational Therapy Association, Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE)
Initial Accreditation: January 1, 1985
Last Accreditation Review: 2014-2015
Next Accreditation Review: 2024-2025
Current Status: Accredited

Osteopathic Medicine

American Osteopathic Association (AOA), Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA)
Initial Accreditation: July 1, 1982*
Last Accreditation Review: 2017-2018
Next Full Accreditation Review: Fall 2027
Current Status: Accredited with Exceptional Outcomes

Pharmacy

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)
Initial Accreditation: 2013
Last Accreditation Review: June 2019
Next Full Accreditation Review: Spring 2027
Current Status: Accredited

Physical Therapy

American Physical Therapy Association, Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)
Initial Accreditation: May 11, 1984*
Last Accreditation Review: May 2012
Next Full Accreditation Review: Fall 2022
Current Status: Accredited

Physician Assistant

Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA)
Initial Accreditation: Provisional, 1996; Full, 1998
Last Accreditation Review: 2016
Next Accreditation Review: 2025-2026
Current Status: Accredited

Public Health

Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH)
Initial Accreditation: October 2011
Last Accreditation Review: 2018-2019
Next Accreditation Review: 2026
Current Status: Accredited

Social Work (M.S.W. on campus/online options)

Commission on Accreditation (COA) of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)
Initial Accreditation: 1990
Last Accreditation Review: 2017-2018
Next Full Accreditation Review: February 2026
Current Status: Accredited

Social Work (B.S.W.)

Commission on Accreditation (COA) of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)
Initial Accreditation: June 2019
Next Full Accreditation Review: 2023
Current Status: Initial Accreditation

Sport and Recreation Management

Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP)
Initial Accreditation: November 2019
Next Full Accreditation Review: 2029
Current Status: Accredited

*Estimated date

2023–2024 Other Memberships

  • The Applied Exercise Science program is approved and endorsed by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), Education Recognition Program (ERP).
  • The Health Informatics program is an Approved Education Partner (AEP) of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

2023–2024 Notices

Adverse Action Disclosure Policy For Any Required Accreditor Teach Out Plan

The University of New England has not been required to maintain a teach-out plan by its accrediting agency (34 CFR Section 668.43(a)(19)). In the event of an adverse action by any of its regional or specialized accrediting agencies, the University will follow the teach-out plan requirements in compliance with those agencies.

Adverse Action Disclosure Policy For Any State or Federal Law Enforcement

The University of New England has not had an enforcement action or prosecution brought against the institution by a State or Federal law enforcement agency in any matter where a final judgment against the institution if rendered, would result in adverse action by an accrediting agency against the university, revocation of State authorization, or limitation, suspension or termination of eligibility under Title IV (34 CFR Section 668.43(a)(20)).

2023–2024 Additional Notes

Most programs offered at the University of New England have been approved for the training of veterans under the auspices of the Maine State Approving Agency for Veterans' Education Programs. Graduates of the University meet the educational requirements for officer candidacy in all branches of the armed forces.

In accordance with federal and state law, the University will consider all qualified students for admission, regardless of citizenship status.

The University holds, among others, memberships in: New England Commission of Higher Education; Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions; Council of Independent Colleges; National Association of College Auxiliary Services; The College Board; National Collegiate Athletic Association; National Association for College Admission Counseling; New England Association for College Admission Counseling; American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers; National Association of College and University Business Officers; National Association of Financial Aid Administrators; American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine; and the Greater Portland Alliance of Colleges and Universities.

The University reserves the right to make adjustments to financial costs to attend the University, as approved by the Board of Trustees, up to the date of registration for a given academic term. All students acknowledge this reservation by the submission of an application for admission or by registration in course(s).

All students are responsible for any debts they have incurred at the University. This includes tuition, fees, room & board, library fees, parking fines, monetary penalties, and fines as well as any changes in their financial aid packages. A student will not receive a transcript until all bills, including the graduation fee, have been paid. A student who is graduating will not receive a diploma and will not be able to obtain transcripts until all outstanding debts have been paid.

The University of New England reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes of any nature in its programs, calendar, or academic schedule whenever it is deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the rescheduling of classes with or without extending the academic term, canceling of scheduled classes or other academic activities, in any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably practicable under the circumstances.

While each student may work closely with an academic advisor, he/she/they must retain individual responsibility for meeting requirements in this catalog and for being aware of any changes in provisions or requirements.

The University prohibits and will not tolerate discrimination in employment, the provision of academic services, or in any other area of University life based on race, color, sex, physical or mental disability, religion, age, ancestry, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity and/or expression, ethnicity, genetic information, HIV status, or status as a veteran. Prohibited bias factors will not be permitted to have an adverse influence upon decisions regarding students, employees, applicants for admission, applicants for employment, contractors, volunteers, or participants in and/or users of institutional programs, services, and activities. This policy is enforced by Federal Law under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and all other applicable civil rights laws and regulations. It is also enforced under Maine law through the Maine Human Rights Act at 5 M.R.S.A. section 4551 et. seq. Inquiries regarding compliance with these statutes may be directed to the Office of Human Resources.

University Administration

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2023–2024 University Administration

Herbert, James – President
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; B.A., University of Texas at Austin

Alonzo, Matthew – Chief Information Officer
M.Ed. from the University of Holy Cross; B.S. from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Beaulieu, Ellen, G. – Vice President for Strategy and Communications
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University; M.P.H., University of Hawaii; B.A., University of Hawaii; A.S., Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists

DeBurro, Jennifer – Dean of Students and Vice President of Student Affairs
M.Ed., Suffolk University; B.A., Assumption College

Fereday, Alicia - Vice President for Institutional Advancement
M.B.A., Walden University; B.A., The State University of New York at Oswego

Houseknecht, Karen L. – Associate Provost for Research and Scholarship
Ph.D., Cornell University; M.S., University of Georgia; B.S., Virginia Tech

Kallner, Bobby – Chief Human Resources Officer/Associate Vice President of Human Resources
B.S., Butler University

Mahon, Gwendolyn – Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
Ph.D., Rutgers School of Graduate Studies, Division of Biomedical and Health Sciences; M.Sc., B.S., University of British Columbia

Majid, Anouar – Vice President for Global Affairs
Ph.D.,n Syracuse University; M.A., City University of New York; B.A., University of Fez, Morocco

Pardue, Karen – Associate Provost, Strategic Initiatives
Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University; M.S., Russell Sage College; B.S., Russell Sage College

Sheldon, Michael – Associate Provost for Academic Affairs Ph.D.
Muskie School of Public Service USM; M.S., P.T., Duke University; M.S. University of Maine; B.S., University of Rhode Island

Steinberg, Scott – Vice President of University Admissions
M.B.A., Columbia University; B.A., Bates College

Thibeault, Alan - Vice President for Operations
B.S. University of Maine, Orono

Shapiro, Philip – Interim Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration
M.Ed., University of Maine; M.B.A., Boston College; B.A., Amherst College

Tumiel, John – Vice President for Board Relations and Senior Advisor to the President, Interim Associate Provost for Student Success
M.A, University of Alabama in Birmingham; B.S., Empire State College, State University of New York; A.A.S., Erie Community College

Zlotkowski, Shannon – Assistant Provost for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI)
M.S., Indiana University; B.A., Marquette University

2023–2024 College Deans

Carreiro, Jane E. – Dean, College of Osteopathic Medicine and Vice President of Health Affairs
D.O., University of New England: B.A., Clark University

Dyer, Elizabeth – Dean of Library Services
M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina; B.A. Cornell University

Kimmes, Nicole – Dean, College of Dental Medicine
D.D.S., Creighton University School of Dentistry; B.S., Northern State University

Millen, Jonathan – Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Ph.D., M.A., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; B.A., University of New Hampshire-Communications

Morton, Jennifer – Dean, Westbrook College of Health Professions
D.N.P., University of Massachusetts - Amherst; M.S. and M.P.H., University of Massachusetts; B.S.N., University of Southern Maine

Taylor-Nolan, Beth – Dean, College of Professional Studies
Ed.D., M.Ed., B.A., University of Vermont

2023–2024 College of Arts and Sciences Administration

Millen, Jonathan – Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Amherst; B.A., University of New Hampshire-Communications

Brown, A. Christine – Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Ph.D., University of Oregon, Oregon Institute of Marine Biology-Biology; B.A., Bowdoin College-Biology

Guay, David A. – Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
M.S., University of California, San Diego - Marine Biology; B.S., Bates College - Biology

Keirstead, Amy – Associate Dean, College of Arts and Science
Ph.D., Dalhousie University-Physical Organic Chemistry; B.S., Bishop's University-Chemistry

Austin, John R. – P.D. Merrill Chair, Department of Business, School of Professional Programs
Ph.D., Boston College-Organizational Studies; B.A., Johns Hopkins University-Economics

Burman, Michael – Academic Director, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Ph.D., University of Minnesota – Cognitive and Biological Pscyhology; B.A., Carleton College – Psychology

Clarke, Lane W. – Chair, Education, School of Professional Programs
Ed.D., University of Cincinnati; M.S.T., Rowan University; B.A., Dickinson College – Psychology

Cripps, Michael J. – Academic Director, School of Arts and Humanities
Ph.D., M.A., Rutgers, State University of New Jersey-Political Sciences; B.S., University of Connecticut-Business Management; B.A., University of Connecticut-Philosophy

Deveau, Amy M. – Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Ph.D., University of Virginia – Chemistry; B.S., Stonehill College – Chemistry and Secondary Education

Dragon, Emily – Director, Global Education Program
B.A., Brown University

Simon, Cynthia – Director, Internship Office
M.S., Lesley College - Environmental Education; B.S., Northeastern University - Business Administration - Marketing

Tilburg, Charles – Academic Director, School of Marine and Environmental Programs; Director, Marine Science Center
Ph.D., Florida State University - Oceanography; M.S., University of Texas at Austin - Environmental Engineering; B.S., University of Texas at Austin - Aerospace Engineering

Travis, Steven E. – Academic Director, School of Biological Sciences
Ph.D., M.S., Northern Arizona University; B.S., Southern Oregon University

2023–2024 Westbrook College of Health Professions Administration

Morton, Jennifer – Dean, Westbrook College of Health Professions; Professor, School of Nursing & Population Health
D.N.P., University of Massachusetts - Amherst; M.S. and M.P.H., University of Massachusetts; B.S.N., University of Southern Maine

Audette, Jennifer – Program Director, Physical Therapy, Professor, Physical Therapy
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island/Rhode Island College; M.S., Boston University; B.S., Northeastern University

Dornblaser, Emily – Interim Dean, School of Pharmacy; Associate Professor, School of Pharmacy
Pharm.D., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., University of New England

Harmer-Beem, Marji – Program Director, Dental Hygiene, Professor, Dental Hygiene
M.S., B.S., University of Southern Maine; A.S., Westbrook College

Husman, Caryn – Program Director, Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies; Associate Clinical Professor, Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies
M.S.O.T., B.S., University of New England.

Kramlich, Deborah – Interim Program Director, School of Nursing and Public Health; Associate Professor
Ph.D. Nursing, Duquesne University; M.S. Nursing Education and B.S. Nursing, Saint Joseph’s College of Maine

Mason, Trisha – Director of Service Learning
M.A., Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine; B.A., Hamilton College

McCormack Tutt, Sally – Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Westbrook College of Health Professions; Clinical Professor,  Physical Therapy
Ed.D., University of St. Augustine; M.P.H., Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; DPT, BS, University of New England

Mills, Bernice – Associate Dean of Clinical & Student Affairs, Westbrook College of Health Professions; Associate Clinical Professor, Dental Hygiene
M.S., University of Southern Maine; B.S., Indiana University, A.S., Westbrook College

Nimmo, Cheryl – Program Director, Nurse Anesthesia; Associate Clinical Professor, Nurse Anesthesia
D.N.P., Northeastern University; M.S.H.S.A., Salve Regina University; B.S., Evangel University

O’Neil, Jennifer – Program Director, School of Social Work; Assistant Professor, School of Social Work
Ph.D., Lesley University; M.S.W., Simmons University

Pierce, Heath – Assistant Dean, Westbrook College of Professions; Director, Applied Exercise Science; Clinical Professor, Exercise and Sport Performance
M.Ed., University of Maine; B.S., University of Maine at Farmington

Rahman, Shireen – Interim Program Director, Nutrition; Clinical Professor, Exercise and Sport Performance
D.Ed., University of New England; M.S. Exercise Physiology, Frostburg State University; B.S. Athletic Training, Canisius College

Villmore, Dana – Interim Program Director, Physician Assistant; Assistant Clinical Professor, Physician Assistant
Ph.D., University of Florida; M.S., MCPHS University, Boston; B.A., Gulf Coast University

Visich, Paul – Program Director, Department of Exercise and Sport Performance; Professor, Exercise and Sport Performance
Ph.D., M.P.H., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., George Williams College; B.S., Pennsylvania State University

Winston, Kristin – Program Director, Occupational Therapy; Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy
Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University; M.Ed., University of Vermont; B.S., University of New Hampshire

2023–2024 College of Osteopathic Medicine Administration

Carreiro, Jane E. – Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean, College of Osteopathic Medicine
D.O., University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine

DeFeo, Guy – Associate Dean for Clinical Education
D.O., University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine; M.S., Medical Education Leadership, University of New England

Pierce-Talsma, Stacey – Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
D.O., Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine; M.S., Medical Education Leadership, University of New England

Brandt, Kathryn – Chair of Primary Care Medicine
D.O., University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine; M.S., Medical Education Leadership, University of New England

Brenner, Carol – Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship
Ph.D., Tufts University

Brittle, Lori – Director, Finance and Administration
M.B.A., Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien (University of Economics & Business Administration), Vienna, Austria; I.M.B.A., University of South Carolina

Buonocore, Vin – Associate Dean of Recruitment, Student and Alumni Services
M.Ed., University of South Carolina

Sendzicki, Bonnie – Chair of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
D.O, University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine;M.S Nutrition, Washing State University; B.S., Union College

Cawley, Robert – Chair of Specialty Medicine
D.O., University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine

Ferland, Russell – Chair of Biomedical Sciences
Ph.D., University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

2023–2024 College of Professional Studies Administration

Taylor-Nolan, Beth – Dean, College of Professional Studies
Ed.D, M.Ed., B.A, University of Vermont

Heatley, Scott – Assistant Dean, College of Professional Studies
M.S., New England College

2023–2024 Academic Administration

Benz, Elizabeth A. – Director, Pre-Health Programs and Student Services
M.A. Gonzaga University; B.G.S., Valdosta State University

Dodge, Elizabeth (Ellie) C. – Program Director, Graduate Programs in Applied Nutrition
Ph.D., M.S., University of Maine

Harrington, Anne – Direct, Graduate Programs in Education

Kaszubinski, Matthew – Program Director, Health Administration, and Informatics
M.M.E.L., University of New England

Lindsay, Nicole – Director, Enrollment Services
M.S. University of New England; B.S., University of Maine

Slasten-LaPlante, Olga – Director of Learning Experience

Straw, Autumn – Director, Graduate Programs in Social Work Online
M.S.W., Simmons College of Social Work

2023–2024 College of Dental Medicine Administration

Kimmes, Nicole – Dean, Associate Dean of Curriculum Integration and Analytics
D.D.S., Creighton University School of Dentistry; B.S., Northern State University

Abena, Albert G. – Associate Dean of Clinical Education and Patient Care; Assistant Dean for Community Partnerships
D.D.S., University of California at San Francisco School of Dentistry; J.D., Marquette University Law School; B.S., University of California at San Francisco School of Dentistry

Erickson, Travis – Assistant Dean of Student Affairs
M.Ed., University of Maine, B.S., University of Maine

Board of Trustees

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2023–2024 Board of Trustees

  • Dan McCormack, MBA, Chair
  • James D. Herbert, Ph.D., President (ex-officio)
  • Regen Gallagher ’95, D.O. ’99, MBA, Vice Chair
  • George M. Locarno, ’70, LL.M., CPA, J.D., Secretary
  • Cheri Walker, CPA, Treasurer
  • David L. Anderson, Ph.D.
  • Louise Bowditch, J.D., M.A.
  • Jim Brady
  • Calen B. Colby, PE
  • Story Landis, Ph.D.
  • Brenda Garrand, M.A.
  • Fran Girard
  • Joshua Golden, Student Trustee
  • Mark Haley, J.D.
  • Katherine Heer ’90, D.M.D.
  • Mason “Skip” Irving, III, MBA
  • Ethan Kennedy, Student Trustee
  • Marge Kilkelly, M.S.
  • Robert T. Leonard, D.O.’86
  • Mark Malone, CCIM
  • Jean Ginn Marvin, M.A.
  • Julie Mostov, Ph.D.
  • Ford S. Reiche, J.D.
  • Justin Schair, MBA
  • Stephen C. Shannon, D.O.’86, M.P.H.
  • Krystal Williams, J.D., MBA

2023–2024 Trustee Emeriti

  • Vincent E. Furey, Jr.
  • Robert McAfee, M.D.

2023–2024 President Emeriti

  • Danielle N. Ripich, Ph.D.

Five Colleges - One University

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College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) offers preparation for the undergraduate degrees of bachelor of arts and bachelor of science. CAS also offers master of science degrees in biological science and marine science. CAS programs of study are on the Biddeford Campus.

College of Arts and Sciences Mission

The College of Arts and Sciences at the University of New England is a coeducational college committed to academic excellence. We seek to help students find and fulfill their own unique potential. Through study and research in the arts and sciences, the faculty of the college challenge students to set and reach for higher intellectual and professional goals and to develop powers of critical assessment, analysis, expression, aesthetic sensibility, and independent thought. The faculty and administration of the College also endeavor to help students participate in shaping the culturally diverse and interdependent world in which they live. Curricular offerings give students the tools to face life challenges by enhancing their awareness of environmental, social, and global issues, and by fostering values that sustain healthy communities. Students are urged to pursue these objectives not only in their course work, but also through attendance at cultural events, participation in campus organizations and activities, and services to others.

Schools and Areas of Study

  • School of Arts and Humanities
  • School of Biological Sciences
  • School of Marine and Environmental Programs
  • School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
  • School of Professional Programs
    • Department of Business
    • Department of Education
  • School of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Westbrook College of Health Professions

The Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) is a large, complex college of 14 distinct programs ranging from baccalaureate to doctoral. Majors at the undergraduate level include Applied Exercise Science (AES), Dental Hygiene, Health, Wellness and Occupational Studies (HWOS), Nursing, Nutrition, Public Health, and Social Work (BSW). A B.S. in Pharmacy is also offered; master's degrees in Athletic Training, Nurse Anesthesia, Physician Assistant, Occupational Therapy, and Social Work (MSW). The college offers professional doctoral degrees in Pharmacy (PharmD) and Physical Therapy (DPT).

Undergraduate education in WCHP occurs on the residential Biddeford campus. The exceptions are the dental hygiene and nursing majors, where students spend the first two years on the Biddeford campus followed by the junior and senior years in Portland. The athletic training program is fully delivered on the Biddeford campus. All remaining graduate programs of study are located on the Portland campus.

Westbrook College of Health Professions Mission

The Westbrook College of Health Professions educates a dynamic, collaborative workforce responsive to the evolving needs of society, thus advancing the health and well-being of all people.

Departments and Areas of Study

  • Department of Exercise and Sport Performance
  • Department of Dental Hygiene
  • Department of Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies
  • School of Nursing and Population Health
  • Department of Nutrition
  • School of Nurse Anesthesia
  • Department of Occupational Therapy
  • Department of Physician Assistant
  • Department of Physical Therapy
  • School of Social Work
  • School of Pharmacy

College of Osteopathic Medicine

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNE COM) grants the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree (D.O.) and holds the distinction of being Maine's only medical school.

Guided by the tenets of Osteopathic Medicine, we prepare students to become skilled, caring, and successful osteopathic physicians. Our integrated curriculum provides varied learning experiences to help students develop the knowledge and clinical skills necessary to become competent physicians. Along with our affiliated clinical training sites, UNE COM prepares students who consistently score at the top in national licensing exams. UNE COM has been recognized in the top ten of all US medical schools for graduates obtaining the residency of their choice. While two-thirds of graduates practice in primary care, the remainder choose careers in specialty and subspecialty medicine. Our graduates are leaders in health care at the local, state, and national levels throughout the US, and in all branches of military service. Over 70% of UNE COM graduates practice in underserved areas, caring for our most vulnerable populations.

At UNE COM, we recognize and support the role of research in all educational, clinical, and biomedical science activities and provide fellowship opportunities to encourage student participation in research. Both undergraduate and graduate/medical students work with faculty, professional staff, and peers to conduct exciting and innovative work in a number of areas, including cancer and metabolic disease, immunology and infectious disease, anatomy and interventional pain management, medical education, and through our internationally renowned neuroscience and pain research.

The College of Osteopathic Medicine has taken a leading role in facilitating our students’ involvement with Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Practice. We are proud to share educational experiences with programs in dental medicine, pharmacy, nursing, physician assistant, occupational and physical therapy, and social work. COM shares many collaborative enterprises with our health profession colleagues including rural emersion experiences, scholars programs, research opportunities, and shared clinical training assignments.

The UNE COM Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) maintains dual accreditation with the American Osteopathic Association and the Maine Medical Association; authorizing UNE COM's sponsorship of collaborative CME activities for osteopathic (D.O.) and allopathic (M.D.) physicians. UNE COM is one of a handful of providers in the country that holds this distinction.

College of Osteopathic Medicine Mission

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine fosters health care leaders across the continuum in undergraduate, predoctoral, graduate, and continuing medical education. UNE COM advances exceptional osteopathic health care locally and globally through practice, research, scholarship, education, and community health.

Departments and Areas of Study

  • Department of Primary Care:
    • Division of Family Medicine
    • Division of Geriatrics
    • Division of Internal Medicine
    • Division of Psychiatry
    • Division of Pediatrics
    • Mature Care Clinical Services
    • Coastal Healthy Communities Coalition
  • Department of Specialty Care Medicine
  • Department of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine
  • Department of Biomedical Sciences

UNE Online | College of Professional Studies (Formally the college of graduate and professional studies)

UNE Online Vision

To advance the fields we serve by functioning as a nexus for relationships between scholars and professionals, and by educating clients to lead in that evolving convergence.

UNE Online Mission

UNE Online educates and supports future leaders in industry and service via programs designed to catalyze meaningful career development.

UNE Online Values

  • Growth: To grow in community, infrastructure, and scope, in order to give more options while making all options stronger.
  • Relationships: To cultivate the agency necessary to grapple with and execute on opportunities.
  • Agility; To cultivate the agency necessary to grapple with and execute on opportunities.
  • Sustainability: To consider ourselves an ecosystem built first upon the healthy balance of all our values, and second upon the exploratory process necessary to our evolution.

Academic Core Values

Critical and Innovative Thinking

Graduates of the College of Professional Studies (UNE Online) programs are capable of critical analysis of the scholarship in their discipline. Graduates are able to synthesize and interpret theory and apply it to their field of practice; evaluating what is most appropriate for their professional setting is a habit of mind leading to deeper learning.

Oral and/or Written Communication

Graduates of UNE Online programs are able to effectively and accurately communicate with industry stakeholders, professional colleagues, and academic peers. Graduates communicate with coherence and organization. Graduates’ work exhibits proper mechanics and grammar, along with accurate style and citation relevant to their discipline. Graduates are able to offer both oral and written products to meet the needs of the intended audience

Ethical Reasoning and Practice

Graduates of UNE Online programs have a sound understanding of ethics in their area of expertise. Graduates have an understanding of the pertinent regulations that protect the communities or industries that they serve. Graduates are able to enter into their field of practice with the ability to make ethical decisions and to engage in culturally sensitive behavior to enhance the greater good.

Application of Scholarship and Research

Graduates of UNE Online programs are critical consumers of research and evidence. Graduates are adept at analyzing and translating the findings of primary sources, including literature, data, and research. Graduates are able to synthesize current literature and propose novel research in their field of study. Graduates understand the importance of evidence-based decision-making and utilize data to support their professional practice.

*Field-based learning, practicum, capstone, and ePortfolio demonstrate mastery of all core academic values*

Departments and Areas of Study

  • Applied Nutrition (online master's degree and RD Track)
  • Education (online certificates, master's, and doctoral degrees)
  • Healthcare Administration (online master's degree and graduate certificates)
  • Health Informatics (online certificates, and master's degree)
  • Pre-Requisite Sciences Courses (online science and math courses for credit)
  • Public Health (online certificate and master's degree)
  • Social Work (online master's degree)

College of Dental Medicine

The College of Dental Medicine is located on the Portland Campus and grants the Doctor of Dental Medicine degree.

The College seeks to recruit compassionate students who demonstrate a commitment to patient-centered care, social responsibility, and professionalism. Students in the program are treated as professional colleagues and supported in a learner-centered environment grounded in trust, collegiality, and high ethical standards. They benefit from a comprehensive, integrated education in the basic and behavioral sciences, and they understand and appreciate the many connections between oral health and overall health. Our students enjoy extensive practical experience, from providing care to a simulated patient in their first year to providing patient-centered care in group practice teams in our Oral Health Center during their second, third, and fourth years. In addition, fourth-year students provide care to diverse patient populations at community-based clinics across Northern New England and beyond.

Throughout our curriculum, we utilize learning methods that support the development of communication and critical thinking skills. Our students learn how to access and evaluate information, including the very latest scientific research, as well as how to use that information to provide evidence-based care to their patients. Interested students are also provided opportunities to conduct oral health research under the guidance of faculty mentors. What’s more, our program educates students on the business side of dentistry, including practice management concepts and leadership skills, and we emphasize the importance of self-assessment and lifelong learning to personal and professional growth.

Public health is an essential component of our curriculum, and our students frequently discuss issues related to access to care and health policy. Throughout the four-year program, DMD students participate in service-learning experiences, such as school-based programs aimed at preventing childhood caries; conducting oral assessments for individuals with developmental challenges; and delivering oral health education to older adults at long-term care facilities. These experiences are designed to prepare new graduates with the skills needed to address access to dental care for society’s most vulnerable and underserved populations. The College also provides opportunities for dental students to learn and work with students of other health professions at UNE. Through these experiences, our students grow to appreciate the value of interprofessional communication and collaboration in delivering high-quality, comprehensive care to their patients.

Ultimately, our graduates will be ethical, caring, competent oral health care providers who will improve the oral health, overall health, and quality of life of people in their communities.

College of Dental Medicine Mission

The mission of the UNE College of Dental Medicine is to improve the health of Northern New England as well as rural and underserved areas while shaping the future of dentistry through excellence in education, discovery, and service.

Student Records and Administrative Policy

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2023–2024 Educational Records and Information Maintained

The University does not maintain a single record or file consisting of all materials and information pertaining to students in any one location. Instead, various segments of the education record are kept in a variety of offices.

2023–2024 Student Academic Records

Student academic records are kept in the University Registrar’s Office on both the Biddeford campus and on the Portland campus. Records are maintained/retained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) and upon recommendations made by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO).

The term “education records” does not include:

  • Records of faculty and administration that are in the sole possession of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to any other individual except a temporary substitute.
  • Law enforcement records, which are kept separate from education records and which are created by a law enforcement unit for a law enforcement purpose.
  • Medical, psychiatric, or psychological records created and used only for the care or treatment of a student. These records may be made available to other appropriate professionals at the written request of the student.
  • Employment records, except for records of students employed because of their status as students.
  • Records that contain information about a student which is obtained after they are no longer a student.

2023–2024 Expunging Records

The official academic record of a student is maintained in perpetuity by the institution. The University Registrar’s Office is the custodian of this record. No other record is officially designated as a permanent record. Other records can be expunged at the discretion of specific department heads wherein a record resides. Access rights shall be honored prior to the destruction of records where the student has requested such access. Departments and offices which maintain education records may have specific policies regarding access to and retention of such records which are consistent with this policy and FERPA.

2023–2024 Student Conduct Records

Student conduct records and related files are maintained by the Dean of Students in the Student Affairs Offices on each campus. Student conduct records/files are maintained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). All student conduct and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of no less than four years after separation from the University. Records may be destroyed at that time. Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time or permanently if specified in the terms of disciplinary sanctions.

2023–2024 Student Rights

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law designed to protect the privacy of a student’s education records. Under FERPA, students who are presently enrolled at the University of New England (but not applicants seeking admission to the University), former students, and alumni have certain rights with respect to their education records.

1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education record.

  • A written request by a student to the University Registrar identifying the records they wish to inspect.
  • The University Registrar is obligated to inform the student when the requested record will be made available. The office has up to 45 days to respond. In most instances, the response will be made promptly.
  • Students are obligated to properly identify themselves (valid government-issued photo identification or student identification card) before being shown their record.
  • Students are obligated not to interfere with the normal operation of the office in which the record is being maintained.
  • Students are obligated to examine the record during regular hours maintained by the particular office.
  • Prior to giving a student their record for examination, all confidential data received prior to January 1, 1975, any information waived by the student, any information pertaining to other students, and any financial records of parents will be removed.
  • The examination will be supervised.
  • The Act does not require the institution to provide copies of records.

2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s rights of privacy.

  • For the purpose of this policy, a student may not challenge the judgment of a grade that has been assigned to their performance in a course but may challenge the accuracy of the recording of a grade.
  • The student should discuss their objection (submitted in writing) with the designated person in the office where their records are maintained and try to resolve the problem through informal discussion.
  • If no agreement is reached through informal discussion, the student should submit a formal letter to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record they want amended, and explain how it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University Registrar will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
  • If not satisfied, the student should file a written request for a formal hearing to the University Registrar.
  • Upon receipt of a written request for a formal hearing, the University Registrar will appoint a panel of three members to hear the objection and advise. The University Registrar will appoint one of the panelists to serve as chairperson. Once appointed, the panel will hold a hearing within two calendar weeks. The panel must provide an opportunity for a presentation of evidence relative to the objection stated and must render a decision in writing to the University Registrar within one week following the conclusion of the hearing. The University Registrar must inform the student in writing within ten working days of any amendment made, or of the decision not to amend the record. If the decision is not to amend, the student has the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information.

3. The right to provide written consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

The University of New England will disclose information from a student’s education records only with the written consent of the student, except for disclosures to the following:

  • To school officials with legitimate education interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, National Student Clearinghouse, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfil his or her professional responsibility.
  • To authorized federal or state officials in connection with an audit or evaluation of federal or state-supported educational programs.
  • To state or local officials pursuant to the state statute concerning the juvenile justice system.
  • Records released in connection with the student’s application for, or receipt of, financial aid.
  • Organizations conducting studies on behalf of educational agencies in connection with predictive tests, student financial aid programs, and the improvement of instruction provided that the identify of students is not revealed to anyone other than representatives of such organizations. Such information will be destroyed when no longer needed for the purpose of which it is conducted.
  • Recognized accrediting organizations in order to carry out their accrediting functions.
  • Records released on the basis of judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena and on condition that every effort is made to notify the student of the subpoena or order, except where a court or other issuing agency has ordered that there be no notification.
  • In an emergency, appropriate persons as determined by the custodian of the records, if the knowledge of information from the particular record is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons.
  • Disclosure to another educational institution where the student seeks or intends to enroll.
  • Disclosure of directory information.
  • Disclosure to the student.
  • Disclosure of the final results of a disciplinary hearing to the victim of an alleged crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense.
  • Disclosure of the final results of a disciplinary hearing involving an alleged crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense where a violation was committed.
  • Disclosure in a legal action between the institution and the student.
  • Disclosure to parents of a student under 21 regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State or local law, or any rule or policy of the University, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the University determines the student committed a disciplinary violation.

Records released to any individual or group shall be transmitted on condition that the individual or group is informed that they may not permit any other party to have access to such information without the written consent of the student. The recipient shall also be notified in writing that if compliance with this requirement is not acceptable, all records shall be returned, unused, to the institution. The prohibition on the re-release of records does not apply in the case of disclosures of directory information, disclosures pursuant to a subpoena, court order or litigation; disclosures to the student; or disclosures of the final results of a disciplinary hearing involving an alleged crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense where a violation was committed.

Each office that maintains education records shall maintain a record for each student with that student’s education record. The record shall list all individuals, agencies or organizations which have requested or obtained access to each disclosure of the student’s education record. Disclosures to school officials and disclosures made in response to certain subpoenas or orders described above shall not be recorded.

4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

U. S. Department of Education, Student Privacy Policy Office, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC, 20202-4605

2023–2024 Directory Information and Disclosure

The University of New England has designated certain information contained in the education records of its students as directory information for purposes of FERPA. Directory information may be publicly shared by the University*, unless the student specifically requests that directory information not be released. The University of New England has designed the following as directory information:

  • Student Name
  • Address
  • Appropriate personal athletic statistical data
  • Class Level (PR, GR, UG - Senior, Junior, Sophomore, Freshmen)
  • Date of Birth
  • Dates of Attendance (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • Degrees and Awards received (including dates)
  • Enrollment Status (full/part-time)
  • Most recent previous educational institution attended
  • Participation in sports and activities
  • Phone
  • Program of Study
  • UNE assigned email address
  • Photo

*UNE normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including directory information.

If a student requests that directory information not be released, no information will be released to any requestor, including insurance companies and prospective employers, without the express written consent of the student. Further, the student’s name will not be included in the published Dean’s List, student directory, commencement brochure, or any other institutional publication or press release. Requests to Restrict Disclosure of Directory Information are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office.

Requests to Restrict Disclosure of Directory Information will remain in effect until revoked in writing by the student. Forms to Reverse the Request to Restrict the Disclosure of Directory Information are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office.

Information beyond directory information can be released by the appropriate education records custodian only on the basis of a written, dated request by the student or by the student’s completion of a Student Consent to Release Information form. These forms are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office. Student consent will remain in effect until revoked in writing by the student. Forms to Revoke Student Consent to Release Information are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office.;

The Solomon Amendment

Institutions of higher education receiving Federal grants and contracts are subject to the “Solomon Amendment.” (10 U.S.C. 1983 § 549). It allows federal funding to be cut if military recruiters are prohibited from recruiting on campus or are prohibited from accessing student directory information for recruiting purposes.

Covered student directory information (“student recruiting information”) is defined as name, address, telephone number, age or date of birth, place of birth, academic major, level of education (e.g. freshman, sophomore, freshmen), degree awarded, and educational institution in which the student was most recently enrolled. Where there is a conflict between the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), the Solomon Amendment would supersede FERPA. A student who has requested non-disclosure of directory information to any party under FERPA remains protected.

Under the Solomon Amendment, information will be released for military recruitment purposes only. The military recruiters may request student recruitment information once each academic term or semester for each of the eligible units within the five branches of the service:

  1. Army, Army Reserve, Army National Guard
  2. Navy, Navy Reserve
  3. Marine Corps, Marine Corps Reserve
  4. Air Force, Air Force Reserve, Air Force National Guard
  5. Coast Guard, Coast Guard Reserve

The request must be submitted in writing and on letterhead which clearly identifies the unit of service requesting the student recruitment information.

USA Patriot Act

Section 507 of the USA Patriot Act amends FERPA in a significant way to make it easier for Federal Officers and employees to secure, and therefore for institutions to release, education records without student consent. Under the amendments, the Attorney General, or designee, may obtain an ex parte order requiring an institution to turn over education records relevant in a terrorism investigation without the consent of or notice to the student or parent. The amendment provides that an institution is not required to keep a record the disclosure of information.

Revised May 2, 2023.

2023–2024 Online student verification

University of New England students enrolled in online or hybrid courses must access the campus learning management system (Brightspace) through our Single Sign-On system Okta, by using their Nor'Easter ID provided at the time of enrollment. Electronic coursework must be submitted only through the LMS or through the University of New England (student@une.edu) Office365 email system. Additional methods of authentication that may be used at the University's discretion are proctored examination systems, third party publisher platforms (McGraw Hill Connect, Pearson MyLab, etc.), and the use of personally identifiable information to verify identity (e.g. student ID, date of birth, address, etc).

2023–2024 Petition to Graduate and Receipt of Diploma

In the last year of enrollment, students who anticipate completion of all degree requirements must submit an online petition to graduate. The Petition to Graduate form is available via the "Apply to Graduate" link in U-Online. The completed form sets into motion all final processing towards verification of the degree completion, correct spelling of name on the diploma, correct mailing address, and indication of plans to participate in the May commencement ceremony.

If a mailing address should change after submission of the form, the student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's office of a new address. It is the goal of the registrar's office to verify/post degree completions and mail out diplomas within six-eight weeks of a student's completion of studies.

Commencement is held at the end of each spring semester (usually May) and students who will have completed successfully all degree requirements per academic policy are considered to be in the "Class of...[that particular year]." Student names must be approved, on the recommendation of the faculty, by the Board of Trustees prior to being authorized a degree and diploma from the University of New England.

Under some circumstances, documentation of early graduation may be possible for students who complete all of their degree requirements prior to the date of the degree conferral. Requests for degree completion letters should be made to the Office of the University Registrar. UNE confers degrees three times each academic year. There is a single Commencement Ceremony. If graduation is anticipated by the end of:

If graduation is anticipated by the end of: Submit the petition to graduate by:
Summer Semester June 30
Fall Semester September 30
Spring Semester January 30

Further information regarding graduation procedures can be obtained from the Office of the University Registrar.

For more information see:

2023–2024 Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence for a specified period of time, not to exceed one academic year (two consecutive semesters) may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate, and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form available from the respective program/school director, Student Affairs, University Registrar's Office, or online. A student who is on an approved leave of absence has the status "active/not enrolled" and may not enroll in courses for credit at another institution*. Application for readmission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to readmission procedures. A student returning from a leave of absence should contact the University Registrar's Office well in advance of returning semester so that status changes are made allowing the student to access courses. The policy related to the leave of absence tuition credit can be found in the respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Students with financial aid should meet with a financial aid representative prior to completing leave of absence paperwork.

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or University Registrar or designee (undergraduate) to indicate the change of plans.

*This requirement is waived for students participating in University sponsored dual enrollment programs.

2023–2024 University Withdrawal Policy

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete a University Withdrawal and LOA Request form found online or in the University Registrar’s Office. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

2023–2024 Change of Name Policy

A student who wishes to change his/her legal name in the Student Information System (Banner) must provide a copy of the Government issued photo ID with the new name, and a copy of the Legal name change documentation in English.

Examples of Government Photo ID accepted:

  • Social Security Card with the new name and a government-issued photo ID
  • State Driver's License or state-issued photo ID
  • Passport
  • Military Identification Card

Matriculated students should submit this documentation to the Registrar's Office. Applicants for admission who have not yet been matriculated should submit the appropriate documentation to the Admissions office.

Please Note: Marriage certificates will not be accepted as name change documentation.

2023–2024 Response Time and End-of-Term Processing

Due to production demands in registration services (both campuses), requests for student records services cannot be processed on demand. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

At the end of each fall and spring semester, registration offices must process significant volumes of grades, completions, and verifications after all final grades are submitted by instructors. This end-of-term processing is not finished for a minimum of two weeks after the last final exam.

For students graduating at the end of the spring semester: degree verification, posting, and diploma printing/mailing must be done after end-of-term grades are processed. Diplomas are not normally mailed for a minimum of six-eight weeks after the last final exam. Students are advised to anticipate waiting these periods of time, and should plan ahead when working with employers, graduate schools, agencies, or licensing bureaus when ordering transcripts, grade reports, or degree verifications.

2023–2024 Transcripts

No official transcript will be issued until all financial obligations have been met.

Transcripts are issued only at the written and signed request of the student. The purpose of this policy is to protect the privacy of the individual concerned and to minimize the possibility of the use of another's transcripts for fraudulent purposes. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests. Due to the volume of transcript requests received at the end of fall and spring semesters students should plan on a two-week turnaround on requests.

Official transcripts are normally issued directly to other educational institutions or prospective employers designated by the student. Official transcripts issued to the student for purposes of transport to another party can be provided in a sealed envelope but will be considered unofficial if opened by the student. Unsealed transcripts issued directly to students are considered unofficial and may be stamped "Issued to Student."

Undergraduate Catalog

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Admissions

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Candidates for admission to the University of New England may be surprised to discover that we spend as much time and effort helping them to evaluate the University as we do in evaluating their own credentials. We are interested in establishing a good match between the applicant's needs and goals and the University's ability to meet them.

2023–2024 Campus Tours and Information Sessions

Prospective students, their friends, and their families have an open invitation to visit the University. The pleasant drive to scenic Maine and the opportunity to meet the University's students and admissions staff results in a day that is both interesting and informative.

Biddeford Campus tours and information sessions may be scheduled by contacting the Admissions Office, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Prospective students are encouraged to visit on a weekday if at all possible. Daily tours and information sessions are offered during the school year, school breaks, and throughout the summer multiple times during the day. Saturday tours with information sessions are offered on the Biddeford campus during the fall and spring semesters. Please call in advance, 1 (800) 477-4863. You can also register online athttps://www.une.edu/admissions/undergrad/visit-une.

2023–2024 Admissions Criteria

To determine a first-year applicant's qualifications as a candidate for admission to the undergraduate programs of the University of New England, we carefully consider many different criteria.

UNE does not require submission of ACT/SAT scores to apply for undergraduate admission with the following exceptions where students are able to apply test optional:

  • Applicants for the Nursing program
  • Applicants for Medical Biology/Pre-Dental Medicine 3+4 or Medical Biology/Pre-Medicine 3+4 D.O.
  • Homeschooled applicants
  • Applicants with unweighted GPAs less than 2.5 (on 4.0 scale)
  • Applicants with narrative or non-letter grade transcripts
  • Some International Applicants

The above applicants are able to submit official standardized test scores as part of their test optional application to UNE. For more information about the test blind and test-optional policies please see https://www.une.edu/admissions/testpolicy.

Students applying for undergraduate admission will be required to submit a completed application, an official secondary school transcript, and a $40 application fee. Students are also highly recommended to submit the following:

  • Extracurricular involvement.
  • The essay or personal statement.
  • The two recommendations
  • Qualified students with equivalency certificates are also considered for admission.

The University of New England supports the efforts of secondary school officials and governing bodies to have their schools achieve regional accredited status in order to provide reliable assurance of the quality of the educational preparation of applicants for admission.

Nursing Students

All first-year applicants are required to submit the following:

  • A Common Application (www.commonapp.org), Online UNE Application (connect.une.edu) or Coalition Application (www.coalitionforcollegeaccess.org) with the $40 application fee.
  • Official copy of high school transcript, with 1st semester senior grades.
  • (Optional) Official SAT or ACT results

Students interested in the Accelerated Second Degree Bachelor (ABSN) Program should apply online using The Centralized Application Service for Nursing Programs (NursingCAS).

Please note that external transfers are unable to apply for the undergraduate 4-year nursing program.

Home-Schooled Students

The University of New England welcomes applications from qualified home-schooled students and we review each applicant with careful attention.
UNE requires that students enrolling at UNE have completed home schooling at the secondary level as defined by their home state law. Please check with your state to make sure you are following their guidelines and send us any necessary supporting materials.

Requirements

Your high school transcript from grades 9–12

If you have taken any courses at a school, college, online, or by correspondence, please be sure to have official transcripts sent directly to us. Detailed performance evaluations and materials such as course bibliographies or syllabi are also helpful, but not required.

SAT or ACT scores (Optional)

Home-schooled students have the option to submit official SAT or ACT results if they choose.

Two letters of recommendation

At least one letter must be from someone who can assess your academic ability. The second letter may be from someone who can further assess your academic ability and/or level of co-curricular involvement.

2023–2024 Admissions Deadlines

Fall

Early Action: November 15

We offer an Early Action Application deadline for undergraduate applicants who desire early notification of their admission status. Applicants wishing to be considered for Early Action admission will need to submit their completed application by November 15.

Regular Decision: February 15

Freshman: Freshman applicants wishing to be considered for regular admission must submit their completed application by February 15.

Spring

All applicants wishing to be considered for the spring semester must submit their completed application by January 6.

2023–2024 Reservation Agreement

Once accepted, students are required to submit a $500 deposit for on campus or $300 if living off campus, which will guarantee their place in the entering class. In order to give accepted students enough time to hear from all colleges to which they have applied and to eliminate any undue pressure that may affect their final decision, the reservation deposit is refundable through May 1st for students entering the fall semester. After this date, the deposit is either credited toward the expense of the first semester's tuition (and room for residential students) or forfeited for those students withdrawing.

2023–2024 Physical Examination and Immunization

The University requires all entering students to have a physical examination prior to enrollment. The necessary form, along with an immunization record, will be sent to all entering students following admission and receipt of the reservation fee. The forms must be completed by an approved health care provider and returned to the University Health Center prior to matriculation. Maine State Law requires all students born after 1956, who wish to register and matriculate for seven or more credits, to produce proof of immunization against those diseases listed on the immunization record form. The University of New England requires additional immunizations, over and above state mandates, for health profession students. That information will also be available on the health forms.

2023–2024 Advanced Placement and CLEP

The University of New England participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) administered by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey. Both of these examinations provide academic credit for students qualified for advanced standing. The CAS and CHP undergraduate programs may accept courses toward graduation via these two types of examinations in accordance with the tables which follow.

To receive academic credit from the University of New England through the CLEP and advanced placement examinations, the student must be admitted to the University, and must provide UNE with official transcripts from the organization(s).

2023–2024 Advanced Placement Equivalencies

Qualifying scores necessary to receive credit for advanced placement are recommended by the academic departments and are approved by the University Registrar. They are treated as transfer credit in accordance with the following table.

AP Exam TitleMinimum ScoreCourse EquivalentCredit Earned
Art History3ARH 210 or ARH 2113
Biology4BIO 1044
Calculus AB4MAT 1904
Calculus BC3MAT 1904
Calculus BC4MAT 190 and MAT 1958
Chemistry3CHE 1104
Chemistry4CHE 110 and CHE 1118
Chinese Language and Culture3ENG 199 - Exploration3
Computer Science A3MAT 2253
English Language and Composition4ENG 1104
English Literature and Composition4ENG 199 - Exploration3
Environmental Science3ENV 1043
European History4HIS 231 - Exploration3
French Language3FRE 100 - Exploration3
French Language5FRE 101 and FRE 1996
German Language3ENG 199 - Exploration3
Government and Politics: Comparative3PSC 204 - Exploration3
Government and Politics: United States3PSC 101 - Exploration3
Human Geography4ENV 2003
Japanese Language and Culture3ENG 199 - Exploration3
Latin: Vergil3ENG 198 - Exploration3
Macroeconomics3BUEC 2033
Microeconomics3BUEC 2043
Music Theory3MUS 1013
Physics 13PHY 1104
Physics 23PHY 1114
Physics 1 and 23PHY 110 and PHY 1118
Physics C: Mechanics3PHY 1104
Physics C: Mechanics4PHY 2104
Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism3PHY 1114
Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism4PHY 2114
Psychology4PSY 1053
Spanish Language3SPA 101 - Exploration3
Spanish Language5SPA 101 and SPA 2016
Statistics3MAT 1203
Studio Art: 2-D Design4ART 1063
Studio Art: 3-D Design4ART 1133
Studio Art: Drawing4ART 1183
United States History4HIS 199 - Exploration3
World History4HIS 276 or HIS 2783

If an advanced placement examination has been taken on a subject not listed in the table above, the student should contact the Registration Services at uneregistrar@une.edu.

2023–2024 College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) minimum score standard for each examination, and its UNE equivalent course, is individually determined by the Department in which the course is offered.

CLEP - General ExamsMinimum ScoreCourse EquivalentCredit Earned
English Composition with Essay50ENG 1104
English Composition50ENG 1104
Social Sciences and History50Explorations (1)3
Natural Sciences50Clear with DepartmentVaries
Humanities50Explorations (2)6
MathematicsN/ANo EquivalencyN/A
American Government50PSC 1013
American Literature50ENG 2003
Analyzing and Interpreting of Literature50ENG 1993
Algebra, College50SAS 022 (non-degree)3
PreCalculus50MAT 1803
English Literature50ENG 1993
General Chemistry50CHE 1104
General Chemistry65CHE 110 and CHE 1118
Psychology, Introduction50PSY 1053
Human Growth and Development50PSY 2503
Principles of Management50BUMG 2003
Accounting, Introduction50BUAC 2013
Business Law, Introduction50BUMG 3263
Principles of Marketing50BUMK 2003
TrigonometryN/ANo EquivalencyN/A
Macroeconomics, Introduction50BUEC 2033
Microeconomics, Introduction50BUEC 2043
Introductory Sociology50SOC 1503
French: 2 Semesters50FRE 1003
French: 4 Semesters50FRE 100 and 1016
German: 2 Semesters50Exploration (1)3
German: 4 Semesters50Explorations (2)6
Spanish: 2 Semesters50SPA 1013
Spanish: 4 Semesters50SPA 101 and 1026
Calculus50MAT 1904
General Biology50BIO 105 or MAR 1054
Biology56BIO 1044
U.S. History I50HIS 2013
U.S. History II50HIS 2023
Western Civilization I50HIS 1993
Western Civilization II50HIS 1993
Educational Psychology, IntroductionVariesClear with SSBSVaries
Information Systems and Computer Applications50CMM 1003
Freshman College Composition50ENG 1104

If a CLEP examination has been taken on a subject not listed in the table above, the student should contact Registration Services at uneregistrar@une.edu.

2023–2024 DANTES

DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs) provide an opportunity for people to obtain college credit for what they have learned in non-traditional ways. The DSST Program is made available by The Chauncey Group International® and is used by adult education programs, the United States Department of Defense, and two and four-year colleges. Designed originally for the military, DSSTs are available to civilian students and adult learners as well. The DSST program is used by colleges and universities to award college credit to those who demonstrate that they have knowledge comparable to someone who completed the classroom course in the subject.

Recommended credits and minimum scores are based on evaluation by qualified individuals in the American Council on Education (ACE). The symbol B signifies credit to be awarded at the bachelor's level; the symbol BU signifies recommended credit at the upper division (3rd and 4th year) level.

DANTES Exam TitleMinimum Score (ACE)Course EquivalentCredit Earned
Fundamentals of College Algebra3B/47SAS 021 (non-degree)3
Principles of Statistics3B/48MAT 1203
Art of the Western World3B/48ARH 2703
Contemporary Western Europe: 1946 - 19903B/48HIS 1993
Introduction to the Middle east3B/44PSC 1993
Human/Cultural Geography3B/48HIS 3343
Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union3BU/45HIS 1993
History of the Vietnam War3B/49HIS 1993
Civil War and Reconstruction3BU/47HIS 1993
Foundations of Education3B/46EDU 1053
Lifespan Developmental Psychology3B/46PSY 2203
General Anthropology3B/47ANT 1013
Drug and Alcohol Abuse3BU/49General Elective3
Introduction to Law Enforcement3B/45General Elective3
Criminal Justice3B/49General Elective3
Fundamentals of Counseling3B/45General Elective3
Principles of Finance3BU/46BUMG 3153
Principles of Financial Accounting3B/49BUAC 2013
Human Resource Management3B/48BUMG 3023
Organizational Behavior3B/48BUMG 3013
Principles of Supervision3B/46BUMG 1993
Business Law II3BU/52BUMG 3253
Introduction to Computing3B/47CMM 1003
Introduction to Business3B/46BUMG 1993
Money and Banking3BU/48BUMG 1993
Personal Finance3B/46BUFI 1993
Management Information Systems3BU/46CMM 1003
Business Mathematics3B/48General Elective3
Astronomy3B/48General Elective3
Here's to Your Health3B/48HSM 1993
Environment and Humanity:Race to Save the Planet3B/46ENV 1043
Principles of Physical Science I3B/47CHE 1254
Physical Geology3B/46ENV 2303
Technical Writing3B/46ENG 199 - Exploration3
Ethics in America3B/46PHI 1993
Introduction to World Religions3B/49REL 2003
Principles of Public Speaking3B/47SPC 1003

2023–2024 Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exams (CAPE)

The Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exam minimum score standard for each examination, and its UNE equivalent course, is individually determined by the Department in which the course is offered.

CAPE Exam TitleAccepted ScoreCourse EquivalentCredit Earned
Accounting Unit I1 or 2BUAC 2013
Biology Unit I1 or 2BIO 1064
Biology Unit II1 or 2BIO 1054
Caribbean Studies1 or 2HIS 1993
Chemistry Unit1 or 2CHE 1104
Chemistry Unit II1 or 2CHE 1114
Communication Studies Unit I1 or 2ENG 1104
Economics Unit I1 or 2BUEC 2033
Economics Unit II1 or 2BUEC 2043
Environmental Science Unit I1 or 2ENV 1043
Environmental Science Unit II1 or 2ENV 1043
French Unit I1 or 2FRE 1013
Geography Unit I1 or 2ELE 199 - Elective3
Information Technology Unit I1 or 2CMM 1003
Information Technology Unit II1 or 2CMM 1023
Law Unit II1 or 2BUMG 3253
Literatures in English Unit I1 or 2ENG 1993
Literatures in English Unit II1 or 2ENG 1983
Management of Business Unit I1 or 2BUMG 200 or 3023
Management of Business Unit II1 or 2BUMG 3123
Pure Mathematics Unit I1 or 2MAT 180 and 1907
Pure Mathematics Unit II1 or 2MAT 1954
Physics Unit I1 or 2PHY 1104
Physics Unit II1 or 2PHY 1114
Psychology Unit I1 or 2PSY 1053
Psychology Unit II1 or 2PSY 1053
Sociology Unit I1 or 2SOC 1503
Sociology Unit II1 or 2SOC 1703

2023–2024 International Baccalaureate (IB) and International Examination

To receive academic credit from the University of New England through the IB examinations, the student must be admitted to the University, and must provide UNE with official IB transcripts.

Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature

IB Course TitleLevelMinimum ScoreUNE Course EquivalencyUNE Credits
Language A: LiteratureHL5ENG 199 English Electives3
Language A: Literature and LanguageHL5ENG 199 English Electives3

Group 2: Language Acquisition

IB Course TitleLevelMinimum ScoreUNE Course EquivalencyUNE Credits
Language B: FrenchHL5FRE 101 Basic French3
Language B: SpanishHL5SPA 101 Basic Spanish3

Group 3: Individuals and Societies

IB Course TitleLevelMinimum ScoreUNE Course EquivalencyUNE Credits
Business and ManagementHL5BUMG 200 Management or Business Elective3
EconomicsHL5BUEC 204 Microeconomics or Business Elective3
HistoryHL5HIS 199 Explorations3
PhilosophyHL5PHI 110 Problems of Knowledge3
PsychologyHL5PSY 105 Intro to Psychology3
Social and Cultural AnthropologyHL5ANT 102 Cultural Anthropology3
Environmental Systems and SocietiesSL5ENV 104 Intro to Environmental Issues or ENV 100 and 101 GLC: Intro to Environmental Issues3
Global PoliticsHL5PSC 1XX Political Science Explorations3

Group 4: Sciences

IB Course TitleLevelMinimum ScoreUNE Course EquivalencyUNE Credits
BiologyHL5BIO 104 General Biology or BIO 105 Biology I and 106 Biology II4 or 8
ChemistryHL5 or 6CHE 110 General Chemistry I4
ChemistryHL7CHE 110 General Chemistry I and CHE 111 General Chemistry II8
PhysicsHL5 or 6PHY 110 Physics I4
PhysicsHL7PHY 110 Physics I and PHY 111 Physics II8
Design TechnologyHL5Business Elective3

Group 5: Mathematics

IB Course TitleLevelMinimum ScoreUNE Course EquivalencyUNE Credits
Further MathematicsHL4MAT 180 Precalculus3
Further MathematicsHL5, 6, 7MAT 190 Calculus I4
MathematicsHL4MAT 180 Precalculus3
MathematicsHL5, 6, 7MAT 190 Calculus I4

Group 6: The Arts

IB Course TitleLevelMinimum ScoreUNE Course EquivalencyUNE Credits
MusicHL5MUS 101 Intro to Music or MUS 115 Music Appreciation3
Visual ArtsHL5ART 106 Two-Dimensional Design3
FilmHL5ART 199 Topics in Art3

Credit may be awarded for Advanced Placement examinations, International Baccalaureate HL courses, Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Exams, some foreign diploma programs and/or college level courses completed while in high school. If students choose to take one or more courses at the University of New England which covers substantially the same material as any of these exams or courses the credit from the transferred course or exam will be forfeited. Students may not receive credit twice for the same material.

2023–2024 International Student Admission

The University of New England (UNE) welcomes applications from students from around the world.

UNE is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and has been approved by the Department of Homeland Security to enroll international students and issue student and/or exchange visitor visa-qualifying documents (I-20/DS-2019). We comply with all regulations of the U.S. Government pertaining to the enrollment and tracking of international students under the SEVIS Program.

At UNE, an international student is someone who is not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. (holder of a “Green Card”). Prospective international students must meet the same admissions criteria required of all other applicants. In accordance with federal and state law, the University will consider all qualified students for admission, regardless of citizenship status.

Applicants to online programs are not eligible for a student visa.

UNE requires that the student submits ONE of the following tests: SAT, ACT, TOEFL, IELTS, Duolingo English Test OR PTE Academic. However, international students who have attended a regionally accredited U.S. high school or U.S. Department of Defense school overseas for at least three years, or have received an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, will be eligible to apply without standardized test scores (i.e. SAT, ACT, TOEFL, ITELS). Additionally, international students who are taking an IB Curriculum or IB Diploma program are also eligible to apply without standardized test scores.

In some cases, an international student may be required to submit standardized test scores. The following applicants are required to submit official SAT or ACT test scores as part of their application to UNE.

  • Applicants for the Nursing program
  • Applicants for Medical Biology/Pre-Dental Medicine 3+4 or Medical Biology/Pre-Medicine 3+4 D.O.
  • Homeschooled applicants
  • Applicants with unweighted GPAs less than 2.5 (on 4.0 scale)
  • Applicants with narrative or non-letter grade transcripts

Admissions Requirements For

An international applicant (not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who will require a visa to study in the U.S.)

or

An applicant with international degrees or coursework (a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. who has been educated outside of the U.S. and will not require a visa to study in the U.S.)

General admissions criteria for the University and its academic programs can be found by accessing the undergraduate or graduate admissions catalogs or the individual program or major.

In addition to the general University admissions criteria, and program-specific criteria, international students must also meet the following:

English Language Proficiency

  • International applicants must be able to understand and communicate in English to gain full admission to the University of New England. If English is not your native language, you will need to submit documentation that indicates your level of English proficiency (please see above for testing policy for International applicants.)
  • UNE accepts several methods of English proficiency including the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), as well as others. If standardized tests are required, students will meet the minimum standards for English proficiency at UNE by demonstrating one of the following:
TestScore
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)550 (paper-based)
213 (computer-based)
79 (internet-based)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System)Overall Band 6.0 or higher
IB (International Baccalaureate)Grade 5 or higher HL
SAT (Critical Reading and Writing Sections)500 or higher
GRE (Analytical Writing Section)4.0 or higher
AP English Language and Composition ExamsScore of 4 or higher with college transfer credit received
One year of English composition, taken at a U.S. institution, which counts as transfer credit at UNE (not ESL)Grade of "C" or higher
Duolingo English Test105 or Higher

Additional Methods

  • UNE also waives the English proficiency requirement for students who graduated from a regionally accredited school in other English-speaking countries: Anguilla, Antigua/Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Guyana, Canada (except Quebec), Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica/other West Indies, Liberia, Montserrat, New Zealand, South Africa, St. Helena, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks and Caico Isle, United Kingdom, the Virgin Islands, and others.
  • Passing scores on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) with the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) Certification (with submission of photocopy of ECFMG certification to UNE Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions).

Verification of Financial Support

Federal law requires that we document how you will finance your education in the U.S., prior to issuing the appropriate student visa application form. In addition to the application for admission to your program of interest, all international applicants must:

International Transcripts

English Translation of Transcript
  • Official transcripts from ALL schools attended must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions as a part of the application process.
  • All official scholastic records submitted in support of your application must be in English or include English translations.
  • English translations should be literal (word-for-word, not interpretive) translations.
  • For specific procedures and admission criteria for each of our academic programs, please check the program website.
Evaluation of Transcripts
  • UNE requires all international applicants and all U.S. students with international degrees or coursework to have international transcripts evaluated for degree and grade equivalency to that of a regionally accredited institution within the U.S. (Any exceptions to this policy will be noted in specific program admissions requirements.)
  • UNE will accept transcript evaluations from World Education Services (WES) only. Evaluations must be for grade and degree equivalency. Please order the WES ICAP service to ensure that copies of your transcripts will be included with the evaluation report.
  • Undergraduate international applicants only may also be permitted to use The Center for Educational Documentation. Please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for further details.
  • International medical school graduates only: If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. you must have the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) submit review and verification of the equivalency of your medical degree to that of one earned at a regionally accredited U.S. medical school. The ECFMG review and verification of the student’s International Medical Degree will be accepted as an official evaluation of the degree.
  • Official transcripts from Canadian Medical Schools that are approved by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) do not require external evaluation. There is joint accreditation between LCME and Canada adding 17 more schools to the LCME list. Any school on this LCME list can be considered as offering a valid Doctor of Medicine (MD).

Please note: Official transcripts from ALL schools that the student has attended, U.S. or International, must be submitted to the Office Admissions as a part of the application process. Concerns regarding your ability to provide official transcripts should be directed to your admissions counselor.

Seek Assistance in Your Home Country
For further assistance with securing official documents and information from your country, please contact your local U.S. Embassy/U.S. Consulate/Office of Public Affairs for referral to an overseas educational advising center near you, or consult the list available on the U.S. State Department website.

2023–2024 Transfer Admissions

Students applying for transfer admission are required to forward the completed application form and application fee of $40, and official college transcripts of ALL academic work to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. If the student has less than 30 college credits at the time of application the application must also include their secondary school records.

All undergraduate students accepted to the University will be expected to fulfill both the University and program requirements prior to being awarded a degree from the University of New England. Transfer students will be individually advised by the Undergraduate Admissions Office of all such requirements left outstanding after the evaluation of transfer credit has been completed prior to registration. A transfer student's grade point average (GPA) is based only on grades received at the University of New England.

Transfer students are evaluated on the basis of their collegiate records according to the following guidelines:

  • All students who have earned an associate degree in a program of study from an accredited institution that is parallel or related to the academic offerings at the University of New England are eligible for admission to the University. The student could receive credit for all courses therein, up to a total of 63 credits. However, not all of those credits will necessarily apply towards core or degree requirements.
  • Students who have earned less than an associate degree will be granted transfer credit for those courses completed at an accredited institution that parallel or relate to courses offered by the University with a grade of C- or higher. Some programs impose even higher grade cutoffs and/or time restrictions on the age of coursework which can be transferred. This information can be found on the individual catalog page related to a program. An exception to this policy will be made for classes taken on a pass/fail basis during Spring 2020 due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Any class earning a grade of “Pass” for Spring 2020 will be accepted for transfer. Please note that some graduate programs do not accept pass/fail grades for pre-requisite coursework (e.g., biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics). Any student who aspires to future graduate school study in select disciplines may discover the award of “Pass” does not support their candidacy for admission and might be guided to repeat the course to earn a standard letter grade.
  • All eligible students with a grade point average of at least 2.5 will be considered for admission to the University; students with a grade point average below 2.5 are considered on an individual basis.
  • Class standing is determined by the University Registrar.
  • Transfer credit is given for courses graded C- or higher. Some restrictions may apply. Refer to program descriptions for further information.
  • Courses previously completed at another regionally accredited college may be transferrable to a UNE degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years to be transferrable. Other options and restrictions may apply.
  • While credits may transfer in based on the criteria above, grades and/or grade points do not transfer into the student's UNE academic record. Grades for accepted transfer courses are identified on the UNE transcript with a "TR" symbol in the grade column, which denotes credit accepted but no GPA calculation value.

Note: Matriculated UNE students who wish to have college-level credits transferred back (for course work taken at institutions away from UNE) must follow policy identified under the Academic Policy section of this catalog.

2023–2024 Portfolio Assessment Credit for Prior Experiential Learning

The University of New England will consider, for credit equivalency, prior experiential learning which a matriculated student might possess, which is considered by the faculty to be college-level learning. It is imperative that the experience relate directly to specific course work in the student's program of study and has occurred within five years of the student's matriculation at UNE. Experience gathered after matriculation at UNE will not be considered under this policy. A maximum of eight credits can be awarded for prior experiential learning, which will be documented from an approved portfolio initiated and prepared by the student. An individual portfolio must be submitted for each course equivalency. Individual departments may designate courses exempt from this policy. There is a $50 processing fee for each portfolio assessment.

Note: Nursing students should contact the Department of Nursing for further information concerning this area of assessment credit.

2023–2024 Portfolio Assessment Application Procedure Outline

The student is responsible for the following procedure of portfolio assessment.

  • Portfolio assessment packets are available from the Registration Services on both the Biddeford and the Portland Campus.
  • A request for credit equivalency, and the subsequent portfolio submission, must occur during your first two semesters at UNE.
  • Secure a faculty sponsor from UNE or within the Greater Portland Alliance of Colleges and Universities. The faculty sponsor will provide guidance in the preparation of the portfolio.
  • Complete the portfolio per the Guidelines for Portfolio Assessment document available in Registration Services.
  • Submit portfolio to the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The dean will notify Student Accounts that the request for experiential learning has been submitted and the student will be billed for a $50.00 non-refundable portfolio assessment fee. The dean will forward the portfolio to the chair of the department in which the course is offered. The chair of the department will select a faculty member to review the portfolio. Faculty selected must have either taught the course for which credit is requested or have proper qualifications to teach the course if/when it is offered at UNE. The faculty reviewer may interview or test the student, or request further information from the student, in order to assess if course objectives have been met. The faculty reviewer will then make a decision and forward it to the chair of the department and the dean for approval or rejection of the credit equivalency request, or may return the portfolio to the student for suggested revision.
  • The decision of the faculty reviewer is final. A reconsideration for the same course equivalency may not be made.
  • If approved, the Registrar records course equivalency as prior experiential learning credits.
  • Course equivalency credit approval for an individual course does not result in a waiver or equivalency credit for any prerequisites of that course. A separate portfolio must be submitted if credit equivalency is requested for the prerequisite.
  • Student is billed by Student Accounts for portfolio assessment, regardless of the decision rendered by the faculty reviewer.

Veterans

Programs of the University of New England have been approved for persons eligible for Veterans Administration Benefits by the Maine State Approving Agency for Veterans' Education Programs. The University encourages active and retired military, National Guard and reservists, as well as veterans, to become matriculated students. For further information concerning veterans admissions and benefits, please email uneveteranaffairs@une.edu.

Applicants who are requesting Veterans Administration educational benefits are required to have all previous postsecondary education and training evaluated for transfer credit.

Applicants with military service should send a copy of an Army/ACE Registry Transcript Service (AARTS) or a SMART (Sailor/ Marine Corps American Council on Education Registry Transcript) to Registration Services for credit evaluation.

More information on veterans benefits is available on the Veteran Education Benefits website.

Financial Information for Undergraduate Programs

Financial Information for Undergraduate Programs uneadmin

2023–2024 Undergraduate Tuition and Fees

(2023–2024 Tuition and Fees subject to change)

Full-Time Fall Spring Total
Tuition $20,525 $20,525 $41,050
Room and Board* $8,420 $8,420 $16,840
General Services Fee** $750 $750 $1,500
Full Time Total $29,695 $29,695 $59,390

Parking Permit Fees

Resident $350
Commuter $100

*Standard Double Occupancy rate for first-year student housing. The University offers other options on the Biddeford Campus for upperclassman.

**Biddeford Campus only; General Services Fee for Portland Campus is $1,040 for one year.

Scope of Tuition: Tuition for full-time undergraduate students covers a course load from twelve to eighteen hours per semester. A course load in excess of eighteen hours requires prior academic approval and will be subject to an overload charge of $1,450 per credit hour.

Part-Time Matriculating: $1,450 per credit hour

2023–2024 Deposits

Admissions Deposit

A $300 deposit is required for all incoming students. The deposit is refundable through May 1. This deposit is later credited on the fall billing.

Reservation Deposit

A non-refundable $100 deposit is required in the spring for all returning full-time matriculating students prior to fall registration scheduled in April. This deposit is later credited on the fall billing.

Room Deposit

A $200 escrow deposit is required for all residential students. This escrow deposit will be held by the University as long as the student is a residential student.

2023–2024 Fees

General Services Fee (Biddeford Campus)

This mandatory fee is billed to undergraduate matriculating full- and part-time day students enrolled in 7 or more credits and provides the following services:

  • Orientation/educational assessment testing program designed to introduce new students to UNE. Includes cost of food, testing, student housing, New Student Convocation, and entertainment.
  • Graduate activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  • Undergraduate Student Government activities including support for clubs, programs, cultural events, etc.
  • Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  • Campus Center featuring a gymnasium, running track, pool, fitness center with racquetball court, snack bar, and bookstore.
  • Harold Alfond Forum featuring an ice rink, multi-surface court, fitness center, grill, and cafe.
  • Access to Portland Campus facilities including: Finley Recreation Center, dining area.
  • Athletic events including intramural programs and all intercollegiate home games.
  • Transcripts are available at no charge.

General Services Fee (Portland Campus)

Undergraduate: This mandatory fee is billed to undergraduate matriculating full- and part-time students enrolled in seven or more credits and provides the following services:

  • Orientation/educational assessment testing program designed to introduce new students to UNE. Includes cost of food, testing, student housing, and entertainment.
  • Graduate activities including cost of banquet, speakers, and diplomas.
  • Finley Center gymnasium
  • Access to Biddeford Campus facilities including: Harold Alfond Forum, Campus Center, Library, Bookstore.
  • Student Health Services providing high quality health care services.
  • Transcripts are available at no charge.

Health Insurance

Students are required to enroll in UNE's Student Medical Insurance Plan unless proof of comparable insurance can be demonstrated. Please refer to the Health Insurance Brochure.

Student Malpractice Insurance

Annual mandatory malpractice insurance for the students involved in clinical training rotations.

Program Student Malpractice Insurance Cost
Applied Exercise Science, annual, fourth year $50
Athletic Training, annual, third, and fourth years $50
Dental Hygiene, annual, third, and fourth years $60
Nursing, annual, third, and fourth years $65
Nutrition, annual, third year $50
Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies, annual, third year $50
Social Work, annual, fourth year $50

Travel and Student Teaching Fees

Fees are charged to students who enroll in travel, student teaching, or other designated courses. The fee is listed in the official course schedule published at the time of registration. Please refer to semester course schedules for fee structures.

Parking Fee

Students, faculty, and professional staff wishing to park a vehicle on campus must purchase a parking permit from www.thepermitstore.com. Enter your destination as University of New England. Permit prices vary. Failure to register a vehicle will result in a fine and having your vehicle towed from campus.

Summer Session

Courses are open to any student on a direct registration basis. Contact the Registrar's Office for more information and course listings.

College of Arts and Sciences Courses

  • $390 per undergraduate credit
  • $390 per audited undergraduate course
  • $770 per graduate credit (non-matriculated students and courses not part of a graduate program)
  • Audited graduate course cost is equal to the per credit rate of that program.

Westbrook College of Health Professions' Courses

  • $1,450 per undergraduate credit
  • $570 per MaineHealth CNA to ABSN credit
  • 390 per audited undergraduate course

2023–2024 Withdrawal Tuition Refund Policy

Course changes for matriculated students are allowed during the add/drop period during the fall and spring semesters. After the add/drop period, no refunds are made for course withdrawals.

Tuition Refunds

Refunds for students leaving the institution during a semester will be made as follows:

Fall and Spring Refunds

Time into Semester Portion of Tuition Refunded
During first two weeks 80%
During third week 60%
During the fourth week 40%
Over four weeks No refunds

Summer or other Special Sessions Refunds

Time into Semester Portion of Tuition Refunded
Before second class 100%
During first week 40%
During second week 20%
More than two weeks No refunds

Please note: Any undergraduate student who intends to withdraw from the University will be required to go through the withdrawal process. He/she must first see the Dean of their College&nbto obtain the necessary forms. Verbal notice is not sufficient. For purposes of computing refunds, the date of withdrawal recorded by the Dean of their College after receipt of withdrawal forms from the student shall be considered official and that date will be used by Student Financial Services to compute any refunds due to the student.

Room (60% of Room and Board Rate)

There will be no refund of the room charge for the semester after the room has been occupied. A student obtaining permission to break the Residence Hall/Dining Service Contract by moving off campus for the spring semester will be billed 60 percent of a double room rate for that semester.

Board (40% of Room and Board Rate)

If a student withdraws during the semester, a refund for board charges will be prorated effective the first of the following month.

Other Fees

After registration, there shall be no refund of lab fees or other annual fees.

Refunds for Maryland Residents

MARYLAND

University of New England's Refund Policy follows the Federal Return of Title IV Aid Refund Policy for Maryland residents. If a student withdraws from UNE prior to the 60% point in the semester (based on calendar days from the first day of the semester through the last scheduled day of the semester), eligible charges due or paid will be refunded on a pro rata basis within 40 days of termination date. Some fees are non-refundable and therefore not pro-rated. Fees not refunded are: General Service (one-time fee), Application (one-time fee), and Technology (charged each semester fee). Financial aid awarded (if any) will be returned to the federal, state, and University of New England programs on a pro rata basis. Outside scholarship or non-federal loan assistance will not be returned unless specifically requested by the provider. After the 60 percent point in the semester, financial aid will not be reduced for any withdrawal, nor will any refund will be granted. This policy applies to all university withdrawals whether student-initiated or administrative withdrawals. Students should note that withdrawal may or may not result in an actual refund of money to the student. Circumstances may occur in which the student still owes money to the University even after appropriate withdrawal credit.

Maryland Students: Proportion of total course, program, or term completed as of withdrawal or termination date Percent of Tuition Refunded
Less than 10% 90%
10% up to but not including 20% 80%
20% up to but not including 30% 60%
30% up to but not including 40% 40%
40% up to but not including 60% 20%
more than 60% No Refund

Contact Student Financial Services with specific questions.

2023–2024 Adjustments

Adjustments to scholarships, grants, and loan programs will be made in accordance with respective Title IV program regulations and University policy before a refund to the student or parent is calculated. In cases where a refund may be due and the student has received funds through the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, it is our policy to refund those funds directly to the bank which made the loan, consistent with Federal guidelines. Refunds will not be made in the case of absence, dismissal, or suspension.

2023–2024 Leave of Absence Policy

In the event a matriculating undergraduate student desires to apply for a leave of absence, a Leave Form must be submitted to the Dean of Students. The form will include the reason for leaving as well as the expected date of return. Leave of absence adjustment to the student accounts will be given based upon the withdrawal policies. Failure to return on the agreed upon date will result in a withdrawal.

A student in the military reserves will be granted a full leave of absence tuition credit should the student be called to active duty while attending courses during any given semester. Room, board, and fees will be subject to regular withdrawal policies.

2023–2024 Payment Options

The person or persons responsible for tuition and fee payments (whether it be a student, their parent(s), or guardian(s)) may pay the charges as they come due each semester or by using the ten-month installment plan offered through Tuition Pay (see Option II: Monthly Payment Plans). They may also arrange to pay by using a combination of these payment arrangements.

The payment dates in the UNE sponsored payment plans cannot be deferred for the convenience of families using guaranteed student and parent loans or other tuition payment programs. Both long and short term financial arrangements should be made far enough in advance to assure payment on the required dates. Special problems or emergency situations can be discussed with the Student Financial Services Center at any time.

In addition to the following options for payment, UNE accepts MasterCard, Discover, and VISA cards.

Option I: Payment by Semester

About June 15, a bill will be sent for the tuition, board, room rent, and fees for the fall semester. Payment on this bill is due August 1st. Payments from the family, or any other cash payments, will appear on the bill as credits. Awarded financial aid will appear as a credit or if pending, as a memo to be deducted from the amount owed on the bill. The balance due is the difference between all charges, credits, and memos. The bill for the spring semester will be sent about December 15 and is due on January 10.

Option II: Monthly Payment Plans

The UNE Installment Plan (IP) spreads the full year charges over ten months beginning June 1st. This program is administered on behalf of UNE by Tuition Pay at 1 (800) 635-0120. These plans are designed to relieve the pressure of "lump sum" payments by spreading the cost over 10 months. There is an application fee. There are no interest charges.

Application Deadline

Students and/or their parents are urged to apply by May 15th. Applications made after the start of the program (June 1) must be accompanied by an initial payment sufficient to become current with the regular 10-month payment schedule. Applications for the 10-month plan will not be accepted after August 15th.

Late Payment Charge

The balance due each semester will be considered overdue if not paid by the specified date, and any unpaid balance will be subject to a late charge of 12% per annum or 1% per month.

Students with unpaid bills will not be able to register for courses, and they will not be allowed to attend classes until they have made satisfactory arrangements with the Student Financial Services Center. Students with overdue accounts are not eligible for academic credit, transcripts, or degrees.

2023–2024 Additional Information

  • Students should expect annual increases in the cost of attending UNE since the University is subject to the same inflationary pressures that affect the rest of society.
  • For their own protection while at the University, it is recommended that students carry their own local checking accounts to provide funds for incidental expenses and emergencies. People's United Bank, which is our preferred bank, provides a full-service ATM machine located in the Campus Center and in the Alfond Forum on the Biddeford Campus, and in the breezeway between Proctor and Hersey Halls on the Portland Campus. For those students who have People's United Bank checking accounts, ATM transactions are free of charge. Checks may also be cashed daily ($75 maximum) at the Student Accounts Office on the Biddeford Campus.
  • The University offers direct deposit to its students. Students with credit balances can have the excess funds directly deposited in the bank of their choice. The sign-up form is available on the web at the HR website.
  • The University will not be responsible for the loss of property on or off-campus although it strives to safeguard students' property on campus.
  • Students are expected to pay for books at the beginning of the semester. Books, supplies, and other items available at the University Bookstores may be paid for with cash, check, Master Card, VISA, Discover, and American Express.

Academic Policy and Regulations

Academic Policy and Regulations uneadmin

2023–2024 Educational Records and Information Maintained

The University does not maintain a single record or file consisting of all materials and information pertaining to students in any one location. Instead, various segments of the education record are kept in a variety of offices.

2023–2024 Student Academic Records

Student academic records are kept in the University Registrar’s Office on both the Biddeford campus and on the Portland campus. Records are maintained/retained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) and upon recommendations made by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO).

The term “education records” does not include:

  • Records of faculty and administration that are in the sole possession of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to any other individual except a temporary substitute.
  • Law enforcement records, which are kept separate from education records and which are created by a law enforcement unit for a law enforcement purpose.
  • Medical, psychiatric, or psychological records created and used only for the care or treatment of a student. These records may be made available to other appropriate professionals at the written request of the student.
  • Employment records, except for records of students employed because of their status as students.
  • Records that contain information about a student which is obtained after they are no longer a student.

2023–2024 Expunging Records

The official academic record of a student is maintained in perpetuity by the institution. The University Registrar’s Office is the custodian of this record. No other record is officially designated as a permanent record. Other records can be expunged at the discretion of specific department heads wherein a record resides. Access rights shall be honored prior to the destruction of records where the student has requested such access. Departments and offices which maintain education records may have specific policies regarding access to and retention of such records which are consistent with this policy and FERPA.

2023–2024 Student Conduct Records

Student conduct records and related files are maintained by the Dean of Students in the Student Affairs Offices on each campus. Student conduct records/files are maintained under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). All student conduct and related files are maintained by the Office of the Dean of Students for a period of no less than four years after separation from the University. Records may be destroyed at that time. Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time or permanently if specified in the terms of disciplinary sanctions.

2023–2024 Student Rights

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law designed to protect the privacy of a student’s education records. Under FERPA, students who are presently enrolled at the University of New England (but not applicants seeking admission to the University), former students, and alumni have certain rights with respect to their education records.

1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education record.

  • A written request by a student to the University Registrar identifying the records they wish to inspect.
  • The University Registrar is obligated to inform the student when the requested record will be made available. The office has up to 45 days to respond. In most instances, the response will be made promptly.
  • Students are obligated to properly identify themselves (valid government-issued photo identification or student identification card) before being shown their record.
  • Students are obligated not to interfere with the normal operation of the office in which the record is being maintained.
  • Students are obligated to examine the record during regular hours maintained by the particular office.
  • Prior to giving a student their record for examination, all confidential data received prior to January 1, 1975, any information waived by the student, any information pertaining to other students, and any financial records of parents will be removed.
  • The examination will be supervised.
  • The Act does not require the institution to provide copies of records.

2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes to be inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s rights of privacy.

  • For the purpose of this policy, a student may not challenge the judgement of a grade which has been assigned to their performance in a course but may challenge the accuracy of the recording of a grade.
  • The student should discuss their objection (submitted in writing) with the designated person in the office where their records are maintained and try to resolve the problem through informal discussion.
  • If no agreement is reached through informal discussion, the student should submit a formal letter to the University Registrar, clearly identifying the part of the record they want amended, and explain how it is inaccurate or misleading. If it is determined not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University Registrar will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
  • If not satisfied, the student should file a written request for a formal hearing to the University Registrar.
  • Upon receipt of a written request for a formal hearing, the University Registrar will appoint a panel of three members to hear the objection and advise. The University Registrar will appoint one of the panelists to serve as chairperson. Once appointed, the panel will hold a hearing within two calendar weeks. The panel must provide an opportunity for a presentation of evidence relative to the objection stated and must render a decision in writing to the University Registrar within one week following the conclusion of the hearing. The University Registrar must inform the student in writing within ten working days of any amendment made, or of the decision not to amend the record. If the decision is not to amend, the student has the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information.

3. The right to provide written consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

The University of New England will disclose information from a student’s education records only with the written consent of the student, except for disclosures to the following:

  • To school officials with legitimate education interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, National Student Clearinghouse, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her task. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfil his or her professional responsibility.
  • To authorized federal or state officials in connection with an audit or evaluation of federal or state supported educational programs.
  • To state or local officials pursuant to the state statute concerning the juvenile justice system.
  • Records released in connection with the student’s application for, or receipt of, financial aid.
  • Organizations conducting studies on behalf of educational agencies in connection with predictive tests, student financial aid programs, and the improvement of instruction provided that the identify of students is not revealed to anyone other than representatives of such organizations. Such information will be destroyed when no longer needed for the purpose of which it is conducted.
  • Recognized accrediting organizations in order to carry out their accrediting functions.
  • Records released on the basis of judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena and on condition that every effort is made to notify the student of the subpoena or order, except where a court or other issuing agency has ordered that there be no notification.
  • In an emergency, appropriate persons as determined by the custodian of the records, if the knowledge of information from the particular record is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons.
  • Disclosure to another educational institution where the student seeks or intends to enroll.
  • Disclosure of directory information.
  • Disclosure to the student.
  • Disclosure of the final results of a disciplinary hearing to the victim of an alleged crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense.
  • Disclosure of the final results of a disciplinary hearing involving an alleged crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense where a violation was committed.
  • Disclosure in a legal action between the institution and the student.
  • Disclosure to parents of a student under 21 regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State or local law, or any rule or policy of the University, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the University determines the student committed a disciplinary violation.

Records released to any individual or group shall be transmitted on condition that the individual or group is informed that they may not permit any other party to have access to such information without the written consent of the student. The recipient shall also be notified in writing that if compliance with this requirement is not acceptable, all records shall be returned, unused, to the institution. The prohibition on the re-release of records does not apply in the case of disclosures of directory information, disclosures pursuant to a subpoena, court order or litigation; disclosures to the student; or disclosures of the final results of a disciplinary hearing involving an alleged crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense where a violation was committed.

Each office that maintains education records shall maintain a record for each student with that student’s education record. The record shall list all individuals, agencies or organizations which have requested or obtained access to each disclosure of the student’s education record. Disclosures to school officials and disclosures made in response to certain subpoenas or orders described above shall not be recorded.

4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of New England to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

U. S. Department of Education, Student Privacy Policy Office, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC, 20202-4605

2023–2024 Directory Information and Disclosure

The University of New England has designated certain information contained in the education records of its students as directory information for purposes of FERPA. Directory information may be publicly shared by the University*, unless the student specifically requests that directory information not be released. The University of New England has designed the following as directory information:

  • Student Name
  • Address
  • Appropriate personal athletic statistical data
  • Class Level (PR, GR, UG - Senior, Junior, Sophomore, Freshmen)
  • Date of Birth
  • Dates of Attendance (Fall, Spring, Summer)
  • Degrees and Awards received (including dates)
  • Enrollment Status (full/part-time)
  • Most recent previous educational institution attended
  • Participation in sports and activities
  • Phone
  • Program of Study
  • UNE assigned email address
  • Photo

*UNE normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including directory information.

If a student requests that directory information not be released, no information will be released to any requestor, including insurance companies and prospective employers, without the express written consent of the student. Further, the student’s name will not be included in the published Dean’s List, student directory, commencement brochure, or any other institutional publication or press release. Requests to Restrict Disclosure of Directory Information are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office.

Requests to Restrict Disclosure of Directory Information will remain in effect until revoked in writing by the student. ;Forms to Reverse the Request to Restrict the Disclosure of Directory Information are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office.

Information beyond directory information can be released by the appropriate education records custodian only on the basis of a written, dated request by the student or by the student’s completion of a Student Consent to Release Information form. These forms are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office. Student consent will remain in effect until revoked in writing by the student. Forms to Revoke Student Consent to Release Information are located online or in the University Registrar’s Office.

The Solomon Amendment

Institutions of higher education receiving Federal grants and contracts are subject to the “Solomon Amendment.” (10 U.S.C. 1983 § 549). It allows federal funding to be cut if military recruiters are prohibited from recruiting on campus or are prohibited from accessing student directory information for recruiting purposes.

Covered student directory information (“student recruiting information”) is defined as name, address, telephone number, age or date of birth, place of birth, academic major, level of education (e.g. freshman, sophomore, freshmen), degree awarded, and educational institution in which the student was most recently enrolled. Where there is a conflict between the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), the Solomon Amendment would supersede FERPA. A student who has requested non-disclosure of directory information to any party under FERPA remains protected.

Under the Solomon Amendment, information will be released for military recruitment purposes only. The military recruiters may request student recruitment information once each academic term or semester for each of the eligible units within the five branches of the service:

  1. Army, Army Reserve, Army National Guard
  2. Navy, Navy Reserve
  3. Marine Corps, Marine Corps Reserve
  4. Air Force, Air Force Reserve, Air Force National Guard
  5. Coast Guard, Coast Guard Reserve

The request must be submitted in writing and on letterhead which clearly identifies the unit of service requesting the student recruitment information.

USA Patriot Act

Section 507 of the USA Patriot Act amends FERPA in a significant way to make it easier for Federal Officers and employees to secure, and therefore for institutions to release, education records without student consent. Under the amendments, the Attorney General, or designee, may obtain an ex parte order requiring an institution to turn over education records relevant in a terrorism investigation without the consent of or notice to the student or parent. The amendment provides that an institution is not required to keep a record the disclosure of information.

Revised May 2, 2023.

2023–2024 Graduation Requirements for Undergraduates

The academic requirements outlined in the catalog at the time of a student's matriculation into a program of study are generally normative for graduation.

If a student withdraws or is dismissed from the University and subsequently reenters, he/she must observe the catalog requirements in effect at reentry.

Although academic advisors are available to assist students in fulfilling major and graduation requirements, the ultimate responsibility for these matters rests with the student. All undergraduate students entering the University fall semester 1995, or after, must fulfill the following general requirements:

A minimum of 120 credits for a baccalaureate-level program. For specific credits see program requirements listed under each degree/major. The minimum required credits are normally arrived at by a defined combination of:

  1. Satisfactory completion of the course standards and specific requirements in the student's major program. See specific degree/major requirements in this catalog.
    1. ​University core requirements - to explore important college themes, develop crucial skills, and prepare for lifelong learning.
    2. Program, or professional requirements - to complete curricula established by the academic department responsible for the major area of study.
    3. General elective credit — to encourage additional study in areas of interest and to accumulate credits required for a degree.
  2. Fourth (senior) year in residence.
  3. Submission, by the student, of an online Application for Graduation no later than January 30 prior to intended commencement in May. Application for August graduation (no ceremony) is due by June 30 and December graduation (no ceremony) is due September 30.
  4. Satisfaction of all Business Office obligations.
  5. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. Higher grade point requirements may apply in certain programs. Refer to departmental and degree/major requirements.

Notes

A fourth-year student who expects to complete degree requirements by the conclusion of the following fall semester with two courses (typically 6-8 credits*) or less of outstanding degree requirements may opt to:

  1. Participate in the May commencement prior to his/her last semester (diploma to be issued after completion of studies); or
  2. Participate in the May commencement following his/her last semester.

*A student might have greater than 6-8 credits if the two courses involve clinical, practicum, or internship study. Learning Assistance Center and developmental mathematics courses do not carry degree credits for fulfillment of graduation requirements.

2023–2024 Petition to Graduate and Receipt of Diploma

In the last year of enrollment, students who anticipate completion of all degree requirements must submit an online petition to graduate. The Petition to Graduate form is available via the "Apply to Graduate" link in U-Online. The completed form sets into motion all final processing towards verification of the degree completion, correct spelling of name on the diploma, correct mailing address, and indication of plans to participate in the commencement ceremony.

If a mailing address should change after submission of the form, the student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's office of a new address. It is the goal of the office to verify/post degree completions and mail out diplomas within six to eight weeks of a student's completion of studies.

Commencement is held at the end of each spring semester (usually May) and students who successfully complete all degree requirements per academic policy are considered to be in the "Class of...[that particular year]." Student names must be approved, on recommendation of the faculty, by the Board of Trustees prior to being authorized a degree and diploma from the University of New England.

Under some circumstances, verification of degree completion may be possible for students who complete all of their degree requirements prior to the end of the semester. Requests of degree completion letters should be made to the Office of the University Registrar.

Guidelines for submission of the petition to graduate form are as follows:

If graduation is anticipated by the end of Submit the petition to graduate by
Summer Semester June 30
Fall Semester September 30
Spring Semester January 30

The degree awarded date will correspond to the term where the last course requirement was completed and graded. The exception is where one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided). In the case of late completion of course requirements (e.g due to an "Incomplete" grade), the degree will be awarded in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources. Further information regarding graduation procedures can be obtained through the Office of the University Registrar or by launching the following link: http://www.une.edu/registrar/graduation.

2023–2024 Posthumous Degree Policy

A posthumous degree will be awarded, if at the time of death, the student is enrolled in coursework to complete degree requirements.

A posthumous degree may be awarded, if at the time of death, the undergraduate student has completed 75% or more of degree requirements (90 credit hours for baccalaureate students), and recommendation is made by the appropriate Dean to the University Registrar. The University Registrar, after reviewing the guidelines, will forward the recommendation to the Provost.

A posthumous degree may be awarded, if at the time of death, the graduate student has completed 75% or more of the degree requirements for the graduate degree, and recommendation is made by the appropriate Dean to the University Registrar. The University Registrar, after reviewing the guidelines, will forward the recommendation to the Provost.

The decision to award a Posthumous Degree will be made by the Provost after consultation with the Dean of the College and the Registrar. Arrangements for diploma or certificate award will be determined by the Dean of the College and Provost in consultation with the family.

Notation that the degree is presented posthumously will appear on the transcript, in the commencement program, and on the diploma.

2023–2024 Citation of Achievement at Graduation

Students receive citations of achievement at commencement in one of three categories. Honors are based on all academic coursework completed at UNE.

Cum Laude 3.30 – 3.59
Magna cum Laude 3.60 – 3.79
Summa cum Laude 3.80 and above

For the purpose of wearing honor cords at the commencement ceremony, coursework taken during the semester prior to the ceremony (Spring) will not be used in the calculation of honors. Because end-of-term processing may not be completed until after the commencement ceremony semester grades may not be finalized. It is possible that the student’s honor status may change by the time degrees are awarded. The final honors status printed on the student’s diploma and any future transcripts will be based on the student cumulative GPA directly following the semester for which the degree is awarded.

2023–2024 Residency Requirements

Any course offered for credit by the University of New England is designated as residence or campus credit. This may include University-sponsored off-campus experiences including internships, distance learning, exchange programs, and consortium courses.

Bachelor’s Degree

For a baccalaureate degree, students must complete at least 30 of the last 45 credits in residence at the University of New England.

Second Bachelor’s Degree

Students who are pursuing a second bachelor’s degree must complete at least 30 semester hours in residence once the first degree is finished. If the first degree is from the University of New England, the same requirements apply as the first bachelor’s degree.

A waiver of residency requirements may be obtained by written request from the Office of the University Registrar, University of New England, 11 Hills Beach Road, Biddeford, Maine 04005. The student’s advisor and the appropriate College Dean’s Office will carefully review each request. Requestors should receive written notification of the decision within one month of submission.

For more information see:

2023–2024 Academic Load

An undergraduate student's normal academic load ranges from 12 to 18 credit hours during the fall and spring semesters. Students must obtain advisor permission to enroll in 19 or 20 academic credits per semester and must obtain the academic dean's permission to enroll in greater than 20 credits. A student must register for a minimum of 12 credits per semester in order to maintain status as a full-time student. A student attempting more than 18 credits during a semester will be subject to an overload charge at the part-time per-credit tuition rate.

Semester and Semester Hour Credit

Semester: A calendar 15 weeks of instructional time or its equivalent in effort.

Federal Definition of the Credit Hour

Federal regulation defines a credit hour as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutional established equivalence that reasonably approximates not less than

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester.
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practical, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

2023–2024 Classification

Student-level, or classification, is pertinent to financial aid eligibility, class year, student organizations, information systems, and other post-secondary-related institutions or nomenclature. The chart below is intended to clarify student classification:

Minimum Credits Earned Towards UNE Degree

Year Terminology Credits
First-Year Freshman 1–23
Second-Year Sophomore 24–56
Third-Year Junior 57–89
Fourth-Year Senior 90–120
Fifth-Year Fifth-Year *

*Beyond Baccalaureate Degree

2023–2024 Student Enrollment Status

The University of New England classifies student credit load status for the purposes of financial aid loan deferments. The following table applies credit hour enrollment to full time, 3/4 time, and half time status.

Program Classification Credits
Undergraduate Full Time 12.0 or more
Undergraduate 3/4 Time 9.0–11.9
Undergraduate Half Time 6.0–8.9
Undergraduate Less than Half Time 1.0–5.9

2023–2024 Registration and Enrollment Confirmation

Students matriculated in any undergraduate program must be pre-approved to register for courses, or change course registration, through their advisor. First-time students will be registered by the Registrar's office staff and will go through a new student orientation where they receive their course schedule. Returning students can preregister for courses at dates established in the University's Academic Calendar.

Course registration must be confirmed through Registrar's office. This is accomplished only after matriculated students have cleared all other offices on campus, i.e., Student Accounts, Financial Aid, Health Center, Security, or other offices through which arrangements must be made in order to become fully enrolled at the University. All students must confirm their enrollment at the beginning of each semester within certain timelines by methods identified by Registrar's office. Instructions regarding enrollment confirmation are e-mailed to each student.

Course changes are allowed during a designated add/drop period only, as specified on the current academic calendar. Detailed instructions, as well as designated timelines regarding the add/drop process, are e-mailed to each student. Tuition and/or financial aid may be adjusted, depending on the number of credit hours enrolled.

2023–2024 Reinstatement

Reinstatement to the University after a Leave of Absence will require written communication from the student's official UNE email stating they wish to be reinstated as a student for a given term. In some cases, if leave exceeds allotted leave time, the student will need to contact Admissions to complete a re-admission application. If a re-admission application is required, this will change the student's catalog year and possibly their degree requirements.

2023–2024 Class Attendance

All students are expected to attend all classes for which they have registered. Attendance policies regarding unexcused absences are established and announced by the individual instructor for his/her classes. If a student is absent to the extent that his/her work is adversely affected, the instructor will report the student's absence to the department chair/program director with comments on the status of the student in the course. Ordinarily, for each course, absences per semester should not exceed the number of times that the course meets weekly.

Whenever a student is specifically reported in writing by an instructor to the department chair/program director as being excessively absent from class, the instructor, with the approval of the department chair/program director, may drop the student from that course with an appropriate grade.

When a student misses class for any religious observances, it is an excused absence. The student should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. Before the absence, the student is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty to arrange to obtain all information contained in each missed class. The student must plan, at the discretion of the faculty member, to take any missed exam either prior to or following the scheduled exam time. All assignments must be handed in on time.

2023–2024 Athletic Competition and Class Attendance

When an athlete misses class for a scheduled varsity intercollegiate competition, it is an excused absence. The student athlete should not suffer any academic penalty because of this absence. This policy does not apply to students on clinical rotations.

When such absences occur, the student athlete is responsible for initiating collaboration with faculty and making arrangements to obtain all information and/or training contained in each missed class. The athlete must make arrangements to take exams scheduled for a day of absence early or late, at the instructor's preference. All assignments must be handed in on time.

Faculty are not required to remediate student athletes as a result of these absences.

2023–2024 Examinations

Finals week is part of each 16 week semester (15 weeks of courses and 1 week of final exams). The University expects all undergraduate courses to include appropriate procedures for evaluating student performance unless the department chairperson/program director and the dean of the college have granted an exception. For many undergraduate courses, these procedures will include a final exam, a final paper or project, or some other cumulative activity appropriate to the discipline and to the course.

All final examinations must be given during the one-week period set aside by the University for this purpose, and final examinations must be given at the time specified on the Registrar's Final Examination Schedule.

No final papers, projects, or exams may be due during the last week of a course. With rare exceptions, undergraduate courses should have a final exam and/or paper/project that is due during final exams week. All courses are assigned a final examination time and room within the final examination week except the following:

  • Labs
  • Research Courses
  • Internships/Practicums/Clinical/Field Work

Information on the use of the final examination period and its duration should be provided within the course syllabus. Although the final examination schedule is not published by the Registrar's Office until approximately the fifth week of the semester, instructors should include as much information about the final exam schedule as possible in the syllabus. This includes its duration and a reminder to students not to plan travel until the exam date and time are announced.

Whether assessed by a final examination, final paper or culminating project, all undergraduate grades are due by Noon on the Monday following Final Exam Week.

2023–2024 Undergraduate Grading System

The following grading system is presently in effect: A, A- (outstanding work), B+, B, B- (excellent work), C-,C ,C-(satisfactory work), D (passing but not satisfactory work), F (failure), P (pass), I (incomplete), W (withdrew without penalty), WP (withdrew passing), WF (withdrew failing), *F (administrative F, assigned to incompletes which haven't been completed within designated time), and AU (audit). NG is assigned when instructors do not assign grades.

Grade Equivalent quality points assigned to grade
A 4.00
A- 3.75
B+ 3.50
B 3.00
B- 2.75
C+ 2.50
C 2.00
C- 1.75
D 1.00
F 0

Note: Students may not elect to take a course that satisfies a core requirement on a pass/fail basis.

2023–2024 Grade Changes

Students with questions regarding the accuracy of a grade should contact the appropriate instructor for resolution. If a change of grade is justified, the instructor will forward a Faculty Request to Change a Grade form to the Registrar's Office. Grade changes will not be processed for students who are two semesters beyond separation from either the course in which the grade was assigned or from the University, or for a student whose degree has been awarded.

2023–2024 Double Major Policy

A double major is program of study that meets the requirements of two distinct majors within a single Bachelor’s degree (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science). The program of study consists of courses required to meet the degree requirements for each of the two majors, together with the courses needed to meet the general education requirements of the degree. The minimum number of credit hours required for the double major equals the total number of credits required for the major comprising the larger number of credit hours for the degree. For example: A BS in Applied Mathematics may require 120 credits to complete the degree. A BS in Applied Exercise Science may require 122 credits to complete the degree. A student double majoring in Applied Exercise Science and Applied Mathematics would be required to complete a minimum of 122 credit hours for the degree.

Students who complete the requirements for a double major receive a single diploma that acknowledges both majors. For example: Bachelor of Science in Applied Exercise Science with a second major in Applied Mathematics.

2023–2024 Dual Degree Policy

A dual degree program is one in which the student works toward satisfying the academic requirements for two distinct degree types (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Social Work or Bachelor of Science in Nursing). To achieve the academic depth and breadth implied by a program of study that results in the awarding of two undergraduate degrees, a dual degree program consists of substantial additional coursework as compared to that required for a double major; namely a minimum of 30 additional semester hours beyond the credit hours required for the degree program comprised of the smaller number of credits.

Students who successfully complete a dual degree program receive two diplomas, one for each degree earned (BA, BS, BSN, BSW).

2023–2024 Audit Policy

A student may, with prior consent of the instructor, enroll in a course for an audit grade ("AU"). This must be done at the time of registration for the course and must be accompanied by signed approval of the instructor. This applies to both matriculated and non-matriculated students. Reversal or change of and audit grade is not possible (i.e., once enrolled for "AU" the grade becomes permanent on a student's academic record). The student who wishes later to be graded for such a course must re-enroll in and pay for graded credit. In auditing a course, the student is expected to attend classes regularly but is not permitted to submit course work for evaluation, take examinations, receive grades, or earn credit. Auditing a course does not count towards enrollment status (i.e., part-time, full-time, etc.) and therefore cannot be considered for financial aid purposes, veterans benefits, etc. Audit courses carry zero credit.

2023–2024 Pass/Fail Policy

Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in a course on a pass/fail basis may do so by notifying the Registrar no later than 15 class days into the given semester on a form provided for this purpose. The decision to take a course pass/fail is final. Note: Students may not elect to take a course that satisfies a core requirement on a pass/fail basis.

Passing represents earned grades of an assigned A through C-. Most elective courses are open to pass/fail enrollment except courses in major fields and English composition and courses satisfying core requirements. Students may register for not more than one course per semester on a pass/fail basis not to exceed eight courses in a degree program. Students in health science programs should consult their departmental requirements for exceptions to the pass/fail policy.

2023–2024 Incomplete Policy

An incomplete (I) grade notation may be given by the instructor to a student who is doing passing work in a course, but who, for reasons beyond his/her control, is not able to complete the work on time. The I grade notation must be changed within the time limit determined by the instructor and may not extend beyond six weeks following the end of the semester or 30 days for sessions eight weeks or less in length. Until changed, the I grade notation defers computation of credits and grade points for the course to which it is assigned. Failure to complete the work before the limitation date, or within the time imposed by the instructor, results in the assignment of an administrative *F grade for the course. Some programs have established more restrictive or differing policy regarding incomplete grades. Students should consult the program in which they are enrolled for exceptions to this policy. Once an I grade notation is removed, academic standing will be updated according to good standing or probationary standards. If one or more courses are completed late (after the end of the term in which the course was provided due to an "I" grade), then the degree awarded date (if applicable) will be posted in the current term (in progress) when the final course requirements are completed. This practice is consistent with graduation reporting to external sources. Students receiving Incompletes are not eligible for Dean's List.

2023–2024 Course Withdrawal Policy*

In the fall and spring semesters, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty with a grade of W at any time during the first two-thirds of the semester as specified in the current academic calendar. If withdrawal occurs after that date, the grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) will be entered. The grade of WF is computed in the grade point average.

*A withdrawal from a course(s) at any point after the add/drop period will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse. A withdrawal that changes a student’s enrollment status could impact repayment of loans/deferment of loans.

2023–2024 Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence for a specified period of time, not to exceed one academic year (two consecutive semesters) may be granted to a matriculated student with the authorization of the academic dean, program/school director or designate, and upon completion of the required Request for Leave of Absence form available from the respective program/school director, Student Affairs, University Registrar's Office, or online. A student who is on an approved leave of absence has the status "active/not enrolled" and may not enroll in courses for credit at another institution*. Application for re-admission is not necessary if the student returns as planned. However, the student who does not return at the specified time will be administratively withdrawn and will be subject to re-admission procedures. A student returning from a leave of absence should contact the University Registrar's Office well in advance of the returning semester so that status changes are made to allow the student to access courses. The policy related to the leave of absence tuition credit can be found in the respective Financial Information sections of this catalog. Students with financial aid should meet with a financial aid representative prior to completing leave of absence paperwork.

Note: It is the responsibility of the student to contact the office of the appropriate academic dean or program/school director (graduate) or University Registrar or designee (undergraduate) to indicate change of plans.

*This requirement is waived for students participating in University sponsored dual enrollment programs.

2023–2024 University Withdrawal Policy

All matriculated students who wish to withdraw from the University must complete a University Withdrawal and LOA Request form found online or in the University Registrar’s Office. Documentation must be signed by designated academic and administrative authorities. Student responsibilities include: (a) knowledge of the University's policies regarding refund of tuition and/or fees as stated in your respective catalog; (b) return of University identification (ID) card to the Office of Student Affairs; (c) return of any University keys in your possession to the appropriate departments. The University reserves the right to withhold the issuance of refunds and transcripts until the process has been completed. Following withdrawal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions.

2023–2024 Repeat Course Policy

A student may repeat a course in order to improve his/her grade. However, only the second or last course taken will receive credit on the student's transcript, and only the second or last grade received will calculate into the cumulative GPA.

2023–2024 Course Work at Another Institution

Matriculated student who wish to transfer college-level course work taken at other institutions must obtain permission to do so prior to enrolling at another institution. The Application for Transfer Course Work form is located under student forms on the University Registrar’s webpage or through the University Registrar’s Office.

Eligible credit must be earned from a regionally accredited college or university recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). International universities must be recognized according to its country’s regulations. International academic transcripts must be credentialed by World Education Services (WES). Undergraduate international applicants may also use The Center for Educational Documentation.

  1. The posting of transfer credit for approved courses will be completed by the Admissions Office or the University Registrar’s Office upon the receipt of an official transcript. An official transcript is one that corresponds with the credit granting institution’s definition of “official” and is received directly from that institution by the University of New England’s Admissions or University Registrar’s Offices. When a course description is not sufficient, a syllabus may be requested. The threshold of majority match in course outcomes will be used to determine course equivalence (1:1); otherwise an elective will be assigned. A transfer course that is not a 1:1 equivalent is assigned elective credit at the appropriate level; i.e. a 100-level will be noted as 100 level, a 200-level will be noted as 200 level, etc.
  2. Transfer credit will be granted for those courses completed with a grade C- or higher. Each course grade earned is held to the University’s grade rules for the degree and program requirements. Some programs at the University of New England impose higher grade cutoffs and/or time restrictions on the age of the coursework that can be transferred. This information can be found on the individual catalog page related to the program.
  3. All courses will be evaluated for potential transfer, with only a maximum of 63 credits eligible for transfer. Not all credits transferred will necessarily apply toward completion of core or degree requirements. A transfer course is identified with the grade of “TR”. Grade quality points are not awarded or calculated into a University of New England cumulative grade point average.
  4. All credit hours earned will be assigned for transfer. When a transfer course has fewer credits than an equivalent UNE course, the course may transfer (as equivalent) if outcomes have been met for the UNE course, but only the credit hours earned will be applied.
  5. Grades earned at other institutions as course repeats do not replace those earned at the University of New England.
  6. A transfer student must meet residency requirements to be eligible for a degree. When a student’s transfer credit hour exceeds transfer limitations, additional course requirements will be arranged between the Advisor or the Department Chair and the student to ensure that the student meets the residency requirement.
  7. Quarter credit hours or units will be converted to semester credits. A quarter credit is divided by 1.5.

Approved Study Abroad

Matriculated students who wish to receive credit for a 3rd Party Study Abroad Program must obtain permission to do so. The form is available at the study abroad website. The student should work closely with his/her advisor and the Global Education Office regarding this process. Approved Request for Study Abroad Coursework forms are required prior to departure.

Study Abroad Transfer Credit

UNE works only with fully accredited study abroad programs. All courses offered abroad through approved programs are eligible for transfer credit.

With proper planning, study abroad should not interfere with your time to graduate. It is important to work closely with your academic advisor and a the Global Education Office Study to determine which courses to take abroad, how the courses will transfer to UNE, and how they will fit with your degree progress toward graduation. Be aware that:

  • Grades earned abroad are listed on the UNE transcript as “TR” and are not computed in the GPA.
  • A grade of C- or better is required for undergraduate credits to transfer.
  • UNE Program and Departmental requirements for specific courses may also apply

Categories of Transfer Courses

While preparing to study abroad, students will complete a Request for Study Abroad Coursework form which will determine transfer credit equivalencies.

  • Exact Equivalency are designated only when it is clear from the course description that the content of the study abroad course is equivalent to a course offered at UNE. For example, “POS 201 Environmental Politics” at the University of New Brunswick in Canada transfers as “PSC 204 Intro to Politics & the Environment.”
  • Same Subject Elective are study abroad courses for which UNE has a comparable subject area, but not an exact course equivalent. For example, “POS 201 Introduction to Policy” at the University of New Brunswick in Canada transfers as “POS 299 Political Science Elective” indicating that the subject area is Political Science, it is a 200-level course at UNE, and the “99” indicates that it is an elective.
  • General Elective are study abroad courses for which UNE does not offer courses in the specific subject area. General Elective: “are study abroad courses for which UNE does not offer courses in the specific subject area are listed as “ELE 299 General Elective.”

2023–2024 Semester and Term Grade Reports

Semester and term grade reports are issued after examinations have been held at the close of each semester or term and are viewable on U-Online. Semester and term grades reported by faculty members to the Registrar's office are final. Notices of deficiency, if reported, will be viewable at mid-semester on U-Online.

2023–2024 Academic Probation and Dismissal

A student will be placed on academic probation if their grade point average (GPA) at the end of the any semester falls below 1.70 or whose cumulative grade point average is below the minimum acceptable level. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall, spring or summer semester to raise their cumulative GPA to the minimum acceptable level and will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 1.70 for the semester. Failure to meet both of these criteria will result in automatic dismissal from the University for academic deficiency. Following dismissal, any student wishing to re-enroll at the University of New England must apply through the Office of Admissions. A student on academic probation is ineligible to participate in major extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate athletics, or to serve as an officer or director of any student activity. Academic probation is not subject to appeal.

Minimum Acceptable Levels

Earned Hours Minimum cGPA
0 to 30 1.70
30.01 to 45 1.70
45.01 to 60 1.80
60.01 to 75 1.80
75.01 to 90 1.90
90.01 to 105 1.90
105.01 and over 2.00

Note: A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is required for graduation. Higher levels of the minimum acceptable semester and/or cumulative GPA may be established by individual departments or academic programs.

Policy as of Summer 2023 (202401)

2023–2024 Dean’s List

The Dean's List contains the names of full-time matriculating students in good academic standing who have attained a semester grade point average of 3.30 or better. The student must have earned at least 12 credits. A grade of D,F, or I automatically prohibits a student from receiving this citation. A student must have a minimum of three courses other than pass/fail in order to be named to the Dean's List with the exception of individual courses offered for 8–15 credits.

2023–2024 Alpha Chi National College Honor Society

Alpha Chi is a national college honor scholarship society, founded in 1922, with membership limited to third- and fourth-year students enrolled in institutions with Alpha Chi chapters. To be eligible for active membership, a student must be in the top 10 percent of the third or fourth year.

2023–2024 Declaration and Change of Major

If Undeclared, before March 15 of the second year, a student is required to make a formal declaration of major using the appropriate form available online or from the University Registrar’s Office. Students declaring majors in marine biology, medical biology, and elementary education are asked to declare by the end of the first year. This declaration must be signed by the advisor and the chair/director of the major department. The declared major must be an existing, approved academic program of study. See undergraduate catalog (majors) for existing programs of study.

Note 1: Change of major requests received mid-semester will become effective the next semester.

Note 2: Change of major requests will not be processed in the student’s final semester at the University.

Personal Major (College of Arts and Sciences Only)

In exceptional circumstances College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) students may propose a personal major as an alternate to a traditional academic major degree program. Personal major degree programs must have sponsorship of an academic department within CAS and approval of the CAS Dean’s office. To receive approval of a personal major degree program an undergraduate student must work collaboratively with college/department faculty and the CAS academic dean to design and describe a proposed comprehensive program that combines core curriculum, departmental requirements, and a course of study reflecting the student's personal scholarly interests. Approval to begin planning and eventually submit a personal major proposal must be obtained through the CAS Dean’s office. To be eligible for consideration of a personal major, students must be in their second year of study and are required to have a minimum 2.50 overall GPA. A student pursuing a Personal Major must matriculate, without exception, the equivalent of one full academic year, full time status (30 credit hour minimum) after the approval of his/her degree program. Additional policies and procedures regarding proposal protocols are available through the CAS Dean’s office.

2023–2024 Academic Minors

The University of New England offers the option for students to petition for a minor program of study. A "minor" is a structured plan of study outside the student's major. A student must have a declared major prior to declaring a minor. See undergraduate catalog (minors) for available options. The minimum amount of credits required for a minor is 18 credits. Minors do not appear on UNE diplomas.

Note: Minors will not be added in the student’s final semester at the University.

2023–2024 Student Advising

The University of New England assigns professional advisors and faculty mentors to each first- and second-year student. Third- and fourth-year students will transition to have their faculty mentor as their primary advisor. Students are required to visit an advisor at least once a semester and during important milestones. Advisors serve as the student's primary resource for academic and career guidance planning.

2023–2024 Response Time and End-of-Term Processing

Due to production demands in registration services (both campuses), requests for student records services cannot be processed on demand. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

At the end of each fall and spring semester, Registration Services must process significant volumes of grades, completions, and verifications after all final grades are submitted by instructors. This end-of-term processing is not finished for a minimum of two weeks after the last final exam.

For students graduating at the end of spring semester degree verification, posting, and diploma printing/mailing must be done after end-of-term grades are processed. Diplomas are not normally mailed for a minimum of six-eight weeks after the last final exam. Students are advised to anticipate waiting these periods of time, and should plan ahead when working with employers, graduate schools, agencies, or licensing bureaus when ordering transcripts, grade reports, or degree verifications.

2023–2024 Transcripts

No official transcript will be issued until all financial obligations have been met. Transcripts are issued only at the written and signed request of the student.

The purpose of this policy is to protect the privacy of the individual concerned and to minimize the possibility of the use of another's transcripts for fraudulent purposes. Students are advised to plan on a three-to-five-business day turn-around on requests.

Official transcripts are normally issued directly to other educational institutions or prospective employers designated by the student. Official transcripts issued to the student for purposes of transport to another party can be provided in a sealed envelope but will be considered unofficial if opened by the student. Unsealed transcripts issued directly to students are considered unofficial and may be stamped Issued to Student.

Please note: GI Bill® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official U.S. government Website at http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill

CAS Core Curriculum

CAS Core Curriculum uneadmin

The College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum (Core) provides an innovative common learning experience for all undergraduates in the college. The Core invites students to explore four college-wide themes from multiple disciplinary perspectives and to develop important intellectual skills. Students focus on a theme each year: Environmental Awareness (first year), Social and Global Awareness (second year), Critical Thinking (third year), and Citizenship (fourth year). Skills of communication, quantitative reasoning, and critical thinking are taught throughout the Core. Designed to provide a foundation in the liberal arts, the Core reflects the values of the college and prepares students for living informed, thoughtful, and active lives in a complex and changing society.

2023–2024 First Year Theme

Environmental Awareness

All entering students enroll in Introduction to Environmental Issues and a four-credit Laboratory Science course. Students discover science as a process and discuss the role of science and technology in society. The laboratory science course also serves to introduce the scientific method as an approach to knowledge, while infusing consideration of issues pertaining to environmental awareness.

As part of the first-year experience, students enroll in one Humanities Exploration course and a subsequent Humanities or Social/Behavioral Sciences Exploration course. These courses are designed to foster student inquiry into engaging academic topics. Each Exploration course introduces the intellectual tools of the discipline in which it is offered, encouraging students to understand the liberal arts as including distinctive ways of understanding. All Exploration courses promote writing as a tool of expression and explicitly teach critical thinking skills.

2023–2024 Second Year Theme

Social and Global Awareness

Students come to understand the human experience by means of two specific types of courses: Social and Global Awareness (SGA) and Human Traditions (HT).

In the SGA courses, human experience is explored in cultural, societal, national, and global contexts. Students use perspectives and methods of the social and behavioral sciences to examine human interaction and growth. Students complete two SGA courses in the second year.

In HT courses, human experience is examined within the traditions of the humanities. Students inquire into the rise and fall of civilizations; study works of art and literature; and, examine the philosophical, religious, and economic ideas that shaped ancient cultures and the modern world. Students complete two HT courses in the second year, with one focused on human prehistory to approximately 1500 and the other focused on human cultures from 1500 to the present day.

2023–2024 Third Year Theme

Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges

This theme is offered through students’ major programs of study and builds upon the knowledge and skills students have developed during their first two years. This theme and approach enhance students’ ability to deal with the complex problems and issues they confront in their upper-level major courses. Each academic program requires its majors to enroll in a course where students and faculty engage in informed critical and creative thinking about problems confronting their discipline. Grounded in the thinking process as well as on the issues, students research and identify causes of problems, generate and evaluate possible solutions, and decide upon a plan of action.

2023–2024 Fourth Year Theme

Citizenship

This theme focuses on preparing students to make a difference in the world, their communities, and their professions. Students enroll in an interdisciplinary seminar and participate in community service and civic activity. During this seminar, students discuss personal, professional, and public responsibilities as they anticipate and share their concerns for the world they are about to enter. The seminar challenges students to understand the balance between making a living and making a life. Activities provide the opportunity to weave together various threads of the Core and the major.

2023–2024 Additional Core Requirements

In the third and fourth years of study, students select two Advanced Studies courses outside of their major area of study and based upon their interests. Major areas are broadly defined as the natural sciences, mathematics, social sciences, humanities, professional programs, and interdisciplinary programs. Advanced Studies courses explore methodologies, theories, and/or concepts important within the disciplines in the College of Arts and Sciences.

At some time in their academic career, all students participate in a Creative Arts Experience (CAE) by taking a specifically designated CAE course or by completing an independent project. This requirement emphasizes the value of students’ creative spirits and uncovers gifts that will sustain students throughout their lives.

2023–2024 College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum Goals and Learning Outcomes

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences will prepare for twenty-first-century challenges by acquiring and demonstrating a variety of separate but interrelated concepts and skills.

Acquire Knowledge

Students will acquire and demonstrate knowledge of and skills in disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and methodologies in all of the following areas humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics.

Develop Skillful Thinking

Students will demonstrate their ability to engage in multiple modes of scholarly inquiry including critical thinking, creative thinking, decision making and problem-solving, and quantitative reasoning.

Expand Expressive Capabilities

Students will demonstrate proficiency in expressing original thought through different avenues including oral, written, graphic, and symbolic communication, and artistic expression.

Demonstrate Understanding of What It Means to Act Responsibly and Ethically

Students will show evidence of a greater understanding of their place in the world and their responsibilities by demonstrating these proficiencies at multiple levels, including personal and interpersonal, academic, civic, environmental.

2023–2024 Subject Area Details

First Year Theme: Environmental Awareness Credits
ENV 100/101 or ENV 104 – Intro to Environmental Issues or ENV 105 – GLC: Intro to ENV Issues 3
One four-credit Laboratory Science course 4
One Humanities Exploration course 3
One Humanities or Social/Behavioral Science Exploration course 3
ENG 110 – English Composition or equivalent or ENG 122 and SAS 011 and ENG 123 (7 cr.) 4
One Mathematics course 3–4
Second Year Theme: Social and Global Awareness Credits
Two Social and Global Awareness courses 6
Human Traditions I*: Prehistory to 1500 (3 cr.) and ARH 276, ENG 276, HIS 276, PHI 276, PSC 276 or REL 276 3
Human Traditions II*: 1500 to Present (3 cr.) and ARH 278, ENG 278, HIS 278, PHI 278, PSC 278 or REL 278 3
Third Year Theme: Critical Thinking Credits
Critical Thinking: Offered as part of major coursework Variable
Advanced Studies**: Two in total, completed in third and/or fourth year 6
Fourth Year Theme: Citizenship Credits
CIT 400 - Citizenship Seminar (1 cr.) or CIT 420 - Global Citizenship (1 cr.) 1
Once Across the Four Years Total of 6 Credits
One Creative Arts Experience course 3
Total CAS Core Curriculum Credits 42–43

*Students must take Human Traditions I and Human Traditions II from different disciplines.
**To fulfill the advanced studies requirement the ADV courses must have a prefix that is different from the prefix of courses that are used by the student to satisfy two or more 200-, 300- or 400-level program requirements. Students who double major or who pursue a dual degree may take any ADV course to fulfill their core curriculum requirement. Students who major and minor may select their ADV courses that overlap with their minor program requirements if they so choose.

2023–2024 University Core Curriculum Summary and Objectives

The Core Curriculum emphasizes active, collaborative, and experiential learning. It challenges students to transfer knowledge from one academic area to another, appreciate different disciplinary perspectives on the same topic, and integrate what they have learned to construct their own knowledge. Courses in the Core cultivate effective oral and written communication, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills, and issues of diversity. The curriculum provides an interwoven and reinforced set of experiences in Core courses, in major or professional requirements, in special all-campus events, and in general college life. The faculty at the University of New England believes that our Core Curriculum is intrinsically valuable and that it helps us to influence our graduates to be better citizens and to be well equipped to contribute to society.

A more thorough description of the Core is available through the College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Office.

2023–2024 Core Counting Rules for Double Majors and Minors

A student who double majors or who pursues a dual degree may count any relevant core attribute toward both the core and the major/minor. If a student has completed the requirements of the core in their primary degree or completed the requirements of the core in their second degree, then the student has met the core requirements.

The Core attributes are Environmental Studies, Math, English Composition, Laboratory Science, Creative Arts Experience, Exploration, Social and Global Awareness, Human Traditions, Citizenship, and Advanced Study. All programs of study (majors/minors) fall into one of the following areas: humanities, natural sciences, professional programs, social sciences, interdisciplinary programs, or math.

WCHP Common Curriculum

WCHP Common Curriculum uneadmin

The Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) Common Curriculum is designed to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to engage in liberal arts and science coursework while exploring health profession study. Contemporary education in the health professions is demanding and unique. The shaping of a competent health professional requires strong traditional liberal arts and sciences foundations, comprehensive disciplinary knowledge, and the advancement of interprofessional abilities. The construction of the WCHP Common Curriculum supports the development of the student in this educational endeavor.

The WCHP Common Curriculum is constructed around three (3) domains of study: Study in the Arts and Sciences, Interprofessional Education and Discipline-specific Study.

Study in the Arts and Sciences

Engagement in the arts and sciences provides an essential underpinning for health profession study and renders a framework for the first two academic years. This arena serves to develop important intellectual skills, and is characterized by a well-scaffolded sequence of biological course work and study in social-behavioral science. Quantitative reasoning and critical thinking are examined through mathematics and scientific inquiry. Written and oral communication abilities are cultivated through English composition and supporting exploratory humanities. Elements of the College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum are interwoven throughout, providing academic offerings in creative arts, social-global awareness, humanities exploration, and advanced studies/ human traditions course work. Understanding in the arts and sciences is additionally fostered through other special co-curricular campus events and throughout general collegiate life. Study in the arts and sciences supports the development of effective communication skills, critical thinking abilities, quantitative reasoning and exploration of issues related to societal and global diversity.

Interprofessional Education

Contemporary health profession practice demands that graduates be competent not only in disciplinary expertise but also with knowledge and skills in interprofessional collaboration. This requires health professionals to learn with, from, and about each other in gaining competence in communication, teamwork, understanding of roles and responsibilities, and ethical comportment. Two required interprofessional education courses (IPE) examine these competencies, providing students with the opportunity to engage in increasingly complex problem solving, work collaboratively in teams, apply interpersonal communication principles, and explore ethical considerations for high-quality patient and population care. Interprofessional course work is delivered in year one through a first year experience (FYE) course, and in year 2 through a course exploring ethical principles and practice. Application occurs through experiential learning within the major, co-curricular seminars, IPE elective courses, and service-learning activities.

2023–2024 Discipline-specific Study

Engagement in the major is prominent during years three and four of health profession course work. Study within the major provides the student with experiential learning opportunities integrating foundational cognitive, psychomotor, and affective knowledge gained from study in the arts and sciences and IPE. Disciplinary education is informed by classroom learning experiences, guided hands-on clinical laboratory, facilitated simulation exercises, and diverse experiences in fieldwork and clinical practice sites. Study within the major advances critical and creative thinking within the discipline instills a spirit of inquiry and life-long learning, and upholds the imperative of citizenship within a complex, changing society.

2023–2024 WCHP Common Curriculum Objectives

  • Employ critical thinking and problem-solving skills in the study of the health professions.
  • Examine ethical knowledge, professional standards, and values congruent with interprofessional practice.
  • Demonstrate effective communication and interprofessional collaboration abilities.
  • Appraise knowledge of self and personal fit in preparation for& interprofessional health practice.

2023–2024 WCHP Common Curriculum Summary

The WCHP Common Curriculum is outcomes-oriented and emphasizes active, engaged approaches to learning. It challenges students to acquire and then integrate knowledge across fields of study in shaping a capable and competent health professional. The faculty in the Westbrook College of Health Professions uphold the Common Curriculum as an essential component to producing graduates who are highly effective in their disciplinary practice, competent with interprofessional collaboration, and informed citizens ready to contribute to a complex, dynamic society.

Student Academic Success

Student Academic Success uneadmin

The Student Academic Success Center (SASC) provides a comprehensive array of academic support services, including placement evaluation, courses, workshops, tutoring, writing support, digital project support, and learning consultations. The Student Academic Success Center is dedicated to supporting all students in their pursuit of being independent, effective, and successful learners.

2023–2024 Placement

Incoming undergraduate students will be placed in an appropriate writing course or math course based on a review of multiple measures of their achievement, including high school grade point average, course grades in math and English, Advanced Placement credit, SAT/ACT scores, or transfer credit.

Students who do not meet the University's predetermined criteria are placed into an appropriate developmental mathematics course, developmental writing course, or both. These courses (prefixed with SAS) are subject to the academic policies and procedures set forth by CAS and CHP. SAS courses, however, do not satisfy core curriculum or graduation requirements.

Students receive notification of their placement prior to course registration. Students who feel that their initial placement does not accurately reflect their ability are encouraged to challenge placement.

Mathematics

Students are assigned one of five placement levels in Mathematics.
 

  • L2: Introduction to Algebra and Problem Solving (SAS 021)
  • L3: Advanced Algebra and Problem Solving (SAS 022), Quantitative Reasoning (MAT 110 or MAT 110G), Statistics (MAT 120), or Applications of Functions (MAT170)
  • L4: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (MAT 130), Statistics for the Life Sciences (MAT 150), or Pre-calculus (MAT 180)
  • L5: Calculus I (MAT 190) or Geometry (MAT 240)
  • L6: Calculus II (MAT 195), Linear Algebra (MAT 220), or Foundations of Mathematics (MAT 230).

To challenge math placement students may submit additional evidence of achievement, including Advanced Placement scores and updated or additional transcripts. In particular, students who enrolled in any mathematics class during their senior year should send a final senior transcript directly to the Developmental Mathematics Supervisor at the SASC.

Writing

Based on the placement process, students are assigned one of these courses in Writing.

  • English Composition with Writing Lab (ENG 110+SAS 011)
  • English Composition (ENG 110)

The Writing Placement Process considers multiple measures of each student's current skill in writing to determine the most appropriate writing course. Measures of writing skill include reported high school GPA, high school English grades, and in some cases, grades in writing-intensive college courses.

Students wishing to challenge their initial placement may submit additional evidence as detailed in the Writing Placement Challenge procedure. For more information, email writingplacement@une.edu.

2023–2024 Tutoring

The SASC offers professional and peer content tutoring and digital project support for a wide variety of courses. Peer and professional writing support services are also available. Peer tutors complete a training program certified by the College Reading and Learning Association. Currently enrolled students will find tutors' regularly scheduled hours accessible online at une.tutortrac.com.

2023–2024 Individual Consultation

Learning specialists are available (by appointment) to meet students seeking assistance with their study and learning practice. Consultations regarding learning strategy, note-taking skills, active reading skills, time management skills, test-taking skills, and preparation for professional boards are available.

Student Enrollment Status

Student Enrollment Status uneadmin

2023–2024 Student Enrollment Status

The University of New England classifies student credit load status for the purposes of financial aid loan deferments. The following table applies credit hour enrollment to full-time, three-quarter time, and half-time status.

Program Classification Credits
Undergraduate Full Time 12 or more
Undergraduate Three-quarter time 9–11.9
Undergraduate Half time 6–8.9
Undergraduate Less than half time 1–5.9

Animal Behavior

Contact

Dr. Jennifer Stiegler-Balfour
jstiegler@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Animal Behavior
Sections

Mission

The Animal Behavior program prepares students to be critical, flexible thinkers who evaluate and integrate information, and who use the scientific method to better understand proximate and ultimate drivers of behavior, to improve the lives of animals and human-animal interactions, and to conserve the species.

The Animal Behavior program realizes its mission through a rigorous interdisciplinary curriculum, a focus on career readiness and internship experiences, and by challenging students with opportunities for undergraduate research both in and out of the classroom. Specifically, the interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to build concept and skill mastery in the discipline of animal behavior and includes coursework in the fields of psychology (the student of behavior and mental processes) and biology (the study of the living world; including marine and environmental sciences), among other disciplines. By the time students graduate, they will know how to think like scientists and be able to effectively articulate focal animal behavior concepts in writing and in speech. Our students will also practice ethical and socially responsible professionalism that will see them through unpredictable career paths. Importantly, the Animal Behavior program will push students intellectually by providing opportunities for research in the classroom as well as outside of the classroom setting, and in doing so will create graduates who are career-ready but also professionally flexible; able to enter the workforce and pursue graduate education.

Major Description

Animal Behavior is an interdisciplinary major with students taking courses in a variety of departments to gain an appreciation of the discipline from multiple perspectives. Animal behavior is the scientific study of not only everything an animal does but why it does it. This major is designed for students who are interested in understanding why animals act the way they do on a proximate and ultimate level. An animal behavior major can lead to employment in national parks, research laboratories, veterinary clinics, animal shelters, aquariums or zoos, or academia. Students who are planning on attending a graduate program in this field should be prepared not only to maintain an appropriately high GPA but also to conduct research in a laboratory on campus or at another institution.

The Animal Behavior program's core values reflect those of the larger University community. We place particular emphasis on the following values:

  • Student Centeredness underpins everything we do
  • We respect diversity in all its forms and actively pursue an inclusive academic environment
  • We recognize and work to conserve the diversity of life as Stewards of the Planet
  • We promote and practice Relentless Inquiry as we seek truth

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Course Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution w/Lab or MAR 105/105L – Eco/Evo of Marine Organisms w/Lab 4
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular w/Lab or MAR 106/106L – Cell/Molec Bio/Marine Orgs w/Lab 4
BIO 322 – Comparative Animal Physiology or BIO 245 – General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology & Pathophysiology 4
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab or CHE 150/150L – University General Chem I w/Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab or CHE 151/151L – University General Chem II w/Lab 4
MAT 180 – Precalculus Credits included in Core
Organismal topic** 3-4
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 225 – Psychology Statistics 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development in Context Credits included in Core
PSY 275 – Intro-Tech in Animal Behavior 3
PSY 285 – Research Methods 3
PSY 335 – Comparative Animal Behavior 3
PSY 362 – Animal Cognition 3
PSY 365 – Biological Bases of Behavior 3
PSY 384/384L – Animal Learning and Behavior w/Lab 4
PSY 425 – Advanced Methods in Animal Behavior 3
PSY 495 – Animal Behavior Internship/Research 3–12
Animal Behavior Electives* 6–13
Total Program-Specific Credits 60+
General Electives Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

**Three (3) Animal Behavior electives are required if the Animal Behavior internship is 3–4 credits. If the internship is five (5) or more credits, then only two (2) electives are required. Other courses may be applied as electives with the approval of the School of Social and Behavior Sciences director or assistant academic director.

Elective options Credits
BIO 232 – Microbiology 3
BIO 235 – Winter Natural History 3
BIO 333 – Evolution 3
BIO 345 – General Prin Anat/Phys/Pathophys 5
BIO 350 – Ecology 4
BIO 422/422L – Coral Biology w/Lab 4
BIO 459/459L – Conserv and Ecol Caribbean Isl w/Lab 4
ENV 208 – Climate Change 3
ENV 250 – Environ Policy Compare Perspect 3
ENV 318 – Advanced Methods in Avian Ecology 4
ENV 319 – Practicum in Field Ecology Squirrels 1
ENV 356 – Terrestrial Wildlife and Ecology 4
MAR 250 – Marine Biology 4
MAR 252 – Nat His Marine Mammals 3
MAR 376 – Bio of Sharks, Skates, Rays 3
MAR 428 – Marine Conservation 3
MAR 436/436L – Natural History of Iceland w/Lab 4
PHY 110/110L – General Physics I w/Lab 4
PHY 111/111L – General Physics II w/Lab 4
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 226 – Motivation & Emotion 3
PSY 245 – Evolutionary Psychology 3
PSY 278 – Captive Animal Management 3
PSY 305 – Special Topics (with program approval) 3
PSY 308 – Animal Communication 3
PSY 316 – Psychology of Consciousness 3
PSY 325 – Psychology of Aging 3
PSY 330 – Psychology of Stress 3
PSY 370 – Drugs, Society, Behavior 3
PSY 383 – Memory & Cognition 3
PSY 364 – Soc & Emot Dev in Childhood 3
PSY 371 – Conservation Behavior 3
PSY 372 – Foraging Behavior 3
PSY 406 – Special Topics in Animal Behavior 3

*Organismal topics courses must be 200-level or higher and include a hands-on component. These courses include BIO 222 Finfish/Shellfish Culture Tech; BIO 223 Health Nutrition Feeding of Cultured Organisms; BIO 235 Winter Natural History; BIO257/257L Costa Rica: Tropical Forest and Global Change w/Lab; BIO 305/305L Mammalogy w/Lab; BIO 319 Ornithology; BIO 330 Comp Vert Anatomy; ENV 318 Adv Research Methods Avian Ecol; ENV 356 Terrestrial Wildlife Eco/Cons; MAR 320 Invert Zoology; MAR 331 Biology of Fishes; MAR 355 Biology Marine Mammals; MAR 436/436L Natural History of Iceland w/ Lab; MAR 452/452L Natural History and Evolution of Galapagos Fauna w/Lab; PSY 372 Foraging Behavior; PSY 406 Spec Topics Animal Behavior.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

A grade point average of 2.25 is necessary to be approved to add a major in Psychology, Animal Behavior, or Neuroscience, and to add a minor in Psychology, Animal Behavior, Neuroscience, Art Therapy, or MHRT/C. Double majoring or majoring and minoring within the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences may be possible for a student. However, students interested in this option should do so with close consultation with their academic advisor to ensure that a substantial degree of overlap between the two areas does not occur.

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all courses used to fulfill the requirements for the Animal Behavior major. Students must also complete the University Core mathematics requirement by the end of the first year. The program strongly recommends that students take PSY 225 and PSY 285 in their sophomore year. The program requires that PSY 225 and PSY 285 be completed by the end of the junior year. See Undergraduate Academic Policy also.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their bachelor's degree program in Animal Behavior, students will be able to

  • Exhibit critical and integrative thinking skills
  • Demonstrate ability to communicate scientific information in both oral and written formats
  • Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts in animal behavior
  • Exhibit quantitative research skills (or demonstrate ability to perform all parts of the scientific method)
  • Demonstrate ability to think flexibly and apply knowledge to new problems

Minor

A student with GPA of at least 2.25 and a major at UNE may minor in Animal Behavior with the approval of the assistant academic director. Declarations must occur prior to the completion of the first semester of the junior year. Major programs of study with significant course overlap with animal behavior minor requirements may be disallowed by the academic director. Students declaring a minor in animal behavior will not be allowed to double-dip credits across the minor and either major or core requirements (unless no other options are provided by the major, minor, or core requirements). A minimum of eighteen (18) hours of approved course credit with a minimum grade of "C-" in each course is required for the minor in Animal Behavior as follows:

Courses Credits
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 335 – Comparative Animal Behavior 3
PSY 365 – Biological Bases of Behavior 3
One Organismal Topic (see above) 3–4
Animal Behavior Elective (see above) 3–4
PSY 384/384L – Animal Learning and Behavior  4
Minimum credits 19

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship, or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Anthropology

Category
Contact

Mike Burman
Academic Director of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
mburman@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Anthropology
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Society, Culture, and Languages programs is to offer a vigorous and exciting broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics. The School of Behavioral and Social Sciences provides a combination of theoretical, scientific, practical, and experiential approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture, as well as hands-on learning, are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for careers in a variety of public and social services and/or for graduate study in related areas.

Minor Description

A minor in Anthropology is the scientific study of the origin, the behavior, and the physical, social, and cultural development of humans. In simple terms, it is the study of humanity. A minor in Anthropology will prepare students to work side by side with civil and industrial engineers, cancer researchers, specialists in public health and medicine, chemists, biologists, and others in the science, technology, and engineering fields as well as pursue careers more directly related to Anthropology.

 

Curricular Requirements

To complete the Minor in Anthropology students must complete six (6) three (3) credit courses in Anthropology. One course (ANT 101) is required of all minors. One course must be at the 300 level or above. Students may include one elective from a related field if approved by the school. Students may count courses taken in the Core Curriculum as part of the minor.

Required Course Credits
ANT 101 – Introduction to Anthropology 3
Choose One (1) Introductory Area Course Credits
ANT 102 – Cultural Anthropology 3
ARC 190 – Cultures Through Archaeology 3
ANT/BIO 103 – Intro to Biological Anthro 3
Choose Four (4) Electives (at least one (1) elective at the 300 or level above) Credits
ARC 190 – Exp Cultures Thru Archaeology 3
ARC 193 – The Origins of Human Society 3
ARC 205 – Archaeological Field Methods in New England Prehistory 3
ARC 235 – Archaeology of New England 3
ANT 101 – Introduction to Anthropology 3
ANT 102 – Cultural Anthropology 3
ANT 103 – Intro to Biological Anthro 3
ANT 118 – Applied Anthropology 3
ANT 211 – Medical Anthropology 3
ANT 224 – Forensic Anthrop/Human Rights 3
ANT 228 – Anthropology of Gender 3
ANT 230 – Anthropology in Latin American and the Caribbean 3
ANT 231 – Culture and Society in the Middle East (Morocco) 3
ANT 241 – Plagues and Populations 3
ANT 312 – Human Trafficking 3
ANT 332 – Anthropology of Magic 3
BIO 328 – Human Evolution 3–4
SOC 370 – Applied Field Methods 3
Courses that can be used as electives with pre-approval Credits
ENV 200 – Society, Population, and Environment: A Global Perspective 3
ENV 341 – Indigenous Ecology, Conservation Biology, and the Politics of Know 3
HIS 210 – Race and Ethnicity Latin America 3
SOC 210 – Displaced Cultures and Society 3
SOC 265 – Social Issues Problem Global World 3
SOC 290 – British Cultural Studies 3
SOC 331 – Latin American Society and Culture Through Cinema 3
Total Credits for Minor 18–19

Learning Outcomes

These goals and outcomes are for the Minor in Anthropology. Each of these goals and outcomes also meets the goals and outcomes of the Social and Cultural Studies programs.

  • Expand the awareness and application of anthropology
  • Examine, apply, and critically assess various anthropological research methods
  • Examine how cultural and social structures operate
  • Examine the diversity of human societies
  • Communicate anthropology effectively

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Applied Exercise Science

Category
Contact

Heath R. Pierce, M.Ed., RSCC*D, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, ACSM EP-C
Program Director, Applied Exercise Science
hpierce@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Applied Exercise Science
Sections

Mission

The Applied Exercise Science (AES) program is a student-centered, innovative, comprehensive program designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for excellence in the fields of exercise science, sport performance, and health and wellness. The curriculum encourages life-long learning through classroom, laboratory, internship, and research experience. Graduates will become highly effective, compassionate allied health care professionals capable of working with varied populations.

Major Description

The AES major is designed to provide graduates with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to perform pre-participatory screening, fitness testing, exercise prescription, and exercise leadership for healthy, health-compromised populations, and athletic performance enhancement. The primary goals of the AES major are to prepare students:

  • For graduate/professional school admissions in various applied health programs including Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Accelerated Nursing, Chiropractic Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Exercise Physiology, and Strength and Conditioning.
  • For entry-level employment as an exercise science professional in various careers including cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, cardiovascular diagnostic testing, strength and conditioning, sports medicine, corporate fitness, and personal training.
  • To successfully challenge accredited national certification examinations.

Curricular Requirements

Total Credits
Minimum required 120–122

First Year

Course Credits
IHS 130 – Interprofessional Health Care First-Year Experience 3
BIO 105 – Bio I: Ecology/Evolution 4
BIO 106 – Bio II: Cellular/Molecular 4
ENG 110 – English Composition or ENG 122/123 - College Reading & Writing I/II 4–6
EXS 101 – Introduction to Applied Exercise Science 1
EXS 120 – Personal Health and Wellness 3
MAT 120 – Statistics 3
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Explorations Course 3
Total 31–33

Second Year

Course Credits
BIO 208 – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
NUTR 220 – Nutrition 3
IHS 310 – Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
ATC 333 – Gross Anatomy 3
One (1) Creative Art Course (ART, ARH, MUS Prefix) 3
EXS 180 – Motor Learning and Performance 3
BIO 209 or BIO 209G – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
CHE 110 – General Chemistry I 4
ATC 101 – Care and prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development 3
Total 33

Third Year

Course Credits
ATC 420 – Research Methods 3
EXS 310 – Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3
EXS 320 – Exercise Physiology w/Lab 3
EXS 330 – Fitness Evaluation and Prescription w/Lab 3
EXS 380 – 12 Lead ECG Interpretation w/Lab 3
EXS 392 – Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription w/Lab 3
EXS 495 – AES Seminar 1
BIO 309 – Pathophysiology 3
PHY 110 – General Physics w/ Lab 4
One (1) EXS or ATC Elective Course 3
One (1) EXS, ATC, BIO, CHE, or PHY Elective Course** 3
Total 32

Fourth Year

Course Credits
EXS 340 – Concepts of Strength and Conditioning 3
EXS 432 – Exercise Management for Chronic Disease & Disability 3
EXS 322 – Metabolism and Bioenergetics of Sport Nutrition 3
One (1) Advanced Studies Course 3
EXS 499 – Internship* 6
One (1) EXS, ATC, BIO, CHE, or PHY Elective Course** 3
ATC 306 – Psychology of Sport and Exercise 3
Total 24

*Internship experience

The senior-level culminating experience may be either EXS 499 taken as a six-credit field experience internship (taken in the summer, fall, or spring) or a combination of (2) EXS 499 three-credit field experience internships totaling six credits. Each student is required to complete a minimum of 270 hours (45 hours/credit) under the direct supervision of an approved clinical internship site supervisor. To be eligible to complete the internship the student must: be senior-level status with a minimum of 90 earned credits, be in good standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater, and be compliant with all academic and technical standards. Failure to achieve these academic standards may delay graduation.

**EXS, ATC, BIO, CHE, or PHY Electives (9 credits)

An elective course substitution is allowed per permission of the Exercise and Sports Performance Department chair.

Academic and Technical Standards

Students accepted to the Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) at the University of New England are subject to two sets of academic guidelines, one to meet minimum qualifications for ongoing enrollment at the University of New England and the other to meet specific program requirements.

National Strength and Conditioning Association - Education Recognition Program Endorsement

WCHP Common Curriculum Standards

Semesters one through four (freshman and sophomore years)

  1. In keeping with the guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows
    Semester Minimum Cumulative GPA
    Fall of first year 1.70
    Spring of first year 1.70
    Fall of second year 1.70
    Spring of second year 1.80
  2. Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the Catalog of the University of New England.
  3. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in the following courses: MAT 120, BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 309, EXS 101, EXS 120, EXS 180, ATC 101, PSY 105 and IHS 220/NUTR 220. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a “C” will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  4. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C-” in the following courses: CHE 110 and PHY 110. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a “C-” will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  5. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a "C" or "C-" in any of the above-outlined courses requires the student to repeat the course.
  6. Failure to achieve a minimum of a "C" or "C-" a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  7. A student may enroll in any of the courses listed above a maximum of two times. Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade. Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.

Applied Exercise Science Program Standards

Semesters four through eight (junior and senior years)

Minimum acceptable semester-end GPA 2.5
Minimal grade of a C or better in any EXS or ATC prefix course 2.0
  1. Once in course work within the major (fall of the junior year and beyond), students must maintain a minimum semester-end grade point average GPA of 2.5. Failure to do so will result in program–level probation and may affect academic progression and delay graduation.
  2. Students whose semester-end GPA falls below the 2.5 threshold for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the program.
  3. Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in each EXS and ATC prefix course.
  4. Failure to achieve a minimum grade of a "C" in each EXS or ATC prefix course requires the student to repeat the course.
  5. Failure to achieve a minimum of a "C" a second time the course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.
  6. A student may only enroll in any EXS or ATC prefix course a maximum of two times. Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP or WF or a letter grade. Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the AES program students will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge in the exercise sciences including anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology, kinesiology and biomechanics, ECG interpretation, exercise testing, and prescription, motor learning, and nutrition.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and clinical proficiency in the following content areas for both apparently healthy and chronic disease populations: a) pre-participation screening/ health risk appraisal and stratification, b) fitness assessment and evaluation c) the design of individually tailored exercise prescription, d) appropriate exercise techniques.
  • Recognize the importance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of safe, high-quality care within the health care system/exercise science field.
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in both oral and written formats.
  • Recognize the importance of ethically-grounded care for diverse clients, patients and/or athletes.
  • Successfully challenge accredited national certification examinations from the American College of Sports Medicine and/or the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

The following criteria must be met for admission to the AES program:

  • A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including chemistry (must include laboratory), biology (must include laboratory), mathematics (two mathematics courses — algebra required, geometry preferred), English (three years required — four years preferred).
  • Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses.
  • Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) is optional. 
  • A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding applicant's complete physical exam.
  • Complete the Common Application.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Accreditation

The University of New England’s AES major received accreditation in January 2019 from the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). The CAAHEP is the largest programmatic accreditor of the health sciences professions. In collaboration with its Committee on Accreditation, CAAHEP reviews and accredits more than 2,100 individual education programs in 30 health science occupations. CAAHEP accredited programs are assessed on an ongoing basis to ensure that they meet the standards and guidelines of each profession.

The AES major has received endorsement since its inception in 2006 from the National Strength and Conditioning Association’s (NSCA) Education Recognition Program (ERP). The NSCA ERP recognizes and distinguishes schools with standardized, approved strength and conditioning curricula in undergraduate settings designed to prepare students for the NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer® (NSCA-CPT®) and NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS®) certifications.

Applied Mathematics

Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics
Sections

Mission

Mathematical Sciences is an integral part of the strong liberal arts tradition at the University of New England. We believe a student's education is enriched by studying mathematics, and our courses support the College of Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum. Our Applied Mathematics major and minor programs provide a solid foundation in contemporary mathematics which prepares students to pursue further study and careers in the mathematical sciences and other quantitative and analytical fields. The Mathematical Sciences faculty mentor student research and are active in original scholarship. Through consulting and research collaborations, we are a resource for students and faculty across the University.

Major Description

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics provides a well-rounded, liberal arts-based education focused on the application of the mathematical sciences for inquiry and problem-solving. The program places emphasis on mathematical modeling and statistical methods, and project-based approaches. The curriculum integrates computational and theoretical approaches to enable students to experience both the power and the beauty of mathematics for problem-solving and exploration. This major gives students the quantitative and analytical skills to support careers in the sciences, business, finance, health, government, and many other fields. The program also prepares students for advanced study in the applied mathematical sciences. Students interested in a double major will find Applied Mathematics to be an excellent complement to majors in the natural sciences and other fields, as many fields continue to experience an increasing reliance on mathematics.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42
Program Required Courses Credits
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences Credits included in Core Requirements
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
MAT 195 – Calculus II 4
MAT 200 – Calculus III 4
MAT 212 – Discrete Mathematics 3
MAT 220 – Linear Algebra 3
MAT 225 – Computer Programming with MATLAB or DSC 225 – Programming I 3
MAT 315 – Applied Mathematics with Differential Equations 3
MAT 321 – Applied Statistics 3
MAT 323 – Applied Regression Analysis 3
MAT 400 – Real Analysis or MAT 405 – Introduction to Numerical Analysis 3
MAT 480 – Mathematics Research Seminar or MAT 490 Topics in Mathematics 3
Total Credits 36
Elective Requirements Credits
Program Elective Courses* 6–8
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) 34–36
Total Elective Credit Requirement 42–44
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Mathematics and/or Science electives at level 300 or above.

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Math can complete a double major with Applied Mathematics and Secondary Education or a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Applied Mathematics. For more information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Applied Mathematics major will:

  • Use mathematical reasoning, modeling, and statistical methods to explore, represent, and communicate about quantitative relationships
  • Apply quantitative methods to solve problems in a variety of disciplines
  • Develop proficiency with algebraic and computational software to investigate mathematical concepts and applications
  • Prepare mathematical documents for dissemination in written and presentation formats
  • Gain analytic and technological skills to support careers in mathematics and related areas, as well as graduate and professional study

Minors

A student with a major in another program may minor in Applied Mathematics with the approval of the academic director. A minimum of 19 hours of approved course credit is required. Students wishing to declare an Applied Mathematics minor should complete a course plan in consultation with a Mathematical Sciences faculty member.

Students may earn a Minor in Applied Mathematics by completing 19–21 credits in the following:

Required Courses Credits
MAT 120 or MAT 150 or MAT 151 3
MAT 190 4
Four additional mathematics courses, including MAT 195 and/or any MAT course at a 200 level or above 12–14
Total 19–21

Honors Program

At this time, Applied Mathematics does not offer an Honors Program.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.

Transferred mathematics courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the mathematics courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives.

All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Applied Social and Cultural Studies

Category
Contact

Zach Olson
Assistant Academic Director
zolson@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Applied Social and Cultural Studies
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Society, Culture, and Languages programs is to offer a vigorous and exciting broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics. The programs provide a combination of theoretical, scientific, practical, and experiential approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture, as well as hands-on learning, are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for careers in a variety of public and social services and/or for graduate study in related areas.

Major Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Applied Social and Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary degree that allows students to integrate coursework from sociology, anthropology, political science, psychology, communications, and other related fields of study. The major core emphasizes social science methods and ways of knowing while introducing students to a variety of social science disciplines. Within the Applied Social and Cultural Studies degree, students will also pursue a concentration in one of the three particular content areas.

In addition to the interdisciplinary approaches to the social sciences, there are two unique elements to this program. First, students complete a 120-hour internship. This helps students to engage in experiential learning, apply social science to the real world, undertake career explorations. Second, upper-level students participate in a semester-long applied sociological experience. One option is an internship with a minimum of 360 hours of engagement to be selected from a variety of area schools, agencies, and programs. A second option is for a student to study abroad. While studying in a foreign society and culture is important, the primary focus is for students to take courses and engage experientially in a way that helps students develop their areas of interest. There needs to be an integrated social science experience that drives the study abroad learning as well as the opportunity to explore a new society and culture for this to be a successful experience.

Overall, this program will provide students with a strong foundation for understanding today's social issues and problems. The student will also have a wide range of skills and experiences that will enhance their future educational and career opportunities as well as enable them to be more active and aware citizens.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
ASCL Fundamental Requirements Credits
SOC 268 – Practice of Social Research 3
SOC 270 – Classical Social Theory or SOC 280 – Contemporary Social Theory 3
SOC 300 – Internship 3
SOC 370 – Applied Field Methods 3
ASCL Fundamental Requirements: Choose three (3) Credits
ANT 102 – Cultural Anthropology 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSC 105 – Introduction to Political Science 3
Additional Requirements Credits
Applied Capstone Experience* 9–16
Concentration Credits** 12
Total Credits in Major 42–49
Open Electives (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

*Applied Capstone Experiences (ACE)

Internship

Students may take between 9 and 16 credits to complete this ACE. Students may select from over 750 sites in the Civic Engagement database. This learning opportunity should parallel the student’s concentration and help him/her to gain experience, skills, and knowledge of how systems work and how to develop contacts in a given field.

Thesis

Students may take between 9 and 16 credits to complete this ACE. The thesis should build on the work the student has done in the ASCS major and his/her chosen concentration. This academic work should prepare them for graduate study in disciplines that have been incorporated into their concentration.

Study Abroad

Students will typically take 15–16 credits to complete a study abroad experience. While studying in a foreign society and culture is important, the primary focus is to take courses from the new institution that will help the student to develop his/her areas of interest as it relates to the major. In short, there needs to be an integrated social science experience that drives the study abroad learning as well as the opportunity to explore a new society and culture for this to be a successful experience. All study abroad experiences should first be cleared with the Academic Director, to see if they qualify to meet the requirement for the Capstone.

**Applied Concentration

There are three concentrations in the ASCS major: Health, Medicine, and Society; Society, Human Services, and Community; and Law, Crime, and Society. As soon as possible after arriving at UNE students should declare their major. By the end of their second-year students should declare their concentration. There are no required courses in any concentration. In each concentration students, in consultation with their advisor, choose four courses from a variety of disciplines that will help them build foundations, skills, and develop expertise in their chosen concentration.

Health, Medicine, and Society

Sample courses include (but are not limited to)

  • ANT 211 – Medical Anthropology
  • SOC 228 – The Sociology of Aging
  • SOC 275 – The Sociology of Food and Health
  • SOC 355 – Medical Sociology
  • PSY 235 – Health Psychology
  • PSC 325 – Politics and Public Health
Society, Human Services, and Community

Sample courses include (but are not limited to)

  • SOC 215 – Poverty
  • SOC 320 – Community Organization
  • SOC 460 – Social Policy and Planning
  • SOC 480 – The Family
  • PSY 236 – Mental Health and Society
  • PSY 370 – Drugs, Society, and Behavior
Law, Crime, and Society

Sample courses include (but are not limited to)

  • ANT 224 – Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights
  • SOC 170 – Deviance and Crime
  • SOC 333 – Sociology of Law
  • SOC 241 – A Just Society?
  • PSY 252 – Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 255 or 255G – Social Psychology
  • CMM 411 – Communication, Law, and Regulation

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

Students in all Social and Cultural Studies programs will explore the world and its diverse people, environments, social/cultural structure, and languages by employing sociological and anthropological theory, research design, analysis, experiential learning, and critical assessment methods. As a result, at the completion of all Social and Cultural Studies Programs, students will be able to recognize and evaluate the nature of social evidence and in doing so be able to articulate and apply appropriate terminology, and theoretical and methodological procedures to the examination of society, culture, and languages across space and time.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences

Contact

Dr. Charles Tillburg
Academic Director
ctillburg@une.edu

Dr. Jeri Fox
jfox@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences
Sections

Mission

The mission of the School of Marine and Environmental Programs at the University of New England is to help our students gain an understanding of the natural world, develop critical thinking skills, and become scientifically literate. Together, we lay a foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful productive contributions to society.

The Marine Sciences encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, how it is related to earth systems science, and how humans interact with the environment. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology to chemistry, geology, and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems in ocean sciences and beyond.

Major Description

The Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences major provides students the opportunity to develop analytical skills in biology and business, and technical skills in the culture and maintenance of marine and freshwater organisms. Students who successfully complete the program should satisfy employment needs in the fields of marine and freshwater aquaculture and in the educational, maintenance and design needs of local, regional and national aquarium museums and businesses. Students who choose to go into graduate programs in these fields should be prepared to do so after maintaining an appropriate GPA in this program.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution Credits included in Core Requirements
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 214/214L – Genetics or BIO 205/205L Fish Genetics 4
BIO 204/204L – Parasitology 4
BIO 221 – Principles of Aquaculture 3
BIO 222/222L – Techniques in Finfish and Shellfish Culture 4
BIO 223/223L – Health, Nutrition, and Feeding of Cultured Organisms 4
BIO 232/232L – Microbiology or BIO 234/234L – Environmental Microbiology 4
BIO 323/323L – Principles of Aquarium Operations and Science 4
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I/Lab or CHE 150/150L – University General Chemistry I/Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II/Lab or CHE 151/151L – University General Chemistry II/Lab 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology 4
MAR 325 – Marine Science Speaker Series 1
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
BIO 495 – Advanced Biological Internship 6
One (1) Cellular and Molecular Biology or Physiology Topic Area Course 3–4
One (1) Ecology/Evolutionary Biology Topic Area Course 3–4
Two (2) Upper-division Business Administration Electives 6
Total Program Required Credits 65–67
Total Minimum Required Credits 120

Topic area program required courses are to be selected in consultation with advisor.

Topic Area Courses

Cellular and Molecular Biology
Cellular and Molecular Biology Area Courses Credits
BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission 3
BIO 203 – Histology 4
BIO 365 – Immunology 3
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
Physiology Topic Area Course
Physiology Area Courses Credits
BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission 3
BIO 208 – Anatomy and Physiology 4
BIO 245 – Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology 4
BIO 322 – Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 404 – Neuroscience 4
MAR 326 – Experimental Animal Physiology 3
MAR 424 – Physiological Ecology of Fish 4

Ecology/Evolutionary Biology Topic Area Course
Ecology/Evolutionary Biology Topic Area Course Credits
BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission 3
BIO 307 – Conservation Genetics 3
BIO 328 – Human Evolution 3
BIO 333 – Evolution 3
MAR 335 – Animal/Behavioral Ecology 4
BIO 350 – Ecology 4

Business Administration Electives

Choose two (2) upper-division Business electives in consultation with an advisor.

Open Business Administration Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Credit
BUMG 200 – Management 3
BUMG 313 – Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship 3
BUMG 335 – International Management 3
BUAC 201 – Financial Accounting 3
BUEC 203 – Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 – Microeconomics 3
BUFI 302 – Personal Finance 3
BUFI 315 – Business Financial Concepts and Skill 3

Highly Recommended Elective Credits

  • CHE 307 - Quantitative Analysis
  • EDU 202 - Curriculum Theory and Design
  • SPC 100 - Effective Public Speaking

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate a strong content-knowledge foundation in their specific field of study (Marine Biology, Oceanography, Marine Entrepreneurship, or Marine Affairs).
  • Students will communicate effectively in both oral and written format to convey their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinary training, and findings to peers, professional audiences, decision-makers, and/or the public.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills in their specific field of study by designing, carrying out, and interpreting the results of their experiments by evaluating the literature published by professionals, by making recommendations to policy makers, and/or by creating and innovating in their field.

Minor

A minor requires 6 biology courses, including the Introductory Biology series. In particular, majors in a Biology or Marine Sciences program who wish to take an AQS minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences Minor Required Courses

  • BIO 105 – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular or BIO 104/104L – General Biology with Lab and one of the following: BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution with Lab or BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular Biology with Lab
  • BIO 221 – Principles of Aquaculture
  • BIO 222/222L – Finfish/Shellfish Culture Techniques with Lab
  • BIO 223/223L – Health/Nutrition/Feeding Cultured Organisms with Lab
  • BIO 323/323L – Principles of Aquarium Operations Science with Lab

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. 

All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Beginning Fall 2023 UNE is no longer accepting students into the Bachelor of Science in Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences. UNE students may still declare the Aquaculture and Aquarium Sciences minor.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Aquaculture, Aquarium Science, and Aquaponics

Category
Contact

Dr. Charles Tilburg
Academic Director
ctilburg@une.edu

Dr. Jeri Fox
jfox@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Aquaculture, Aquarium Science, and Aquaponics
Sections

Mission

The mission of the School of Marine and Environmental Programs at the University of New England is to help our students gain an understanding of the natural world, develop critical thinking skills, and become scientifically literate. Together, we lay a foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful contributions to society and offer a baccalaureate education to students interested in all facets of the marine environment.

Our programs encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, how it is related to earth systems science, and how humans interact with the environment. Students will learn theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology to chemistry, geology, and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems encountered in coastal and marine ecosystems and by the human communities that depend on them.

Major Description

The Aquaculture, Aquarium Science, and Aquaponics major provides students the opportunity to develop analytical skills in biology, marine science, and business, and technical skills in the culture and maintenance of marine and freshwater organisms. Students who successfully complete the program should satisfy employment needs in the fields of marine and freshwater aquaculture and in the educational, maintenance and design needs of local, regional and national aquarium museums and businesses. Students who choose to go into graduate programs in these fields should be prepared to do so after maintaining an appropriate GPA in this program.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 214/214L – Genetics 4
BIO 221 – Principles of Aquaculture 3
BIO 222/222L – Finfish/Shellfish Culture Tech 4
BIO 234/234L – Environmental Microbiology 4
BIO 323/323L – Aquarium Science and Operations 4
BUMG 313 – Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship or BUMK 312 – Entrepreneurship/Sml Business 3
CHE 130/130L – Principles of Chemistry or CHE 150/150L – University General Chem I or CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I 4
GIS 161 – GIS I: Fundamentals of Geospatial Science and Technology 3
MAR 105/105L – Ecology and Evolution of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 106/106L – Cellular and Molecular Biology of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 150/150L – Discovering the Ocean Environment or MAR 270/270L – Oceanography 4
MAR 235 – Sustainable Harvest of Aquatic Organisms 3
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology 4
MAR 305/305L – Aquatic Health Management 4
MAR 495 – Adv Marine Science Internship 4
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
One (1) course Cellular and Molecular Biology Topic Area Course or Physiology Topic Area Course or Ecology/Evolutionary Biology Topic Area Course 3–4
Total Program Required Courses 62–63
Total Minimum Required Credits 120

Topic area program required courses are to be selected in consultation with advisor.

Topic Area Courses

Cellular and Molecular Biology
Cellular and Molecular Biology Area Courses Credits
BIO 203 - Histology 4
BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission. 3
BIO 365 - Immunology 3
BIO 370 - Cell and Molecular Biology 3
Physiology
Physiology Area Courses Credits
BIO 208 - Anatomy and Physiology 4
BIO 245 - Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology 4
BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission. 3
BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 404 - Neuroscience 4
MAR 326 - Experimental Animal Physiology 3
MAR 424 - Physiological Ecology of Fish 4

Ecology/Evolutionary Biology
Ecology/Evolutionary Biology Topic Area Course Credits
BIO 290 may fulfill Biology Area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission. 3
BIO 307 - Conservation Genetics 3
BIO 328 - Human Evolution 3
BIO 333 - Evolution 3
BIO 350 - Ecology 4
MAR 335 - Animal/Behavioral Ecology 4

Recommended Elective Credits (Not required)

  • MAF 200 – Intro to Marine Pollution
  • MAF 210 – Intro to US Ocean Governance
  • MAR 316 – Science in Society
  • MAR 414 – Ocean Food Systems Seminar
  • PHI 201 – Bio-Medical Ethics

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate a strong content-knowledge foundation in their specific field of study (Marine Biology, Oceanography, Marine Entrepreneurship, Marine Affairs, or Aquaculture/Aquarium Science/Aquaponics).
  • Students will communicate effectively in both oral and written format to convey their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinary training, and findings to peers, professional audiences, decision-makers, and/or the public.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills in their specific field of study by designing, carrying out, and interpreting the results of their experiments by evaluating the literature published by professionals, by making recommendations to policy makers, and/or by creating and innovating in their field.

Honors

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. 

All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years. Other options and restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Art

Category
Contact

Sarah Gorham
sgorham@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Art
Sections

Mission

Arts programs develop intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills through an active hands-on curriculum. While imparting foundational expressive skills, the program encourages students to expand their conceptual and perceptual capabilities and make connections between their personal experience and art, science, social science, and the environment. 

Curricular Requirements

A student with a major in another program may minor in Art with the permission of the academic director. This minor provides an in-depth introduction to studio art in both traditional and contemporary practice. Eighteen credit hours as listed are required.

Courses Credits
ART 101 – Watercolor or ART 104 – Painting I 3
ART 118 – Drawing & Design Fundamentals 3
Two (2) Elective Courses from List A, at most one (1) WRT course allowed 6
One (1) Elective Course from list B 3
One (1) Art History (ARH) course 3
Total 18
List A Elective Course Options Credits
ART 101 – Watercolor 3
ART 102 – Photography 3
ART 104 – Painting I 3
ART 105 – Elements of Acting 3
ART 106 – Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 108 – Boatbuilding 3
ART 109 – T-Shirt Design 3
ART 110 – Ceramics I 3
ART 111 – Scientific Illustration 3
ART 113 – Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 114 – Printmaking 3
ART 124 – The Painted Book 3
ART 199 – Topics in Art 3
LIL 120 – Intro to Arts & Humanities Seminar 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Short Fiction 3
List B Elective Course Options Credits
ART 200 – Advanced Drawing 3
ART 206 – Expressions in Clay 3
ART 207 – Landscape Painting 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design 3
ART 234 – Digital Animation 3
ART 299 – Advanced Topics in Arts 3
ART 395 – Studio Concentration Seminar 3

Academic and Technical Standards

No course grade below C (2.0) in a content area will be accepted towards degree completion. If a grade below C is attained in a required arts course, that course must be retaken until at least a C is received for degree credit. 

Learning Outcomes

Through directed and experiential learning, courses in the creative arts introduce understanding of methods, materials, processes, and their application. Students learn to think concretely and intuitively through hands-on experiences. Instructors provide historical and contemporary models to convey these concepts. Learning through the arts allows students to acquire a variety of separate but interrelated concepts and skills to demonstrate knowledge of the creative process, craftsmanship, and personal voice.

Students successfully completing an arts class or minor will:

  • Be able to determine and demonstrate concrete methods and processes for research and creation, or performance, in the arts. Accordingly, they will be able to demonstrate skill in graphic and/or symbolic communication.
  • Be able to assemble or perform work that demonstrates standards of craftsmanship in the discipline. Accordingly, they will learn methods of writing, discussion and critique of creative works of art or music.
  • Develop skills that expand their expressive capabilities, with the goal of developing a distinct personal voice that emphasizes their interests and experiences.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Art Education K-12

Category
Contact

Sarah Gorham, Arts Program
sgorham@une.edu

Lane W. Clarke, Education Department
lclarke1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Art Education
Sections

Mission

Arts programs are staffed by a community of professional artists with national reputations. The mission of the faculty is to nurture and encourage students' individual growth, development, and expression while preparing them to pursue a professional career. After a firm grounding in the foundations, students are mentored in the development of an original body of work in their preferred medium.

Major Description

The Arts programs, in collaboration with the Department of Education, offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in art education. Staffed by professional scholars and artists with national reputations, students learn the theory and practice of education as well as effective educational strategies that prepare them as elementary and secondary teachers. Through in-depth study in the studio, culminating in an exhibition of their personal work developed in the Studio Concentration Seminar students will gain a strong understanding of the artistic process and their own expressive capabilities. Students will leave the program as skilled and confident advocates for the arts with Maine state teaching certification (levels K-12) in the visual arts.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–26
Required Art Courses Credits
ART 104 – Painting I Credits included in Core Requirements
ART 110 – Ceramics I 3
ART 113 – Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 114 – Printmaking 3
ART 118 – Drawing & Design Fundamentals 3
ART 200 – Advanced Drawing 3
ART 395 – Studio Concentration Seminar 3
ARH 210 – Art History Survey I 3
ARH 211 – Art History Survey II 3
ARH 260 – Renaissance & Baroque Art or ARH 270 – Art in the Modern World 3
One (1) Elective Course from List A 3
One (1) Elective Course from List B 3
Total 33
Required Education Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching Credits included in Core Requirements
EDU 110 – Supporting 21st Century Learning/Tech 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment 3
EDU 382 – Reading/Lang/Child Lit: Adolescents 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
EDU 441 – Methods in Art Education 3
EDU 484 – K-12 Internship (Art) 12
EDU 488 – Secondary or Art Ed Practicum 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Class 3
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data Based Decision Making 3
Total 36
Open elective courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Elective Course Options

List A Elective Course Options Credits
ART 101 – Watercolor 3
ART 102 – Photography 3
ART 106 – Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 108 – Boatbuilding 3
ART 109 – T-Shirt Design 3
ART 111 – Scientific Illustration 3
ART 124 – The Painted Book 3
ART 199 – Topics in Art 3
LIL 120 – Introductory Arts & Humanities Seminar 3
List B Elective Course Options Credits
ART 206 – Expressions in Clay 3
ART 207 – Landscape Painting 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design 3
ART 234 – Digital Animation 3
ART 299 – Advanced Topics in Art 3
PSY 430 – Intro to Art Therapy 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Short Fiction 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Environments 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3

Field Experience

The faculty in the Department of Education is committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific competency-based focus to meet the Maine standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in teacher preparation will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, teaching lessons, conducting experiments, administering assessments, etc.). Transportation to and from schools is the responsibility of the student.

Internship

Without specific permission from the Education Department Chair, courses may not be taken during the internship semester, so all required coursework must be completed the semester prior to the internship. Admission to the internship is not guaranteed (see section on “Admission requirements and successful progression in the program”). In addition, the student should have:

  • Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  • Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  • Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  • Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  • Understanding of and empathy for working with students.
  • No serious reservations identified on the Student Assessment of Professional Attributes (SAPA) instrument.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer. Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects both schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Department of Education, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests. The 15-week student teaching experience must be done in a local Maine Public School that is in an established internship protocol with the University of New England.

Professional Educator Review Board

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence with respect to Maine Common Core Teaching Standards before the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB). The Board is comprised of professional educators from area schools as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a presentation reflecting their proficiency in meeting these state standards and present and defend the presentation in front of the Board. Passing PERB is a requirement for completion of the certification program and subsequently being recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their bachelor's degree, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards
  • Demonstrate professionalism through accountability and engagement
  • Demonstrate ability to communicate effectively in both written and oral formats
  • Demonstrate appropriate dispositions as defined by professional expectations

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog. 

Art Therapy

Category
Contact

Michael Cripps
Academic Director and Professor, School of Arts and Humanities
mcripps@une.edu

Michael Burman
Academic Director and Professor, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
mburman@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Art Therapy
Sections

Minor Description

The School of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the School of Arts and Humanities jointly offer a Minor in Art Therapy.

Art Therapy is a burgeoning field that draws from the disciplines of psychology, art, and other creative processes to promote healing and overall well-being for individuals with mental and physical disabilities.

The minor provides a basic foundation for continued study or for work in community art programs and organizations where art is used as part of the therapeutic process.

The permission of the Academic Director in either the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences or the School of Arts and Humanities is required.

Curricular Requirements

A student with GPA of at least 2.25 and a major at UNE may minor in Art Therapy with the approval of the academic director of the School of Art and Humanities or the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Declarations must occur prior to the completion of the first semester of the junior year. Major programs of study with significant course overlap with art therapy minor requirements may be disallowed by the Academic Director.

The minor in Art Therapy requires a total of 21 credits (12 from Psychology and 9 from the Arts) with a minimum grade of "C-" in each course. Courses may not be used to fulfill both major and minor requirements. For example, students who must complete PSY 205, Abnormal Psychology, as part of their major may not also use this course to fulfill the Art Therapy requirement. Those students should instead complete either PSY 295, Listening and Communication Skills, or PSY 310, Children and Stress.

Required Psychology Courses Credits
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 410 – Theories, Research, and Practice of Counseling 3
PSY 430 – Introduction to Art Therapy 3
Total Required 12
Required Art Courses (Select 3) Credits
ART 100 – Drawing I 3
ART 101 – Watercolor 3
ART 102 – Photography 3
ART 103 – Introduction to Image Capture 3
ART 104 – Painting I 3
ART 105 – Elements of Acting 3
ART 106 – Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 110 – Ceramics 3
ART 113 – Three-Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 114 – Printmaking 3
ART 118 – Drawing and Design Fundamentals 3
ART 124 – The Painted Book 3
ART 199 – Topics Courses (any media) 3
ART 206 – Expressions in Clay 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography 3
ART 234 – Digital Animation 3
MUS 104 – Introduction to Singing Voice 3
MUS 150 – African Drumming Ensemble 3
Total Required 9
Total Required Credits for Minor 21

In the event that the above courses have been taken to fulfill requirements for the Art Education Major or an Art Minor, students will be required to take 9 credits from the following options:

Alternate Courses Credits
ART 102 – Photography 3
ART 103 – Introduction to Image Capture 3
ART 114 – Printmaking 3
ART 199 – Art Topics Course 3
ART 204 – Painting II 3
ART 214 – Digital Photography 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design 3

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Art and Design Media

Category
Contact

Sarah Gorham
sgorham@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Art and Design Media
Sections

Mission

Arts programs are staffed by a community of professional artists with national reputations. The mission of the faculty is to nurture and encourage students' individual growth, development, and expression while preparing them to pursue a professional career.

After a firm grounding in the foundations, students are mentored in the development of an original body of work in their preferred medium.

Major Description

The School of Arts and Humanities offers a bachelor of arts in Art and Design Media.

The Art and Design Media course of study develops intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills through an active hands-on curriculum taught by professional scholars and artists. While imparting foundational expressive skills in traditional art media, the program encourages students to expand their conceptual and perceptual capabilities and receive training in current technological media that both support the traditional arts and are essential tools in contemporary society.

Developing connections between their personal experience and art, science, social science, and the environment is an important part of the program and is emphasized in a year-long concentration seminar experience (required of all majors) where students choose an area of focus ranging from traditional arts such as painting and ceramics to video production. Majors will gain a strong understanding of the creative process and their own expressive capabilities culminating in an exhibition of their personal creative work. Whether planning a career in the arts or developing innovative interdisciplinary work in a double major, the Art and Design Media program will build diverse strengths and skills for the 21st century student.

Program Description

The Art and Design Media program stresses students' acquisition of skills that represent appropriate professional practices and a clear understanding of how to evaluate their own work for accuracy, expression, and clarity. Among these skills students will develop experience in and knowledge of:

  • Creative and compositional methods across media.
  • The creative process starting from initial sketches and outlines to the finished work. Problem solving is intrinsic to this process.
  • The development of their personal voice through intensive study in the senior capstone year.
  • The link between concept and media.
  • Art history with an emphasis on contemporary practice in Western and Non-Western worlds.
  • Critical thinking and aesthetic assessment both verbal and written.
  • The program provides students with hands-on experience with the tools and latest technologies used in the arts professions in which they will work. They study and learn to:
  • Appreciate, understand and utilize methods of craftsmanship in a variety of media.
  • Develop their knowledge and abilities in graphic and web design, commercially viable skills with broad applicability.
  • Develop working knowledge of the gallery and museum world.

Students are encouraged to link their study of art with other disciplines and have the opportunity to create work that expresses their personal backgrounds and interests. The 36 credits required of an art media major allows them the possibility to double major in English, History, Liberal Studies, Political Science, Math, and Psychology.

Students can also take (3 credit) internships in art and/or communications organizations as part of their course of study. Faculty will work with interested students to facilitate this option.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Curriculum Credits
Total 42–46
Required Courses Credits
ART 104 – Painting I 3
ART 113 – Three Dimensional Fundamentals 3
ART 118 – Drawing & Design Fundamentals 3
ART 200 – Advanced Drawing 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design 3
ART 395 – Studio Concentration Seminar 3
ARH 210 – Art History Survey I or ARH 211 – Art History Survey II or ARH 270 – Art in the Modern World 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography or CMM 300 – Documentary Video or CMM 311 – Digital Video Production or WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Environments 3
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
Nine (9) credits of elective coursework: Three (3) credits of elective coursework must come from List A and the remaining six (6) credits may come from either List A or List B 9
Total 36
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Electives

List A – Elective Options Credits
ART 101 – Watercolor 3
ART 102 – Photography 3
ART 105 – Elements of Acting 3
ART 108 – Boatbuilding 3
ART 109 – T-Shirt Design 3
ART 110 – Ceramics 3
ART 111 – Scientific Illustration 3
ART 114 – Printmaking 3
ART 124 – The Painted Book 3
ART 199 – Topics Course (any media) 3
ART 207 – Landscape Painting 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography 3
ART 234 – Digital Animation 3
ART 299 – Advanced Topics in Arts 3
ART 401 – Creative/Fine Arts Internship 3
List B – Elective Options Credits
CMM 210 – Understanding Media 3
CMM 300 – Photo and Video Documentation 3
CMM 311 – Digital Video and Audio Production 3
CMM 430 – Internship in Communication 3
HIS 345 – Museums & Public History 3
LIL 120 – Introductory Arts & Humanities Seminar 3
WRT 111 – Topics in Creative Writing 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Short Fiction 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Environments 3
WRT 312 – Fiction Writing Workshop 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3
HIS 345 – Museums & Public History 3

An average GPA of 2.0 or higher is required for this degree.

View the Suggested Progression for Art and Media Majors (PDF)

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

Through directed and experiential learning, courses in the creative arts introduce understanding of methods, materials, and processes and their application. Students learn to think concretely and intuitively through hands-on experiences. Instructors provide historical and contemporary models to convey these concepts. Learning through the arts allows students to acquire a variety of separate but interrelated concepts and skills to demonstrate knowledge of the creative process, craftsmanship, and personal voice. Students successfully completing arts study will:

  • Be able to determine and demonstrate concrete methods and processes for research and creation, or performance, in the arts. Accordingly, they will be able to demonstrate skill in graphic and/or symbolic communication.
  • Be able to assemble or perform work that demonstrates standards of craftsmanship in the discipline. Accordingly, they will learn methods of writing, discussion, and critique of creative works of art or music.
  • Develop skills that expand their expressive capabilities, with the goal of developing a distinct personal voice that emphasizes their interests and experiences.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Biochemistry

Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry
Sections

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter — its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science, it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn, is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science and has applications diverse areas of research, including the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. Understanding living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, biochemistry, and laboratory science, and minors in chemistry biochemistry, and biophysics, the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics. Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in biochemistry, with its balanced curriculum, assures that each student will gain a solid biochemical foundation, while securing a substantial foundation in the other major chemical subdisciplines, including analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical chemistry.

This major is an excellent choice for students who are especially interested in studying the infrastructure and applications of chemistry in biological systems. With appropriate choice of courses, graduates will be prepared for entry into graduate programs in chemistry, biochemistry, or the biomedical sciences, and well-prepared for professional programs in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, and many other fields that rely on chemistry as a fundamental science.

Students wishing to enter the job market immediately after completion of their degree program have available to them a wide range of career opportunities in both the public and private sectors. Graduates will be especially well-prepared for entry-level positions in the rapidly growing biotechnology industry.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42—46
Program required courses Credits
BIO 105/105L – Bio I: Ecology/Evolution with Lab Credits included in Core Requirements
BIO 106/106L – Bio II: Cellular/Molecular with Lab 4
BIO 214/214L – Genetics with Lab 4
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
CHE 150/150L – University General Chemistry I with Lab* 4
CHE 151/151L – University General Chemistry II with Lab* 4
CHE 250/250L/250S – University Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture* 5
CHE 251/251L/251S – University Organic Chemistry II with Lab and LabLecture* 5
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis with Lab 5
CHE 327 – Applied Physical Chemistry or CHE 371 - Physical Chemistry II 3
CHE 350/350L – Biochemistry I: Proteins with Lab 5
CHE 351 – Biochemistry II: Metabolism and Bioenergetics 3
CHE 401 – Chemistry Seminar 1
CHE 375 – Advanced Laboratory or CHE 417/417L – Instrumental Methods of Analysis with Lab or CHE 450 – Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory 3
MAT 190 – Calculus I Credits included in Core Requirements
MAT 195 – Calculus II 4
PHY 210 – University Physics I* 4
PHY 211 – University Physics II* 4
Total 61
Required Elective Courses Credits
CHE 280 – Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 320 – Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 3
CHE 370/370L – Physical Chemistry I with Lab 4
CHE 375 – Advanced Laboratory** 2
CHE 380 – Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 405 – Medicinal Chemistry 3
CHE 410 – Research I and/or CHE 411 – Research II (not to exceed 3 credits total combined) 1–3
CHE 417/417L – Instrumental Methods of Analysis with Lab** 4
CHE 420 – Spectroscopic Methods of Structural Analysis 3
CHE 450 – Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory** 3
Minimum flexible required credits 6+
Minimum program credits 67+
Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Matriculated majors are expected to enroll in the University course sequences for general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. The following substitutions may be made with program permission: CHE 110 for CHE 150; CHE 111 for CHE 151; CHE 210 or CHE 210G for CHE 250; CHE 211 or 211G for CHE 251; PHY 110 for PHY 210; and/or PHY 111 for PHY 211.

**If not already taken for program required course option.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in biochemistry, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Biochemistry major, students will be able to

  • Describe and apply advanced biochemical information and concepts.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in safe and ethical laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Clearly communicate biochemical information in both oral and written forms.
  • Work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Compete for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.

Minor

Required Courses Credits
CHE 350/350L – Biochemistry I: Proteins with Lab 5
CHE 351 – Biochemistry II: Bioenergetics & Metabolism 3
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis with Lab or CHE 450 - Advanced Biochemistry Lab 3–5
Total Required credits 14–16
Elective Courses (choose at least one) Credits
CHE 280/280L – Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry with Lab 3
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis* with Lab 5
CHE 320 – Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 3
CHE 327 – Applied Physical Chemistry 3
CHE 371 – Physical Chemistry II 3
CHE 375 – Advanced Laboratory 2
CHE 405 – Medicinal Chemistry 3
CHE 417/417L – Instrumental Methods of Analysis with Lab 4
CHE 420 – Spectroscopic Methods of Structural Analysis 3
CHE 450 – Advanced Biochemistry Lab* 3
BIO 254 – Medicinal Plant Biology 3
BIO 305 – Virology 3
BIO 318 – Nutrition through the Life Cycle 3
BIO 232/232L – Microbiology with Lab 4
BIO 365 – Immunology 3
BIO 404/404S – Neuroscience** with Recitation 4
BIO 407 – Developmental Biology 3
NEU 205/205L – Introduction to Neurobiology with Lab 4
MAR 326 – Experimental Animal Physiology 3
Total Elective credits 2–5
Total Minor credits 16–21

*If not chosen as a required course.

**Enrollment eligibility is dependent upon availability and requires permission

Additionally, selected topics courses may be acceptable. Contact the academic director for more information.

There are no restrictions on counting a course towards this minor and towards other program requirements.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. A transferred course must align in scope and content to the required course offered at UNE. Otherwise, a course may transfer as a general elective. 

All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Transferred courses for matriculated students must be approved by the Academic Director. 

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Preferred conditions for entry into the biochemistry major are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry, and physics.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Biological Sciences

Contact

Dr. Steven Travis
stravis@une.edu

Dr. Kristin Burkholder
kburkholder@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
Sections

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history — at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age — students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies. Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty. Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them. In addition, the biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience, and experiential learning.

The department also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog. Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The Biological Sciences major provides a broad background for students interested in biology. The core program is flexible, thereby permitting the student latitude in the area of emphasis. However, students who wish to narrow their focus can elect a concentration in either Cellular and Molecular Biology (CMB) or Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB). A goal of the major is to provide students with the necessary background for entry-level career positions and graduate study.

The department also offers Biological Sciences majors the opportunity to select all of the EDU secondary education certification courses (listed below) as their electives in order to become middle or high school teachers (grades 7-12) in the area of life science.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core RequirementsCredits
Total42–46
Biological Sciences Program Required CoursesCredits
BIO 105 – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution4
BIO 106 – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular4
BIO 214 – Genetics4
BIO 400 or higher capstone course chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor (not satisfied by internship/research**)3–4
Cellular & Molecular Area Course*3–4
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Area Course*3–4
Organismal Biology Area Course*3–4
CHE 110 – General Chemistry I or CHE 150 – University General Chemistry I4
CHE 111 – General Chemistry II or CHE 151 – University General Chemistry II4
CHE 210 or 210G – Organic Chemistry I or CHE 250 – University Organic Chemistry I5
CHE 211 or 211G – Organic Chemistry II or CHE 251 – University Organic Chemistry II or CHE 310 – Fundamentals of Biochemistry4–5
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences (Biological Sciences Core Program and CMB Concentration) or MAT 151 – Statistics for Environmental Sciences (EEB concentration)3
MAT 190 – Calculus I4
PHY 110 – Physics I or PHY 210 – University Physics I4
PHY 111 – Physics II or PHY 211 – University Physics II4
Total Required Credits56–61
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits)Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits120

*Topic Area courses are to be selected in consultation with your advisor.
**Any BIO 400+ level course excluding BIO 404, 410, 495.

Concentration Options

Optional Concentration in Cellular and Molecular Biology (CMB) Required CoursesCredits
BIO 105 – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution4
BIO 106 – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular4
BIO 214 – Genetics4
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology3
BIO 407 – Developmental Biology3
BIO 400 or higher capstone course chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor (not satisfied by Internship/Research**)3–4
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Area Course*3–4
Organismal Biology Area Course*3–4
Cognate Chemistry, Physics, and Math Courses (same as above program requirements)32–33
Optional Concentration in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) Required CoursesCredits
BIO 105 – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution4
BIO 106 – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular4
BIO 214 – Genetics or BIO 322 - Comparative Animal Physiology3–4
BIO 333 – Evolution3
BIO 350 – Ecology4
BIO 400 or higher capstone course chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor (not satisfied by Internship/Research**)3–4
Organismal Biology Topic Area*3–4
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Area Course or a second Organismal Biology Area Course*3–4
Cognate Chemistry, Physics, and Math Courses (same as above program requirements)32–33

*Topic Area courses are to be selected in consultation with your advisor.
**Any BIO 400+ level course excluding BIO 404, 410, 495

Topic Area Courses

Cellular and Molecular AreaCredits
BIO 203 – Histology4
BIO 365 – Immunology3
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology3
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology AreaCredits
BIO 307 – Conservation Genetics3
BIO 328 – Human Evolution3
BIO 333 – Evolution3
MAR 335 – Animal/Behavioral Ecology4
BIO 350 – Ecology4
Organismal Biology AreaCredits
BIO 204 – Parasitology4
BIO 232 – Microbiology or BIO 234 – Environmental Microbiology4
BIO 235 – Winter Natural History4
BIO 254 – Medicinal Plant Biology3
BIO 305 – Mammalogy4
BIO 306 – Virology3
BIO 319 – Ornithology4
MAR 320 – Invertebrate Zoology4
BIO 330 – Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy4
MAR 331 – Biology of Fishes4

BIO 290 may fulfill biology area requirements depending on the subject matter and advisor permission.

Additional Guidelines

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Life Science can complete a double major with Biological Sciences and Secondary Education or a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Biological Sciences. For more information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of professional staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental, and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Biology.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Concentrations

Biological Sciences students who wish to narrow their focus beyond the core program can elect a concentration in either Cellular and Molecular Biology (CMB) or Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB). Please see Curricular Requirements for details.

 

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the Department of Biology include:

  • Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas:
    • Molecular and cellular basis of life including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, and reproduction.
    • Organismal diversity including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
    • Interrelations of organisms and their environment including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.
  • Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:
    • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
    • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
    • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).
  • Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:
    • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
    • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
    • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.

Minor

A Biological Sciences minor requires six biology courses, including the Introductory Biology series. In particular, Biology majors who wish to take a biology minor must select 4 additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Minor Required CoursesCredits
BIO 104 - General Biology orBIO 105 - Biology I: Ecology/Evolution4
BIO 106 - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular4
One (1) Organismal Biology Area course3–4
One (1) Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Area course3–4
One (1) Cellular and Molecular Area course3–4
One (1) additional course with BIO designation3+
Total Minimum Required Credits20

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. 

All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five (5) years. 

Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Biophysics

Category
Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

 

Degree name
Minor in Biophysics
Sections

Minor Description

The biophysics minor builds on the foundations of Physics I and Physics II to create a comprehensive understanding of how the laws of physics apply to organisms, explored from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view.

With its organismal focus and relationship to modern technology, this minor is well-suited to complement majors in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, Medical Biology, Neuroscience, and Marine Science, in addition to Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, and Pre-Pharmacy programs of study.

Curricular Requirements

The biophysics minor requires 18 hours of coursework.

Required Courses Credits
PHY 210 – University Physics I* 4
PHY 211 – University Physics II* 4
PHY 220 – Medical Physics or PHY 310 – Biophysics: Structure & Motion or PHY 410 – Topics in Physics 4
Total Required 12
Six (6) Credits of Elective Courses** Credits
PHY 208 – Energy and Climate Change 3
PHY 209 – Computational Physics 3
PHY 220 – Medical Physics 4
PHY 305 – Revolutions of 20th Century Physics 3
PHY 306 – Math Methods of Modern Physics 1
PHY 310 – Biophysics: Structure & Motion 3
PHY 320 – Biomechanics 4
PHY 410 – Topics in Physics 3–4
Total Required 6

*PHY 110 and PHY 111 may be accepted with program permission.

**With permission, either MAR 368 (Advanced Oceanography II: PHY/CHE, 3 credits) or CHE 370 (Physical Chemistry I, 4 credits) can be substituted for one elective course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the minor in Biophysics, students will be able to:

  • Describe basic physical, biophysical, and biomechanics concepts
  • Demonstrate understanding of physical processes/instrumentation used to investigate biophysical and biomechanical phenomena
  • Clearly communicate scientific information in both oral and written forms
  • Work collaboratively in various team settings

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. A transferred course must align in scope and content to the required course offered at UNE. Otherwise, a course may transfer as a general elective. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Transferred courses for matriculated students must be approved by the Academic Director.

Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Business Administration

Contact

John Austin
jaustin8@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Business programs is to provide experienced, skilled and supportive faculty who offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in and face the challenges of an ever-changing world. More specifically, the department strives

  • To prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in business, not-for-profit organizations, and society in general
  • To develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems
  • To prepare students to speak and present in front of various audiences in an articulate and compelling manner
  • To help students achieve their personal and career goals
  • To prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in Business Administration is designed to work together with the University's liberal arts core curriculum to achieve the following goals:

  • Facilitation of students' acquisition of basic business knowledge in the functional areas of business including, but not limited to, accounting, business law, economics, finance, management, and marketing
  • Facilitation of students' acquisition of technical skills and competencies in  quantitative techniques
  • Provide students with the opportunity to focus their business studies by selecting one (1) of six (6) concentrations: management, marketing, economics, international business, social entrepreneurship, or health sector management
  • Provide experiential opportunities, including at least one credit-bearing internship, to hone students' skills and facilitate their career exploration and professional job search;
  • Facilitation of students' ability to integrate their knowledge of the functional areas of business with their technical skills and competencies and their professional experiences and to apply that knowledge and those skills.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Designated Core Courses Credits
BUMG 120 – Innovation thru Technology 3
MAT 120 – Statistics 3
Program Required Courses Credits
BUAC 201 – Financial Accounting 3
BUAC 303 – Managerial Accounting 3
BUEC 203 – Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 – Microeconomics 3
BUFI 205/DSC 205 – Introduction to Data Analysis & Modeling 3
BUFI 315 – Business Finance Concepts & Skills 3
BUMG 200 – Management 3
BUMG 302 – Human Resource Management 3
BUMG 311 – Business and Society Relations 3
BUMG 325 – Legal Environment of Business 3
BUMG 335 – International Management 3
BUMG 495A – Internship in Business Administration 3
BUMG 498 – Strategic Management 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMK 312 – Small Business Management or BUMK 313 – Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship 3
Total 45
Business Elective Required Courses (Concentration) Credits
See Concentration section below 15–16
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

Concentrations

A business administration student in their sophomore year may, with the permission of the Business chair, enroll in one (1) of the following concentrations.

Management

Choose any five (5) courses from the list below for a total of fifteen (15) credits Credits
BUMG 301 – Organizational Behavior 3
BUMG 303 – Management of Non-Profit Organization 3
BUMG 307 – Operations Management 3
BUMG 315 – Triple Bottom Line Reporting 3
BUMG 360 – Leadership 3
BUMG 400 – Management Seminar 3
BUMK 405 – Sales Management 3
BUMG 495B – Internship (with approved Management focus) 3

Marketing

Choose any five (5) courses from the list below for a total of fifteen (15) credits Credits
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
BUMK 335 – Global Marketing 3
BUMK 350 – Social Media Marketing Strategy 3
BUMK 400 – Marketing Seminar 3
BUMK 405 – Sales Management 3
BUMK 495B – Internship with approved marketing focus) 3

Economics

Choose any five (5) courses from the list below for a total of fifteen (15) credits Credits
BUEC 370 – Money, Credit, and Banking 3
BUEC 375 – International Trade and Finance 3
BUEC 380 – Economic Development of the United States 3
BUEC 385 – Health Economics 3
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
BUEC 399 – Economic Topics 3
BUMG 495B – Internship (with approved Economics focus) 3
PSC 332 – International Political Economy 3

International Business

Choose any five (5) courses from the list below for a total of fifteen (15) credits Credits
BUMK 335 or 335G – Global Marketing 3
PSC 332 – International Political Economy 3
CMM 320 – Intercultural Communications orSOC 206 – Cross-Cultural Communications 3
BUEC 375 – International Trade and Finance 3
BUFI 347G – International Financial Accounting 3
BUMG 400 – Management Seminar orPSC 240 – American Foreign Policy or PSC 320 – Global Organizations, Politics, and Culture or PSC 409 – Origin of Modern Global Systems or SOC 255 – Globalization of Technology or SOC 377 – International Development 3
BUMG 495B – Internship (with approved international business focus) 3

Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Required Courses Credits
BUMG 120 – Innovation through Technology (EXP) 3
BUMG 313 – Social (Innovation and) Entrepreneurship (ADV) 3
Total 6
Choose two (2) of the following: Credits
CMM 240 – Social Applications of Web 2.0 (SGA) 3
BUMG 309 – Hacking Maine Food Chain (ADV) 3
BUMK 312 – Entrepreneurship/Small Business 3
BUMG 307 – Operations Management 3
BUMG 314 – Grant Writing (ADV) or WRT 317 - Proposal and Grant Writing 3
BUEC 380 – Economic Development of the US 3
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics (ADV) or BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
DSC 205/BUFI 205 – Introduction to Data Analysis and Modeling 3
MAT 225 – Computer Programming w/MALAB 3
Total 6
Choose one (1) of the following: Credits
BUMG 410 – Creating Social Enterprises through Design Thinking and Innovation 4
BUMG 495B* – Internship with Social I&E Focus 3
Total 3–4
Total Concentration Credits 15–16

*Can be substituted with an Internship of another major with the permission of the BUMG 495B coordinator.

Students will be allowed to use up to 12 credits from another minor or from their major to complete this concentration.

Health Section Management

Required Courses Credits
BUEC 380 – Health Economics 3
BUMG 400 – Management Seminar 3
BUMG 495B – Internship (with approved Health Sector Management focus) 3
Two (2) department-approved courses 6

Individualized Concentration

Choose any five (5) courses from the list below for a total of fifteen (15) credits, with advisor approval Credits
BUEC 365 – Evolution of Economic Theory 3
BUEC 370 – Money Credit and Banking 3
BUEC 375 – International Trade and Finance 3
BUEC 380 – Economic Development of the United States 3
BUEC 385 – Health Economics 3
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
BUFI 302 – Personal Finance 3
BUFI 321 – Investment Management 3
BUFI 322 – Investments 3
BUMG 120 – Innovation through Technology 3
BUMG 295 – Business Internship 3
BUMG 301 – Organizational Behavior 3
BUMG 303 – Mgmt of Non-Profit Orgs 3
BUMG 309 – Hacking the Maine Food System 3
BUMG 313 – Social Entrepreneurship 3
BUMG 314 – Grant Writing 3
BUMG 315 – Triple Bottom Line Reporting 3
BUMG 328 – Employment Law 3
BUMG 360 – Leadership 3
BUMG 400 – Management Seminar 3
BUMG 410 – Creating Social Enterprises 4
BUMG 495B – Internship in Business Administration 3
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
BUMK 335 – Global Marketing 3
BUMK 350 – Social Media Marketing Strategy 3
BUMK 405 – Sales Management 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Writing 3

Minors

A student pursuing a major other than Business Administration may, with the permission of the academic director, minor in Business Administration.

Minor in Business Administration Curriculum

Required Courses Credits
BUAC 201 – Financial Accounting 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMG 200 – Management 3
BUEC 204 – Microeconomics 3
Business Electives – 300 and 400 level courses 6
Total Credits 18

UNE also offers a minor in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate foundational knowledge in accounting, economics, finance, management, and marketing in application of concepts and theories. 
  • Demonstrate effective skills in written and oral communications using appropriate technologies.
  • Demonstrate an ability to integrate the concepts of the core areas of business.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of the ethical requirements of business activities.
  • Demonstrate an ability to conduct methodological, secondary research into business issues, which may relate to general business or to a specific business function, which requires familiarity with a range of data, research sources, and appropriate methodologies.

Concentration Learning Outcomes

Management

The management concentration covers the organizational, operational and sales aspects of management, as well as introduces non-profit management techniques.

Upon completing the concentration in management, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to apply general Management know-how in practical business situations.
  • Develop an understanding of business that reflects the moral responsibility of management to all relevant stakeholders and the natural environment.
  • Understand the nature and dynamics of social behavior relating to organizational performance in order to develop strategies to become effective in organizations.
Marketing

The marketing concentration focuses on developing strategic and tactical marketing skills, including those used in both digital media and global environments.

Upon completing the concentration in marketing, students will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of how marketing initiatives by business and not-for-profit organizations impact society and the economy.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the strategic and tactical use of the primary decision-making areas of marketing used by organizations.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of traditional and digital channels of distribution.
  • Understand the uses of traditional and digital promotional methods.
  • Understand the strategic importance of global marketing and be able to develop tactics for an organization’s global marketing thrusts.
Economics

The economics concentration focuses on understanding the impact of the economy on individuals, society, and global business development.

Upon completing the concentration in economics, students will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of economic thought regarding the incentives.
  • Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  • Demonstrate the assumptions and limitations of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  • Understand the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using the Keynesian model.
  • Understand the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economic development with reference to theory and empirical data.
International Business

The international business concentration focuses on understanding the role that cultural differences, globalization, and worldwide trends play in the global marketplace. A semester abroad is required.

Upon completing the concentration in international business, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate detailed familiarity with the impact of the global economy on U.S. businesses and organizations, utilizing appropriate terminology and concepts.
  • Demonstrate comprehension of cultural differences in the conduct of business and/or daily life within major global markets during a study abroad experience.
  • Demonstrate global awareness through an understanding of international business concepts and trends and an ability to internationalize domestically developed business methods and practices.
Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship

The social innovation and entrepreneurship concentration focuses on applying the concepts of sustainability to the creation of a new venture with triple bottom line responsibility and ecological value.

Upon completing the concentration in social entrepreneurship, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding and the application of the concepts of social entrepreneurship and distinguish social entrepreneurship from traditional economic entrepreneurship as well as from sustainable entrepreneurship.
  • Evaluate and articulate the rewards and risks of undertaking social entrepreneurship by measuring the economic, social, and environmental risks and rewards (triple bottom line) of a new venture and measuring and comparing the short-term economic risks and returns of the venture with the long-term expected benefits.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the ecological problems facing local and global communities as well as the ability to recognize business opportunities for entrepreneurs that arise as a result of the trend of identifying and resolving those ecological problems. Undertake this demonstration by applying those skills necessary to investigate and evaluate all the various aspects of the business and policy environment that have an impact on social entrepreneurship decisions, including an evaluation of corporate behavior in the context of environmental and social goals.
Health Sector Management

The Health Sector Management Concentration focuses on understanding how U.S. healthcare policy and systems impact business in the health sector.

Upon completing the concentration in Health Sector Management, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to integrate core general management skills with sophisticated understanding of the institutions of the US health care sector.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of U.S. health care economy and markets and those factors that significantly influence decision-making both at the policy level and at the level of the organization.
  3. Utilize the terminology and concepts of health sector systems such as governmental programs, managed care, and information management to recognize and explain the importance of cost, access, and quality to providers, payers, and vendors.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the legal systems and processes impacting healthcare, including governmental regulation, tort litigation and reform, non-discrimination and privacy legislation, and access/equity of care movements in both the federal and state governments.

Academic and Technical Standards

  • Business majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all Business Core required courses, business concentration courses, and business elective courses.
  • Business minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all four required courses and the two business elective courses.

Accreditation

All degree programs offered by the Department of Business are accredited by The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). The Business Administration Degree Program in the Department of Business is additionally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Chemistry

Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
Sections

Mission

Chemistry and physics are both fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes.

Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. Understanding living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, biochemistry, and laboratory science, and minors in chemistry, biochemistry, and biophysics, the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics. Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry stresses the fundamental aspects of chemistry as a discipline, including analytical chemistry, biochemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and physical chemistry. 

Coursework in the core areas of chemistry is complemented with laboratory experiments designed to illustrate important chemical principles, theories, and applications through discovery with the integration of practical instrumental techniques that are essential in the field. While the chemistry core courses provide both depth and breadth in the basic areas of chemistry, students also have the opportunity to intensely study selected areas of modern in advanced elective courses and in undergraduate research. 

The School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences' faculty members are highly committed to excellence in undergraduate education and offer many opportunities for students to engage in collaborative, mentored undergraduate research. Additionally, the department is well equipped with modern laboratory instrumentation, available to students in laboratory courses and in undergraduate research projects.

The curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training. Since the School of Mathematical and Physical Science courses stress the integration of theory and experiment, the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the cultivation of oral and written communication skills, students are well-prepared for direct entry into the workforce, or into competitive graduate programs in the physical sciences and other related technology fields. Chemistry graduates are also well prepared for entry into professional programs such as medical, dental, pharmacy, or veterinary schools.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total Core Requirements 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
CHE 150/150L – University General Chemistry I* 4
CHE 151/151L – University General Chemistry II* 4
CHE 250/250L/250S – University Organic Chemistry I* 5
CHE 251/251L/251S – University Organic Chemistry II* 5
CHE 280/280L – Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 350/350L – Biochemistry I: Proteins 5
CHE 370/370L – Physical Chemistry I 4
CHE 371 – Physical Chemistry II 3
CHE 375 – Advanced Laboratory 2
CHE 401 – Seminar 1
CHE 417/417L – Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4
MAT 190 – Calculus I (credits included in core requirements) 4
MAT 195 – Calculus II 4
MAT 200 – Calculus III 4
PHY 210 – University Physics I* 4
PHY 211 – University Physics II* 4
Total 61
Minimum one course from the following for a total of three (3) credits Credits
CHE 320 – Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 3
CHE 380 – Inorganic Chemistry 3
CHE 405 – Medicinal Chemistry 3
CHE 410 – Research I 1–4
CHE 411 – Research II 1–4
CHE 420 – Spectroscopic Methods of Structural Analysis 3
CHE 450 – Advanced Biochemistry Lab 3
Total 3
Minimum Program Credits 64
Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Matriculated majors are expected to enroll in the University course sequences for general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. The following substitutions may be made with program permission: CHE 110 for CHE 150; CHE 111 for CHE 151; CHE 210 or CHE 210G for CHE 250; CHE 211 or 211G for CHE 251; PHY 110 for PHY 210; and/or PHY 111 for PHY 211.

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Physical Science can complete a double major with Chemistry and Secondary Education, or a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Chemistry. For more information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in chemistry/secondary education, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to describe and apply advanced chemical information and concepts.
  • Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in safe laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Students will be able to clearly communicate chemical information in both oral and written forms.
  • Students will be able to work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Students will be able to compete successfully for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.

Minor

A student with a major in another program may minor in Chemistry with the permission of the academic director. Twenty-three (23) hours of coursework is required for the Minor in Chemistry as specified below. This minor indicates a significant level of accomplishment in the important foundation areas of Chemistry.

Required Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I** 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II** 4
CHE 210/210L or CHE 210G/210LG – Organic Chemistry I** 5
CHE 211/211L or CHE 211G/211LG – Organic Chemistry II** 5
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis 5
Total Required 23

The chemistry course grade point average must be maintained at 2.00 (C) or better.

**The following course substitutions may be made with advisor permission: CHE 150 for CHE 110; CHE 151 for CHE 111; CHE 250 for CHE 210 or CHE 210G; and/or CHE 251 for CHE 211 or CHE 211G.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. A transferred course must align in scope and content to the required course offered at UNE. Otherwise, a course may transfer as a general elective.

All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Transferred courses for matriculated students must be approved by the Academic Director.

Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Preferred conditions for entry into the chemistry major are completion of at least three years of high school mathematics and three years of high school science, including biology, chemistry, and physics.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Climate Change Studies

Category
Contact

Dr. Bethany Woodworth
bwoodworth@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Climate Change Studies
Sections

Mission

Climate change promises to be one of the defining environmental and social problems of our lifetime, and the topic of climate change will grow ever more relevant as we move into the future. The interdisciplinary minor in Climate Change Studies is committed to educating tomorrow’s leaders in the science, impacts, and solutions to climate change. This interdisciplinary program of study seeks to engage students with an understanding of climate change from diverse perspectives — scientific, political, psychological, economic, and ethical dimensions of the problem and its solutions — and prepare them for a myriad of professions that directly or indirectly relate to understanding, combating, and adapting to climate change.

Minor Description

The interdisciplinary minor in Climate Change Studies engages students in understanding climate change from diverse perspectives, helping them examine scientific, political, psychological, economic, and ethical dimensions of the problem and its solutions. It prepares them for a myriad of professions that directly or indirectly relate to understanding, combating, and adapting to climate change.

Curricular Requirements

A student may minor in Climate Change Studies with the approval of the academic directory. To complete this minor, students are expected to successfully complete the following course of study, totaling nineteen (19) credits:

Program Required Courses Credits
ENV 208 – Climate Change: Causes, Consequences, and Solutions 3
PHY 218 – Energy and Climate Change 4
SOC 227 – Climate Change and Society 3
Total Required Course Credits 10
Choose One (1) Policy Electives** Credits
ENV 250 – Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
ENV 362 – Climate Change Adaptation: Planning and Policy 3
MAF 300 – Climate Change, Oceans, and Law 3
MAR 316 – Science and Society 3
PSC 201 – Introduction to International Relations 3
PSC 205 – Introduction to Politics and Environment 3
PSC 306 – Environmental Politics 3
Total Policy Elective credits 3
Choose One (1) Natural Sciences Electives** Credits
ENV 318/318L – Advanced Field Methods in Avian Ecology and Conservation with Lab 4
ENV 328 – Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife, and Human Health 3
BIO 235/235L – Winter Natural History with Lab 4
BIO 413 – Global Change Ecology 3
BIO 422/422L – Coral Reefs with Lab 4
MAF 200 – Introduction to Marine Pollution 3
MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 436/436L – Natural History of Iceland with Lab 4
MAR 368 – Advanced Oceanography II: Physical and Chemical Oceanography 3
MAR 460 – The Scientific Basis for Global Climate Change 3
MAR 464 – Polar Biology 3
Total Natural Sciences Elective credits 3
Choose One (1) Social Sciences and Humanities Electives** Credits
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
ENV 321 – Environmental Communication: Expert Practices for Environmental Management 3
ENV 328 – Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife, and Human Health 3
ENV 340 – Environmental Movements and Social Change 3
ENV 344 – Environmental Ethics 3
PHI 202 – Ethics of Science and Technology 3
PHI 330 – Environmental Philosophy 3
SOC 210 – Displaced Cultures and Society 3
SOC 320 – Community Organization 3
SOC 226 – Environmental Sociology 3
SOC 265 – Social Issues/Problems Global World 3
SOC 377 – International Development 3
Total Social Sciences and Humanities Elective credits 3
Total Credits 19-20

*Course Designators vary by major and include but are not limited to ENV 295/495, PSY 300/400, PSC 411, SOC 300/400, SPT 395.

**Internship Opportunities (Optional): Internships may substitute for one of the above elective courses, subject to advisor and internship coordinator approval. The internship must deal explicitly with some aspect of climate change science, mitigation, or adaptation.

Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate the issues and conflicts surrounding climate change from multiple perspectives, including scientific, geographic, political, economic, sociological, psychological, ethical, and cultural perspectives
  • Explain and quantify the impacts of climate change on human well-being and the natural world
  • Think critically about the uneven distribution of climate change responsibility, impacts, vulnerability, adaptive capacity, and political power across individuals, societies, generations, and species;
  • Identify options for preventing further climate change (mitigation) and reducing impacts of change on human and natural systems (adaptation)
  • Analyze and critique policy issues related to global warming
  • Apply a practical understanding of climate change impacts, mitigation, and adaptation to their professional work

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years. 

Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

The minor in Climate Change Studies is open to all undergraduate students at the University of New England. Permission from the student’s advisor and the Climate Change Studies coordinator is required to enroll.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Coaching

Category
Contact

Katie Hawke 
khawke@une.edu

Paul Visich
pvisich@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Coaching
Sections

Minor Description

The athletic coaching minor is open to any undergraduate student at the University of New England. The minor is offered through the Westbrook College of Health professions and is directly administered through the Department of Exercise and Sports Performance.

The minor is interdisciplinary in nature and draws from courses from the Department of Sport and Recreational Management and Education.

The minor provides a comprehensive and meaningful academic program for students wishing to pursue coaching at the youth and college level. The minor provides expert knowledge following the eight domains from the National Standards for Sports Coaches: Philosophy and Ethics, Safety and Injury Prevention, Physical Conditioning, Growth and Development, Teaching and Communication, Sport Skills and Tactics, Organization and Administration, and Evaluation.

Curricular Requirements

Required Courses Credits
EXS 312 – Foundations in Coaching 3
EXS 360 – Coaching Practicum (Prerequisite EXS 312 and successful completion of coaching certification, CPR, and First Aid) 3
EXS 205 – Sports Physiology or EXS 320 – Exercise Physiology (Prerequisite – 4 credit Laboratory Science course) 3
SPT 340 – Athletic and Sport Administration or a course substitution is allowed per permission of the Coordinator of the Coaching Minor. 3
Total 12
Two (2) Elective Courses Credits
ATC 101 – Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
ATC 306/PSY 345 – Sport and Exercise Psychology 3
EXS 340 – Strength and Conditioning 3
EXS 180 – Motor Learning and Performance 3
EXS 310 – Biomechanics and Kinesiology 3
EXS 322 – Metabolism/Bioenergetics and Sport Nutrition 3
EXS 315 – Training the Endurance Athlete 3
SRM 350 – Sport and Recreational Finance Management 3
SRM 360 – Leadership 3
SPT 330 – Sport Governance 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum and Assessment 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
Total 6
Total Required Credits 18

Students are required to earn a minimum grade of a "C" in all courses with an ATC or EXS prefix. Students are only able to retake a course one time.

Students are required to pass a coaching certification and complete CPR and First Aid prior to taking the Coaching Practicum.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Communications

Contact
Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Communications
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Bachelor of Arts in Communications is to provide exceptional and supportive faculty and to offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in an ever-changing world. More specifically, the degree strives to

  • Prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in their chosen professions and society
  • Develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems
  • Help students achieve their personal and career goals
  • Prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements (MAT 120 Recommended) Credits
Total 42–46
Foundational Required Courses Credits
CMM 110 – Intro to Communications 3
CMM 122 – Oral Communication or SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
CMM 210 – Understanding Media 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design 3
Total 12
Video Production Required Courses Credits
CMM 300 – Documentary Video 3
CMM 311 – Digital Video Production 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
Total

9

Advanced Required Courses Credits
CMM 320 – Intercultural Communication or CMM 416 – Global Communication 3
CMM 430 – Internship in Communication 3
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
Total 9
Required Elective Courses Credits
Six (6) credits of electives from List A 6
Six (6) credits of electives from List A or List B 6
Total 12
Open elective courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Required Elective Course Options

List A – Elective Courses Credits
CMM 130 – Media Literacy 3
CMM 135 – Evolution of Television 3
CMM 170 – Evolution of Documentary Film 3
CMM 201 – Digital Media & Software Tools 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 220 – Organizational Communication 3
CMM 225 – Topics in Digital Storytelling 3
CMM 240 – Social Media: Theory & Practice 3
CMM 305 – Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
CMM 340 – Women and Film 3
CMM 350 – Video Game Studies 3
CMM 411 – Communication Law & Regulation 3
CMM 420 – Senior Project 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Communication 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Env. 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3
List B – Elective Courses Credits
ART 105 – Elements of Acting 3
ART 106 – Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 111 – Scientific Illustration 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography 3
ART 234 – Digital Animation 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
ENG 140 – Indigenous Film and Literature 3
ENV 321 – Env Comm: Expert Prac Eco 3
HIS 150 – Telling Tales of the Past 3
HIS 295 – Medicine and the Media 3
LIL 120 – Intro Arts & Humanities Sem 3
ENG 110 – English Composition 4
ENG 208 – Narrative Medicine & Writing 3

Academic and Technical Standards

  • Communication majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA.
  • Communication minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA.

Learning Outcomes

The program goals of the Bachelor of Arts in Communications are strongly focused on providing our students with the oral, written, technical and critical thinking skills that are necessary for them to function effectively in the professional world and their personal lives. Learning outcomes for the degree relate to the teaching of communication skills and practices that extend across different communication contexts. The learning outcomes listed here are built upon the core competencies that are inherent in each course required for the degree.

  • Demonstrate oral communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Effectively speak in public settings
    • Apply advanced decision-making processes within groups
    • Negotiate and collaborate effectively
  • Demonstrate written communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Write for specific purposes and situations
    • Write informatively, persuasively and clearly
  • Use current technology related to the communication field effectively and ethically.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Use a range of applications software effectively
    • Use communication technology effectively and ethically in a professional setting.
    • Understand the limitations of technology
  • Competently employ digital media in professional settings as an effective communication tool. Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Have a working knowledge of media story structure
    • Create media content that communicates effectively using a variety of tools
    • Contribute to the production of media content by serving in different roles and working effectively in teams

Minor

The Minor in Communications examines questions about society, business, and communication practices with critical attention to the newest media and computer-related technologies. Students will explore communications theory and also learn how to communicate effectively using a full range of media channels including new media technology. Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and evolution of communication and the role of societies and institutions in shaping communications.
  • Articulate and apply the theories and best practices for the use and presentation of images and digital information including audio and video.
  • Apply tools and technologies used in the communications professions.
Foundational Required Courses Credits
CMM 110 – Intro to Communications 3
CMM 210 – Understanding Media 3
Six (6) credits from Communication Theory Elective Courses 6
Six (6) credits from Communication Practice Elective Courses 6
Total 18

Elective Course Options

Communication Theory Elective Courses Credits
CMM 130 – Media Literacy 3
CMM 135 – Evolution of Television 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Communication or CMM 220 – Organizational Communication 3
CMM 305 – Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
CMM 320 – Intercultural Communication or CMM 416 – Global Communication 3
CMM 340 – Women and Film 3
CMM 350 – Video Game Studies 3
CMM 411 – Communication Law & Regulation 3
Communication Practice Elective Courses Credits
CMM 122 – Oral Communication or SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design or CMM 201 – Digital Media & Software Tools 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 225 – Topics in Digital Storytelling 3
CMM 240 – Social Media: Theory & Practice 3
CMM 300 – Documentary Video 3
CMM 311 – Digital Video Production 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
CMM 420 – Senior Project 3
CMM 430 – Internship in Communication 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Env. 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Communications and Media Arts

Category
Contact
Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Communications and Media Arts
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Bachelor of Arts in Communications and Media Arts is to provide exceptional and supportive faculty and to offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in an ever-changing world. More specifically, the degree strives to:

  • Prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in their chosen professions and society
  • Develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems
  • Help students achieve their personal and career goals
  • Prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Foundational Required Courses Credits
LIL 120 – Introductory Arts and Humanities Seminar* or open elective 3
CMM 110 – Intro to Communications 3
CMM 122 – Oral Communication or SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
CMM 210 – Understanding Media 3
ART 230 – Graphic Design 3
Total 15
Advanced Required Courses Credits
CMM 320 – Intercultural Communication or CMM 416 – Global Communication 3
CMM 430 – Internship in Communication 3
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
Total 9
Required Track Credits
Choose one (1) Communications and Media Arts track 12
Required Elective Courses Credits
Three (3) credits of electives from List A 3
Six (6) credits of electives from List A or List B 6
Total 9
Open elective courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*LIL 120 - Introductory Arts and Humanities Seminar is a required course for new, first-year students in the School of Arts and Humanities

Communications and Media Arts Track options

Sports Media Track
Choose three (3) of the following Credits
CMM 215 – Video Field Production orCMM 216 – Sports Field Production 3
CMM 310 – DV Studio I 3
CMM 311 – Digital Video Production 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
Total 9
Choose one (1) of the following Credits
CMM 216 – Sports Field Production 3
CMM 290 – Intro to Broadcast Media Writ 3
CMM 310 – DV Studio I 3
CMM 405 – DV Studio II 3
Total 3
Digital Video Production Track
Choose three (3) of the following Credits
CMM 300 – Documentary Video 3
CMM 310 – DV Studio I 3
CMM 311 – Digital Video Production 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
Total 9
Choose one (1) of the following Credits
CMM 216 – Sports Field Production 3
CMM 290 – Intro to Broadcast Media Writ 3
CMM 310 – DV Studio I 3
CMM 405 – DV Studio II 3
Total 3
Reporting and Public Relations Track
Choose three (3) of the following Credits
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Communication or CMM 220 – Organizational Communication 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 290 – Intro to Broadcast Media Writ 3
CMM 305 – Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
Total 9
Choose one (1) of the following Credits
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
SRM 325 – Sport and Recreation Marketing 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
CMM 415 – Sports Reporting and Writing 3
Total 3

Required Elective Course Options

List A – Elective Courses Credits
CMM 130 – Media Literacy 3
CMM 135 – Evolution of Television 3
CMM 170 – Evolution of Documentary Film 3
CMM 201 – Digital Media & Software Tools 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 220 – Organizational Communication 3
CMM 240 – Social Media: Theory & Practice 3
CMM 290 – Intro to Broadcast Media Writ 3
CMM 300 – Documentary Video 3
CMM 305 – Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
CMM 311 – Digital Video Production 3
CMM 340 – Women and Film 3
CMM 350 – Video Game Studies 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
CMM 411 – Communication Law & Regulation 3
CMM 415 – Sports Reporting and Writing 3
CMM 420 – Senior Project 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Communication 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Env. 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3
List B – Elective Courses Credits
ART 105 – Elements of Acting 3
ART 106 – Two-Dimensional Design 3
ART 111 – Scientific Illustration 3
ART 214 – Color Digital Photography 3
ART 234 – Digital Animation 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
ENG 140 – Indigenous Film and Literature 3
ENV 321 – Env Comm: Expert Prac Eco 3
HIS 150 – Telling Tales of the Past 3
HIS 295 – Medicine and the Media 3
SRM 160 – Intro to Sport and Rec Mgmt 3

Academic and Technical Standards

Communications and Media Arts majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA.

Learning Outcomes

The program goals of the Bachelor of Arts in Communications are strongly focused on providing our students with the oral, written, technical and critical thinking skills that are necessary for them to function effectively in the professional world and their personal lives. Learning outcomes for the degree relate to the teaching of communication skills and practices that extend across different communication contexts. The learning outcomes listed here are built upon the core competencies that are inherent in each course required for the degree.

  • Demonstrate oral communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Effectively speak in public settings
    • Apply advanced decision-making processes within groups
    • Negotiate and collaborate effectively
  • Demonstrate written communication skills expected of a future professional in the field.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Write for specific purposes and situations
    • Write informatively, persuasively and clearly
  • Use current technology related to the communication field effectively and ethically.
    Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Use a range of applications software effectively
    • Use communication technology effectively and ethically in a professional setting.
    • Understand the limitations of technology
  • Competently employ digital media in professional settings as an effective communication tool. Indicators of achievement are as follows:
    • Have a working knowledge of media story structure
    • Create media content that communicates effectively using a variety of tools
    • Contribute to the production of media content by serving in different roles and working effectively in teams

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Computer Science

Category
Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Computer Science
Sections

Goals

  • Provide students with a strong background in the fundamentals of programming, algorithms, and discrete mathematics
  • Develop in-demand technical skills that can  lead to career opportunities
  • Allow students to engage with internal or external collaborators and be better prepared to participate in interdisciplinary research initiatives

Curricular Requirements

A student with a major in another program may minor in Computer Science with the approval of the academic director. A minimum of 18 hours of approved course credit is required.

Students wishing to declare a Computer Science minor should complete a course plan in consultation with a Mathematical Sciences faculty member.

Students may earn a Minor in Computer Science by completing 18 credits in the following:

Required Courses Credits
DSC 225 – Programming I or MAT 225 – Computer Programming with MATLAB 3
DSC 270 – Data Structures and Algorithms 3
MAT 212 – Discrete Mathematics 3
Total 9
Three (3) Elective Courses Credits
DSC 301 – Introduction to Database Design/SQL 3
DSC 325 – Programming II 3
Any DSC course at 400-level 3
MAT 220 – Linear Algebra 3
MAT 340 – Graph Theory with Applications 3
MAT 405 – Introduction to Numerical Analysis 3
Total 9
Total Required Credits 18

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Computer Science minor will:

  • Apply fundamental principles and methods of Computer Science to a variety of applications
  • Apply computational reasoning to a wide range of problems
  • Formulate and implement algorithmic solutions to computational problems
  • Analyze and compare alternative algorithms
  • Manage data and implement database management systems

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program.  Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Criminology

Category
Contact

Ken Courtney
kcourtney1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Criminology
Sections

Mission

The Criminology Program will provide a deeply contextualized understanding of crime, law, justice and punishment; facilitate the development of critical competencies including, critical reading, writing, and analysis within the study of criminology; enable the focused study of how crime and the law shape the worlds in which we live; and afford opportunities for experiential learning via student research and professional experiences.

Major Description

Criminology focuses on the study of crimes, criminals, crime victims, theories explaining illegal and deviant behavior, the social reaction to crime and criminals, the effectiveness of anti-crime policies and the broader political terrain of social control. Criminology programs are interdisciplinary, but ordinarily borrow much from sociology as well as other social sciences and humanities disciplines. Criminology programs are thus grounded in the liberal arts, and provide a rigorous engagement with crime and the institutions that are created to contend with it. The professional profile of instructors in criminology is generally an academic background and a terminal degree in criminology or a related field.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Required Courses Credits
SOC 170 – Deviance and Crime 3
PSC 125 – Understanding Law: An Introduction or PSC 210 – Constitutional Law 3
CRL 205 – The Criminal Justice System 3
SOC 311 – Theories of Race and Racism 3
SOC 345 – Crime, Media, and Culture 3
SOC 270 – Classical Social Theory or SOC 280 – Contemporary Social Theory 3
SOC 268 – Practice of Social Science Research 3
SOC 370 – Applied Field Method in Sociology 3
SOC 300 – Sociology Internship or PSY 300 – Psychology Internship 3–15
SOC 494 – Cap Exp: Thesis 3–16
Four (4) Criminology elective courses 12
Minimum Required Major Credits 42
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Elective Course Options

Criminology Elective Course Options Credits
ANT 312 – Human Trafficking 3
HIS 266 – History of Drugs in the Americas 3
PSC 241 – Human Rights in World Politics 3
PSC 278 – Pol Sci Human Trad II 3
PSC 330 – Theories of Politics and War 3
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 236 – Mental Health & Society 3
PSY 370 – Drugs, Society, and Behavior 3
SOC 333 – Sociology of Law 3
SOC 350 – Deviance 3
SOC 421 – A Just Society? 3

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the Bachelor of Arts in Criminology program students will be able to:

  • Distinguish the differing agencies associated with the social control of criminal, regulatory, and international law violations.
  • Summarize and differentiate the major theories of crime and criminalization.
  • Recognize, theoretically and empirically, structural inequalities and their relation to crime and social control.
  • Use criminological methods, or investigative techniques, to assess patterns of crime, criminalization, and victimization.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Data Science

Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

 

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Data Science
Sections

Mission

The Data Science Bachelor of Science degree program inspires students to become innovators who make impactful contributions through data analysis, modeling, computation, and simulation. The program fosters flexible and creative approaches for problem solving and the ability to gain insights about complex relationships and interdependencies, and to describe and communicate these insights for prediction and decision making.

Major Description

In recent years the explosion of data in a wide range of fields has created a wealth of opportunities for data science professionals, and the demand for people with the right skills continues to grow. The Data Science B.S. program at UNE gives you the opportunity to apply your passion for mathematical modeling and computing to problems involving the analysis of data and the design of models for extracting information, making predictions, and decision-making.

Beginning with foundational mathematics, statistics, and computing, you will develop techniques in visualization, machine learning, and data mining. 

Industry partnerships with local employers provide opportunities to apply these techniques and refine your expertise through project-based learning experiences throughout the curriculum as well as in a senior practicum.  

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
DSC 110 – Survey of Software Tools 1
DSC 130 – Exploring Data 3
DSC 225 – Programming I or MAT 225 – Computer Programming with MATLAB 3
DSC 260 – Data Visualization 3
DSC 301 – Introduction to Database Design/SQL 3
DSC 344 – Machine Learning 3
DSC 480 – Data Science Practicum 3
DSC 410 – Data Mining or DSC 420 – Predictive Modeling or DSC 490 – Topics in Data Science 3
MAT 120 – Statistics or MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences Credits included in Core Requirements
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
MAT 220 – Linear Algebra 3
Total 29
Choose Four (4) Elective Courses Credits
DSC 205 – Introduction to Data Analysis and Modeling 3
DSC 270 – Data Structures and Algorithms 3
DSC 325 – Programming II 3
GIS 364 – Spatial Data Analysis 3
MAT 195 – Calculus II 3
MAT 212 – Discrete Mathematics 3
MAT 323 – Applied Regression Analysis 3
MAT 340 – Graph Theory with Applications 3
MAT 405 – Introduction to Numerical Analysis 3
Total 12
Minimum Program Credits 41
Open elective credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Learning Outcomes

Students successfully completing the B.S. in Data Science will:

  • Develop, test, and deploy mathematical and statistical models for data analysis, prediction, and decision making
  • Use current field-standard digital tools for data management, manipulation, organization, analysis, and visualization
  • Effectively communicate quantitative information to technical and non-technical audiences orally, in writing, and through visual formats

Minors

A student with a major in another program may minor in Data Science with the approval of the academic director. A minimum of 18 hours of approved course credit is required.

Students wishing to declare a Data Science minor should complete a course plan in consultation with a Mathematical Sciences faculty member.

Students may earn a Minor in Data Science by completing 18-19 credits in the following:

Required Courses Credits
DSC 130 – Exploring Data 3
DSC 225 – Programming I or MAT 225 – Computer Programming with MATLAB 3
DSC 260 – Data Visualization 3
DSC 344 – Machine Learning 3
MAT 120 – Statistics or MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
Elective Credits* 3–4

*Select at least one course from among DSC 205, DSC 301, DSC 410, DSC 420, DSC 490, and GIS 364.

Honors Program

At this time, Data Science does not offer Honors Program.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program beginning in Fall 2020. Transferred mathematics courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the mathematics courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives.

All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dental Hygiene

Category
Contact

Marji Harmer-Beem, RDH, M.S., B.S. 
mharmerbeem@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene
Sections

Mission

The Dental Hygiene Program distinguishes itself by masterfully preparing oral health professionals, both intellectually and practically, for a broad and robust career in dental hygiene. 

Major Description

This dynamic 4-year program begins with the students becoming fully engaged during their first four semesters in the building of a foundation of knowledge in the sciences and liberal studies, while simultaneously being introduced to interrelated disciplines within the health professions. The students begin their academic experience on the Biddeford campus, which will provide them with the opportunity to enjoy full participation in clubs, seminars, sports, and intercollegiate activities.

The last four semesters are delivered on the Portland campus where students are immersed in both the study of dental hygiene theory and professional clinical practice. Dental hygiene students will have the opportunity to engage in interprofessional educational experiences with students and faculty in undergraduate and graduate-level health professions programs within the University setting. The dental hygiene baccalaureate program is designed to provide the student with expanded professional opportunities, therefore, skill development in the areas of critical thinking, ethical decision-making and leadership are enhanced.

The Dental Hygiene Program faculty welcomes the opportunity to educate future oral hygienists in both the traditional and newly evolving skills required for entry into the profession.

Curricular Requirements

WCHP Core Requirements Credits
BIO 104/104L – General Biology 4
BIO 208/208L – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab 4
BIO 209/209L – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab 4
BIO 309 – Pathophysiology 3
BIO 242/242L – Applied Microbiology with Lab 4
CHE 130/130L – Principles of Chemistry with Lab 4
DEN 201 – Histology and Embryology 2
ENG 110 – English Composition 3
IHS 130 – Interprofessional Health Care First Year Experience 3
IHS 210 – Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
NUTR 220 – Nutrition 3
IHS 310 – Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
MAT 120 – Statistics 3
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
One (1) Creative Arts Course (with prefix ARH, ART, or MUS) 3
One 276 or 278 Human Traditions Course with the following prefix: ARH, ENG, HIS, LIL, PHI, PSC, or REL 3
Total 61
Dental Hygiene Required Courses Credits
DEN 100 – Introduction to Dental Hygiene 1
DEN 303 – Dental Hygiene Theory I 2
DEN 304 – Dental Hygiene Theory II 2
DEN 309 – Dental Hygiene Clinic I 4
DEN 312 – Dental Hygiene Clinic II 2
DEN 322 – Radiology 2
DEN 322L – Radiology Lab 1
DEN 325 – Preservation of Tooth Structure 2
DEN 325L – Preservation of Tooth Structure Lab 1
DEN 332 – Community Health I 2
DEN 334 – Community Health II 2
DEN 338 – Medical Emergencies 1
DEN 341 – Oral Anatomy 2
DEN 342 – Head and Neck Anatomy 2
DEN 403 – Dental Hygiene Theory III 1
DEN 404 – Dental Hygiene Theory IV 1
DEN 410 – Dental Hygiene Clinic III 4
DEN 411 – Dental Hygiene Clinic IV 4
DEN 422 – Leadership 2
DEN 425 – Periodontology I 3
DEN 435 – Periodontology II 3
DEN 442 – Pharmacology 2
DEN 445 – Special Care I 2
DEN 446 – Special Care II 2
DEN 452 – Oral Pathology 3
DEN 456 – Pain Management 3
Total 56
Open Electives (needed to reach 120 credits) 4
Total Required for Graduation 121

A student in the dental hygiene major may elect to pursue a bachelor’s degree in health sciences. This degree is only open to matriculated students at the University of New England. Special permission from the student’s advisor and the dean of the Westbrook College of Health Professions is required for enrollment in the B.S. in Health Sciences.

Academic and Technical Standards

Progression Guidelines

Dental Hygiene follows the WCHP Common Curriculum Academic Progression Guidelines.

Requirements laid out below for the first two years of enrollment apply to any undergraduate program of the Westbrook College of Health Professions. Beginning with the Fall semester of the third year, students will be held to their program specific progression guidelines.

In keeping with the guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows:

  • Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the Catalog of the University of New England.
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in all required math and science including the following courses: MAT 120/150, CHE 130, BIO 104/105, BIO 208, BIO 209, BIO 242, BIO 309, and NUTR 220. Failure to achieve a “C” will result in program level probation.
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade of a "C" in all Dental Hygiene prefix courses.
  • Failure to achieve the above referenced minimum grades will result in program level probation and the need to retake the course - therefore affecting academic progression.
  • Students may enroll in any of the courses referenced above a maximum of two times. Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP, WF, or letter grade. Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.
  • Failure to achieve the above referenced minimum grade a second time a course is taken or failing two separate science, math or dental hygiene courses in a single semester will result in dismissal from the major.

See Technical Standards (PDF)

Learning Outcomes

The Dental Hygiene Program offers students the opportunity to:

  • Provide the public with compassionate and competent dental hygiene care founded on evidence-based scientific knowledge, as an essential component of comprehensive interprofessional health care and community-based health care.
  • Demonstrate effective decision-making skills through the use of the critical thinking process.
  • Explore the complexities of ethical decision-making as it relates to professional expectations and social responsibility for diversity and inclusion.
  • Commit to advocacy leadership, scholarship, and life-long learning to respond to an ever-changing healthcare environment and growing profession.
  • Utilize oral healthcare technology (Health Informatics) to enhance patient care and communication abilities for the professional and practical arenas.
  • Successfully gain access to dental hygiene licensure in the state of choice by completing the national and regional board examinations.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Admissions Requirements

  • A high school diploma or the equivalent with a better-than-average achievement record in a college preparatory program including chemistry (must include laboratory); biology (must include laboratory); mathematics (two mathematics courses — algebra required, geometry preferred); English (three years required - four years preferred).
  • Academic transcripts must reflect an overall high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.0, in addition to a GPA of 3.0 in all science and math courses. College GPA will be considered only if the applicant has completed at least 15 semester hours. Transfer students should have an overall college grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 and a 3.0 in math and science.
  • Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) scores are optional but highly recommended.
  • A health record must be submitted which indicates specific findings regarding the applicant's complete physical exam.
  • Complete the Application.

Students applying for undergraduate admissions will be required to submit:

  • A completed application
  • An official secondary school transcript
  • Forty ($40) dollar application fee

Students are also highly recommended to submit the following:

  • The SAT or ACT scores (optional, see below)
  • Extracurricular involvement
  • The essay or personal statement
  • Two Recommendations
  • Qualified students with equivalency certificates are also considered for admissions

The University of New England supports efforts of secondary school officials and governing bodies to have their schools achieve regional accredited status in order to provide reliable assurance of the quality of the educational preparation of applicants for admission.

Learn more about the test-optional policy

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Dental Hygiene Completion Program

Category
Contact

Marji Harmer-Beem, RDH, M.S., B.S.
mharmerbeem@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene
Sections

Mission

The Dental Hygiene Program distinguishes itself by masterfully preparing oral health professionals, both intellectually and practically, for a broad and robust career in dental hygiene. 

The Dental Hygiene Program endeavors to improve the oral health of individuals and communities by graduating students who place meaningful value on life-long learning, and who have the desire and motivation to achieve beyond their self-imposed limitations. The faculty strives to stimulate student development of intellectual curiosity and professional expertise through collaborative participation in an academic environment that fosters interprofessional education.

Major Description

The University of New England offers a Bachelor of Science completion program for registered dental hygienists already holding an Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene.

The Bachelor of Science program advances education in dental hygiene skills and prepares students for a broader range of careers in dental hygiene, community health, administration, research, or teaching. The Bachelor of Science degree program builds upon the knowledge obtained at the associate degree level with core curriculum courses in the arts and sciences and upper-division courses in dental hygiene, management, health care, interprofessional education, and upper-division electives. 

This program is designed to prepare students to meet the challenges of the changing health care delivery system and to establish a foundation for graduate study.

Curricular Requirements

Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Credits
Max Transfer 85
General Education Credits
MAT 120 – Statistics 3
BIO 309 – Pathophysiology 3
Human Traditions I or II 3
Creative Arts 3
Social Global Awareness 3
Advanced Studies 3
Total 18
Major Courses Credits
IHS 310 – Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
DEN 422 – Leadership 2
DEN 490 – Internship/Experiential Learning 3
DEN 406 – Current Concepts in Dental Hygiene 3
Professional Electives (300 level or higher) 6 credits*
Minimum Total Required Credit 120

*Additional elective credit will be required if transfer coursework is less than 85 credits.

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of "C" is required in all DEN prefix courses and professional electives. A "C" or higher must be achieved in all prerequisites for these courses.

View Technical Standards (PDF)

Learning Outcomes

The Dental Hygiene Completion Program offers students the opportunity to:

  • Explore compassionate and competent dental hygiene care founded on evidenced-based scientific knowledge, as an essential component of comprehensive interprofessional health care and community-based health care.
  • Demonstrate effective decision-making skills through the use of the critical thinking process.
  • Explore the complexities of ethical decision-making as it relates to professional expectations and social responsibility.
  • Commit to leadership, scholarship, and life-long learning to respond to an ever changing healthcare environment and growing profession. 
  • Utilize oral healthcare technology (Health Informatics)  to enhance patient care and communication abilities for use in the professional and practical arena.

Transfer Credit

For students transferring from another institution, a minimum of 36 credits in attendance is required for a bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene. You must take at least 36 credits at UNE. 

If there appears to be an area of clinical deficiency, due to time away from clinical practice or the introduction of new technology and knowledge into the practice of dental hygiene, a clinical dental hygiene course may be required. Other restrictions apply. 

Admissions

Admission Requirements: Dental Hygienist with an Associate Degree

  • Must be a graduate of a dental hygiene program accredited by the American Dental Association - Commission on Dental Accreditation.
  • Must have completed the requirements for a Dental Hygiene (Associate Degree) with at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA).
  • Must submit official college transcripts reflecting an overall GPA of 2.5, in addition to a GPA of 2.5 in all science and math courses.
  • Must complete the UNE admissions application.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Economics

Category
Contact

John Austin
jaustin8@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Economics
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Business programs is to provide experienced, skilled and supportive faculty who offer relevant curricula that will help prepare students to thrive in and face the challenges of an ever-changing world. More specifically, the department strives:

  • To prepare students for ethically and socially responsible roles in business, not-for-profit organizations, and society in general;
  • To develop in students the ability to recognize, analyze, and solve problems;
  • To prepare students to speak and present in front of various audiences in an articulate and compelling manner;
  • To help students achieve their personal and career goals; and
  • To prepare students for entry-level positions in either the private or public sector and/or to prepare students for coursework at the graduate level.

Minor Description

The Economics minor provides students with a foundation in economic theory and analysis with courses in Macroeconomics and Microeconomics.

Students build on that foundation by learning to apply concepts, techniques and analysis in courses such as Environmental Economics, Ecological Economics, Economic Development of the United States, Health Economics, Money Credit and Banking, International Trade and Finance, Evolution of Modern Economic Theory, and International Political Economy.

Curricular Requirements

A student with a major other than Business Administration may, with the permission of the academic director, minor in Economics. Students with a major in Business Administration may pursue one of the concentrations within the business administration degree, including but not limited to: management, marketing, economics, international business, social innovation, and entrepreneurship, or health sector management.

Required Courses Credits
BUEC 203 – Macroeconomics 3
BUEC 204 – Microeconomics 3
Plus four (4) 300- or 400-level Economics courses as prescribed below. Economic courses may include but are not limited to Credits
BUEC 365 – Evolution of Economic Theory 3
BUEC 370 – Money Credit and Banking 3
BUEC 375 – International Trade and Finance 3
BUEC 380 – Economic Development of the U.S. 3
BUEC 385 – Health Economics 3
BUEC 390/ENV 324 – Environmental Economics 3
BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
PSC 322 – International Political Economy 3
Total Required Credits 18

Academic and Technical Standards

Economic minors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in the two (2) required courses and the four 300- or 400-level economics elective courses.

Accreditation

All degree programs offered are accredited by The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). The Business Administration Degree Program in the Department of Business is additionally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Economics minor, students will be able to:

  • Explain how individuals and businesses respond to market incentives and how incentives resolve in real-world situations.
  • Demonstrate the conditions under which the market allocates resources efficiently and under what conditions it fails to produce socially optimal outcomes.
  • Demonstrate the assumptions, limitations, and applications of the neoclassical school of thought reflected in both micro and macroeconomic models.
  • Identify and explain the key concepts in macroeconomic analysis and be able to demonstrate how they are impacted by external events and policy using Keynesian and Classical models.
  • Explain the factors that have determined productivity trends in the history of U.S. economic development with reference to theory and empirical data.

Transfer Credits

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Education

Category
Contact

Lane W. Clarke
Department Chair, Education
lclarke1@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Education
Sections

Mission

Mission

The mission of the Education Department is to prepare lifelong reflective educators who exhibit flexibility, compassion, collaboration, and student-centered pedagogy knowledge and skills. The Education Department offers strong experiential, student-centered, and responsive program preparing students to develop:

  • Knowledge of content and instructional practice
  • Professional dispositions
  • Pedagogical skills

Vision

Our vision is to prepare future educators to have an exponential impact on the lives of their students and the broader community. The core values that drive the Education Department and guide our ethos, principles, and standards are:

  • Knowledgeable Professionals
  • Collaborative Practitioners
  • Inclusive and Culturally Competent Educators
  • Reflective Life-Long Learners

Minor Description

The Education minor meets the needs of students who wish to consider education as a career as well as those who wish to work in a teaching role outside of K–12 school settings.

Numerous institutions need teacher expertise to develop and deliver professional development; educate patients/clients, support immigrant agencies; design curricular materials for the government, environmental, or charitable agencies; and/or work overseas in an educational capacity.

There are numerous alternative settings that use educational skills including health care, museums, environmental programs, social agencies, children or teens in group homes, non-profit associations, and human resource departments. Specialized academic areas such as mathematics combined with computing skills may lead to a career in designing software utilizing educational principles. 

Curricular Requirements

Eighteen (18) credits are required for the Education minor. Two (2) 3-credit courses listed below are required. The additional four (4) 3-credit courses may be taken from any of the remaining Education or Special Education courses (with the exception of intern student teaching).

Required Courses Credits
EDU 202 – Curriculum Theory and Design 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
Twelve (12) credits of any EDU or SPE courses 12
Total 18

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. 

All courses completed must be no older than five (5) years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Educational Studies

Category
Contact

Lane W. Clarke
lclarke1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Educational Studies
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Education Department is to prepare lifelong reflective educators who exhibit flexibility, compassion, collaboration, and student-centered pedagogy knowledge and skills. The Education Department offers strong experiential, student-centered, and responsive program preparing students to develop:

  • Knowledge of content and instructional practice
  • Professional dispositions
  • Pedagogical skills

Our vision is to prepare future educators to have an exponential impact on the lives of their students and the broader community. The core values that drive the Education Department and guide our ethos, principles, and standards are:

  • Knowledgeable Professionals
  • Collaborative Practitioners
  • Inclusive and Culturally Competent Educators
  • Reflective Life-Long Learners

Major Description

The Education program offers an undergraduate major in Educational Studies for students interested in the study of educational foundations, methods, and processes.

The major includes a culminating capstone where students will engage in an educational experience to deepen their understanding of the complexity of education and schooling as well as develop the ability to think critically about the ways in which education intersects with a broad range of social, cultural, political, and economic forces.

The Educational Studies major does not lead to teacher certification.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Required Courses Credits
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum & Assessment 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
Total Required Credits 9
Methods Courses (Choose 2 from the following list) Credits
EDU 261 – Teaching Social Studies: K-8 3
EDU 267 – Teaching Science: K-8 3
SPE 300 – Special Education Methods 3
EDU 386 – Literacy Methods: K-8 Reading 3
EDU 387 – Literacy Methods: K-8 Writing 3
EDU 373 – Teaching Mathematics: K-8 3
EDU 436 – Teaching Secondary English 3
EDU 437 – Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 438 – Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3
EDU 439 – Teaching Secondary Math 3
EDU 441 – Methods of Art Education 3
Total Methods Credits 6
Education Electives Credits
Five (5) courses with an EDU or SPE designation 15
Educational Studies Internships and Capstone Experience Courses Credits
EDU 465 – Educational Studies Internship Up to 9
EDU 495 – Edu Studies Internship (minimum of 3 credits completed in final semester) 3+
Minimum Experience Credits 12
Minimum Required Total Credits for Major 42
Open Electives (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will reflect on their understanding of how individual differences and diverse cultures impact education to create inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  • Students will design and implement developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences that reflect their understanding of how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas.
  • Students will demonstrate they have acquired and mastered the dispositions defining professionalism.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to seek appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth and to advance the profession.

FIELD EXPERIENCE

The faculty in the Education programs are committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. All students engaged in education courses will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, teaching lessons, conducting experiments, administering assessments, etc.). Students in Educational Studies will also have internship experiences in school or educational settings that support their career aspirations.

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply. 

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Elementary Education with Certification

Category
Contact

Lane W. Clarke
Chair, Department of Education
lclarke1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education with Certification
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Education Department is to prepare lifelong reflective educators who exhibit flexibility, compassion, collaboration, and student-centered pedagogy knowledge and skills.

The Education Department offers strong experiential, student-centered, and responsive program preparing students to develop:

  • Knowledge of content and instructional practice
  • Professional dispositions
  • Pedagogical skills

Our vision is to prepare future educators to have an exponential impact on the lives of their students and the broader community.

The core values that drive the Education Department and guide our ethos, principles, and standards are:

  • Knowledgeable Professionals
  • Collaborative Practitioners
  • Inclusive and Culturally Competent Educators
  • Reflective Life-Long Learners

Major Description

Students complete a four-year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education and earn Maine certification. UNE has reciprocity with the majority of states in the United States including New England.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Curriculum Credits
Total 42–46
Professional Core Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110 – Supporting 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum & Assessment 3
EDU 206 – Foundations of Literacy 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionalities in the Classroom 3
EDU 261 – Teaching Social Studies: K-8 3
EDU 267 – Teaching Science: K-8 3
EDU 373 – Teaching Mathematics: K-8 3
EDU 386 – Literacy Methods: K-8 Reading 3
EDU 387 – Literacy Methods K-8 Writing 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data-Based Decision Making 3
EDU 485 – Elementary Practicum 3
EDU 491 – Student Teaching Internship and Seminar 12
Total Professional Core Credits 51
Electives or Physical Education Concentration* 6–23
Electives to get to 120 credits* Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120–122

*You must take a minimum of 6 credits of ENG, MAT, HIS/POL, and SCI in order to teach and receive state certification. These courses can be a part of the CORE or taken as an elective. Consult with your academic advisor when choosing electives.

*Students pursuing the Physical Education Concentration should see the Concentration Tab below for the course list.

Field Experience

The faculty in the Education programs are committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific competency-based focus to meet the Maine standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in teacher preparation will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, teaching lessons, conducting experiments, administering assessments, etc.). Transportation to and from schools is the responsibility of the student.

Internship

Without specific permission from the Education Chair, courses may not be taken during the internship semester, so all required coursework must be completed the semester prior to the internship. Admission to the internship is not guaranteed and students must have reached Advanced Standing to apply.

In addition, the student should have:

  • Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  • Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  • Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  • Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  • Understanding of and empathy for working with students.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer. Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects both schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Education programs, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests. The 15-week student teaching internship experience must be done in a local Maine Public School that is in an established internship protocol with the University of New England.

Professional Educator Review Board (PERB)

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence with respect to Maine Common Core Teaching Standards before the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB). The Board is comprised of professional educators from area schools as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a presentation reflecting their proficiency in meeting these state standards and present and defend the presentation in front of the Board. Passing PERB is a requirement for completion of the certification program and subsequently is recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

Advanced Standing

All students in education certification programs must apply for admission to advanced standing when they have completed approximately 60 credit hours. To apply for advanced standing, students must develop a portfolio demonstrating how they have met proficiency in the following areas: a) teaching skills, knowledge, and disposition aligned with the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards; b) basic academic skills and c) professional skills. This portfolio is evaluated by a committee of education faculty and a pass/fail determination is made based on a holistic rubric.

Students not meeting these criteria do not remain enrolled in a certification program; however, students do have the option of changing their major to a non-certification major such as Educational Studies. Students can reapply for advanced standing upon completion of each additional semester up until their second to last semester (i.e., students graduating in Spring must meet advanced standing by the beginning of the previous Fall semester.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their bachelor's degree, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards
  • Demonstrate professionalism through accountability and engagement
  • Demonstrate ability to communicate effectively in both written and oral formats
  • Demonstrate appropriate dispositions as defined by professional expectations

Concentration

The Physical Education Concentration includes 26 credits offered through the Exercise and Sport Performance Department. This 26-credit concentration needs to be added to either an Elementary or Middle and Secondary Education Major.

To complete this concentration a student can major in Elementary Education with an academic discipline concentration and then add the 26-credit concentration enabling the student to be certified in Elementary Education and get a Conditional Certification in Physical Education. Please note, Physical Education is not a stand-alone concentration.

Elementary Education Certification with Physical Education Concentration Curricular Requirements

Physical Education Concentration Courses Credits
BIO 208/208L – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab 4
BIO 209/209L - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab 4
EXS 180 - Motor Learning and Performance 3
EXS 310 - Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3
EXS 320 - Exercise Physiology with Lab or EXS 205 - Sports Physiology 3
EXS 330/330L - Fitness Evaluation Prescription with Lab 3
EXS 340 - Concepts of Strength and Conditioning 3
ATC 306 - Psychology of Sport and Exercise 3
Elective (Math Course) 3

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Completion Requirements

All coursework, including the internship, should be completed within a five-year time frame. A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of coursework. Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five-year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised program plan, in order to meet state certification regulations.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Elementary-Middle Education Major with K-8 certification

Category
Contact

Audrey Bartholomew, Chair
abartholomew1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Elementary-Middle Education Major with K-8 certification
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Education programs is to develop reflective teachers and school leaders who are competent and caring lifelong learners. Our faculty members are dedicated to our students, university, and community through our research, service, and innovative teaching.

In addition to the mission statement, the Education programs have four guiding principles that are used in the development and delivery of all courses and programs. These principles are:

  • Rigorous mind
  • Compassionate heart
  • Competent demonstration
  • Reflective stance

These guiding principles are integrated into all of our programs and align with our mission statement to define our commitment to our students. The Education programs are aligned with state teacher certification standards, and only individuals who demonstrate that they possess the knowledge, skills, professional attitude, and commitment to future students will be recommended by the institution for certification.

Major Description

Students complete a four-year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary/Middle Education and earn Maine certification to teach in grades K-8. UNE has reciprocity with the majority of states in the United States including New England.

Curricular Requirements

Elementary-MIDDLE Education K–8 Certification

CAS Core Curriculum Credits
Total 42–46
Professional Core Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110 – Supporting 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum & Assessment 3
EDU 206 – Foundations of Literacy 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionalities in the Classroom 3
EDU 261 – Teaching Social Studies: K - 8 3
EDU 267 – Teaching Science: K - 8 3
EDU 373 – Teaching Mathematics: K - 8 3
EDU 386 – Literacy Methods: K-8 Reading 3
EDU 387 – Literacy Methods K-8 Writing 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data-Based Decision Making 3
EDU 485 – Elementary Practicum 3
EDU 491 – Student Teaching Internship and Seminar 12
Electives or Physical Education Concentration 6–23

You must take a minimum of 6 credits of ENG, MAT, HIS/POL, and SCI in order to teach and receive state certification. These courses can be a part of the CORE or taken as an elective. Consult with your academic advisor when choosing electives.

Students pursuing the Physical Education Concentration should see the Concentration Tab below for the course list.

Totals Credits
Electives to get to 120 credits Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120-122

Field Experience

The faculty in the Education programs are committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific competency-based focus to meet the Maine standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in teacher preparation will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, teaching lessons, conducting experiments, administering assessments, etc.). Transportation to and from schools is the responsibility of the student.

Internship

Without specific permission from the Education Chair, courses may not be taken during the internship semester, so all required coursework must be completed the semester prior to the internship. Admission to the internship is not guaranteed and students must have reached Advanced Standing to apply.

In addition, the student should have:

  • Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  • Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  • Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  • Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  • Understanding of and empathy for working with students.
  • No serious reservations identified on the Student Assessment of Professional Attributes (SAPA) instrument.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer. Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects both schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Education programs, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests. The 15-week student teaching internship experience must be done in a local Maine Public School that is in an established internship protocol with the University of New England.

Professional Educator Review Board (PERB)

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence with respect to Maine Common Core Teaching Standards before the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB). The Board is comprised of professional educators from area schools as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a portfolio reflecting their proficiency in meeting these state standards and present and defend the portfolio in front of the Board. Passing PERB is a requirement for completion of the certification program and subsequently is recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

Advanced Standing

All students in education certification programs must apply for admission to advanced standing when they have completed approximately 60 credit hours. To apply for advanced standing, students must develop a portfolio demonstrating how they have met proficiency in the following areas: a) teaching skills, knowledge, and disposition aligned with the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards; b) basic academic skills and c) professional skills. This portfolio is evaluated by a committee of education faculty and a pass/fail determination is made based on a holistic rubric. Students meeting these criteria create a development plan ensuring they will continue meeting require criteria and are prepared to student teach their final semester.

Students not meeting these criteria do not remain enrolled in a certification program; however, students do not have the option of changing their major to a non-certification major such as Educational Studies. Students can reapply for advanced standing upon completion of each additional semester up until their second to last semester (i.e., students graduating in Spring must meet advanced standing by the beginning of the previous Fall semester.

Learning Outcomes

Maine Common Core Teaching Standards

Standard One: Learner Development

The teacher understands how students learn and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

Standard Two: Learning Differences

The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that allow each learner to reach his/her full potential.

Standard Three: Learning Environments

The teacher works with learners to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, encouraging positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Standard Four: Content Knowledge

The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners

Standard Five: Innovative Applications of Content

The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical/creative thinking and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Standard Six: Assessment

The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to document learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s ongoing planning and instruction.

Standard Seven: Planning for Instruction

The teacher draws upon knowledge of content areas, cross-disciplinary skills, learners, the community, and pedagogy to plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals.

Standard Eight: Instructional Strategies

The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to access and appropriately apply information.

Standard Nine: Reflection and Continuous Growth

The teacher is a reflective practitioner who uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, families, and other professionals in the learning community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

Standard Ten: Collaboration 

The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

Standard Eleven: Technology Standards for Teachers - (NETS.T)

Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS.S) as they design, implement, and assess learning experiences to engage students and improve learning; enrich professional practice; and provide positive models for students, colleagues, and the community. All teachers will meet the following standards and performance indicators. 

Concentration

The Education programs, within the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) along with the Exercise and Sport Performance Department in Westbrook College of Health Professions (WCHP) offers an academic concentration that leads to Maine State Certificate in Physical Education. This is NOT a full major but rather a concentration of courses that would lead to eligibility in K-12 Physical Education Certification. This 26-credit concentration needs to be added to either an Elementary/Middle or Secondary Education Major.

Content Courses: The Physical Education Concentration includes 26 credits offered through the Exercise and Sport Performance Department.

Education Courses: Students have two (2) options to complete this concentration:

  • A student can major in Elementary/Middle and then add the 26 credit concentration enabling the student to be certified in Elementary/Middle and get a Conditional Certification in Physical Education.
  • A student can major in Secondary Education with a discipline content area and then add this concentration to allow the student to obtain certification in one discipline and conditionally certified in a second discipline. The student would need to choose which area they are planning on pursuing initial certification by the time they get to student teaching. A student can only get certified in the discipline in which the student completes the 15-week student teaching requirement unless the student chooses to teach for ​two semesters in different certification areas.

Curricular Requirements

Elementary/Middle Education K-8 Certification with Physical Education Certification Credits
Additional Elementary Education Core Course: EDU 4XX - Methods of Physical Education K–12 3
Physical Education Concentration Credits 26
BIO 208/208L - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BIO 209/209L - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II 4
EXS 180 - Motor Learning and Performance 3
EXS 310 - Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3
EXS 320 - Exercise Physiology with Lab or EXS 205 - Sports Physiology 3
EXS 330/330L - Fitness Evaluation Prescription with Lab 3
EXS 340 - Concepts of Strength and Conditioning 3
ATC 306 - Psychology of Sport and Exercise 3
Elective (Math Course) 3

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply. 

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Beginning Fall 2023 UNE is no longer accepting students into the Bachelor of Science in Bachelor of Science in Elementary-Middle Education Major with K-8 certification.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Completion Requirements

Completion Requirements

All coursework, including the internship, should be completed within a five-year time frame. A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of coursework. Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five-year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised program plan, in order to meet state certification regulations.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Completing Student Teaching Post-Graduation

Recent UNE graduates can enroll as Continuing Education students to complete student teaching in the Department of Education to achieve State of Maine’s Elementary or Secondary teacher certification.

In order to be admitted to student teaching through Continuing Education, students must:

  • Have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 upon graduation from UNE;
  • Apply to student teach within 2 years of graduation;
  • Be recommended by a UNE Education advisor;
  • Provide contact information for three references;
  • Have completed the State of Maine recommended certification courses prior to student teaching.

Application deadlines for Student Teaching are October 1 for the following Spring semester and April 1 for the following Fall semester.

Once students are approved, the Education Chair will forward the approval paperwork to the Continuing Education program. The student will be eligible to register for the 12-credit student teaching experience.

English

Contact

Michael J. Cripps
Director of Composition, English
mcripps@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in English
Sections

Mission

Through interdisciplinary course offerings, innovative theoretical models, and accomplished instructors, the English major exposes students to a wide and diverse body of knowledge and provides them with the tools to think, analyze, and write with confidence.

Major Description

English programs offer a wide range of literature and writing courses that introduce students to significant global literary works and train them in the careful analysis of texts, ranging from traditional novels to emerging electronic communication. English faculty specialize in the study of animals in culture, law and humanities, digital humanities, and literature and health, among other areas. Working through a variety of theoretical approaches, students will learn how to analyze the heavily textualized world around them, communicate their ideas effectively, and prepare themselves for numerous professions.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Required Courses Credits
Three (3) credits of U.S. Literature elective courses 3
Three (3) credits of British Literature elective courses 3
ENG 206 – Intro Lit Theory & Criticism 3
Six (6) credits of Diversity and Global Literature elective courses 6
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
Choose one (1) English Track 21
Total Program Required Credits 39
Open elective courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

English Track Options

Literature Track Credits
Three (3) credits of U.S. Literature elective courses or British Literature elective courses 3
Eighteen (18) credits of elective courses with at least twelve (12) credits from List A and at least six (6) credits at 300/400 level 18
Writing Track Credits
Three (3) credits of Creative Writing Foundation courses 3
Three (3) credits of Professional Writing Foundation courses 3
Fifteen (15) credits of elective courses with nine (9) credits from List C and six (6) credits from List C or List D 15
English Education Track Credits
Three (3) credits of U.S. Literature elective courses 3
Three (3) credits of British Literature elective courses 3
Fifteen (15) credits of elective courses with at least nine (9) credits from List A and at least six (6) credits at 300/400 level 15

Elective Course Options

U.S. Literature Elective Courses Credits
ENG 200 – Writing, Revolution, & Resistance in U.S. Lit 3
ENG 201 – Who and What is an American? Reimagining US Lit 3
ENG 235 – Topics in U.S. Lit to 1865 3
ENG 237 – Topics in U.S. Lit after 1865 3
ENG 310 – Writing & Women’s Health 3
British Literature Elective Courses Credits
ENG 115 – Poets, Pilgrims & Other Yahoos 3
ENG 116 – Democratizing Literature 3
ENG 216 – Criminals, Idiots & Minors 3
ENG 229 – Topics in Brit Lit Before 1800 3
ENG 234 – Topics in Brit Lit After 1800 3
ENG 312 – Global Shakespeare 3
ENG 330 – Topics in British Literature 3
ENG 340 – The English Novel 3
ENG 409 – Storytelling, Literature, Law 3
ENG 420 – Victorian Monsters 3
Diversity and Global Literature Elective Courses Credits
ENG 135 – Dog Stories 3
ENG 140 – Indigenous Film and Literature 3
ENG 200 – Writing, Revolution, & Resistance in U.S. Lit 3
ENG 201 – Who and What is an American? Reimagining US Lit 3
ENG 202 – Lyrics 3
ENG 204 – Animals, Literature, & Culture 3
ENG 208 – Narrative Medicine & Writing 3
ENG 214 – Freedom & Authority 3
ENG 221 – Justice 3
ENG 235 – Topics in U.S. Lit to 1865 3
ENG 237 – Topics in U.S. Lit after 1865 3
ENG 255 – Literary Topics 3
ENG 276 – English Human Trad I 3
ENG 278 – English Human Trad II 3
ENG 301 – Nature Films 3
ENG 310 – Writing & Women’s Health 3
ENG 312 – Global Shakespeare 3
ENG 326 – Topics in Literature & Health 3
ENG 329 – Topics in World Literature 3
ENG 330 – Topics in British Literature 3
ENG 401 – Literatures of the Sea 3
ENG 405 – Topics in Postcolonial Lit 3
ENG 409 – Storytelling, Literature, Law 3
Creative Writing Foundation Courses Credits
WRT 111 – Topics in Creative Writing 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Short Fiction 3
Professional Writing Foundation Courses Credits
CMM 110 – Intro to Communications 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
WRT 233 – Professional & Tech. Commun. 3

Lists A-D Elective Courses

List A Elective Courses Credits
ENG 115 – Poets, Pilgrims & Other Yahoos 3
ENG 116 – Democratizing Literature 3
ENG 135 – Dog Stories 3
ENG 140 – Indigenous Film and Literature 3
ENG 200 – Writing, Revolution, & Resistance in U.S. Lit 3
ENG 201 – Who and What is an American? Reimagining US Lit 3
ENG 202 – Lyrics 3
ENG 204 – Animals, Literature, & Culture 3
ENG 208 – Narrative Medicine & Writing 3
ENG 214 – Freedom & Authority 3
ENG 216 – Criminals, Idiots & Minors 3
ENG 221 – Justice 3
ENG 229 – Topics in Brit Lit Before 1800 3
ENG 234 – Topics in Brit Lit After 1800 3
ENG 235 – Topics in U.S. Lit to 1865 3
ENG 237 – Topics in U.S. Lit after 1865 3
ENG 255 – Literary Topics 3
ENG 276 – English Human Trad I 3
ENG 278 – English Human Trad II 3
ENG 300 – Literary Topics 3
ENG 301 – Nature Films 3
ENG 310 – Writing & Women’s Health 3
ENG 312 – Global Shakespeare 3
ENG 326 – Topics in Literature & Health 3
ENG 329 – Topics in World Literature 3
ENG 330 – Topics in British Literature 3
ENG 340 – The English Novel 3
ENG 397 – Independent Study 1–12
ENG 399 – Independent Study 3
ENG 401 – Literatures of the Sea 3
ENG 402 – Directed Study in English 1–12
ENG 405 – Topics in Postcolonial Lit 3
ENG 412 – Humanities Seminar 3
ENG 420 – Victorian Monsters 3
ENG 491 – English Studies Internship I 3–9
ENG 492 – English Studies Internship II 3–9
EDU 498 – Secondary Internship & Seminar 12
List B Elective Courses Credits
ARB 101 – Basic Arabic 3
ASL 101 – Intro to American Sign Lang 3
ART 124 – The Painted Book 3
CMM 122 – Oral Communication or SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
CMM 290 – Intro to Broadcast Media Writ 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
EDU 436 – Teaching Secondary English 3
ENG 110 – English Composition 4
ENG 209 – Introduction to Linguistics 3
ENG 220 – History of the English Language 3
FRE 101 – Basic French 3
HIS 150 – Telling Tales of the Past 3
HIS 341 – Bestsellers & the Big Bad City 3
LIT 124 – Lit, Nature & the Environment 3
PHI 212 – Thinking Philosoph about Arts 3
SPA 101 – Basic Spanish 3
SPA 306 – Span. For Health Professions 3
WRT 111 – Topics in Creative Writing 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Short Fiction 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Communication 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Env. 3
WRT 312 – Fiction Writing Workshop 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3
WRT 342 – Writing Fellows Practicum 1
List C Elective Courses Credits
ART 124 – The Painted Book 3
CMM 211 – Introduction to Journalism 3
ENG 208 – Narrative Medicine & Writing 3
ENG 209 – Introduction to Linguistics 3
ENG 220 – History of the English Language 3
ENG 310 – Writing & Women’s Health 3
ENG 397 – Independent Study 1–12
ENG 399 – Independent Study 3
ENG 402 – Directed Study in English 1–12
ENG 491 – English Studies Internship I 3–9
ENG 492 – English Studies Internship II 3–9
LIL 120 – Intro Arts & Humanities Sem 3
WRT 111 – Topics in Creative Writing 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Shrt Fiction 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Communication 3
WRT 304 – Read & Write in Digital Env. 3
WRT 312 – Fiction Writing Workshop 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3
WRT 342 – Writing Fellows Practicum 1
List D Elective Courses* Credits
ART 395 – Studio Concentration Seminar 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
CMM 110 – Intro to Communications 3
CMM 122 – Oral Communication or SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
CMM 240 – Social Media: Theory & Practic 3
CMM 410 – Writing for the Screen 3
ENG 110 – English Composition 4
ENG 334 – Methods of Literacy and Cultural Criticism 3
ENV 316/316L – Land Conserv Pract with Field Lab 4
ENV 321 – Env Comm: Expert Prac Eco 3
ENV 333/333L – Nature Writers with Field Lab 4
ENV 334 – Contemporary Nature Writing 3
HIS 150 – Telling Tales of the Past 3
MAF 400 – Marine Affairs Capstone 3
NEU 410 – Neurobiology of Mental Illness 3
NSG 332 – Evidence Based Pract (EBP) I 2
NSG 432 – Evidence Based Pract (EBP) II 2
NSG 445 – Leadership 2
PSY 425 – Adv Methods in Animal Behavior 3
PUB 310 – Social, Behavior & Environmental 3
PUB 400 – PH Planning & Evaluation 3
PUB 420 – Community Health Assessment 3

*Some courses have pre-requisites that may prevent registration

English majors are required to maintain an ePortfolio that archives their course and other relevant writing which they will deliver in an oral presentation to the faculty during their senior year.

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in English should complete a major in Secondary Education with a concentration in English. Students pursuing this path are strongly encouraged to complete the highly flexible double major with English and Secondary Education.

For more information, speak with the chair of English and see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Students majoring in English can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of completing the B.A. in English graduate will be able to

Read texts closely and think critically

  • Comprehend a text’s literal/factual content
  • Distinguish between a passage's literal/factual content and its figurative/symbolic/interpretive content
  • Analyze a text closely and identify rhetorical strategies therein
  • Connect a passage's formal structure and thematic content with the text as a whole
  • Extrapolate the larger implications (social, philosophical, ethical, argumentative) of these patterns

Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of literature in English

  • Demonstrate familiarity with specified content areas in literature, literary history, theory, and criticism
  • Understand literature as a culturally and historically embedded practice
  • Relate literature to other fields of inquiry

Communicate effectively

  • Approach writing as a recursive process
  • Develop and support claims about literary texts
  • Articulate claims in conceptually coherent essays
  • Use conventions of standard written English
  • Present research findings orally within the conventions of the discipline

Conduct research in literary and cultural studies

  • Use bibliographic tools to find source material
  • Employ appropriate critical approaches in their research
  • Contribute to scholarly conversations about literary and cultural texts and phenomena
  • Incorporate and document source material using MLA style
  • Communicate in accordance with standards of academic integrity

HuMed

If you are an exceptional undergraduate student aspiring to a career in medicine, the University of New England HuMed program provides the opportunity that spans your junior and senior years as an undergraduate and your four years in UNE’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. The program makes it possible for you to deepen your learning in English, History, or Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities through a humanities major while you prepare for a career as an osteopathic physician. Requirements for this early assurance program are described at the HuMed website.

During your years as an undergraduate in UNE’s College of Arts and Sciences, you complete the requisite coursework in the natural sciences to prepare for your graduate education, while earning a Bachelor of Arts in English, History, or Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities. As a HuMed student, you are not required to take the MCAT for admission to the College of Osteopathic Medicine. Instead, the College of Osteopathic Medicine requires that you take the University Clinical Aptitude test (UCAT). As a HuMed student, you have an assurance of acceptance contingent upon fulfilling the HuMed curricular requirements and passing the interview process.

Entering students interested in HuMed are encouraged to major in English (History, or Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities) and participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation track

 

Minor

A student with a major in another program may minor in English with permission of the academic director. The minor requires eighteen (18) hours of approved coursework, as described below.

Required Courses Credits
Three (3) credits of U.S. Literature elective courses 3
Three (3) credits of British Literature elective courses 3
Three (3) credits of Diversity and Global Literature elective courses 3
Nine (9) credits of English Minor Electives 9
Total 18
English Minor Electives Credits
Any ENG course 3–4
ASL 101 – Intro to American Sign Lang 3
FRE 101 – Basic French 3
HIS 341 – Bestsellers & the Big Bad City 3
LIL 120 – Intro to Arts & Humanities Sem 3
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
LIT 124 – Lit, Nature, & the Environment 3
SPA 101 – Basic Spanish 3
SPA 211 – Intermediate Spanish 3
SPA 306 – Span. For Health Professions 3
CMM 122 – Oral Communication or SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor. 

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Environmental Science

Category
Contact

Dr. Noah Perlut
Assistant Academic Director
nperlut@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science
Sections

Mission

Environmental Studies programs strive to increase awareness and appreciation of human connections with the rest of nature and to stimulate advocacy for sustainable behaviors. The curriculum stresses sound interdisciplinary understanding of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities disciplines in order to explore past, present, and potential ways of living on the earth. We are concerned with environmental issues at local, regional, national, and global levels, and we especially desire to help individuals and communities practice sustainable living by means of our research, teaching, and service. Faculty and students collaborate in active and critical learning through community discourse, personal inquiry, and experiential learning. We intend that our students develop a personal aesthetic awareness of the earth and that they engage in the inquiry, discovery, critical thinking, and debate that characterize the study of environmental issues.

Major Description

The program offers majors in Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, and Sustainability and Business (offered jointly with the Department of Business). All three majors build upon a sound foundation in basic science, and both provide broad explorations of human interaction with the environment.

During the first two(2) years of the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors, course requirements are nearly identical. The difference between the two (2) majors emerges during the final two years in course selection: Environmental Science emphasizes scientific aspects of environmental questions, while Environmental Studies emphasizes humanistic, social, and political aspects. 

During the first year both majors take courses in Environmental Issues; Biology; Literature, Nature and the Environment (or appropriate substitute); and Economics in Context (or appropriate substitute). This two-semester program, called the Green Learning Community (GLC), provides an interdisciplinary framework to explore fundamental themes of environmental studies. Moreover, it develops academic, social, and affective skills necessary for successful college learning and collaborative professional work.

During the second year, students look more deeply into the nature of environmental issues by taking courses in Environment and Society; Conservation and Preservation; and Environmental Policy. In addition, the Conservation Field Lab teaches conservation field skills as well as data analysis and environmental communication arts. And, in the Environmental Sustainability Lab, students apply classroom learning as they propose, research, and bring about a sustainability project on the campus or the larger community. These interdisciplinary environmental issues courses ensure a broad understanding while preparing students for more advanced study.

In their third year, students in both majors take BIO 350 – Ecology. In their third and fourth years, aided by a faculty advisor, students choose advanced courses according to their interests and career plans. Environmental Science majors choose science electives in Environmental Science as well as in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Marine Biology, and Psychology. Environmental Studies majors in the third and fourth years choose advanced courses from the following distribution groups: Conservation, Preservation, and Restoration; Environmental Policy and Management; Arts, Humanities, and Values; Global Ecology and Social Justice.

In both majors, the advanced courses not only stress deeper understanding but also involve problem-solving. Some courses examine the ways that human attitudes affect our environment, while other courses deal with hands-on tasks such as designing a conservation area, restoring a natural ecosystem, or considering technologies to reduce pollution. In order to ensure an intense direct experience of the natural world, the School of Marine and Environmental Programs offers a variety of field study courses. The curriculum culminates with the senior capstone in Sustainability in which students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to an in-depth study of the concept.

Philosophy

Because the study of environmental issues requires knowledge from a wide range of subjects, the School of Marine and Environmental Programs maintains a firm commitment to interdisciplinary education in our curriculum. Core courses in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs utilize knowledge and concepts drawn from the basic sciences as well as from the humanities and social sciences. Upper-division courses investigate environmental questions through disciplines such as literature, anthropology, economics, biology, history, political science, chemistry, physics, and ecology. Through all four years, our curriculum develops the skills necessary for dealing with environmental problems: writing, speaking, critical thinking, computing, research techniques, and media arts. The Environmental Studies Program prepares students to become informed citizens, competent professionals, and lifelong learners.

The Green Learning Community

As mentioned above, all entering first-year environmental students participate in a year-long learning community focused on the fundamental themes of environmental studies. The Green Learning Community includes courses as follows: eight (8) credits of biology, three (3) credits of literature (or an appropriate substitute), 3 credits of economics, and three (3) credits of environmental issues for a total of seventeen (17) credits over two (2) semesters. This interdisciplinary approach enables students to understand more clearly the complexity of environmental issues and at the same time improve skills in critical thinking, writing, oral communication, research, and the use of computers. Experiential learning activities are central.

Internships and Careers

Internships provide students with an opportunity to practice learned skills in an actual work environment with the guidance of an internship coordinator, who helps students match their interests with a work experience that might take place locally, regionally, nationally, or internationally. Internships provide career exploration and can help establish professional networks that lead to career opportunities upon graduation. The interdisciplinary nature of Environmental Studies and Environmental Science is reflected in the wide variety of careers open to graduates, such as air and water resource management, ecological restoration, education, habitat conservation, park management, toxicology, field research, journalism, environmental advocacy, environmental impact assessment, law and regulation, and environmental health. Our graduates enter both master's and doctoral programs in several of these fields.

Curricular Requirements

Since 1991 the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences has defined environmental awareness as a major theme in the College's Core Curriculum and asked Environmental Studies programs to deliver the course Introduction to Environmental Issues to all undergraduates regardless of major. The UNE College of Arts and Sciences is one of the few in the nation that requires formal instruction in Environmental Studies as a requirement for graduation.

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total CAS Core Requirement Credits 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
ENV 100 and 101 or ENV 104 – Introduction to Environmental Issues Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution w/Lab Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular w/Lab 4
LIT 121 and 122 or LIT 124 – Literature, Nature and The Environment Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
BUEC 104 and 105 or BUEC 106 – Economics in Context Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I w/Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II w/Lab 4
MAT 151 – Statistics for Environmental Sciences Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
ENV 200 – Environment and Society: A Global Perspective Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
ENV 220/220L – Conservation and Preservation w/Lab 5
ENV 250 – Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
GIS 161 – GIS I: Fundamentals of Geospatial Science and Technology 3
BIO 350/350L – Ecology w/ Field Lab (third year) 4
Sixteen (16) Credits of Upper Division Science Electives* 16
Two (2) courses from different distribution groups in the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements 6–8
Up to twelve (12) credits of ENV 295 and/or ENV 495 may be arranged with special permission from the Academic Director 3–12
ENV 499 – Senior Capstone in Environmental Studies 3
Total 55–65
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Upper-Division Science Electives – After consulting with their academic advisors, Environmental Science majors will choose at least sixteen (16) credit hours of upper-division science courses in Environmental Science, Biology, Marine Science, Chemistry, Physics, or Psychology. (This group of courses should be taken during the third and fourth years.)

Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements List

Group One (1) – Conservation, Preservation, Restoration Credits
ENV 309 – Sustainability and Ecological Restoration 3
ENV 312/312L – Wetland Conservation and Ecology with Field Lab 4
ENV 313/313L – Wetland Restoration: Science and Policy with Field Lab 4
ENV 316/316L – Land Conservation Practicum with Field Lab 4
ENV 317 – Case Studies in Preserving Biodiversity and Protected Areas 3
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
Group Two (2) – Environmental Policy and Management Credits
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics (can also meet ADV ST requirement) 3
BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
ENV 204 – Urban Forestry 3
ENV 321 – Environmental Communication: Expert Practices for Ecosystem Management 3
ENV 328 – Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife and Human Health 3
ENV 357 – Sustaining Water: Social and Global Perspectives 3
ENV 362 – Climate Change Adaptation 3
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
Group Three (3) – Arts, Humanities, and Values Credits
ENV 331 – Women and the Environment 3
ENV 333/333L – The Nature Writers with Field Lab 4
ENV 334/334L – Contemporary Nature Writing w/Lab 4
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
Group Four (4) – Global Ecology and Social Justice Credits
ENV 340 – Environmental Movements and Social Change 3
ENV 341 – Indigenous Ecology, Conservation Biology, and the Politics of Knowledge 3
ENV 344 – Environmental Ethics 3
ENV 349/349L – Environment, Health, and Community Development in E. Africa w/Lab 4
ENV 376 – Caribbean Sustainable Development 3
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4

The Environmental Studies program also offers minors in the following areas:

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Life Science can complete a double major with Environmental Science and Secondary Education or a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Environmental Science. For more information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

All courses that fulfill a degree requirement must be completed with a grade of C- or higher. 

Learning Outcomes

All graduates will achieve the below learning outcomes.

Intellectual Flexibility

Students will possess the intellectual flexibility necessary to view environmental questions from multiple perspectives, prepared to alter their understanding as they learn new ways of understanding.

Problem Solving

Students will solve problems systematically, creatively, and reflexively, ready to assemble knowledge and formulate strategy.

Interdisciplinary

When encountering environmental problems students will assess necessary scientific concepts and data, consider likely social dynamics, and establish integral cultural contexts.

Research

When faced with questions that lie beyond their current knowledge base, students will actively research data, concepts, histories, and narratives necessary for adequate consideration of the issue.

Communication

Students will communicate with precision, effective art, and sound rhetoric in writing, in speech, and in digital media.

Values

Reflecting upon their internalized values system, students will continue to evolve an individual vision of harmonious and sustainable interaction among humans as well as between humans and the rest of the natural world.

Knowledge

Students will have mastered foundational knowledge enabling them to make sound life decisions as well as enter a career in an environmental profession or graduate school.

Detailed Learning Outcomes

To deal with environmental issues one must understand not only scientific concepts, but also the social interactions by which humans behave and the cultural values that underlay behaviors. Therefore, our Environmental Studies and Environmental Science programs lead to learning outcomes involving many different disciplines, or ways of knowing. We have organized our more detailed learning outcomes according to the three traditional academic categories: social sciences, natural sciences, and the humanities.

Social Sciences
  • Students will be able to articulate the basic structure, functions, and processes of key social systems affecting the environment.
  • Students will be able to apply specific models of social system processes derived from various social science theories to explain environmental issues (including current and past conditions), and to propose future solutions to environmental problems
  • Students will be able to identify, interpret, and apply basic measures (metrics and formulae) of social system variables to assess socio-environmental conditions.
  • Students will be able to articulate basic understanding of various social science theories/frameworks and how they apply to environmental issues.
  • Students will be able to explain how various paradigms or world views and their implicit and explicit assumptions and values shape the viewer’s perception of environmental problems and solutions.
  • Students will be able to explain how perceptions of environmental problems, the problems themselves, and the proposed solutions are shaped by their historical, geographical, social, political, economic, and cultural contexts.
  • Students will be able to assess/weigh ethical considerations as a component of environmental decision-making and problem-solving.
Natural Sciences
  • Students will understand key concepts in the life and physical sciences and will apply them to environmental issues. 
  • Students will understand and apply the scientific process, as well as appreciate both the potential and limitations of the process. 
  • Students will be able to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from the scientific literature. 
  • Students will analyze data using appropriate statistical methods and will be able to evaluate the use of statistics by others in a variety of contexts. 
  • Students will apply knowledge of the sciences within an interdisciplinary context in solving environmental issues such as environmental health, food and agriculture, energy, waste and pollution, climate change, population, resource management, and loss of biodiversity. 
  • Students will carry out an applied research project in the natural sciences. 
  • Students will be able to communicate science effectively through written work and oral presentations to a variety of audiences. 
  • Students will apply the tools commonly used in field research, particularly in the study of plants, animals, and soils and will find their way on the landscape using map, compass and GPS technology, and use spatial analysis software such as GIS, Google Earth, and Google Maps.
Humanities 
  • Students will articulate historical epochs and concepts relevant to the evolution of environmental consciousness and policy.  
  • Students will analyze and evaluate ideological and philosophical approaches used to understand environmental relationships. 
  • Students will be aware of and able to analyze the potential of literature and fine arts to communicate assumptions of value about human relations with the biosphere. 
  • Students will articulate a coherent philosophy of the environment, & consider ethical bases for responding to environmental questions.

The third- and fourth-year curriculum of the Environmental Studies/Science majors build on the core learning outcomes through a process of intensification, adding depth and sophistication to students’ learning of the concepts and skills specified above. For students majoring in Environmental Studies, the outcomes listed under “Social Sciences” and “Humanities” are emphasized, while the outcomes listed under “Natural Sciences” are emphasized for students majoring in Environmental Science. 

Double Major

It is possible for students to add a second major or minor in areas such as marine biology, medical biology, political science, history, sociology, math, and English. Students interested in a double major should consult with their faculty advisor, who in turn will coordinate with an advisor from the second program.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Environmental Studies

Contact

Dr. Noah Perlut
Assistant Academic Director
nperlut@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies
Sections

Mission

Environmental Studies programs strive to increase awareness and appreciation of human connections with the rest of nature and to stimulate advocacy for sustainable behaviors. The curriculum stresses sound interdisciplinary understanding of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities disciplines in order to explore past, present, and potential ways of living on the earth. We are concerned with environmental issues at local, regional, national, and global levels, and we especially desire to help individuals and communities practice sustainable living by means of our research, teaching, and service. Faculty and students collaborate in active and critical learning through community discourse, personal inquiry, and experiential learning. We intend that our students develop a personal aesthetic awareness of the earth and that they engage in inquiry, discovery, critical thinking, and debate that characterize the study of environmental issues.

Major Description

The program offers majors in Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, and Sustainability and Business (offered jointly with the Department of Business). All three majors build upon a sound foundation in basic science, and both provide broad explorations of human interaction with the environment.

During the first two years of the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors, course requirements are nearly identical. The difference between the two majors emerges during the final two years in course selection: Environmental Science emphasizes scientific aspects of environmental questions, while Environmental Studies emphasizes humanistic, social, and political aspects.

During the first year, both majors take courses in Environmental Issues, Biology, Literature, Nature and the Environment (or appropriate substitute), and Economics in Context (or appropriate substitute). This two-semester program, called the Green Learning Community (GLC), provides an interdisciplinary framework to explore fundamental themes of environmental studies. Moreover, it develops academic, social, and affective skills necessary for successful college learning and collaborative professional work.

During the second year, students look more deeply into the nature of environmental issues by taking courses in Environment and Society, Conservation and Preservation, and Environmental Policy. In addition, the Conservation Field Lab teaches conservation field skills as well as data analysis and environmental communication arts. In the Environmental Sustainability Lab students apply classroom learning as they propose, research and bring about a sustainability project on the campus or in the larger community. These interdisciplinary core environmental courses ensure a broad understanding while preparing students for more advanced study.

In their third year, students in both majors take BIO 350 – Ecology. In their third and fourth years, aided by a faculty advisor, students choose advanced courses according to their interests and career plans. Environmental Science majors choose science electives in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Marine Science, or Psychology. Environmental Studies majors in the third and fourth years choose advanced courses from the following distribution groups: Conservation, Preservation and Restoration; Environmental Policy and Management; Arts, Humanities, and Values; Global Ecology and Social Justice.

In both majors, the advanced courses not only stress deeper understanding but also involve problem-solving. Some courses examine the ways that human attitudes affect our environment, while other courses deal with hands-on tasks such as designing a conservation area, restoring a natural ecosystem, or considering technologies to reduce pollution. In order to ensure an intense direct experience of the natural world, the School of Marine and Environmental Programs offers a variety of field study courses. The curriculum culminates with the Senior Capstone in Sustainability in which students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to an in-depth study of the concept.

Philosophy

Because the study of environmental issues requires knowledge from a wide range of subjects, the program maintains a firm commitment to interdisciplinary education in our curriculum. Core courses utilize knowledge and concepts drawn from the basic sciences as well as from the humanities and social sciences. Upper-division courses investigate environmental questions through disciplines such as literature, anthropology, economics, biology, political science, chemistry, physics, and ecology. Through all four years, our curriculum develops the skills necessary for dealing with environmental problems: writing, speaking, critical thinking, computing, research techniques, and media arts. The Environmental Studies Program prepares students to become informed citizens, competent professionals, and lifelong learners.

The Green Learning Community

As mentioned above, all entering first-year environmental students participate in a year-long learning community focused on the fundamental themes of environmental studies. The Green Learning Community integrates courses as follows: four (4) credits of biology, three (3) credits of literature (or an appropriate substitute), three (3) credits of economics and three (3) credits of environmental issues for a total of thirteen (13) credits over two semesters. This interdisciplinary approach enables students to understand more clearly the complexity of environmental issues and at the same time improve skills in critical thinking, writing, oral communication, research, and use of computers. Experiential learning activities are central.

Internships and Careers

Internships provide students with an opportunity to practice learned skills in an actual work environment with the guidance of the CAS internship coordinator, who helps students match their interests with a work experience that might take place locally, regionally, nationally, or internationally. Internships provide career exploration and can help establish professional networks that lead to career opportunities upon graduation. The interdisciplinary nature of Environmental Studies and Environmental Science is reflected in the wide variety of careers open to graduates, such as air and water resource management, ecological restoration, education, habitat conservation, park management, toxicology, field research, journalism, environmental advocacy, environmental impact assessment, law and regulation, and environmental health. Our graduates enter both masters and doctoral programs in several of these fields.

Curricular Requirements

Since 1991 the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences has defined environmental awareness as a major theme in the College's Core Curriculum, and asked the Environmental Studies program to deliver the course Introduction to Environmental Issues to all undergraduates regardless of major. The UNE College of Arts and Sciences is one of the few in the nation that requires formal instruction in Environmental Studies as a requirement for graduation.

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution with Lab Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 350/350L – Ecology with Field Lab 4
BUEC 104 and 105 or BUEC 106 – Economics in Context Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
CHE – Any college-level Chemistry course with Lab 4
LIT 121 and 122 or LIT 124 – Literature, Nature and the Environment Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
MAT 151 – Statistics for Environmental Sciences Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
ENV 100 and 101 or ENV 104 – Introduction to Environmental Issues Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
ENV 200 – Environment and Society: A Global Perspective Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
ENV 220 – Conservation and Preservation 3
ENV 220L – Conservation and Preservation Lab 2
ENV 240 – Environmental Sustainability Lab 2
ENV 250 – Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
ENV 499 – Senior Capstone in Environmental Studies 3
Environmental Science Elective – After consulting with their academic advisors, Environmental Studies majors will choose 3-4 credit hours of an upper-division science course in Environmental Science or Biology, Marine Science, Chemistry, Physics, or Psychology. (This course should be taken during the third or fourth year.) 3-4
Select one (1) course from each of the four (4) Distribution Groups in the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements and additional credits chosen from any of the groups to total twenty-one (21) or more credits. 21–28
Up to twelve (12) credits of ENV 295 or ENV 495 Internship courses may be arranged with special permission from the Academic Director 3–12
Total 52–68
Open Elective Courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements List

Group One (1): Conservation, Preservation, Restoration Credits
ENV 309 – Sustainability and Ecological Restoration 3
ENV 312/312L – Wetland Conservation and Ecology with Field Lab 4
ENV 313/313L – Wetland Restoration: Science and Policy with Field Lab 4
ENV 316/316L – Land Conservation Practicum with Field Lab 4
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
Group Two (2): Environmental Policy and Management Credits
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics (can also meet ADV ST requirement, but not both) 3
BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
ENV 204 – Urban Forestry 3
ENV 321 – Environmental Communication: Expert Practices for Ecosystem Management 3
ENV 328 – Environmental Pollution: Ecosystems, Wildlife, and Human Health 3
ENV 357 – Sustaining Water: Social and Global Perspectives 3
ENV 362 – Climate Change Adaptation 3
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
Group Three (3): Arts, Humanities, and Values Credits
ENV 331 – Women and the Environment 3
ENV 333/333L – The Nature Writers with Field Lab 4
ENV 334 – Contemporary Nature Writing 3
ENV 334L – Contemporary Nature Writing Lab 1
ENV 338 – Environmental Topics in Popular Lyrics 3
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4
Group Four (4): Global Ecology and Social Justice Credits
ENV 340 – Environmental Movements and Social Change 3
ENV 341 – Indigenous Ecology, Conservation Biology, and the Politics of Knowledge 3
ENV 344 – Environmental Ethics 3
ENV 349 – Environment, Health, and Community Development in E. Africa 3
ENV 349L – Environment, Health, and Community Development in E. Africa Lab 1
ENV 376 – Caribbean Sustainable Development 3
ENV 397 – Topics in Environmental Studies (meets ADV ST requirement for non-majors only) 3
ENV 398 – Topics in Environmental Studies 3
ENV 399 – Topics in Environmental Studies with Lab 4

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Life Science can complete a double major with Environmental Science and Secondary Education or a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Environmental Science. For more information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

All courses that fulfill a degree requirement must be completed with a grade of C- or higher. 

Learning Outcomes

Intellectual Flexibility

Students will possess the intellectual flexibility necessary to view environmental questions from multiple perspectives, prepared to alter their understanding as they learn new ways of understanding.

Problem Solving

Students will solve problems systematically, creatively, and reflexively, ready to assemble knowledge and formulate strategy.

Interdisciplinary

When encountering environmental problems students will assess necessary scientific concepts and data, consider likely social dynamics, and establish integral cultural contexts.

Research

When faced with questions that lie beyond their current knowledge base, students will actively research data, concepts, histories, and narratives necessary for adequate consideration of the issue.

Communication

Students will communicate with precision, effective art, and sound rhetoric in writing, in speech, and in digital media.

Values

Reflecting upon their internalized values system, students will continue to evolve an individual vision of harmonious and sustainable interaction among humans as well as between humans and the rest of the natural world.

Knowledge

Students will have mastered foundational knowledge enabling them to make sound life decisions as well as enter a career in an environmental profession or graduate school.

Detailed Learning Outcomes

To deal with environmental issues one must understand not only scientific concepts, but also the social interactions by which humans behave and the cultural values that underlay behaviors. Therefore, our Environmental Studies and Environmental Science programs lead to learning outcomes involving many different disciplines, or ways of knowing. We have organized our more detailed learning outcomes according to the three traditional academic categories: social sciences, natural sciences, and the humanities.

Social Sciences
  • Students will be able to articulate the basic structure, functions, and processes of key social systems affecting the environment.
  • Students will be able to apply specific models of social system processes derived from various social science theories to explain environmental issues (including current and past conditions), and to propose future solutions to environmental problems.
  • Students will be able to identify, interpret, and apply basic measures (metrics and formulae) of social system variables to assess socio-environmental conditions.
  • Students will be able to articulate basic understanding of various social science theories/frameworks and how they apply to environmental issues.
  • Students will be able to explain how various paradigms or world views and their implicit and explicit assumptions and values shape the viewer’s perception of environmental problems and solutions.
  • Students will be able to explain how perceptions of environmental problems, the problems themselves, and the proposed solutions are shaped by their historical, geographical, social, political, economic, and cultural contexts.
  • Students will be able to assess/weigh ethical considerations as a component of environmental decision-making and problem-solving.
Natural Sciences
  • Students will understand key concepts in the life and physical sciences and will apply them to environmental issues.
  • Students will understand and apply the scientific process, as well as appreciate both the potential and limitations of the process.
  • Students will be able to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from the scientific literature.
  • Students will analyze data using appropriate statistical methods and will be able to evaluate the use of statistics by others in a variety of contexts.
  • Students will apply knowledge of the sciences within an interdisciplinary context in solving environmental issues such as environmental health, food, and agriculture, energy, waste and pollution, climate change, population, resource management, and loss of biodiversity.
  • Students will carry out an applied research project in the natural sciences.
  • Students will be able to communicate science effectively through written work and oral presentations to a variety of audiences.
  • Students will apply the tools commonly used in field research, particularly in the study of plants, animals, and soils and will find their way on the landscape using map, compass and GPS technology, and use spatial analysis software such as GIS, Google Earth, and Google Maps.
Humanities
  • Students will articulate historical epochs and concepts relevant to the evolution of environmental consciousness and policy.
  • Students will analyze and evaluate ideological and philosophical approaches used to understand environmental relationships.
  • Students will be aware of and able to analyze the potential of literature and fine arts to communicate assumptions of value about human relations with the biosphere.
  • Students will articulate a coherent philosophy of the environment and consider ethical bases for responding to environmental questions.

The third- and fourth-year curriculum of the Environmental Studies/Science majors build on the core learning outcomes through a process of intensification, adding depth and sophistication to students’ learning of the concepts and skills specified above. For students majoring in Environmental Studies, the outcomes listed under “Social Sciences” and “Humanities” are emphasized, while the outcomes listed under “Natural Sciences” are emphasized for students majoring in Environmental Science.

Double Major

It is possible for students to add a second major or a minor in areas such as marine biology, medical biology, political science, history, sociology, math, and English. Students interested in a double major should consult with their faculty advisor, who in turn will coordinate with an advisor from the second program.

Minors

A student with a major in another program may minor in Environmental Studies with the approval of the academic director. A minimum of eighteen hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

Courses Credits
ENV 100/101 or ENV 104 – Introduction to Environmental Issues 3
ENV 200 – Environment and Society: A Global Perspective 3
ENV 220 – Conservation and Preservation 3
ENV 250 – Environmental Policy in Comparative Perspective 3
Two (2) courses chosen from the list of Environmental Studies Distribution Requirements and/or courses designated ENV in the list of Environmental Science Electives. 6–8

The School of Marine and Environmental Programs also offers minors in Geographic Information Systems and Climate Change Studies

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Environmental Studies and Science 4+1 Program

Category
Contact

Dr. Noah Perlut
Chair
nperlut@une.edu

Degree name
Master of Science in Environmental Studies and Science
Sections

Mission

The Environmental Studies programs strive to increase awareness and appreciation of human connections with the rest of nature and to stimulate advocacy for sustainable behaviors. The curriculum stresses sound interdisciplinary understanding of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities disciplines in order to explore past, present, and potential ways of living on the earth. We are concerned with environmental issues at local, regional, national, and global levels, and we especially desire to help individuals and communities practice sustainable living by means of our research, teaching, and service. Faculty and students collaborate in active and critical learning through community discourse, personal inquiry, and experiential learning. We intend that our students develop a personal aesthetic awareness of the earth and that they engage in the inquiry, discovery, critical thinking, and debate that characterize the study of environmental issues.

Program Description

This degree requires a total of 36 graduate credits beyond the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science or Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies major. This includes a minimum of 12 thesis/research credits (ENV 510), 2 credits of Graduate Seminar in Environmental Studies/Science (ENV 530; 1 in the fourth and 1 in the fifth year), 3 credits of Research Methods (BIO 503) and up to 19 additional course credits (minimum of 12-course credits). Of the 12-19 additional course credits, at minimum of two classes must be ENV courses. A maximum of 12 course credits can double-count towards both the undergraduate and graduate degree requirements.

Program Goals

  • Improve the competitiveness of our graduates for jobs and entrance into doctoral programs
  • Continue to strengthen and diversify research productivity of faculty
  • Attract and retain high achieving students
  • Enhance the intellectual community involving faculty and students in our department

Curricular Requirements

Program Required Courses Credits
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science or Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies 108–120
At least twelve (12) credits of ENV 510 – Master’s Thesis Research 12–19
Two (2) credits of ENV 530 – Grad Sem Env Studies/Sci 2
BIO 503 – Research Methods 3
At least twelve (12) credits of elective courses in any 500+ ENV, BIO, MAR, MAF course where at least 2 of the courses must be ENV 12–19
Total Required Credits 36

Academic and Technical Standards

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To remain in the M.S. in Environmental Studies and Science program, the student's cumulative graduate GPA must be a minimum of 3.0. A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 or who receives a grade below B- in any course taken for graduate credit will be placed on academic probation.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of five years to complete the graduation requirements. After two academic years (fall and spring terms), students who have completed their coursework but are still completing their theses are required to enroll in a minimum of three Thesis credit hours per semester to remain in the program.

Probation/Dismissal

A graduate student whose grade point average (GPA) for any semester falls below 3.0, or whose cumulative grade point average is below 3.0, or who receives a class grade below a B- for any class taken for graduate credit is automatically placed on probation. A student placed on academic probation will be granted one fall or spring semester to raise his/her cumulative GPA to 3.0 or above, will be required to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the semester, and cannot receive a second class grade below B-. Any student who fails to meet these criteria will be considered for dismissal by the School of Marine and Environmental Programs and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this program, students will:

  • Demonstrate expertise in their thesis research field
  • Develop outstanding scientific communication skills through written and oral presentations
  • Demonstrate mastery of the concepts and principals of Environmental Studies/Sciences
  • Demonstrate an understanding of research design and have the ability to carry out a research project

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit

  • Transfer credits will be reviewed and awarded on a case by case basis

Advanced Standing

  • No advanced standing available

Experiential Learning

  • No credit awarded for experiential learning

Admissions

Policy Exceptions

  • Policies have been established to ensure fair and consistent admissions practice for all applicants.
  • All criteria presented in this summary are subject to change per professional accreditation requirements, changes in curriculum or other institutional standards, and clinical affiliation requirements.
  • Exceptions to existing admission policies are rare and made on a case by case basis, only when it is deemed necessary and appropriate to maintain fair and consistent practice for all candidates, individual candidates.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies

Category
Contact

Linda Morrison
lmorrison@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
Sections

Mission

Through exploring the social construction of gender and sexuality in a variety of cultural contexts, the minor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies aims to improve understanding of the situations of all people and to employ gender and sexuality as central categories of analysis. Its goals include recognizing gendered individuals of all backgrounds as whole and productive human beings, providing a more accurate and equitable account of human experience.

Minor Description

The minor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies introduces students to the theories, methods, and issues in these intersecting fields. Complementing and building upon the traditional offerings of UNE’s undergraduate colleges, this minor provides an interdisciplinary perspective to students' education by combining the scholarly traditions of many fields of knowledge in new and productive ways.

Curricular Requirements

Eighteen credits as indicated below will satisfy the minor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies.

Program Required Courses Credits
WGST 200 – Introduction to Women's Studies 3
WGST 400 – Capstone in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies or one (1) 300-400 level Women, and Sexuality Studies Elective course 3
Four (4) Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Elective courses 12
Minimum Required Total Credits 18

Electives

Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Elective Course Options Credits
ANT 312 – Human Trafficking 3
ENG 310 – Writing and Women's Health 3
ENG 310 – Writing & Women's Health 3
ENV 331 – Women and the Environment 3
HIS 204 – Growing up Female 3
HIS 250 – American Women's History I 3
HIS 251 – American Women's History II 3
HIS 349 – Hist of Gender/Sexuality in LA 3
HIS 337 – Topics in Women's History 3
HIS 353 – Sex and the City 3
PHI 125 – Phil Friend, Love, Mar & Sex 3
PSC 312 – The Family and Politics 3
PSC 450 – Contemporary Feminist Theories 3
PSY 215 – Psychology of Gender 3
SOC 240 – Race, Class & Gender 3
SOC 350 – Deviance 3
WGST 276 – Women in the Ancient World 3
WGST 278 – Women in the Modern World 3
Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies elective credit may be given for the following topics courses. Examples of specific sections for which credit will be given are listed in parentheses. Credits
ENG 216 – Criminals, Idiots & Minors 3
ENG 234 – Topics in British Literature after 1800 (Fallen Angels: New Woman Fiction in England and America) 3
ENG 326 – Topics in Literature & Health (Madness in Literature) 3
ENG 326 – Topics in Literature & Health (Patient Narratives) 3
ENG 235 – Topics in US Literature to 1865 (Women’s YA Dystopian Fiction) 3
ENG 235 or ENG 435 – Topics in US Literature to 1865 (Women of the West) 3
HIS 276 – History Human Trad I (Women in the Ancient World) 3
HIS 278 – History Human Trad II (Women in the Modern World) 3
HIS 290 – History Hands On Topics (Sex and Power: Women in the Americas) 3
HIS 395 – What Actually Happened? 3
HIS 399 – Topics in History (Gender and Sexuality in Latin American History) 3
Any course with a Human Traditions I course attribute (Gender and Politics) 3
PSY 405 – Special Topics Seminar (Psychology of Sexual Orientation) 3

Elective credit may, in some cases, be available through internships or directed studies when approved by the Advisory Committee for Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies. This elective credit must have content that is women, sexuality, and/or gender-focused.

Learning Outcomes

The Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies Program has identified an array of valuable learning outcomes associated with its undergraduate minor curriculum. Among those, the following three represent especially important learning areas for students graduating with a minor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies from the University of New England.

Students completing the Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies minor will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the key concerns and methodologies of the intersecting fields of gender, women, sexuality, and queer studies.
  • Articulate orally and in writing the importance of gender and sexuality to social and cultural issues, past and present.
  • Conduct primary and secondary source research in order to develop a basis for, and effectively communicate, informed opinions in the fields represented by the minor.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

All admitted, matriculated UNE students can declare a minor in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies with the permission of the program director. All students are invited to enroll in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies courses.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Geographic Information Systems

Category
Contact

Dr. Noah Perlut
Assistant Academic Director
nperlut@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Geographic Information Systems
Sections

Minor Description

Geospatial Technology is a growing field, involving geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS), internet mapping technologies, and remote sensing. In the GIS minor you learn about these tools and get hands-on experience using them in an internship. GIS has applications related to health care, ecology and conservation, marine science, engineering, business, urban planning, sociology, politics and more. A GIS Minor gives you practical skills that current employers are seeking and will significantly enhance your ability to gain employment because you become competent in skills that have application to many dynamic fields. With GIS, you can track the spread of disease, find optimal sites to locate a new business, map endangered plant and animal habitat, find the best site for solar panels, or analyze growth patterns of cities.

Curricular Requirements

A student with a major in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs or another program may minor in Geographic Information Systems with the approval of the academic director. A minimum of 18 hours of approved course credit in the following courses is required:

Program Required Courses Credits
GIS 161 – GIS I: Fundamentals of Geospatial Science and Technology 3
GIS 162 – GIS II: Application of Geospatial Science and Technology 3
GIS 224/224L – Remote Sensing/Remote Sensing Lab 4
GIS 364/364L – Spatial Analysis/Spatial Analysis Lab 4
GIS 495 – GIS Internship (Variable credit) 4+

Learning Outcomes

  • Comprehend fundamental concepts and practices of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and advances in Geospatial Information Science and Technology (GIS&T).
  • Apply basic graphic and data visualization concepts such as color theory, symbolization, and use of white space.
  • Demonstrate organizational skills in file and database management.
  • Give examples of interdisciplinary applications of Geospatial Information Science and Technology.
  • Apply GIS analysis to address geospatial problems and/or research questions.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of GIS tools to create maps that are fit-for-purpose and effectively convey the information they are intended to.
  • Effectively communicate and present project results in oral, written, and graphic forms.
  • Demonstrate confidence in undertaking new (unfamiliar) analysis using GIS, troubleshoot problems in GIS, and seek help from software/website help menus and the GIS community to solve problems.
  • Apply mathematical concepts, including statistical methods, to data to be used in geospatial analysis.
  • Gather and process original data using a Global Positioning System (GPS) or other Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives.

All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Global Studies

Contact

Kenneth Courtney
kcourtney1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies
Sections

Mission

Our mission is to provide rigorous liberal arts offerings organized in a way that demonstrates the pedagogical usefulness and theoretical power of bringing various relevant disciplines to bear upon our study of the world. Our goal is to allow students to engage with and comprehend broad global concerns and to foster specific regional expertise including proficiency in relevant languages. We aim to prepare students to change the world by understanding it more deeply and prepare them for the job market by acquiring knowledge and skills demanded of 21st-century graduates.

Major Description

Global Studies (GS) exposes students to global issues, problems, cultures, and relations through an integrated and interdisciplinary curriculum based in the liberal arts.

GS students use the lenses of the humanities, social sciences, business, international experiences, and internships to understand the world they live in. They will divide their time between UNE’s campuses in Maine and Morocco, with additional opportunities to spend semesters in Spain and/or France.

The major prepares students to assume leadership roles in the fields of government, business, tourism, law, non-profits, consulting and a variety of other professions.

Curricular Requirements

At least two (2) full semesters abroad or one (1) semester abroad plus twelve (12) credits of UNE travel courses are required for this major.

CAS Core Curriculum Credits
Total 42–48
Global Studies Core Required Courses Credits
GLS 100 – Introduction to Global Studies 3
GLS 490 – Center Global Humanities Seminar 3
GLS 410 – Global Studies Capstone Seminar or PSC 491 – Integrative Essay 3
Four (4) Interdisciplinary Core courses with at least one (1) course at the 300-level or above 12
Regional Concentration (Choose One Option) Credits
One (1) regional concentration (below) with 18 credits of coursework with at least 6 credits at the 300-level or above 18
Two (2) regional concentrations (below) selecting 9 credits in each with at least 3 credits at the 300-level or above for each concentration 18
Foreign Language Courses Credits
Three (3) Foreign Language courses with at least two (2) of the courses in the same foreign language and at least one (1) course above the introductory level taken during study abroad for a total of 9 credits. 9
Total 48
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Interdisciplinary Core

Interdisciplinary Core Courses Credits
ENG 329 – Topics in World Literature** or ENG 405 – Topics in Postcolonial Literature* 3
PSC 201 – Introduction to International Relations* 3
PSC 322 – International Political Economy* 3
ANT 102 – Cultural Anthropology* 3
HIS 278 – Origins of the Contemporary World* 3
ENV 200 – Society, Population and the Environment: A Global Perspective* 3
Total 12

*These courses can count towards the core curriculum.

Regional Concentration

Europe/The Mediterranean Credits
ARH 322 – History of Spanish Art 3
ENG 345 – Moroccan Theater and Social Change 3
HIS 230 – From Togas to Black Rats 3
HIS 231 – Reformations, Revolutions 3
HIS 329 – Tangier – Crossroads of Civilization 3
HIS 344 – Postwar – Europe after WWII 3
SOC 212 – Society and Culture in Morocco 3
Latin America/Caribbean Courses Credits
ANT 230 – Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean 3
HIS 240 – Latin Amer His I: Colonial Lat 3
HIS 241 – Latin Amer His II: Modern Latin 3
HIS 316 – Rebellion and Revolution in 20th Century Latin America 3
HIS 331 – Revolution and Social Protest in Mexico 3
SOC 230 – Society in Latin America 3
SOC 331 – Latin America Society and Culture through Cinema 3
ENV 376 – Caribbean Sustainable Development 3
Africa/Middle East Courses Credits
ANT 231 – Culture and Society in the Middle East 3
ENG 345 – Moroccan Theater and Social Change 3
ENV 348/348L – Environment, Health, and Community Development in East Africa 3
SOC 212 – Society and Culture in Morocco 3
PSC 110 – Politics – Culture/Inven/Trade 3
PSC 304 – Middle East and North Africa through Film 3
PSC 307 – R & P: Political Islam and Islamic 3
PSC 408 – The Arab – Israeli Conflict 3
HIS 370 – Slave/Citizens: Africans in the New World 3

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates will be able to:

  • Describe, explain and analyze global issues and problems from multiple and critical disciplinary perspectives
  • Demonstrate a level of historical/cultural/economic/political knowledge necessary to engage constructively in intellectual discourse on global issues
  • Assume and draw on the perspective of individuals and cultures other than their own
  • Connect curricular and extracurricular lessons gained during study abroad to those in the global studies major and the UNE core curriculum
  • Describe and articulate the distinctive features of at least one global region's culture, history, and modem features/issues/challenges
  • Communicate at an intermediate level in oral and written forms in at least one modern language other than English
  • Conduct interdisciplinary research in international settings and on global questions
  • Develop solutions to complex global problems that are informed by knowledge, analytical reasoning, and experience
  • Identify and describe career opportunities in global studies and the skill sets required in each

Minor

A student with a major in another department may minor in Global Studies with the permission of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences academic director. Twenty-one hours of course work is required for the Minor in Global Studies as specified below.

Curriculum

Minor Required Courses Credits
GLS 100 – Intro to Global Studies 3
Interdisciplinary Core Credits
Minimum of two (2) global courses (each from a different disciplinary area with at least 3 credits at the 300 level or above) 6
Interdisciplinary Regional Concentration Credits
Six (6) credits of 300+ level coursework in any single Regional Concentration 6
Language Credits
Two (2) courses from a single language (other than English) 6
Total 21

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Health Sciences - Athletic Training

Category
Contact

Wayne R. Lamarre, M.Ed., LAT, ATC
wlamarre@une.edu 

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences-Athletic Training
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Bachelor of Sciences in Health Sciences — Athletic Training degree is to prepare students to enter into UNE's Master of Science in Athletic Training degree program. Graduates will be caring, collaborative, and prepared to apply initiatives in health promotion in a variety of settings.

Major Description

The B.S. in Health Sciences - Athletic Training is designed to provide foundational coursework in preparation for the UNE Master of Science in Athletic Training Program. Study of anatomy, physiology, chemistry, and nutrition promotes a comprehensive framework for analyzing human health and disease. Exploration in the social/behavioral sciences, including psychology and sociology, emphasizes theories of human behavior, lifespan development, and sociocultural considerations. The examination of ethics, research methods, and collaborative interprofessional practice reveals the complex and dynamic nature of health and healthcare delivery. The curriculum is anchored in the Westbrook College of Health Professions Common Curriculum, providing students opportunities to engage in the liberal arts and science. Completion of this degree does not lead to licensure in any health discipline or field, and provides an excellent foundation for advanced study in the health professions.

Curricular Requirements

Year One Courses Credits
BIO 104 – General Biology I with lab 4
ENG 110 – English Composition 4
EXS 120 – Personal Health & Wellness 3
IHS 130 – Interprofessional Health Care First Year Experience 3
MAT 120 – Statistics or MAT 150:& Statistics for Life Sciences 3
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Creative Arts Course (ART/MUS) 3
One (1) Explorations Course (EXP course attribute) 3
Total 29
Year Two Courses Credits
ATC 105 – Intro to Athletic Training with lab 3
BIO 208 – Intro to Anatomy & Physiology I with lab 4
BIO 209 – Intro to Anatomy & Physiology II with lab 4
BIO 309 – Pathophysiology 3
CHE 110 – General Chemistry I with lab 4
EXS 180 – Motor Learning & Performance 3
IHS 310 – Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development 3
PUB 200 – Public Health 3
SPC 100 – Public Speaking 3
Total 33
Year Three Courses Credits
ATC 300 – Special Topics in Athletic Training 1
ATC 333 – Human Gross Anatomy with lab 3
ATC 420 – Research Methods 3
EXS 310 – Kinesiology & Biomechanics 3
EXS 320 – Exercise Physiology 3
NUTR 220 – Nutrition 3
PHY 110 – General Physics I with lab 4
One (1) Advanced Studies Course (ADV course attribute) 3
General Elective 3
Total 26
Year Four Courses Credits
ATC 500 – Fundamentals of Athletic Training 3
ATC 508 – Evaluation of Athletic & Orthopaedic Injuries 6
ATC 515 – Physical Agents in Athletic Training 3
ATC 520 – Clinical Reasoning in Athletic Training 3
ATC 525 – Athletic Training Clinical Practicum I 5
ATC 535 – Athletic Performance and Conditioning 3
ATC 540 – General Medical Conditions in AT 3
ATC 545 – Pharmacology in Athletic Training 3
ATC 550 – Athletic Training Clinical Practicum II 4
Total 33
Degree total 121

Academic and Technical Standards

Students in the BSHS-AT will be retained providing the following criteria are maintained throughout the undergraduate experience:

  • Minimum requirements for successful progression in years 1-3 as outlined in the UNE undergraduate Catalog must be met.
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in the following courses: ATC 105, ATC 333, ATC 420, BIO 104, BIO 208, BIO 209, EXS 120, EXS 180, EXS 310, EXS 320, MAT 120/150, NUTR 220, PSY 105, PUB 200, and SPC 100. Failure to achieve a "C" will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression. 
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade of "C-" in the following courses: CHE 110 and PHY 110. Failure to achieve a "C-" will result in program-level probation, and may affect academic progression.
  • Students may enroll in any course in the WCHP Common Curriculum a maximum of two times. Enrollment consists of achieving a "WP," "WF," or a letter grade. Receiving a "W" in a course is not considered official enrollment and will not result in academic penalty. Failure to achieve the required grade after a second attempt at a course will result in dismissal from the major. 
  • Students enrolled in the BSHS-AT degree program must maintain a minimum cumulative semester GPA of 2.5.
  • Students may enroll in required courses a maximum of two times regardless of the final grade, including "W", "WP", or "WF."
  • Students enrolled in year four of the BSHS-AT program must adhere to the academic and technical standards for the Master of Science in Athletic Training Program. Please refer to the WCHP Graduate Program Progression Policies and Procedures (PDF) for a detailed description of these standards.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Health Sciences - Athletic Training major, students will be able to:

  • Apply biological, physical, and disciplinary sciences in the study of human health and disease.
  • Analyze the influence of environment, individual/community behavior, and culture on health and well-being.
  • Evaluate scientific literature and evidence-based practice approaches which address health-related issues.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of ethical principles and behaviors consistent with professional practice.
  • Demonstrate effective written, oral, and interprofessional communication skills and abilities.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Admission to the program is limited to matriculated UNE students who are enrolled in the five-year Master of Science in Athletic Training program.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Health Sciences

Category
Contact

Heath R. Pierce M.Ed., RSCC*D, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, ACSM EP-C
Assistant Dean, Westbrook College of Health Professions
hpierce@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences
Sections

Mission

The Bachelor of Science with a major in Health Sciences reflects the University’s commitment as a health sciences institution dedicated to innovation for a healthier planet. The mission of the Health Sciences degree is to develop caring, collaborative graduates prepared to apply initiatives in health promotion in a variety of settings.

Major Description

The B.S. in Health Sciences is designed to provide students with a generalist exploratory science degree. The study of anatomy, physiology, chemistry, and nutrition promotes a comprehensive foundation for analyzing human health and disease. Exploration in the social/behavioral sciences, including psychology and sociology, emphasizes theories addressing human behavior, lifespan development, and sociocultural considerations. The examination of ethics, research methods, and collaborative interprofessional practice reveals the complex and dynamic nature of health and healthcare delivery. The curriculum is anchored in the Westbrook College of Health Professions Common Curriculum, providing students with opportunities to engage in the liberal arts and science. Completion of this degree does not lead to licensure in any health discipline or field and provides an excellent foundation for advanced study in the health professions.

Admission to the program is limited to matriculated UNE students and requires permission from the Westbrook College of Health Professions Dean’s office.

Curricular Requirements

Year One (1) Courses Credits
BIO 104 – General Biology or BIO 105 – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution or BIO 106 – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 208 – Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology I 4
ENG 110 – English Composition 3–4
IHS 130 – Health Profession First Year Experience 3
MAT 120 – Statistics or MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Creative Arts Course (ART/MUS/ART) 3
One (1) Explorations Course (EXP course attribute) 3
Total 29–30
Year Two (2) Courses Credits
BIO 209 – Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 309 – Pathophysiology 3
CHE 110 – General Chemistry I or CHE 111 – General Chemistry II orCHE 130 – Principles of Chemistry 4
HWOS 305 – Introduction to OT and Professions 3
IHS 210 – Methods of Scholarly Inquiry 3
IHS 310 – Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 3
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development 3
One (1) Social Global Awareness Course (SGA course attribute) 3
Total 29
Years Three (3) and Four (4) Credits
BIO 404 – Neuroscience or BIO 242 – Applied Microbiology or PHY 110 – General Physics 4
HWOS 316 – Research Methods or ATC 420 – Research Methods or PUB 305 – Research Methods in Public Hlt 3
NUTR 220 – Nutrition 3
One (1) Advanced Studies Course (ADV course attribute) 3
General Electives 48–49
Total 61–62
Degree Total 120

Academic and Technical Standards

Students in the B.S. in Health Sciences major are subject to University undergraduate academic standards.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Health Sciences major, students will be able to:

  • Apply biological, physical, and disciplinary sciences in the study of human health and disease.
  • Analyze the influence of environment, individual/community behavior, and culture on health and well-being.
  • Evaluate scientific literature and evidence-based practice approaches that address health-related issues.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of ethical principles and behaviors consistent with professional practice.
  • Demonstrate effective written, oral, and interprofessional communication skills and abilities.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

Admission to the program is limited to matriculated UNE students and requires permission of the Westbrook College of Health Professions Dean’s Office.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Health, Law, and Policy

Category
Contact

Zach Olson
Assistant Academic Director
zolson@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Health, Law, and Policy
Sections

Minor Description

The Health, Law, and Policy minor is designed to introduce students to the United States healthcare system, with a special emphasis on the public health sector. As a minor, students are provided the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the law that governs our healthcare system and the politics that shape those laws. Students completing the minor will be well-positioned for expanded roles of leadership within a health provider organization or political entity charged with creating health care policy.

Curricular Requirements

Students wishing to pursue a Health, Law, and Policy minor must have an advisor in the program and approval from the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Each student will work with a faculty advisor to design a minor consisting of six (6) courses (18 credits) that supports the student's interests, according to the following guidelines and availability.

Required Courses Credits
PSC 325 – Politics of Public Health 3
One (1) course from Law Electives 3
One (1) course from Political Science Electives 3
One (1) course from Law Electives or Political Science Electives 3
Two (2) courses from Health, Law and Policy Electives 6
Total Required Credits 18
Law Electives Credits
PSC 106 – Law & American Society 3
PSC 125 – Understanding the Law 3
PSC 203 – Politics of Law 3
PSC 210 – Constitutional Law 3
Political Science Electives Credits
PSC 101 – Introduction to American Politics 3
PSC 105 – Introduction to Political Science 3
PSC 200 – Introduction to Political Theory 3
PSC 220 – Research Methods 3
PSC 432 – Autonomy/Politics of Reproduction 3
Health, Law and Policy Electives Credits
ENG 310 – Writing & Women's Health 3
ANT 211 – Medical Anthropology 3
SOC 355 – Medical Sociology 3
BUEC 385 – Health Economics 3
HSM 370 – Law & Ethics of Health Care 3
PHI 406 – Human Genome Project Ethics 3
SOC 460 – Social Policy and Planning 3
PSY 235 – Health Psychology 3
Internship Variable

Learning Outcomes

This minor provides students additional choices and options that are career-oriented in a field that is expected to see significant growth over the next 20 years.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years. Other restrictions apply.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Health, Medicine, and Society

Category
Contact

Zach Olson
Assistant Academic Director, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
zolson@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Health, Medicine and Society
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Social and Cultural Studies programs is to offer a vigorous and exciting broad-based liberal arts education with an emphasis on cultural, global, and political dynamics. The programs provide a combination of theoretical, scientific, practical and experiential approaches to understanding and solving human problems. Issues of gender, race, class, and culture, as well as hands-on learning, are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Our goal is to graduate students with marketable skills that prepare them for careers in a variety of public and social services and/or for graduate study in related areas.

Minor Description

A minor in Health, Medicine, and Society is an interdisciplinary, social scientific study of health and medicine. It encompasses anthropological, sociological, psychological, and political science investigations of health and illness. This minor prepares students for a myriad of careers that directly or indirectly relate to a variety of fields in the medical professions.

Curricular Requirements

To complete the minor in Health, Medicine, and Society students must complete six (6) three (3) credit courses in anthropology, sociology, and related social science or medically related disciplines. Also, four (4) of the total courses must be completed in anthropology or sociology. The electives may come from a variety of fields depending on the specific course. Students may count courses taken in the Core Curriculum as part of the minor. Students in Sociology or Applied Social and Cultural Studies may not count courses toward the major and the HMS minor. One course must be taken at the 300 or 400 level.

Choose one (1) of the following Credits
ANT 101 – Introduction to Anthropology 3
ANT 102 – Cultural Anthropology 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
Total Required Credits 3
Choose five (5) electives of the following with at least one (1) at the 300 level or above* Credits
ANT 118 – Applied Anthropology 3
ANT 211 – Medical Anthropology 3
ANT 241 – Plagues and Populations 3
ANT 425 – Sex, Gender, Sexuality 3
HWOS 432 – Disability Studies and Inclusive Communities 3
PHI 201 – Biomedical Ethics 3
PSY 250 – Human Life Span Development 3
PSY 325 – Psychology of Aging 3
PSY 370 – Drugs, Society, and Behavior 3
PSC 325 – Politics and Public Health 3
PUB 200 – Foundations in Public Health 3
SOC 224 – Family, Health, and Social Change 3
SOC 228 – Sociology of Aging 3
SOC 275 – Sociology of Food and Health 3
SOC 355 – Medical Sociology 3
Total Elective Credits 15
Total Required Credits 18

*Other courses can be substituted with the permission of the academic director.

Learning Outcomes

Students in all Social and Cultural Studies programs will explore the world and its diverse people, environments, social/cultural structure, and languages by employing sociological and anthropological theory, research design, analysis, experiential learning, and critical assessment methods. As a result, at the completion of all Social and Cultural Studies programs:

Students will be able to recognize and evaluate the nature of social evidence and in doing so be able to articulate and apply appropriate terminology, theoretical and methodological procedures to the examination of society, culture, and languages across time and space.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies

Category
Contact

Caryn Husman
Associate Clinical Professor and Director, Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies
11 Hills Beach Rd. Biddeford, ME 04005
Phone: (207) 602-2065
Fax: (207) 602-5921
chusman@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Health, Wellness and Occupational Studies
Sections

Mission

Our mission is to develop caring, collaborative scholars through a dynamic, student-centered, occupation-focused educational program.

Vision

Our vision is to address society's occupational needs by fostering excellence in health, wellness, and occupational studies through teaching, scholarship, and service.

Major Description

The Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies program gives students a broad education that will prepare them for a variety of career paths. Students are prepared for opportunities including application to graduate programs in occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, special education, public health, or related health professions — as well as professional careers as an assistive technology professional, wellness coach, wellness coordinator, activity director, health educator, case manager, medical salesperson, or paraprofessional in mental health and educational settings.

The curriculum is grounded in a holistic conceptualization of health and wellness that teaches students to assess health from both a macro and micro level. Students gain depth in understanding a wide variety of determinants of health through the study of health science, public health, and human occupation – an often-overlooked determinant of health. Students also gain practical skills applicable to a variety of paths through training in motivational interviewing, wellness assessment, health literacy, stress management, health education, and program development, implementation, and evaluation. Thus, Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies students learn how to work with people by understanding where they come from and employing tools to help them take the next steps toward a healthier life. Further, students are encouraged to find their passion by using flexible electives to concentrate their studies in their unique interests, explore a wide range of topics, elect for an internship in health and wellness settings, or take experiential electives. Service learning, active learning, and interprofessional education are embedded into the curriculum with themes of resilience, advocacy, and wellness across the lifespan.

Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies students also have the opportunity to pursue an Assistive Technology Specialization. The specialization prepares students to make a difference in the lives of people who have disabilities by recommending and training people to use health-related technical assistive devices. Students develop skills in promoting independence in the use of devices and equipment, thereby supporting engagement in meaningful activities, occupations, and enhanced quality of life for people across the lifespan.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of the program, the Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies student will:

  • Critically analyze concepts of health and wellness through application at the personal (micro), population (meso), and societal (macro) levels.
  • Synthesize biological, psychosocial, and educational theories that influence human behavior and occupational participation.
  • Assess the influence of disease and disability with respect to health promotion and occupational well-being.
  • Model compassion as an essential attribute in understanding diverse occupational engagement across the lifespan.
  • Collaboratively engage in integrative leadership in occupational media, research, and science in preparation for inter-professional endeavors.
  • Be prepared to apply for graduate study in the field of occupational therapy or a related health profession.

At the conclusion the of program, the Assistive Technology Specialization student will:

  • Assess the characteristics of patient/client to determine candidacy for assistive technology services.
  • Complete a patient/client examination and effectively interpret the data to develop a plan of care with appropriate interventions.
  • Implement the appropriate interventions for a patient/client based on an established plan of care.
  • Complete a patient/client re-evaluation and effectively interpret the data to evaluate the effectiveness of the current plan of care/interventions.
  • Exhibit professional conduct and behaviors that are consistent with the legal and ethical practice of the assistive technology profession.
  • Critically evaluate data and published literature in order to examine and utilize the theoretical and scientific basis when delivering patient/client care and providing practice management.

Curricular Requirements

Required Courses Credits
BIO 104/104L – General Biology with Lab 4
BIO 208/208L – Anatomy & Physiology I with Lab 4
BIO 209/209L – Anatomy & Physiology II with Lab 4
BIO 309 – Pathophysiology 3
PHY 125/125L – Introduction to Biomechanics with Lab or PHY 110/110L – General Physics with Lab 4
ENG 110 – English Composition or ENG 122/123 – College Reading & Writing I/II 4–6
EXS 120 – Personal Health & Wellness 3
EXS 180 – Motor Learning & Performance 3
IHS 130 – Interprofessional Health Care First Year Experience 3
IHS 310 – Ethical Practice in Health Professions 3
MAT 120 – Statistics 3
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development 3
SOC 150 – Introduction to Sociology 3
One (1) Creative Arts Course (with prefix ARH, ART, or MUS) 3
One (1) Explorations Course 3
One (1) Social Global Awareness Course 3
One (1) Advanced Studies Course 3
Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies Requirements Credits
HWOS 305 – Introduction to OT & Related Fields or NUTR 220 – Nutrition 3
HWOS 313 – Occupational Media 3
HWOS 315 – Assessment for Wellness Consultation 3
HWOS 316 – Research Methods 3
HWOS 331 – Principles of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 3
HWOS 341 – Health and Wellness in an Aging Society 3
HWOS 405 – Occupational Science 3
HWOS 414 – Stress Management 3
HWOS 424 – Health Education: From Theory to Practice 4
HWOS 432 – Disability Studies & Inclusive Communities 3
HWOS 434 – Substance Misuse & Prevention 3
Open elective courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Assistive Technology Specialization

Assistive Technology Specialization Requirements Credits
HWOS 201 – Foundations of Assistive Technology 3
HWOS 301 – Assistive Technology in Schools 3
HWOS 302 – Assistive Technology for Aging in Place 3
HWOS 402 – Assistive Technology for Community Mobility 3
HWOS 490 – Internship in Assistive Technology Practice 3
Elective in Assistive Technology 3
Total Credits 18

Academic and Technical Standards

All students in the Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies major are subject to the UNE WCHP undergraduate grading policy (see undergraduate academic policy) and progression guidelines.

Progression Guidelines

HWOS Follows the WCHP Common Curriculum Academic Progression Guidelines

The requirements laid out below for the first two years of enrollment apply to any undergraduate program of the Westbrook College of Health Professions. Beginning with the Fall semester of the third year, students will be held to their program specific progression guidelines.

In keeping with the guidelines of the University of New England, all students must achieve a minimum cumulative semester-end grade point average as follows:

  • Failure to maintain the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation as described in the Catalog of the University of New England.
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in all required math and science including the following courses: MAT 120/150, PHY 125/110, BIO 104/105, BIO 208, BIO 209, and BIO 309.
  • Students must achieve a minimum grade of a "C" in all HWOS prefix courses.
  • Failure to achieve the above referenced minimum grades will result in program level probation and the need to retake the course - therefore affecting academic progression.
  • Students may enroll in any of the courses referenced above a maximum of two times. Enrollment in a course consists of achieving a WP, WF, or letter grade. Receiving a W in a course is not considered officially enrolled and will not result in academic penalty.
  • Failure to achieve the above referenced minimum grade a second time a course is taken will result in dismissal from the major.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

High School Graduates

For entrance into the B.S. in Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies (HWOS) students must meet the following requirements:

  • Students seeking admission should have completed high school courses in chemistry, biology, and two to three years of mathematics including Algebra II.
  • Applicants submit their application materials to the Admissions Office during the fall of the year prior to matriculation. Decisions on applicants will be made on a rolling basis. Qualified students who apply after the fall will be admitted on a space-available basis.

Internal Transfer Students

Students who are enrolled in other majors at the University may apply for admission into the Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies major by completing a change of major form. The Admissions Committee meets at the close of each semester to determine eligibility on a space-available basis.

The potential student is encouraged to explore the professional possibilities by shadowing a health professional, going to appropriate websites, and/or volunteering in a program that supports people with disabilities to participate in occupations. Include this information in the required essay (see below).

Students who wish to transfer into the Health, Wellness, and Occupational Studies must complete the following:

  • Discuss interest in the program with the director of the HWOS program.
  • Fill out, complete, and submit a change of major form.
  • Write an essay of 300 words or less on the rationale for transfer into the HWOS major. This statement should be submitted to the director of the HWOS program.
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above, and be in good standing in accordance with the HWOS standards at the end of the semester of transfer request.

All of these steps should be completed prior to the end of the semester.

External Transfer Student Policy (For students who do not have a B.A./B.S.)

  • UNE accepts qualified transfer students.
  • The minimum GPA to be considered from another institution is 2.75 (B-). A 3.0 (B average or higher is preferred).
  • Students are responsible for completing all WCHP and University core coursework for the HWOS major.

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

History

Contact

Professor Eric G. E. Zuelow
ezuelow@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in History
Sections

Mission

The objectives of the History and Philosophy programs are to bring the study of the past to bear on the present, to demonstrate that knowledge and experience are dependent upon particular historical contexts, to expose students to a variety of cultures in historical context, to assist students to develop research and writing skills, to enrich students' appreciation and enjoyment of the richness of human endeavors, and to prepare students for a productive and rewarding professional life following the completion of their studies.

Major Description

The major and minor in History offer students the opportunity to study the past in connection with the present. All course offerings acquaint students with various ways of thinking about the past while helping them to develop a suite of skills for the 21st century. Required classes introduce students to the nature of history, push them to develop research skills, and familiarize them with various historical arguments while a wide slate of electives provide an opportunity to look more specifically at a range of times and places. There are opportunities to develop museum exhibits, to create podcasts, to develop independent research projects, and to collaborate with faculty.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
HIS 150 – Telling Tales of the Past 3
HIS 290 – History Hands on Topics or HIS 291 – War Letters or HIS 292 – Mourning the Dead or HIS 295 – Medicine and the Media 3
HIS 222 – U.S. History: Contact-Civil War 3
HIS 223 – U.S. History: Reconst-Present 3
HIS 395 – What Really Happened? 3
Choose One (1) History Track 21
Total 36
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

History Track Options

History Track Credits
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone 3
Twelve (12) credits of elective courses from List A with at least six (6) credits at 300/400 level 12
Six (6) credits of elective courses from List A or List B 6
History Education Track Credits
PSC 101 – Intro to American Politics 3
PSC 210 – Constitutional Law 3
LIL 420 – Arts & Humanities Capstone or EDU 498 – Secondary Internship & Seminar 3
Six (6) credits of 300/400 level elective courses from List A 6
Six (6) credits of elective courses from List A or List B 6

Elective Course Options

List A Elective Courses Credits
HIS 106 – Women, Health, and History 3
HIS 199 – Expl: Topics in History 3
HIS 204 – Growing Up Female 3
HIS 230 – From Togas to Black Rats 3
HIS 231 – Reformations, Revolutions 3
HIS 240 – Latin Amer His I: Colonial Lat 3
HIS 241 – Latin Amer His II: Modern Latin 3
HIS 250 – American Women’s History I 3
HIS 251 – American Women’s History II 3
HIS 266 – Hist of Drugs in the Americas 3
HIS 276 – History Human Trad I 3
HIS 278 – Human Traditions 3
HIS 280 – History Internship 3
HIS 290 – History Hands On Topics 3
HIS 291 – War Letters 3
HIS 292 – Mourning the Dead 3
HIS 299 – History Topics 3
HIS 312 – College Girls 3
HIS 318 – Histories of London 3
HIS 337 – Topics in Women’s History 3
HIS 341 – Bestsellers & the Big Bad City 3
HIS 343 – Modern Tourism 3
HIS 344 – Postwar: Europe After WWII 3
HIS 349 – Hist of Gender/Sexuality in LA 3
HIS 351 – History of Modern Mexico 3
HIS 370 – Slaves/Citiz: Afr in New World 3
HIS 397 – History Independent Study 1–12
HIS 399 – Topics in History 3
HIS 400 – Topics in History 3
HIS 404 – Directed Readings in History 3
HIS 410 – Advanced Humanities Seminar 3
HIS 420 – History Internship 3
HIS 497 – History Independent Study 1–12
ARH 210 – Art History Survey I 3
ARH 211 – Art History Survey II 3
ARH 260 – Renaissance & Baroque Art 3
ARH 270 – Art in the Modern World 3
ARH 333 – Moroccan Theatre/Social Ch 3
List B Elective Courses Credits
CMM 135 – Evolution of Television 3
CMM 170 – Evolution of Documentary Film 3
EDU 438 – Teaching Sec Social Studies 3
EDU 498 – Secondary Internship & Seminar 12
ENG 216 – Criminals, Idiots & Minors 3
ENG 220 – History of the English Language 3
ENG 412 – Humanities Seminar: Slavery 3
LIL 120 – Intro to Arts & Humanities Sem 3
MUS 220 – History of Jazz 3
WGST 276 – Women in the Ancient World 3
WGST 278 – Women in the Modern Worlds 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all history courses used toward the major.

A minimum grade of C must be achieved in HIS 290 to be used toward the major.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of the history program, students will be able to:

  • Apply and utilize the range of skills and historical methodologies it takes to decode the historical record because of its incomplete, complex, and contradictory nature.
  • Recognize the provisional nature of knowledge, the disciplinary preference for complexity, and the comfort with ambiguity that familiarity with history requires.
  • Create historical arguments and narratives.

HuMed

If you are an exceptional undergraduate student aspiring to a career in medicine, the University of New England HuMed program provides the opportunity that spans your junior and senior years as an undergraduate and your four years in UNE’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. UNE HuMed makes it possible for you to deepen your learning in English/History/Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities while you prepare for a career as an osteopathic physician View HuMed Requirements.

During your years as an undergraduate in UNE’s College of Arts and Sciences, you complete the requisite coursework in the natural sciences to prepare for your graduate education, while earning a Bachelor of Arts in English/History/Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities. As a HuMed student, you are not required to take the MCAT for the College of Osteopathic Medicine. Instead, the College of Osteopathic Medicine requires that you take the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude test (UKCAT). You have an assurance of acceptance contingent upon fulfilling the HuMed curricular requirements and passing the interview process.

Minor

A student in another program may, with the permission of the Academic Director, earn a minor within the program upon the completion of eighteen (18) hours of course work in History.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities

Category
Contact

Dr. Cathrine Frank
(207) 602-2709
cfrank@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities
Sections

Mission

The major in Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities challenges students to understand and evaluate human values, cultures and ideas as they are expressed in the various humanities disciplines. Students think critically about the disciplines themselves (their similarities, differences, characteristic questions and approaches) and the circumstances under which a specific disciplinary approach will best promote understanding of human phenomena. The major thus requires students to cross disciplinary, historical and cultural boundaries; to practice critical and creative thinking; to ask complex questions and resolve interpretive problems, and to develop strong communication skills. Introductory and capstone courses enable students to match disciplinary breadth with longitudinal depth, seeing their intellectual development over time and showcasing their learning through a student-designed independent project. The program also helps students understand and respond to public perception of the humanities as a key step in translating their academic experience into career readiness.

Major Description

The Interdisciplinary Studies Major (ISH) is designed for students who are interested in more than one humanities discipline, recognize the value of looking at complex issues and phenomena from multiple perspectives, and enjoy the reading, thinking, expression and discussion of human experience that the humanities provide. With the freedom to develop thematic clusters or simply enjoy the breadth of knowledge, students pursue coursework in at least three humanities disciplines, while advanced coursework and internship possibilities bring depth and practical application to their studies. A capstone seminar bridges the worlds of school and work by giving students the opportunity to develop an independent project, reflect on their education through a curated ePortfolio, and translate their academic experience into career readiness. The flexible, 36-credit curriculum makes ISH an ideal candidate for double-majoring with social and natural science programs as well. By developing independence of mind, self-direction, critical thinking and analytic skills, and a continuing desire to learn, ISH graduates leave UNE prepared for a broad spectrum of careers or graduate and professional education.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
LIL 420 – Senior Thesis/Project 3
Thirty-three (33) credits of Humanities Discipline Courses (below) with at least three (3) courses at the 300+ level and no more than five (5) classes in a single discipline. 33
Total Program Required Courses 36
Open Electives (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Humanities Discipline Eligible Courses

History Courses Credits
Any HIS course Variable
ARC 235 – The Archaeology of New England 3
ARH 210 – Art History Survey I 3
ARH 211 – Art History Survey II 3
ARH 260 – Renaissance & Baroque Art 3
ARH 270 – Art in the Modern World 3
CMM 135 – Evolution of Television 3
CMM 170 – Evolution of Documentary Film 3
MUS 216 – History of American Popular Music 3
MUS 220 – History of Jazz 3
PSC 110 – Power & Knowledge: Inventing Traditions 3
English Courses Credits
Any ENG course Variable
ARH 333 – Moroccan Theatre/Social Ch 3
ENV 124 – Lit, Nature & the Environment 3
CMM 340 – Women and Film 3
PSC 300 – Egypt Through the Eye of Mahfouz 3
PSC 304 – The Middle East and Africa through Films 3
WRT 111 – Topics in Creative Writing 3
WRT 211 – Creative Writing: Poetry 3
WRT 212 – Creative Writing: Short Fiction 3
WRT 312 – Fiction Writing Workshop 3
Philosophy Courses Credits
Any PHI course Variable
PSC 200 – Introduction to Political Theory 3
PSC 260 – The Politics of Evil 3
REL 276 – Religion in Human Traditions I 3
REL 278 – Religion in Human Traditions II 3
Liberal Learning Courses Credits
Any LIL course Variable
Language Courses – Up to three (3) courses Credits
ARB 101 – Basic Arabic 3
FRE 101 – Basic French 3
FRE 301 – Advanced French 3
SPA 101 – Basic Spanish 3
SPA 211 – Intermediate Spanish 3
SPA 310 – Advanced Spanish I 3
SPA 497 – Independent Study in Spanish 1–12

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to identify and define a problem or issue which can be addressed from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.
  • Students will be able to apply and integrate methods, materials, and/or insights from different disciplines to the solution of a problem, the analysis of an issue or the completion of a project. This will reflect coursework as well as independent reading and research.
  • Students will be able to find and evaluate different views from within a discipline.
  • Students will be able to conduct primary and secondary research in order to develop well documented, supported, reasoned, and informed conclusions to problems and issues.
  • Students will be able to find, use, and evaluate a variety of sources of information.
  • Students will be able to communicate ideas clearly.
  • Students will be able to complete an interdisciplinary capstone thesis or project informed by their previous work in different disciplines.
  • Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of content from at least two disciplines.

HuMed

If you are an exceptional undergraduate student aspiring to a career in medicine, the University of New England HuMed program provides the opportunity that spans your junior and senior years as an undergraduate and your four years in UNE’s College of Osteopathic Medicine or College of Dental Medicine. The program makes it possible for you to deepen your learning in English, History, or Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities through a humanities major while you prepare for a career as an osteopathic physician or a dentist. Requirements for this early assurance program are described at the HuMed website

During your years as an undergraduate in UNE’s College of Arts and Sciences, you complete the requisite coursework in the natural sciences to prepare for your graduate education, while earning a Bachelor of Arts in English/History/Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities. As a HuMed student, you are not required to take the MCAT for the College of Osteopathic Medicine. Instead, the College of Osteopathic Medicine requires that you take the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude test (UKCAT). You have an assurance of acceptance contingent upon fulfilling the HuMed curricular requirements and passing the interview process.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor.

Transfer Credit

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Laboratory Science

Category
Contact

Amy Deveau, Ph.D.
Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
adeveau@une.edu

Eva Rose Balog, Ph.D.
Assistant Academic Director, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
ebalog@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Laboratory Science
Sections

Mission

Chemistry and physics are fundamental sciences that touch every aspect of our lives and the world around us. Chemistry is the study of matter: its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes that accompany those processes. Chemistry often is referred to as the central science; it rests upon the foundation of mathematics and physics and in turn is the essential basis for the life sciences such as biology and medicine. Chemistry is largely an experimental science, and has applications in such diverse areas of research as the development of new drugs, the search for solutions to problems of environmental pollution, and the derivation of alternative energy sources. Much cutting-edge research in biology and medicine is being carried out at the level of atoms and molecules, the particles of matter upon which the study of chemistry is based.

Physics, too, is the study of matter and energy, viewed from a different perspective. To understand living systems and the universe in which we live requires an understanding of the chemical and physical principles that operate within them.

In addition to offering majors in chemistry, biochemistry and laboratory science, and minors in chemistry, biochemistry, and biophysics, the department fills a significant role for students in other programs through its introductory courses in chemistry and physics. Because of the fundamental roles of chemistry and physics in the biological, environmental, and health sciences, students in these programs benefit from the conceptual, quantitative, problem-solving, and communication skills stressed in the introductory courses, which form the foundation for later courses in the students' majors.

Major Description

The laboratory science (LS) major is designed to prepare graduates for work in a variety of modern laboratory settings, ranging from biotechnology labs to quality control labs to academic, medical, or industrial research labs. The program includes a broad spectrum of laboratory courses in chemistry, biochemistry, and biology so that the graduate will evolve a comprehensive repertoire of relevant lab skills that can be applied to careers across chemical, biological, and medical industries. With careful selection of elective courses, LS graduates wishing to become medical technologists will be well-prepared for acceptance into accredited hospital internship programs in medical technology. Recent LS graduates have been successful in pursuing careers in industry and studies in graduate programs.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 105/105L/106/106L – Biology I and II (4 cr included in core requirements) 4
BIO 214/214L – Genetics 4
BIO 232/232L – Microbiology 4
BIO 365/365L – Immunology 4
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
CHE 150/150L – University General Chemistry I* 4
CHE 151/151L – University General Chemistry II* 4
CHE 250/250L/250S – University Organic Chemistry I* 5
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis 5
CHE 417/417L – Instrumental Methods of Analysis 4
CHE 310/310L – Fundamentals of Biochemistry 4
MAT 190 – Calculus I (included in core requirements) 4
PHY 210 – University Physics I* 4
Total 45
Flexible Program Required Courses (choose a minimum of three (3) courses selected from the following) Credits
BIO 203/203L – Histology 4
BIO 204/204L – Parasitology 4
BIO 245/245L – Gen Prin of Human Anat, Phys and Path I 4
BIO 345/345L – Gen Prin of Human Anat, Phys and Path II 5
CHE 251/251L/251S – University Organic Chemistry II* 5
CHE 450 – Advanced Biochemistry Lab 3
PHY 211 – University Physics II* 4
Total 12–14
Minimum Required Program Credits 99
Recommended Elective Courses Credits
BIO 330/330L – Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (if BIO 245/345 not selected) 4
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 195 – Calculus II 4
Open Elective Credits (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Matriculated majors are expected to enroll in the University course sequences for general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. The following substitutions may be made with department permission: CHE 110 for CHE 150; CHE 111 for CHE 151; CHE 210 or CHE 210G for CHE 250; CHE 211 or 211G for CHE 251; PHY 110 for PHY 210; and/or PHY 111 for PHY 211.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all required science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in laboratory science, and a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average in the sciences is a requirement for graduation.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Laboratory Sciences major students will be able to:

  • Describe and apply advanced information and concepts relevant to general laboratory science.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in safe laboratory practices and use of instrumentation standard to the discipline.
  • Clearly communicate information in both oral and written forms relevant to general laboratory science.
  • Work collaboratively in various team settings.
  • Compete for placement in graduate programs or employment relevant to the field of study.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. A transferred course must align in scope and content to the required course offered at UNE. Otherwise, a course may transfer as a general elective. All courses completed must be no older than five years. Transferred courses for matriculated students must be approved by the department.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Latin American Studies

Category
Contact

Steven Byrd
sbyrd@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Latin American Studies
Sections

Curricular Requirements

The Latin American Studies Minor at the University of New England consists of 18 credits (six (6) three-credit courses) and a recommended experience in Latin America. Study will be in disciplines such as foreign language, sociology, history, and political science. Two courses are required from two different disciplines. Students will choose four (4) additional courses from the list of electives below.

Required Courses Credits
SPA 211 – Intermediate Spanish 3
SOC 230 – Society in Latin America 3
Total 6
Four (4) Elective Courses Credits
ANT 231 – Anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean 3
HIS 240 – Latin American History I: Colonial Latin America 3
HIS 241 – Latin American History II: Contemporary Latin America 3
HIS 252 – Gender in Latin American History 3
HIS 316 – Rebels and Revolutions in Latin America 3
SPA 101 – Basic Spanish 3
SPA 306 – Spanish for the Medical Professions 3
SOC 310 – Population, Society, and Culture 3
SOC 331 – Latin American Society and Culture Through La Cinema 3
PSC 405 – Politics of Latin American 3
PSC 406 – Society and State Relations in Third World Countries 3
Total 12
Total Required Credits 18

Courses in Latin American Studies can also be taken through the Greater Portland Alliance. Additionally, some courses from UNE study abroad programs in Latin America and Spain can be substituted for the minor. Discussions about course substitutions should be initiated by the director of Latin American Studies Minor.

Latin American Experience

All students are expected to engage in at least a short-term intensive (Global Citizenship) or study abroad experience in Latin America. These are approved, as are substitutions, by the LAS program coordinator.

Learning Outcomes

Develop conversational, grammatical, reading, and writing proficiency in Spanish.

  • At the end of the program students will be able to:
    • engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings, and exchange opinions;
    • comprehend and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics;
    • present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners on a variety of topics.

Expand historical and cultural awareness of Latin America and apply it to the study of the region.

  • At the end of the program students will have:
    • learned about the basic historical and cultural origins of Latin America, including pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial Latin America;
    • gained a perspective on regional cultures, religions, languages, and the arts in Latin America;
    • experienced current popular cultures in Latin America in a variety of ways.

Develop a basic knowledge about society in Latin America to include the roles of geography, demographics, politics, culture, and media.

  • At the end of the program students will have:
    • learned about the social origins of Latin America, including social structures, political and economic developments, and demographics;
    • examined the connections between culture and the various dimensions of society.

Enhance the ability to think critically about culture, social relations, history, politics, and language in Latin America.

  • At the end of this program students will have
    • applied their knowledge base to analyze social problems in Latin America such as poverty and income inequality, environmental degradation, and development;
    • increased their ability to integrate disciplines and perspectives using a variety of mediums, methods, and modes of expression.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Marine Affairs

Contact

Dr. Charles Tilburg
Academic Director, School of Marine Programs
ctilburg@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Arts in Marine Affairs
Sections

Mission

The mission of the School of Marine and Environmental Programs at the University of New England is to help our students gain an understanding of the natural world, develop critical thinking skills, and become scientifically literate. Together, we lay a foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful contributions to society and offer a baccalaureate education to students interested in all facets of the marine environment.

Our programs encompasses a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, how it is related to earth systems science, and how humans interact with the environment. Students will learn theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology to chemistry, geology, and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems encountered in coastal and marine ecosystems and by the human communities that depend on them. 

Major Description

The Marine Affairs major is aimed at providing future student leaders a solid grounding in the vital fields of coastal and marine science, as well as resource use, marine governance systems, management, policy, ecosystems ecology, conservation, and sustainable development. This major is suitable for students who are concerned about the marine environment, and are interested in careers in the ecosystem and human health interactions, ocean management, political decision making, and marine sustainability science and policies. The program focuses on hands-on activities, internships, and research experiences in addition to classroom work.

The Marine Living Learning Community (MLC)

All entering first-year Marine Science, Marine Affairs, and Marine Entrepreneurship majors are invited to participate in a year-long living learning community focused on developing the skills needed to be a successful student, discovery of their majors and associated learning opportunities, and building relationships with peers, faculty, and professional staff.

The MLC integrates classroom learning, student success programming, experiential opportunities, as well as team-building and leadership development programs designed to assist Marine majors in their transitions from High School to College to Career.

Learning Community courses and events allows students an opportunity to expand their interests and grow personally, as well as professionally. A dedicated team comprised of faculty, professional staff, and peer leaders supports the MLC. This community of learning enriches classroom content and allows an opportunity to apply learning in context.

Students who participate in the MLC are expected to:

  • Live together in a Residence Hall Community designed by the Office of Housing and Resident/Commuter Life.
  • Take two (2) or more designated courses in common over the course of their first year.
  • Participate in required experiential learning opportunities and community programs.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements* Credits
Total 42–46
Program Requirements Credits
MAR 105/105L – Introduction to Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms with Lab Credits Included in Core Requirements
MAR 106/106L – Introduction to Cellular/Molecular of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 150/150L – Discovering the Ocean Environment with Lab or MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology with Lab or MAR 350/350L – Marine Ecology with Lab 4
MAR 316 – Science in Society 3
MAF 200 – Introduction to Marine Pollution 3
MAF 210 – Introduction to U.S. Ocean Governance 3
MAF 310 – Ocean and Coastal Law 3
MAF 320 – Internship 3–12
MAF 400 – Marine Affairs Capstone 3
Total Program Required Credits 30–139
Program Required Cognate Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab or CHE 130/130L – Principles of Chemistry with Lab 4
PSC 125 – Understanding Law or PSC 210 – Constitutional Law 3
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences or MAT 170 – Applications of Functions Credits Included in Core Requirements
GIS 161 – Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems 3
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics or BUEC 395 – Ecological Economics 3
Total Program Required Cognate Credits 13
Choose One (1) Communication and Outreach Courses Credits
SPC 100 – Effective Public Speaking 3
CMM 210 – Understanding Media 3
CMM 240 – Social Media: Theory and Practice 3
CMM 305 – Public Relations in the Digital Age 3
ENV 321 – Environmental Communications 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum Theory and Design 3
WRT 233 – Professional and Technical Writing 3
WRT 317 – Proposal and Grant Writing 3
Total Communication and Outreach Credits 3
Choose One (1) Organization Management Courses Credits
BUMG 301 – Organizational Behavior 3
BUMG 303 – Management of Non-profit Organizations 3
BUMG 311 – Business and Society Relations 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMK 310 – Advertising 3
ORM 335 – Outdoor Recreation Planning and Policy 3
SOC 226 – Environmental Sociology 3
Total Organization Management Credits 3
Open Electives as Needed to Reach 120 Credits Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

*Must take MAR 105/105L as Lab Science Course and MAT 150 or MAT 170 as Math Course

Graduation Requirements

A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of seven (7) years to complete the graduation requirements

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate a strong content-knowledge foundation in their specific field of study (Marine Biology, Oceanography, Marine Entrepreneurship, or Marine Affairs).
  • Students will communicate effectively in both oral and written format to convey their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinary training, and findings to peers, professional audiences, decision-makers, and/or the public.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills in their specific field of study by designing, carrying out, and interpreting the results of their experiments, by evaluating the literature published by professionals, by making recommendations to policy makers and/or by creating and innovating in their field.

Minor

Minor Requirements

Required Courses Credits
MAR 105/105L – Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms or BIO 105/105L – Bio I: Ecology/Evolution 4
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular or MAR 106/106L – Cellular/Molecular of Marine Organisms) or BIO 104 – General Biology or any 4-credit Lab Science Course (can't double count with other requirements) 4
Total Required Credits 8
Choose Four (4) from the list below 12
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics 3
MAF 200 – Introduction to Marine Pollution 3
MAF 210 – Introduction to U.S. Ocean Governance 3
MAR 316 – Science and Society 3
MAF 310 – Ocean and Coastal Law 3
MAF 300 – Climate Change, Oceans, and the Law 3
ENV 321 – Environmental Communications 3
BUMG 303 – Management of Non-profit Organizations 3
Total Elective Credits 12
Minimum Total Minor Required Credits 20

UMaine School of Law 3+3 Pathways Program

UNE Marine Affairs-UMaine 3+3 Law Pathway Program Information

The University of New England’s Marine Affairs–UMaine 3+3 Law program is for students who wish to complete a B.A. and a J.D. degree in six years rather than the typical seven, by substituting the courses taken during the first year of law school for the final year of the Marine Affairs degree.  This joint program allows the enrolled student to:

  • eliminate one academic year of undergraduate education,
  • save one year’s worth of UNE tuition, and
  • enter their chosen professional field a year early.
Undergraduate Program Requirements

In order to be eligible for graduation from UNE under this joint program, a student must:

  • Meet with the Marine Affairs academic advisor during the student’s second year and continue to meet with this advisor every semester of the program.
  • Submit the application form for the Marine Affairs-UMaine 3+3 Law Pathways Program by June 1 of the student’s second year.  (The application form is available from the Marine Affairs academic advisor.  Acceptance into the program requires a 3.5 GPA in the Marine Affairs major and a letter of support from a faculty member.)
  • Successfully complete all required courses of the Marine Affairs B.A. degree at the University of New England (except for general elective requirements) by the end of the junior year (a sample pathway through the Marine Affairs major is available from the Marine Affairs academic advisor).
  • Maintain an undergraduate GPA of 3.5.
  • Be accepted into and attend the University of Maine School of Law directly after their junior year.
  • Earn a grade of C- or better in all courses of the 1L curriculum (please refer to Maine Law website to find the 1L curriculum).
  • Transfer the curses back to the University of New England.
  • Successfully complete steps above to gain automatic exemption from the University of New England’s Residency Requirements.

Acceptance into the Marine Affairs-UMaine 3+3 Law Pathways Program does not guarantee acceptance into the University of Maine school of Law.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the marine sciences courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five (5) years.

Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Marine Entrepreneurship

Category
Contact

Dr. Charles Tilburg
Academic Director, School of Marine and Environmental Programs
ctilburg@une.edu

Dr. John Austin
Chair, Department of Business
jaustin8@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Marine Entrepreneurship
Sections

Mission

The University of New England’s (UNE) B.S. in Marine Entrepreneurship (MARE) is an interdepartmental, interdisciplinary academic program designed to train the next generation of marine science and business students at UNE for careers in the marine economy, marine businesses, and in the leadership of marine organizations. Degree requirements include the completion of an internship and an applied marine business research project. 

Major Description

Our B.S. in Marine Entrepreneurship (MARE) is a unique major - the only one of its kind in the nation - combining study in business and marine science. Whether you are interested in starting a marine business, leading a marine organization or pursuing a career in marine environmental management, marine conservation, marine tourism, marine policy, fisheries, aquaculture, seafood or a related field, our vast marine and coastal resources, experiential programs, marine business partnerships, and internship opportunities will help you reach your full potential.

The scenic shores of coastal Maine — including UNE’s one mile of coastline and an island just off our shores — provide an ideal environment for you to learn and explore. Your experiences are grounded in a curriculum that provides a sound base of knowledge in marine business and financial management, team-building skills, marine economics, and marine science. The internship and experiential research requirements ensure that you have the tools you need for a successful career.

THe Marine Living Learning Community (MLC)

All entering first-year Marine Science, Marine Affairs, and Marine Entrepreneurship majors are invited to participate in a year-long living-learning community focused on developing the skills needed to be a successful student, discovery of their majors and associated learning opportunities, and building relationships with peers, faculty, and professional staff.

The MLC integrates classroom learning, student success programming, experiential opportunities, as well as team-building and leadership development programs designed to assist Marine majors in their transitions from High School to College to Career.

Learning Community courses and events allows students an opportunity to expand their interests and grow personally, as well as professionally. A dedicated team comprised of faculty, professional staff, and peer leaders supports the MLC. This community of learning enriches classroom content and allows an opportunity to apply learning in context.

Students who participate in the MLC expected to:

  • Live together in a Residence Hall Community designed by the Office of Housing and Resident/Commuter Life.
  • Take two (2) or more designated courses in common over the course of their first year.
  • Participate in required experiential learning opportunities and community programs.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Required Courses Credits
BUAC 201 – Financial Accounting 3
BUEC 204 – Microeconomics 3
BUEC 390 – Environmental Economics 3
BUFI 315 – Financial Concepts and Skills 3
BUMG 120 – Innovation through Technology 3
BUMG 200 – Management 3
BUMG 301 – Organizational Behavior or BUMG 302 – Human Resource Mgmt or BUMG 307 – Operations Management 3
BUMG 325 – Legal Environment of Business 3
BUMG 313 – Social Innov & Entre or BUMK 312 – Entrepreneurship/Small Business Management 3
BUMK 200 – Marketing 3
BUMG 498 – Strategic Management or MAR 410 – Marine Science Research 3
BUMG 495A – Business Administration Internship or MAR 495 – Adv Marine Science Internship 3
MAR 105/105L – Eco/Evo of Marine Organisms with Lab Credits inclulded in Core Requirements
MAR 106/106L – Biology II of Marine Organisms 4
MAR 150/150L – Discovering the Ocean Environment 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology 4
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences Credits included in Core Requirements
Two (2) courses from Biology/Marine Program Electives 6–8
Two (2) courses at 200-level or above in MAR, MAF, GIS, BIO, ORM, SRM, PSC, or ENV 6–8
Total Program Required Credits 60–64
Open elective courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Total Required Credits 120

Elective Courses

Biology/Marine Program Electives Credits
BIO 221 – Principles of Aquaculture 3
BIO 222/222L – Finfish/Shellfish Culture Techniques with Lab 4
MAF 210 – Introduction to U.S Ocean Governance 3
MAF 310 – U.S. Ocean and Coastal Law 3
MAR 316 – Science and Society 3
MAR 331 – Biology of Fishes 4

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

  • MARE majors must earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA ("C") in all required business courses.
  • A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the School of Marine and Environmental Programs.
  • Students have a maximum of seven years to complete the graduation requirements.

Accreditation

All degree programs offered by the Department of Business and School of Marine and Environmental Programs are accredited by The New England Commission of Higher Education.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of completing the B.S. in Marine Entrepreneurship, graduates will be able to:

  • Students will demonstrate a strong content-knowledge foundation in their specific field of study (Marine Biology, Oceanography, Marine Entrepreneurship, or Marine Affairs).
  • Students will communicate effectively in both oral and written format to convey their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinary training, and findings to peers, professional audiences, decision-makers, and/or the public.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills in their specific field of study by designing, carrying out, and interpreting the results of their experiments, by evaluating the literature published by professionals, by making recommendations to policymakers and/or by creating and innovating in their field.

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Marine Science

Contact

Dr. Charles Tilburg
Academic Director
ctilburg@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor in Science in Marine Science
Sections

Mission

The mission of the School of Marine and Environmental Programs at the University of New England is to help our students gain an understanding of the natural world, develop critical thinking skills, and become scientifically literate. Together we lay the foundation for lifelong learning and meaningful, productive contributions to society.

The Marine Sciences encompass a wide variety of disciplines that seek to understand the way the ocean functions, how it is related to earth systems science, and how humans interact with the environment. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and applications of disciplines from biology to chemistry, geology, and physics. These disciplines are critical to life as we know it on the planet. Students will be able to apply these disciplines to solving real problems, in ocean sciences and beyond.

Major Description

The Marine Science program offers a baccalaureate education to students interested in all facets of the marine environment. The classroom curriculum provides a strong background in the marine sciences, including biology, chemistry, physics, and geology of the oceans and their surroundings. The program focuses on hands-on activities, internships, and research experiences in addition to classroom work.

The marine science major is designed to provide students with a strong science foundation upon which to build their marine specialty courses. The program is flexible and students are encouraged to explore many areas of the marine sciences through courses and internships emphasizing "hands-on" experiences. An additional goal of the major is to provide students with an adequate background for entry-level career positions and for graduate study in marine science programs, or any field requiring a strong science background. The University is located on the Saco River where it joins the Atlantic Ocean, providing numerous marine, estuarine, and freshwater habitats to study on or adjacent to campus.

The Marine Living Learning Community (MLC)

All entering first-year Marine Science, Marine Affairs, and Marine Entrepreneurship majors are invited to participate in a year-long living learning community focused on developing the skills needed to be a successful student, discovery of their majors and associated learning opportunities, and building relationships with peers, faculty, and professional staff.

The MLC integrates classroom learning, student success programming, experiential opportunities, as well as team-building and leadership development programs designed to assist Marine majors in their transitions from High School to College to Career.

Learning Community courses and events allows students an opportunity to expand their interests and grow personally, as well as professionally. A dedicated team comprised of faculty, professional staff, and peer leaders supports the MLC. This community of learning enriches classroom content and allows an opportunity to apply learning in context.

Students who participate in the MLC are expected to

  • Live together in a Residence Hall Community designed by the Office of Housing and Resident/Commuter Life.
  • Take two (2) or more designated courses in common over the course of their first year.
  • Participate in required experiential learning opportunities and community programs.

Curricular Requirements

Marine Biology Track

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Marine Biology Track Required Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab 4
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
PHY 110 – General Physics I with Lab 4
PHY 111 - General Physics II with Lab 4
One (1) Cellular and Molecular Area Course 3–4
One (1) Organismal Area Course 3–4
One (1) Process Area Course 3–4
One (1) Physiological Area Course 3–4
Eight (8) Credits of Marine Science Electives 8
MAR 105/105L – Introduction to Ecol/Evol of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 106/106L – Introduction to Cell/Molec of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology with Lab 4
MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 325 – Marine Science Speaker Series 1
One (1) MAR 400-level course 3
Total 56–60
Open Electives (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Credits 120

Oceanography Track

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Oceanography Track Required Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab 4
CHE 210/210L/210S – Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture 5
CHE 211/211L/211S – Organic Chemistry II with Lab and LabLecture or CHE 310/310L – Fundamentals of Biochemistry with Lab 4–5
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences Credits Fulfilled by Core Requirements
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
MAT 195 – Calculus II 4
MAT 225 – Computer Programming with MAT LAB 3
PHY 110 – General Physics I with Lab 4
PHY 111 – General Physics II with Lab 4
MAR 105/105L – Introduction to Ecol/Evol of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 106/106L – Introduction to Cell/Molec of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology with Lab 4
MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 366 – Advanced Oceanography I: Biological & Geological Oceanography 3
MAR 368 – Advanced Oceanography II: Physical & Chemical Oceanography 3
MAR 325 – Marine Science Speaker Series 1
One (1) 400-level MAR course 3
Total 58–59
Open Electives (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Total Minimum Required Credits 120

Area Courses

Organismal Biology Area Courses Credits
BIO 234/234L – Environmental Microbiology 4
MAR 320/320L – Invertebrate Zoology 4
BIO 330/330L – Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4
MAR 331/331L – Biology of Fishes 4
MAR 355/355L – Biology of Marine Mammals 4
MAR 375/375L – Biology of Sharks, Skates, and Rays 4
MAR 376 – Biology of Sharks, Skates and Rays 3
MAR 452/452L – Natural History and Evolution of Galapagos Fauna with Lab 4
BIO 422/422L – Marine Biology Topics: Coral Reefs with Lab 4
MAR 312/312L – Plankton with Lab 4
BIO 222/222L – Techniques in Finfish and Shellfish Culture with Lab 4
BIO 223/223L – Health, Nutrition, and Feeding of Cultured Organism with Lab 4
Process Area Courses Credits
MAR 335/335L – Animal/Behavioral Ecology with Lab 4
MAR 350/350L – Marine Ecology with Lab 4
MAR 432/432L – Fisheries Biology with Lab 4
MAR 428 – Marine Conservation 3
Physiology Area Courses Credits
BIO 322 – Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO/MAR 421/421L – Physiological Ecology of Fishes with Lab 4
MAR 380 – Experimental Animal Physiology 4
Cell and Molecular Area Courses Credits
BIO 205/205L – Fish Genetics with Lab 4
MAR 220/220L – Cellular and Molecular Approaches in Marine Science with Lab 4

Electives

Marine Elective Options Credits
Any MAR course (200 level or above) 3–4
Any MAF course 3
Any Chemistry course (200 level or above) 3-5
BIO 221 – Principles of Aquaculture 3
BIO 222/222L – Finfish/Shellfish Culture Tech 4
BIO 223/223L – Hlth, Nutr, Feed Cultured Org 4
BIO 323/323L – Aquarium Science and Operation 4
Any GIS course 3–4
BIO 205/205L – Fish Genetics with Lab 4
BIO 422/422L – Marine Biology Topics: Coral Reefs with Lab 4
Total Minimum Required Credits 8

Students wishing to pursue teacher certification in Life Science can complete a double major with Marine Science and Secondary Education or a major in Secondary Education and a concentration in Marine Science. For more information, see the Secondary Education catalog page.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Science. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the Department of Marine Science.

Program Completion Timeline

Students have a maximum of seven years to complete the graduation requirements.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will demonstrate a strong content-knowledge foundation in their specific field of study (Marine Biology, Oceanography, Marine Entrepreneurship, or Marine Affairs).
  • Students will communicate effectively in both oral and written format to convey their scientific knowledge, interdisciplinary training, and findings to peers, professional audiences, decision-makers, and/or the public.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills in their specific field of study by designing, carrying out, and interpreting the results of their experiments, by evaluating the literature published by professionals, by making recommendations to policy makers and/or by creating and innovating in their field.

Minors

A marine science minor requires 6 courses and can follow either of the two tracks in the major, Marine Biology or Oceanography.

Marine Biology Minor

Required Courses Credits
MAR 105/105L – Intro to Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms or BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and MAR 106/106L Intro to Cellular/Molecular Biology of Marine Organisms or BIO 106/106L - Biology II: Cellular/Molecular or BIO 104/104L - General Biology and (MAR 105/105L - Intro to Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms or MAR 106/106L - Intro to Cellular/Molecular Biology of Marine Organisms) 8
MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology with Lab 4
Two additional Organismal topics courses (see course listing above in Curricular Requirements) 6-8
Total 21–23

Oceanography Minor

Required Courses Credits
MAR 105/105L – Intro to Ecology/Evolution of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 250/250L – Marine Biology with Lab 4
MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 366 – Adv Oceanography I: Bio/Chem 3
MAR 368 – Advanced Oceanography II: Phy/Geo 3
Any one (1) MAR course 3–4
Total 21–22

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the marine science courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.

Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Lab Fees

Travel courses have separate fees that vary depending on the course.

Financial Aid

Detailed information and applications are available on request from the Financial Aid Office on the Biddeford Campus. Call (207) 602-2342, or visit the Financial Aid website

Medical Biology (Medical Sciences)

Contact

Dr. Steven Travis
stravis@une.edu

Dr. Kristin Burkholder
kburkholder@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Medical Biology-Medical Sciences Track
Sections

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history — at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age — students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies. Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty. Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them. In addition, the medical biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience, and experiential learning. The School of Biological Sciences also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (Master Level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog. The school's medically related programs benefit from interaction with the College of Osteopathic Medicine as well as UNE's graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant. Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The medical biology major is designed to provide a strong foundation in the biological sciences for students who ultimately pursue careers in human medicine, dentistry, other health professions (e.g. physical therapy), biomedical research, or the biotechnology industry. Students in the medical biology major can choose one of two possible tracks: (1) medical sciences track, or (2) pre-physician assistant track.

The medical sciences track provides students with a solid foundation in the biological sciences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels. In addition to the comprehensive introduction to general biology, the courses offered in this track introduce the student to the fields of physiology, biochemistry, cellular biology, and genetics. This track also includes those courses that are pre-requisite courses for entrance into medical and dental schools and graduate programs in Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and other health professional programs. The many laboratory-based courses in this track allow students to become familiar with the most up-to-date laboratory techniques used for biological research, an advantage for students who wish to enter graduate schools in the biomedical sciences or to work in the biotechnology industry. Finally, students in this track have the opportunity to complete off-campus internships for college credit (e.g. in a hospital, clinical, or laboratory setting).

This program is designed for: pre-medical students, pre-dental students, pre-veterinary students, students who will eventually enter graduate school in the biological sciences, and students who will eventually enter the biotechnology industry.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution with Lab Credits included in Core Requirements
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular with Lab 4
BIO 214/214L – Genetics with Lab 4
BIO 245/245L – Gen Prin of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I with Lab 4
BIO 345/345L – Gen Prin of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology II with Lab 5
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
BIO 200 or higher elective (not satisfied by Internship/Research/Speaker Series) 3–4
BIO 400 or higher capstone course (not satisfied by Internship/Research) 3–4
Total 26–28
Program Required Science and Mathematics Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab or CHE 150/150L – University General Chemistry I with Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab or CHE 151/151L – University General Chemistry II with Lab 4
CHE 210/210L/210S or CHE 210G/210LG/210SG – Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture or CHE 250/250L/250S – University Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture 5
CHE 211/211L/211S or CHE 211G/211LG/211SG – Organic Chemistry II with Lab and LabLecture or CHE 251/251L/251S – University Organic Chemistry II with Lab and LabLecture 5
CHE 310/310L – Fundamentals of Biochemistry with Lab 4
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
PHY 110 – Physics I or PHY 210 – University Physics I 4
PHY 111 – Physics II or PHY 211 – University Physics II 4
Total 37
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Additional Guidelines

BIO 210, BIO 295, BIO 410, and BIO 495 research and internship courses do not meet 200- and 400-level course requirements.

Accelerated 3+4 Option Medical Biology-Medical Sciences Track

For those students interested in attending the University of New England's College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM), an accelerated version of this track offers the opportunity to complete the Medical Biology – Medical Sciences major upon the successful conclusion of three years of undergraduate work and the first year of medical school. Qualified College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) undergraduate students who wish to become a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) may apply for consideration to the 3+4 program concurrently with their undergraduate application. This 3+4 program allows mature, qualified CAS students to complete an undergraduate degree and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree in seven (7) years.

Policies and procedures for this program are as follows:
  • Apply for consideration to the 3+4 program concurrently with undergraduate application.
  • Qualified applicants, as indicated by the College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM) Committee on Admissions, will be invited for an on-campus interview.
    • Candidates will be assessed in areas of academic record and scholarship ability, leadership potential, career goals, personal qualities, interpersonal skills, and maturity.
    • Interviews will be conducted in the spring prior to fall matriculation of the first year of undergraduate work, and again at the beginning of the fourth year as part of the normal College of Osteopathic Medicine Committee on Admissions processes.
  • Interviewed candidates accepted by the College of Osteopathic Medicine Committee on Admissions will be conditionally accepted contingent upon the requirements as listed below:
    • Complete College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) course requirements for both the Medical Biology – Medical Sciences major (with the exception of the BIO 4xx elective) and the CAS Core Curriculum.
    • Seventy-five percent, or 90 credit hours, of the total required credit hours for a baccalaureate degree completed prior to matriculation in COM.
    • Complete all admission requirements for the College of Osteopathic Medicine of the University of New England.
    • All prerequisite courses completed at UNE by the end of the spring term of the junior year.
      • Students must pass all COM program prerequisite courses with a grade of “B” or better.
      • Students may take up to 16 credits of non-prerequisite courses at another regionally accredited college or university; students are responsible for ensuring approval of course equivalency in advance of taking any courses.
    • Students in the 3+4 Program must maintain an American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) cumulative grade point average of 3.60 or better for all subjects and a science GPA of 3.60 or better.
    • Successfully complete the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in the spring of the third year of undergraduate studies at UNE, earning a minimum score of 505.
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of Osteopathic Medicine and show significant exposure to health practices through a minimum of 40 hours of shadowing of clinicians, plus additional volunteer experiences, prior to submission of the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS).
    • By the time of application, students must have obtained a letter from the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences verifying good academic and disciplinary standing.
  • Students will undergo the regular admissions processes, as described in the UNE COM catalog, and will need to submit a completed AACOMAS application.
    • Application deadline to electronically submit the application to AACOMAS is August 1 prior to the third year of undergraduate studies.
    • All completed and verified AACOMAS applications must be received in the Office of Graduate Admissions no later than September 15.
    • If accepted, two admission deposits are required.
    • Successfully complete a campus interview as a part of the application process for the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) program.
    • Provide a satisfactory criminal background check and meet all Program Technical Standards prior to matriculation in the College of Osteopathic Medicine.
  • Candidates are strongly advised to seek ongoing advisement and support from the UNE Assistant Director of Pre-Health Advising.
  • First-year 3+4 COM students must submit a "Petition to Graduate" form to the Registrar’s Office during the first week of their second semester at COM and will then be awarded a baccalaureate degree upon satisfactory completion of the first year in UNE COM.

Students must fulfill all other CAS and COM requirements and business office obligations to be awarded the undergraduate degree.

ACCELERATED 3+4 MEDICAL BIOLOGY-DENTAL MEDICINE TRACK

For those students interested in attending the University of New England's College of Dental Medicine (CDM), an accelerated version of this track offers the opportunity to complete the Medical Biology – Medical Sciences major upon the successful conclusion of three years of undergraduate work and the first year of dental school. Qualified College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) undergraduate students who wish to become a Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) may apply for consideration to the Accelerated 3+4 D.M.D. Track concurrently with their undergraduate application. This 3+4 Track allows mature, qualified CAS students to complete an undergraduate degree and Doctor of Dental Medicine degree in seven years.

Policies and procedures for this program are as follows:
  • Apply for consideration to the Accelerated 3+4 D.M.D. Track concurrently with undergraduate application.
  • Qualified applicants will be invited for an on-campus interview at the College of Dental Medicine (CDM), which will take place in February or March prior to the first year of undergraduate study.
    • Prior to the interview, candidates will be asked to complete short supplemental essays and submit them to the chair of the CDM Admissions Committee.
    • Candidates will be interviewed by faculty and/or staff from the CDM and will be assessed in areas such as academic strength, leadership potential, career goals, personal qualities, interpersonal skills, and maturity.
  • The CDM Admissions Committee will make admissions decisions based on information collected during the application and interview process. Selected students will be conditionally accepted into the D.M.D. program contingent on fulfilling the academic and general/application requirements described below.
    • Complete College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) course requirements for both the Medical Biology – Medical Sciences major (with the exception of the BIO 4xx elective) and the CAS Core Curriculum.
      • The “Biology 200 or higher” elective course requirement must be satisfied by taking Microbiology (BIO 232/232L).
    • Seventy-five percent, or 90 credit hours, of the total, required credit hours for a baccalaureate degree completed prior to matriculation in CDM.
    • Complete all admission requirements for the College of Dental Medicine of the University of New England.
    • All prerequisite courses must be completed at UNE by the end of the spring term of the junior year.
      • Students must pass all CDM program prerequisite courses with a grade of “B-” or better on the first attempt. One prerequisite course may be retaken one time to meet the minimum grade requirement.
      • Complete English Composition (e.g., ENG 110) as a prerequisite and earn a “B-” or better. AP credit or English Composition from a community college will also be acceptable if a “B-” or better is earned.
      • Students may take up to 16 credits of non-prerequisite courses at another regionally accredited college or university; students are responsible for ensuring approval of course equivalency in advance of taking any courses.
    • Students in the Accelerated 3+4 D.M.D. Track must maintain an American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS) cumulative grade point average of 3.3 or better for all subjects and a science GPA of 3.3 or better.
    • Complete the US Dental Admissions Test (DAT) by June 30 after the sophomore year of undergraduate studies, with a score of 17 or higher in the Academic Average, Total Science, and PAT sections, in addition to a score of 18 or higher in the Reading Comprehension section.
    • Complete a minimum of 30 hours of dental shadowing/observation. These hours must be reported on the AADSAS application.
    • Obtain one letter of recommendation from a dentist shadowed during undergraduate study (to be submitted with the AADSAS application).
    • Complete a minimum of 30 hours of community service/volunteerism (hours must be distinct from shadowing/observation hours) during undergraduate study at UNE. These hours must be reported on the AADSAS application.
    • Obtain a letter of evaluation from the UNE Assistant Director of Pre-Health Advising (to be submitted with the AADSAS application) verifying good academic and social standing.
  • Submit an application for the D.M.D. program through the ADEA Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS).
    • The deadline to submit the application electronically to AADSAS is September 1 the third year of undergraduate study (i.e., one year prior to potential matriculation into the College of Dental Medicine).
    • The Office of Graduate Admissions must receive all completed and verified AADSAS applications no later than October 15.
    • Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check prior to matriculation in the D.M.D. program.
    • Two non-refundable admissions deposits are required at the time of acceptance to secure a seat in the class.
  • Candidates are strongly advised to seek ongoing advisement and support from the UNE Assistant Director of Pre-Health Advising.
  • First-year 3+4 CDM students must submit a "Petition to Graduate" form to the Registrar’s Office during the first week of their second semester at CDM and will then be awarded a baccalaureate degree upon satisfactory completion of the first year in UNE CDM.

Students must fulfill all other CAS and CDM requirements and business office obligations to be awarded the undergraduate degree.

Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental, and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the School of Biological Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the School of Biological Sciences.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a bachelor of science degree from the School of Biological Sciences:

  • Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas:
    • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life — including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, and reproduction.
    • Organismal Diversity — including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
    • Interrelations of Organisms and their Environment - including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.
  • Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:
    • The scientific method, including observational, comparative and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
    • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
    • Data analysis, interpretation and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).
  • Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:
    • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
    • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
    • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.

Minor

The medical biology minor requires six (6) biology courses, including the introductory biology series. In particular, Biology majors who wish to take a biology minor must select four (4) additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Medical Biology Minor Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 214 – Genetics 4
BIO 245 – General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I 4
BIO 345 – General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II 5
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
Choose One (1) Option Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/ Evolution with Lab and BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular with Lab 8
BIO 104/104L – General Biology with Lab and BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular with Lab 8
Minimum Minor Required Total Credits 24

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives. All Biology courses previously completed must be no older than eight years.

Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Medical Biology (Pre-Physician Assistant Track - MPA)

Contact

Dr. Steven Travis
stravis@une.edu

Dr. Kristin Burkholder
kburkholder@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Medical Biology - Pre-Physician Assistant Track
Sections

Mission

Biology is an exploration of the living world that underscores and explains the unity and diversity of life. But it is also a truly human endeavor in that it affects us all. Because we live at this time in human history — at the beginning of what many believe to be a biological age — students must be able to apply biological concepts to the wide array of problems and choices they inevitably face.

Students who major in biology programs become familiar with all levels of biological organization from molecules to ecosystems and gain practical experience in both laboratory and field studies. Small classes enable the faculty to adopt an approach to learning that stresses how different subjects are related to each other, facilitates critical thinking, and encourages a collaborative approach to learning between students and faculty. Professors want students to experience the excitement and to see the applications of biology as well as appreciate science as a way of knowing about the world around them. In addition, the medical biology program stresses the importance of field opportunities, research experience, and experiential learning. The School of Biological Sciences also offers a graduate degree in Biological Sciences (master level) which is detailed in the graduate portion of this catalog. The School of Biological Sciences medically related programs benefit from interaction with the College of Osteopathic Medicine as well as UNE's graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant. Visit our graduate programs page for details.

Major Description

The medical biology major is designed to provide a strong foundation in the biological sciences for students who ultimately pursue careers in human medicine, dentistry, other health professions (e.g. physical therapy), biomedical research, or the biotechnology industry. Students in the medical biology major can choose one of two possible tracks: (1) medical sciences track or (2) pre-physician assistant track.

The pre-physician assistant track is designed for students who wish to eventually enroll in a physician assistant program. This track provides students with a solid foundation in the biological sciences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels. In addition to the comprehensive introduction to general biology, the courses offered in this track introduce the student to the fields of physiology, biochemistry, cellular biology, and genetics. This track includes those courses that are prerequisite courses for entrance into physician assistant schools. In addition, students in this track have the opportunity to complete off-campus internships for college credit (e.g. in a hospital, clinical, or laboratory setting).

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Program Required Courses Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution (included in core requirements) 4
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 4
BIO 214/214L – Genetics 4
BIO 245/245L – Gen Prin Anat/Phys/Pathophys I 4
BIO 232/232L – Microbiology 4
BIO 345/345L – Gen Prin Anat/Phys/PathophysII 5
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
BIO 400 or higher capstone course (not satisfied by Internship/Research/Speaker Series) 3–4
Total 31–32
Program Required Science and Mathematics Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I or CHE 150/150L - University General Chemistry I 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II or CHE 151/151L - University General Chemistry II 4
CHE 210/210L/210S or 210G/210LG/210SG – Organic Chemistry I or CHE 250/250L/250S – University Organic Chemistry I 5
CHE 310/310L – Fundamentals of Biochemistry 4–5
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
PHY 110 – Physics I or PHY 210 – University Physics I 4
PHY 111 – Physics II or PHY 211 – University Physics II 4
Total 32–33
Open Elective Courses (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Additional Guidelines

BIO 410 and BIO 495 research and internship courses do not meet 200- and 400-level course requirements.

Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (PHPAC) consists of professional staff and faculty members of the College of Arts and Sciences. The major function of this committee is to draft letters of evaluation for students applying to health professions programs such as Medical, Dental, and Veterinary schools. Interested students should view our web page for information regarding the protocol for obtaining a PHPAC letter of evaluation.

Graduation Requirements

A minimum grade of C- must be achieved in all science and mathematics courses used toward graduation in any of the programs in the School of Biological Sciences. A 2.00 cumulative average in sciences is a requirement for graduation in any of the programs in the School of Biological Sciences.

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Learning Outcomes

The expected learning outcomes for students graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree from the Department of Biology include:

  • Knowledge of fundamental principles in biology, relevant concepts in mathematics and the physical sciences, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the critical analysis of new biological information, in the following areas:
    • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Life, including cell structure, metabolism, heredity, and reproduction.
    • Organismal Diversity, including organismal structure and function, hierarchy of organization, and the evolution of life.
    • Interrelations of Organisms and their Environment, including abiotic and biotic interactions, biogeochemical cycles; ecosystems and their dynamics, and human actions and interventions.
  • Understanding of the process of science, as well as demonstrated competency in biological research, with a particular emphasis on:
    • The scientific method, including observational, comparative, and experimental approaches and the tools utilized.
    • A critical reading of the primary scientific literature.
    • Data analysis, interpretation, and the communication of scientific results (including oral presentations and scientific report writing).
  • Appreciation for the relevance of the biological sciences to real-world issues, including:
    • Familiarity with avenues and applications of current and future research as well as the careers that use them.
    • Bioethical issues and their biological and social basis.
    • Recognition of the civic responsibility to share knowledge and to apply expertise to the improvement of human and environmental health.

Minor

A medical biology minor requires six (6) biology courses, including the introductory biology series. In particular, School of Biological Science majors who wish to take a biology minor must select four (4) additional courses beyond those required for their major. No biology courses can satisfy both the major and minor requirements except for the introductory 100-level courses.

Medical Biology Minor Required Courses Credits
BIO 105/150L – Biology I: Ecology/Evolution and BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular or BIO 104/104L – General Biology and BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular 8
BIO 214/214L – Genetics 4
BIO 245/245L – Gen Prin Anat/Phys/Pathophys I 4
BIO 345/345L – Gen Prin Anat/Phys/PathophysII 5
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3

Honors Program

We offer qualified students the option of graduating with Honors. This includes significant research, scholarship or creative activity under the direction of a faculty member. Interested students should consult with their major advisor.

Transfer Credit

Courses previously completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred biology courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the biology courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they will transfer as general electives.

All Science/Math courses previously completed must be no older than five years.

Other options and restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Mental Health Rehabilitation

Category
Contact

Linda Morrison
Associate Professor and Chair, Psychology
lmorrison@une.edu

Degree name
Minor in Mental Health Rehabilitation
Sections

Minor Description

The Mental Health Rehabilitation Technician Certification (MHRT/C) is one of the most needed certifications in the state of Maine. It is required for persons working in positions funded by the Maine Department of Health and Human Services as well as other human service organizations. The University of New England Psychology Department has been approved by the state to offer a program of study, through the MHR minor, that provides full certification upon graduation. Upon graduation, students need only to send an official copy of their transcript and the completed paperwork to the Muskie School Center for Learning, and no additional payment is required. The paperwork to be completed can be downloaded at: http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/cfl/forms.html. For more information, email the MHR minor coordinator Linda Morrison at lmorrison@une.edu.

Curricular Requirements

A student with GPA of at least 2.25 and a major at UNE may minor in MHR with the approval of the coordinator of the minor or the academic director. Declarations must occur prior to the completion of the first semester of the junior year.

Major programs of study with significant course overlap with MHR minor requirements may be disallowed by the chair. Students declaring a minor in MHR will not be allowed to double-dip credits across the minor and either major or core requirements for PSY 236, 375, or 410 (e.g., PSY majors completing PSY 410 should complete a separate course to fulfill their major elective requirement so 410 will count only towards the MHR minor).

A minimum of 21 hours of approved course credit with a minimum grade of "C-" in each is required for the minor in MHR as follows (students completing the seven (7) courses identified below are eligible for the MHRT/C certificate from the state of Maine):

Required Course Credits
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development 3
PSY 236 – Mental Health and Society 3
PSY 375 – Trauma and Health 3
SOC 240 – Race, Class, and Gender 3
PSY 410 – Theories of Clinical/Counseling Psychology 3
Total Required Credits 21

Transfer Credit

Courses completed at another accredited college can be transferred to this degree program. Transferred courses must be reasonably close in scope and content to the required courses offered at UNE in order to count as exact equivalents. Otherwise, they may transfer as general electives. All courses completed must be no older than five years.

Other restrictions apply. See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Middle and Secondary Education with Certification

Category
Contact

Lane W. Clarke
Chair, Department of Education
lclarke1@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Middle and Secondary Education with Certification
Sections

Mission

The mission of the Education Department is to prepare lifelong reflective educators who exhibit flexibility, compassion, collaboration, and student-centered pedagogy knowledge and skills.

The Education Department offers strong experiential, student-centered, and responsive program preparing students to develop:

  • Knowledge of content and instructional practice
  • Professional dispositions
  • Pedagogical skills

Our vision is to prepare future educators to have an exponential impact on the lives of their students and the broader community.

The core values that drive the Education Department and guide our ethos, principles, and standards are:

  • Knowledgeable Professionals
  • Collaborative Practitioners
  • Inclusive and Culturally Competent Educators
  • Reflective Life-Long Learners

Major Description

Students complete a four-year curriculum leading to a Bachelor’s Degree of Science. Maine State requirements mandate 24 credits in a discipline area. Students can either choose to double major in Middle and Secondary Education along with a major in an academic discipline that leads to certification or major in Middle and Secondary Education with an academic area concentration (24 credits). Academic disciplines at UNE leading to secondary certification are: Biology (and associated life science majors), Chemistry, English, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, History, Marine Biology, Mathematics and Political Science. The Education programs provide professional teacher preparation courses culminating in a semester of student teaching.

Curricular Requirements

There are three paths that students can take as a Middle and Secondary Education Major.

Double Major

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Middle and Secondary Education with Certification may double major in an academic area that leads to a second Bachelor of Science degree. Options include Life Sciences, Applied Mathematics, and Physical Science.

Dual Degree

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Middle and Secondary Education with Certification may dual degree in an academic area that leads to a second major that is not a Bachelor of Science degree. Options include English and History (Social Studies).

Concentration

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Middle and Secondary Education with Certification may pursue an academic area concentration. Concentrations are available in Mathematics, Biology, Environmental Science, Physical Science (Chemistry and Physics), History, English, Marine Science, and Physical Education.

Middle and Secondary Education Certification with Double Major

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Professional Core Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110 – 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum & Assessment 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
EDU 303 – Reading and Writing in the Content Areas 3
EDU 488 – Secondary Practicum 3
EDU 498 – Secondary Internship and Seminar 12
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data Based Decision Making 3
Total Professional Core Credits 36
Select one (1) appropriate methods course from the following list: Credits
EDU 436 – Teaching Secondary English 3
EDU 437 – Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 438 – Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3
EDU 439 – Teaching Secondary Math 3
EDU 441 – Methods of Art Education 3
Total Methods Elective Credits 3
Double Major Subject Requirements (see requirements for your major: Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Marine Sciences, Applied Mathematics) Variable
Open Electives (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Middle and Secondary Education Certification with dual degree

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Professional Core Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110 – 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum & Assessment 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
EDU 303 – Reading and Writing in the Content Areas 3
EDU 488 – Secondary Practicum 3
EDU 498 – Secondary Internship and Seminar 12
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data Based Decision Making 3
Total Professional Core Credits 36
Select one (1) appropriate methods course from the following list: Credits
EDU 436 – Teaching Secondary English 3
EDU 437 – Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 438 – Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3
EDU 439 – Teaching Secondary Math 3
EDU 441 – Methods of Art Education 3
Total Methods Elective Credits 3
Dual Degree Subject Requirements (see requirements for your major: Art, English, and Political Science) Variable
Open Electives (as needed to reach 150 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 150

Middle and Secondary (7-12) Education with Academic Area Concentration

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Professional Core Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110 – 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum & Assessment 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
EDU 382 – Literacy Research-Based Instructional Methods 3
EDU 488 – Secondary Practicum 3
EDU 498 – Secondary Internship and Seminar 12
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data Based Decision Making 3
Total Professional Core Credits 36
Select one (1) appropriate methods course from the following list: Credits
EDU 436 – Teaching Secondary English 3
EDU 437 – Teaching Secondary Science 3
EDU 438 – Teaching Secondary Social Studies 3
EDU 439 – Teaching Secondary Math 3
EDU 441 – Methods of Art Education 3
Total Methods Elective Credits 3
Concentration Requirements (see requirements below for Academic Area Concentrations) Variable
Open Electives (as needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120

Field Experience

The faculty in the Education programs are committed to ongoing and frequent observation and involvement in schools. The teacher education programs at UNE have a specific competency-based focus to meet the Maine standards for teacher certification. All students engaged in teacher preparation will spend time in a field setting in each of the semesters for which they are registered for professional education courses. Involvement in the schools will be connected to specific, course-related tasks (e.g., observation, teaching lessons, conducting experiments, administering assessments, etc.). Transportation to and from schools is the responsibility of the student.

Internship

Without specific permission from the Education Chair, courses may not be taken during the internship semester, so all required coursework must be completed the semester prior to the internship. Admission to the internship is not guaranteed and students must have reached Advanced Standing to apply. In addition, the student should have:

  • Sufficient knowledge regarding the components of effective instruction.
  • Sufficient knowledge of appropriate grade-level content and teaching methods.
  • Sufficient knowledge of the developmental needs of students.
  • Sufficient knowledge of how to establish and maintain effective cooperative relationships with school personnel, students, and parents.
  • Understanding of and empathy for working with students.
  • No serious professional behavior reservations.

The selection of individual internship sites will be made by the Certification and Placement Officer.

Geographical location relative to UNE is a consideration. UNE has a collaborative relationship with many districts and selects both schools and teachers based on their interest in and ability to assist interns in demonstrating mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards. Placement in an internship is not guaranteed. The Department of Education, through its Certification and Placement Officer, will make a good-faith effort to negotiate an appropriate placement. Schools have the right to refuse placement requests. The 15-week student teaching internship experience must be done in a local Maine Public School that is in an established internship protocol with the University of New England.

Professional Educator Review Board (PERB)

All students enrolled in the internship must demonstrate their teaching competence with respect to Maine Common Core Teaching Standards before the Professional Educator Review Board (PERB). The Board is comprised of professional educators from area schools as well as UNE faculty. Students are required to develop a presentation reflecting their proficiency in meeting these state standards and present and defend the presentation in front of the Board. Passing PERB is a requirement for completion of the certification program and subsequently being recommended to the Maine State Department of Education for teacher licensure.

Advanced Standing

All students in education certification programs must apply for admission to advanced standing when they have completed approximately 60 credit hours. To apply for advanced standing, students must develop a portfolio demonstrating how they have met proficiency in the following areas: a) teaching skills, knowledge, and disposition aligned with the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards; b) basic academic skills and c) professional skills. This portfolio is evaluated by a committee of education faculty and a pass/fail determination is made based on a holistic rubric.

Students not meeting these criteria do not remain enrolled in a certification program; however, students do have the option of changing their major to a non-certification major such as Educational Studies. Students can reapply for advanced standing upon completion of each additional semester up until their second to last semester (i.e., students graduating in Spring must meet advanced standing by the beginning of the previous Fall semester.

Concentrations

CONCENTRATION IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Maine Certification Area: 300 Math (MAT)
Concentration Courses Credits
MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
MAT 190 – Calculus I 4
MAT 195 – Calculus II 4
MAT 212 – Discrete Mathematics 3
MAT 220 – Linear Algebra 3
MAT 240 – Geometry 3
MAT 321 – Applied Statistics I 3
One (1) MAT course at 200 level or above 3–4
Total 26–27

Concentration in Environmental Science

Maine Certification Area: 395 Life Science (BIO, ENV, MAR)
Concentration Courses Credits
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular with Lab 4
ENV 220/220L – Conservation and Preservation with Lab 5
Four (4) Credit ENV or MAR Elective Course 4
Twelve (12) Credits of 300-level or higher ENV Elective Courses 12
Total 24

Concentration in Biology

Maine Certification Area: 395 Life Science (BIO, ENV, MAR)
Concentration Courses Credits
BIO 105/105L – Biology I: Introduction to Ecology and Evolution with Lab 4
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology with Lab 4
BIO 200/200L/200S – Genetics with Lab and Recitation or BIO 207 – Organismal genetics 4–5
BIO 400 or higher level elective 3–4
One (1) Physiology topic area course 3–4
One (1) Ecology topic area course 3–4
One (1) Organismal topic area course 3–4
Total 24–29

*See Biology Curricular Requirements Below

CONCENTRATION IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE - Chemistry Track

Maine Certification Area: 350 Physical Science (CHE, PHY)
Concentration Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab 4
CHE 210/210L/210S – Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture 5
CHE 307/307L – Quantitative Analysis with Lab or CHE 310/310L – Fundamentals of Biochemistry with Lab 4–5
PHY 110 – General Physics I or PHY 210 – University Physics I 4
PHY 111 – General Physics II or PHY 211 – University Physics II 4
Total 25–26

Concentration in Physical Science – Physics Track

Maine Certification Area: 350 Physical Science (CHE, PHY)
Concentration Courses Credits
PHY 110 – General Physics I or PHY 210 - University Physics I 4
PHY 111 – General Physics II or PHY 211 - University Physics II 4
PHY 208 – Energy and Climate Change 3
PHY 305 – Revolutions of 20th Century Physics 3
PHY 310 – Biophysics Structure and Motion or PHY 320 - Medical Physics 3
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab 4
Total 25

Concentration in Physical Science – Multi-disciplinary Track

Maine Certification Area: 350 Physical Science (CHE, PHY)
Concentration Courses Credits
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab 4
CHE 111/111L – General Chemistry II with Lab 4
CHE 210/210L/210S – Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture 5
PHY 110 – General Physics I or PHY 210 - University Physics I 4
PHY 111 – General Physics II or PHY 211 - University Physics II 4
PHY 305 – Revolutions of 20th Century Physics 3
MAR 270/270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
MAR 366 – Adv Oceanography I: Geological/Biological 3
Total 31

Concentration in History

Maine Certification Area: 200 Social Studies (GEOG, HIS, ECO, POL)
Concentration Courses Credits
HIS 222 – US History I 3
HIS 223 – US History II 3
Five (5) HIS Electives (HIS 290 – Historical Research Methods & Writing Recommended) 15
Total 24

Concentration in English

Maine Certification Area: 100 ENG/LA (ENG)
Concentration Courses Credits
ENG 115 – Classics of British Literature I 3
ENG 116 – Classics of British Literature II 3
ENG 200 – US Literature I: Writing, Revolution and Resistance 3
ENG 201 – US Literature II: Cultural Diversity and Common Identity 3
ENG 206 – Introduction to Literary Theory 3
ENG 334 – Methods of Literary and Cultural Criticism 3
One (1) Global Literacy Elective such as ENG 329 – Topics in World Literature or ENG 403 – British Lit and Its Others or ENG 405 – Topics in Postcolonial Lit 3
One (1) Interdisciplinary Literacy Elective such as ENG 221 – Justice 3
Total 24

Concentration in Marine Science

Maine Certification Area: 395 Life Science (BIO, ENV, MAR)
Concentration Courses Credits
MAR 105/MAR 105L – Evolution/Ecology of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 106/MAR 106L – Cellular/Molecular Biology of Marine Organisms with Lab 4
MAR 250/MAR 250L – Marine Biology with Lab 4
MAR 270/MAR 270L – Oceanography with Lab 4
Two (2) MAR Elective Organismal Biology Area Courses** (see Marine Curricular Requirements) 6–8
One (1) Non-Organismal Marine Science Course** (see Marine Curricular Requirements) 3–4
Total 25–28

**See Marine Curricular Requirements Below

Middle and Secondary Education with Certification With Physical Education Concentration

The Physical Education Concentration includes 26 credits offered through the Exercise and Sport Performance Department. This 26-credit concentration needs to be added to either an Elementary or Middle and Secondary Education Major.

To complete this concentration a student can major in Middle and Secondary Education with an academic discipline concentration and then add the 26-credit concentration enabling the student to be certified in Middle and Secondary Education and get a Conditional Certification in Physical Education. Please note, Physical Education is not a stand-alone concentration.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core with Certification Requirements – Choose One (1) Credits
English Conditional Certification – Must take nine (9) credits of ENG in the Core n/a
History Conditional Certification – Must take nine (9) credits of HIS in the Core n/a
Life Sciences Conditional Certification – Must take BIO 105/105L as Core Course n/a
Total 42–46
Physical Education Concentration Courses Credits
BIO 208/208L – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab 4
BIO 209/209L – Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab 4
EXS 180 – Motor Learning and Performance 3
EXS 310 – Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3
EXS 320 – Exercise Physiology with Lab or EXS 205 – Sports Physiology 3
EXS 330/330L – Fitness Evaluation and Prescription with Lab 3
EXS 340 – Concepts of Strength and Conditioning 3
ATC 306 – Psychology of Sport and Exercise 3
Total Physical Education Concentration Credits 26
Secondary Education Courses Credits
EDU 105 – Exploring Teaching 3
EDU 110 – 21st Century Learning Through Technology 3
EDU 202 – Curriculum and Assessment 3
SPE 220 – Exceptionality in the Classroom 3
EDU 385 – Diversity Issues in Schools 3
EDU 382 – Literacy Research-Based Instructional Methods 3
EDU 486 – Practicum 3
EDU 492 – Student Teaching 12
SPE 405 – Inclusive Methods and Data-Based Decision Making 3
Total Secondary Education Credits 36
Conditional Certification Requirement Courses (see below) 16–19
Minimum Required Total Credits 120–125

Curricular Area Requirements

Ecology Area Credits
BIO 333 – Evolution 3
BIO 350/350L – Ecology with Lab 4
Organismal Biology Area Credits
BIO 204/204L – Parasitology with Lab 4
BIO 208/208L – Introductory Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab 4
BIO 209/209L – Introductory Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab 4
BIO 223/223L – Health, Nutrition, and Feeding Cultured Organisms with Lab 4
BIO 232/232L – Microbiology with Lab or BIO 234/234L – Environmental Microbiology with Lab 4
BIO 245/245L – Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I with Lab 4
BIO 345/345L – Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II with Lab 5
MAR 252 – Natural History of Marine Mammals 3
MAR 310/310L – Phycology with Lab 4
BIO 319/319L – Ornithology with Lab 4
MAR 320/320L – Invertebrate Zoology with Lab 4
BIO 323/323L – Principles of Aquarium Operations and Science with Lab 4
BIO 330/330L – Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy with Lab 4
MAR 331/331L – Biology of Fishes with Lab 4
MAR 355/355L – Biology of Marine Mammals with Lab 4
MAR 375/375L – Biology of Sharks, Skates, and Rays with Lab 4
Physiology (Cellular Biology) Area Credits
BIO 203 – Histology 4
BIO 208/208L – Introductory Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab 4
BIO 209/209L – Introductory Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab 4
BIO 245/245L – Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I with Lab 4
BIO 345/345L – Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II with Lab 5
BIO 322 – Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 365 – Immunology 3
BIO 370 – Cell/Molecular Biology 3
BIO 404/404S – Neuroscience with Recitation 4
MAR Organismal Biology Courses Credits
MAR 310/MAR 310L – Phycology with Lab 4
MAR 312/MAR 312L – Plankton with Lab 4
MAR 320/MAR 320L – Invertebrate Zoology with Lab 4
MAR 331/MAR 331L – Biology of Fishes with Lab 4
MAR 355/MAR 355L – Biology of Marine Mammals with Lab 4
MAR 375/MAR 375L – Biology of Sharks, Skates, Rays with Lab 4
MAR 430 – Deep Sea Biology 3
MAR 442 – Aquatic Invasive Species 3
BIO 421/BIO 421L – Coral Reefs with Lab 4
Additional MAR Courses (not Organismal Biology Courses) Credits
MAR 210 – Intro to Marine Science Research 1–4
MAR 230 – Directed/Independent Study in Mar Sci 1–4
MAR 252 – Natural History of Marine Mammals 3
MAR 275 – Intro to Mar Honors Research 1–4
MAR 295 – Marine Science Internship 1–4
MAR 316 – Science and Society 3
MAR 326 – Experimental Animal Physiology 3
MAR 335/MAR 335L – Animal Behavior/Behavioral Ecology with Lab 4
MAR 350/MAR 350L – Marine Ecology with Lab 4
MAR 354 – Ecological Aquaculture 3
MAR 410 – Marine Science Research 1–4
MAR 415 – Independent Study in Marine Sciences 1–4
MAR 418 – Symbiosis 3
MAR 421/MAR 421L – Marine Science Topics with Lab 4
MAR 424/MAR 424L – Physiological Ecology of Fish with Lab 4
MAR 428 – Marine Conservation 3
MAR 432/MAR 432L – Fisheries Biology with Lab 4
MAR 451/MAR 451L – Marine Biology Topics with Lab 4
MAR 464 – Polar Biology 3
MAR 495 – Adv Marine Science Internship 1–4
BIO 221 – Principles of Aquaculture 3
BIO 222/BIO 222L – Finfish/Shellfish Culture Techniques with Lab 4
BIO 223/BIO 223L – Health, Nutrition, and Feeding of Cultured Organisms with Lab 4
BIO 323/BIO 323L – Principles of Aquarium Operations with Lab 4

Completion Requirements

All coursework, including the internship, should be completed within a five-year timeframe. A delay beyond the five years might warrant the retaking of coursework. Furthermore, if state certification requirements change prior to your completion even within the five-year timeframe, those changes must be incorporated into a revised program plan, in order to meet state certification regulations.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their bachelor's degree, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of the Maine Common Core Teaching Standards
  • Demonstrate professionalism through accountability and engagement
  • Demonstrate ability to communicate effectively in both written and oral formats
  • Demonstrate appropriate dispositions as defined by professional expectations

Transfer Credit

Individuals who have full acceptance in the Teaching Certification Program can transfer up to, but no more than six (6) education credits from other universities.

In-service or workshop-type courses that do not carry college credit will not be accepted for transfer equivalency.

No course of any kind will be accepted from other institutions after your acceptance into the program at UNE without a course equivalency granted prior to the course being taken.

Admissions

See Undergraduate Admissions for more information.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for subsequent years may vary. Other expenses include books and housing. For more information regarding tuition and fees, please consult the Financial Information section of this catalog.

Neuroscience

Contact

Dr. Jennifer Stiegler-Balfour
jstiegler@une.edu

Degree name
Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience
Sections

Mission

The mission of UNE's Neuroscience program is to produce independent, self-motivated learners who have acquired the analytical and research skills that will help them to think creatively while integrating complex ideas. This training prepares them to help solve the critical challenges facing our society and to contribute to the furthering of human knowledge. We accomplish this using a variety of experiential and engaged learning techniques to provide a foundation in the concepts and methodologies of the interdisciplinary field of neuroscience at the cellular, molecular, cognitive systems, and behavioral levels.

Major Description

A Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary major offered by faculty from various schools and colleges with expertise in neuroscience. The neuroscience curriculum offers students an opportunity to explore the structure and function of the nervous system. The major requires a general science background, a number of courses specifically devoted to the brain and nervous system, and an in-depth experience that explores the limits of knowledge in at least one (1) aspect of neuroscience. The major allows considerable flexibility for students to develop the last two (2) years along the lines of individual preferences and interests, with potential foci in areas of cellular/molecular neurobiology, behavioral neuroscience, or cognitive science. The majority of students who graduate with a degree in Neuroscience enter graduate or professional programs culminating with careers in medicine/health care, research, and/or education.

Curricular Requirements

CAS Core Requirements Credits
Total 42–46
Required Courses Credits
PSY 105 – Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 225 – Psychology Statistics or MAT 150 – Statistics for Life Sciences 3
PSY 250 – Lifespan Development in Context Credits included in& Core Requirements
MAT 190 – Calculus I Credits included in Core Requirements
NEU 205/205L – Intro to Neurobiology with Lab 4
NEU 306/306L – Behavioral/Cognitive Neuro with Lab 4
NEU 410 – Neurobiology of Mental Illness 3
NEU 495 – Neuroscience Lab Research or NEU 300 – Neuroscience Internship or PSY 300 - Psychology Internship I 3–12
BIO 105 – Bio I: Ecology/Evolution Credits included in Core Requirements
BIO 106/106L – Biology II: Cellular/Molecular with Lab 4
CHE 110/110L – General Chemistry I with Lab or CHE 150/150L – University General Chem I with Lab 4
CHE 111/111L - General Chemistry II with Lab or CHE 151/151L – University General Chem II with Lab 4
CHE 210/210L/210S or CHE 210G/210LG/210LS – Organic Chemistry I with Lab and LabLecture 5
CHE 211/211L/211S or CHE 211G/211LG/211SG – Organic Chemistry II with Lab and LabLecture or CHE 310/310L – Fundamentals of Biochemistry with Lab 4–5
PHY 110 – General Physics I 4
PHY 111 – General Physics II 4
Three (3) required elective courses taken from List A and B. No more than two (2) may be chosen from either list A or B. 9–13
Total credits required 58–72
Open elective courses (needed to reach 120 credits) Variable
Minimum Required Total Credits 120
List A Courses Credits
BIO 214 /214L – Genetics with Lab 4
BIO 245/245L – General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I with Lab 4
BIO 322 – Comparative Animal Physiology 3
BIO 330/330L – Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy with Lab 4
BIO 345/345L – General Principles of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology II with Lab 5
BIO 365 – Immunology 3
BIO 370 – Cell and Molecular Biology 3
BIO 407 – Developmental Biology 3
BIO 450 – Biology Topics (with program approval) 3
CHE 405 – Medicinal Chemistry 3
List B Courses Credits
PSY 226 – Motivation and Emotion 3
PSY 245 – Evolutionary Psychology 3
PSY 205 – Abnormal Psychology 3
PSY 275 – Introduction to Techniques in Animal Behavior 3
PSY 285 – Research Methods 3
PSY 290 – Developmental Psychopathology 3
PSY 316 – Psychology of Consciousness 3
PSY 325 – Psychology of Aging 3
PSY 335 – Comparative Animal Behavior or BIO 335 – Animal Behavior/Behavioral Ecology 3
PSY 362 – Animal Cognition 3
PSY 364 – Social and Emotional Development in Childhood 3
PSY 370 – Drugs, Society, and Behavior 3
PSY 380 – Learning/Conditioning and Behavior Modification or PSY 384/ 384L – Animal Learning and Behavior with Lab 3–4
PSY 383 – Memory and Cognition 3
PSY 425 – Advanced Methods in Animal Behavior 3
PHI 370 – Philosophy of Psychology 3
PHI 380 – Philosophy of Mind 3

Students in this major can participate in the pre-health graduate school preparation tracks.

Academic and Technical Standards

A grade point average of 2.25 is necessary to be approved to add a major in Psychology, Animal Behavior, or Neuroscience, and to add a minor in Psychology, Animal Behavior, Neuroscience, Art Therapy, or MHRT/C. Double majoring or majoring and minoring within the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences may be possible for students. Students interested in this option should do so with close consultation of their academic advisor to ensure that a substantial degree of overlap between the two areas does not occur. 

A minimum grade of "C-" must be achieved in all courses used to fulfill the requirements for the
Neuroscience major. Students must also complete the University Core mathematics requirement by the end of the first year. The School of Social and Behavioral Sciences strongly recommends that students take PSY 225 or MAT 150 in their sophomore year. The School of Social and Behavioral Sciences requires that PSY 225 or MAT 150 be completed by the end of the junior year. 
See Undergraduate Academic Policy also.

Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate with a B.S. in Neuroscience from UNE will be able to

  1. Demonstrate a broad foundation in the concepts and methodologies of the interdisciplinary field of neuroscience at the cellular, molecular, cognitive, systems, and behavioral levels.
  2. Demonstrate research skills including the ability to design experiments, and collect, analyze, and interpret data through research projects, lab work, internships, and coursework.
  3. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyz